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The Newberry herald. (Newberry, S.C.) 1865-1884, February 08, 1883, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026909/1883-02-08/ed-1/seq-4/

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t
a~a s-s-g
- r ,th&mes r
* ~ Minwb areno
S - been e
- - Whas.ever-.
sans stly 2 mre restor
ilax' anesoran e
S rove More
-: y n gtmea
- genogb a ter work to
s;i; d e daditio of the
-Idt libeilenough, -but
4 ee v;_tbis3ethe law ani
df o'm diet for either
y_fs ea . sgorietrtre
naieni r ie a
t~~'tas idsease; but I
s Ibund that if are
dv:4es sIi woi k orr n9ugh he will be
~.: Y PUmp iflh& ias two suelcient
*a medls Mqsele isythe prodnt of
~ Uotkadfooddat may:be laid on
1 food alone. We see, however,
penty of hoarses that are generous
- too generously-fed thatirstill
-omiitin and show evyidi
ahiof being .under-nourished;
dpeea isa disease not confined
nrdlidel to creatures who own
er.drive i0rses.. But forpeft
haith ad immunity from disease,
7~rIctIa of exercise-must be met
with~ restriction in diet. .Horses re
more. food in cold than in
S.warm weather, if performng the
ame labor. -In case of a warm
s eU- in winter I reduce their feed
nar orles, according to circum
danees, as surely as I do the
ae~ount of fuel consumed. I also
Sadopt the same principle in my own
diet. The result is that neither my
aa@nals nor myself are ever for a
n. oment sick.
Thie following is given as a remn
tdy for lockjaw: Let any one who
Shasan: attack ofthe lockjaw take a
-small quantity of turpentine, warm
4and pour it on the wound, no
patorwhes-e the wound is, and re
j hLwill follow in less than a
~ --imnute. Nothaig better'can be ap
$ied to a severe cut or bruise than
coli turpentine; it will gire certain
Zolief almost instantly. Turpentine
iabnost a sovereign remedy for
-x onp. Saturate a piece of flannel
.-pthe throat and chest, and in a
- a vey severe case three or four drops
Sepa lump of sugar may be taken
Iwdl. -Every family should
haea bottle on hand.
To BaoiL STEAK.-The great
steak is to cut it
it fully an inch -in
mikness. Then beat it with a
roling pin. This softens the fibres,
1ut does not break them or take
he juice out. The use of a knife
-to beat the steak is not advisable,
mait is liable to cut the flres and
use. the juice of the steak ro run
et~o~ The hotter the fire is the bet
ter. Never cook a steak longer
tan seven minutes. After broil
e g it alittle butter and pepper and
~salt should be put over it toilake
tegravy, but no water used.
WELsH RmfrxT.-Two table
Sspoonfuls of milk, three ounces of
cheese, half a tablespoonful of
mustard, two or three tablespoon
fuls of bread erumbs, one ounce of
.First put into asmaillsauce
tablespoonfuls of milk;
qcsof cheese, grated
ver the fire till it
vsalt, ounce
.n deeL.suutard
'~y t~.oe
So ebody was aking a Hartford
man how It happened that Mark
Twain wrote and.published so little
nowadays. "He-wrlite-as much as
.;er" was. the reply, "but his barem
eter Is out of order, and lhe does
not know what to publish. So he
publishes nothing." "What in the
world :his his baromteer to do with
his flerary activiy
' His barometer a a man servant
named =Jacob; who is remarkabte
for his deficient sense of humor.
Mark never can judge of the merit
of his -own performances. Years
ago he fell into'the habit of testing
everything he wrote by observing
is effect on Jacob. IfJacob lis
tened to the -aicle, jest or story,
with. unmoved countenance, or
erel mned in a perfinctory
way, MaEk : st' ed and sent
the mannsript to he printer. But
eJboib igl.d irtiight, or gave
aiy ether indication of genuine
inent, the hhmorist concluded
that the stuff was .opeless and
withhdtit from pulieaiion. He
regaded Jacob as infallible and
oanie to lea: upon his judgement.
".bot 'three years ago, it ap
pears, Jacob learned for the first
ime from some outsider - that his
master was-a professional humorist.
re aihoeid hat he
shaonl have been chosen habitually
to a hj~jie lersgres of every
ne Pgeis.He did
n exactly understand why he
should have been this chosen but
feltin- vague .st? it a great
humorist must need sympathy'1n4
iap}re on and ^ustmnthra1p
look it tu; the fellow-being
nearest at hand. .He also felt that
be' had =pehaps failed"tt&be at all
times suMelently appretisdye. So
Jacob kert his discovery tohiimself
asar4. ,a nseter was concerned,
aid-:esolved to be appreciative ill
tbfatureas anybodj enld desire.
"One' day Mark called Jacob in
and resd' him a- sketch entitled
"The Cow and. the Lightning-rod
man." In composing it Mark had
fiattbred himself that-he had struck
a pretty fine streak. : To his amaze
ment Jacob put back his head and
roared. With a half supressed ejac
elation, Mark dashed therlhianu
script in'the waste-paper basket.
"Then Mark waited six weeks or
two rndnlis to collect his forces (for
he is never precipitate in anything
he:Idoes), 'and achieved a romance
called "How I Bounce the Baby."
He summoned Jacob and watched
his fadewith obvious anxiety as he
read the touching narratiive. Ja
cob's mirth was painful to observe.
Mark tore up the story and then
tore his hair.
"Two or three experiments of
this sort .with unvarying results.
persuaded Mark Twain that -the
mahria, which he has been dread
ing cver since it began to creep up
the Connecticut Valley, had reach
ed him at last and destroyed his
powers of usefulness. He fell into
a .ttled melancholy. His friend,
the Rev. Mr. Twichell, tried in vai
to cheer him up,.. "Perhaps," sug
gested Twichell, "your man has
really cultivated a sense of humor,
so that you 'must no longer judge
by opposites." Mark shook his
head, and borrowed a volume of
Jonathan -Edwards' sermons from
his friend's library. .He.copidd out
a loi.g passage from the discourse
on (t2rnal punishment and palmed
it olt on Jacob as his own latest
effort. ' For the first time in his
tory. 'thie gloomy periods provoked
pals of' laugI ter. Jacob held his
side's, and si.ook all over. Then he
suddenly stopped; his countenance
grew blank, turned pale, and he in
continently fled. He had seen mur
der in his master's eye.
"That," said the Hartford man,
in conclusion, "is why Mark Twain
does not write, Hie hung his rep
utation as a humorist upon his
barometer, and his barometer no
longer works."-Phuladelphia'Press.
"You mustn't touch the top of
the baby's head," said a mother to
her little four-year-old; "she has a
soft spot there that is very tender."
The youngster gazed at it curiously
for a moment and then asked, "Do
all babies have soft spots on their
heads?" "Yes." "Did papa have
a soft spot on the top of his head
when he was a baby?" "Yes," re
plied the mother, with a sigh. "and
he has got it yet." And the old
man, who had overheard the eon
versation' from an adjoining room,
sang out "Yes, indeed, he has, my
dear boy, or hewould be a asingle
man to-day."-Rochester Ex press.
Love -is a severe critic. 'Hate
can pardon mae than love.
dIJisc agood thng tobe deaf
saderbe'gins to talk.
-p.rsat ea the c h --lst-u--- e
-he a leM en
ttoUecte the Broochia Tnb..sadforniss
seothing oeutig, whIch arnet es the f -
astatlo that ease the cough. It da.t..
thee . rapaU iaapuritis
obtcat enfeebid ,!smt.a,
'ite the oironlstson of the bio,andba.e
aer oasystem. Sli aetds eae ead in
ile s?py th r d soa; .A
testa( twenty y-Isa warranbtesaertioa that
morestbdylasrnerbeensuidthatfsaaf
prm anei ses S
tavwhabe anda+ol bin.elyfamiy
T UT 8.
PILLS
Cuet'" s and I everI," Dya sa
S:kfclea laeh.,ilSa o.lhe,00~iips
sir:s: Lhkemtfsm,PHeay PmI mf
S to 7lcart, Diuz ess, Torps ad
'L'eale Irregularities. If yoa do "i e
-y tel,"a sm;de pill stimulates theuoaeanh,
4tore#the appeS::e,mpartsrigr to thesystem.
A NOTED DIMIE SAYS:
3I. Turr:-Dca. ir* For ten years I save
n a matyr to Constipatica'and
lee.. Lat pringyour were rseo.ommded
a.am;I n.d.hem (bntwithlittleaith Iam
;,>.-a wef man, have gooa sppetite,
1-ra"- regui::? stools plta an have
:,:nod fot onsaMSea h y araworth
..- n bis od.
Sv.R: IMPSON,Lo.UIsVE,K. ,
7. c.tpts R E on appea'em.
I'ETS.
S esd a rough aktech-r.a
gs b.dLE n,
, entis Ptelim a.
of a2.Uiedeegatent-sf eIN nd ncwiDatae-d
4mateyogn e ades' w teo
talnflti abo t ofh
awrsed tbatyonr imeuion ipteatabe,
lbpay GertflenUt sof smds ,Il*i
emls a' t*ss"|
(adr and e l!feses
S . attorewnsa usmren
GEOiR Eiia. LteMO A N,adou
leatoa alesa reb A mea.
- oentSte W N,an aut D
. rnah a er. ,he hu.
a.aoneGAe.i'a . D.o.ei tRe.
l0SAriS &n Hf Rete,RbaTset,
*S.aseyc at ppWantsa Sliitor ordl A aab
c[y. andma loead t aents, edm
rps" .ddrmiSeet tAh mEle,doe o.
Attorneys-at-L an,
NEWBERRY, S. C.
"Strict Attention to Business."
A aov. 2 41- ly.
THE SUN.
' 13NW YORE, 1888.
More people have read THE SUN during
the year just now asngthan ever before
since It was .rt print No other news
paper published on this side of the earth
'as heel bought and read In any year byso
many men and women.
.We are redblynformed thaITpeople boy,
read, and like TsE SUN for the following
reasons. among others:
Becaus its news columns present i t
tractive form and with the greatespoassble
accuracy whatever has interest for huaaan
kind; the events, the deeds and misdeeds,
the wisdom, the philosophy. the notable
tolly, the solid sense, the Improving non
sense-nil the news of the busiest world at
present revolving n space.
Because people hare learned that In Its
remarks concerning persons and affairs
Ta SmN makes a practice of telling them
the exact truth to the beat of Its ability
three hundred and sixty-five days in the
year. before election as well as after, about
the whales as well as about the small fish,
in the face of, dissent as plainly anti fe
lessly as when supported by general appro
val. TilE SuN has absolutely no purposes
to serve, save the information of its readers
andl the furtherance of the common good.
-Because it Is everybody's newsaper. No
man is so humble that TE SUN Iidiffer
ent to his welhre and his rgt.No man
i so rich thatit can allow anjstice to be
done him.. No man, no asctin of men,
is powerful enough tobe exempt from the
strict application of its pripcies of right
and wrong.
Because In polities it has fought for a
dozen years, without intermission and
sometimes almost alone amon newspa
persa, the fight that has resulted inthe re
cent overwhelming popular verdict against
Iobesonismi and for honest government.
No matter what prty Is in power, THE 8S15
stands and winf eontinue to stand like a
rock icr the-interests of the people against
the ambition of bosses, the encroachments
of monopolists, and the dishonest schemes
of punb4ic'obbers.
All tis Is what we are tol1 almost daily
by our friends. One man holds that THEn
SuN Is the best religious newspapr ever
published, because its Christianit Is undi
luted with- cant. Another holds that it is
the best Republican newspaper printed, be
cause it has alreadiy whipped half of the r-as
cals out of.-that party, and is proceeding
against the other half with undimilnished
vigor. A thirdl believes It to be the best
inagazine of general niterature in existenice.
because its readiers miss nothing worthy of
notice that Is current in the worktl of
thought. so every friend of THE sUN dils
covera one of Ifs many sides that appeals
with p)articular force to his individual lik
ing.
if you already know THE SUN, you will
observe that in 18831t is a little better than
ever before. It you do not already knsow
THE SUN, you will find It to be'a mirror of
all human activity, a storehouse of the
choicest products of commcon sense and Im
agination, a mainstay for the cause of hon
est government, a sentinel for genuine Jef-1
fersoplan Democracy, a scourge for wicked
ness of every species. and an uncommonly
good investment for the coming year.
TERMS TO MAIL SUBSCEIBERS.
The several edi.ions of THE SUx are -sent
by mall, ptpaid, as follows:
DALY-6 cents a month, $650 year; with
Budy edItion, *7.'70.
SUNDAY-Eight pages. *1.20 a year.
WEEKLY-$1--a year. Elght pages or the
best:matter of the daily issues; ant Agri
cultural Department of unequalled merit,
naarkot reports. and literary, scientific,
and domestic intelligence make TH E
WEEKLY SUN the newspaper for the far
mer's household. To clubs of ten with
Addes a . e W. BNLAND, Publisher,
Noy 2:1, 47-6t THE SUN, N. Y. City.
I people are always on the look
out for chances to Increase their
eqenings, and in time become
wealthy; thos'- who do not Im
prove their opportunities remain In pover
iy. We offer a great chance to make monoy.
We want many men, women, boys and girls
to work for us right In their own localities.
Any one can do the work properly from the
frst start. The business will pay more than
ten times ordinary wages. Expensive out
it furnished free. No one who engages
rails to make mone rapidly. You can de
vote your whole tie to the work or only
yursparem@ments. FullInformation and
all that Is needed sent frep. Address STrI
soR*& Co., Portland, Maine. 47-l7.
HENRY BAYER,
C0COANUTS AND ORANBES,
And-Wholegaie Dealer In
Apples, rotatwe, Onions, &,.
215 Eat= Bay,
CHARLESTON, S. C,.
tdl.
Te CrotwellI H I
A LARGE THREE STORY BRICK BUILDING.
Only Hotel with Electric Bells in Newberry.
Only Hotel with Cistern Water.
CENTRAL OFFICE OF TELEPHONE EXCHANGE.
MRS. EMMA F. BLEASE,
PROPRIETRESS,
N EWBnERY,s. C.
This eommodious and spacious Hotel is now open and fully prepared to entertain all
esmen.
Th Funituoe of every description is New, and no effort will be spared to make alh
piteous patronizingt the establishmet~ at home.
The Rooms in his Hotel are spacious, well lighted, and the best ventilated of any
Hotel in the up country.
One of the Best Sample Booms in the State.
All horses entrusted to our care will be well cared for at Christian & Smith's Stables.
TERMS.
BOARD BY THE MONTH, $30,00; WEEK, $10,00; DAY, $2.00.
LOWER RATES BY THE YEAR.
The Table shall be furnished with the very best. Nov.'2, 44-1y.
Read! Read? Rea
I will close out the Balance of my Stock of
WINTER CLITIE
-AT
Greatly Re'duced Pricesl
IENS YOUTR BOYS' SUTS
ALSO, A LINE OF.
The object of this reduction is to -
Make Room for a Large Spring Stook.
Now is your chanee. Call and examine my prices,
M. L. KINARD
Opposite Grand Central,
Feb.1, 5-f COLUMBIA, 8. C.
~4 o
S-AW MILS COTTf GINS.
.. a oye*J~..
_' -oyI [ ~0D+ xa ' g I.. d I
--- -A L
THED' AM RCNF UTD Y R
Patis ihig h abov ,adrs
SPEAKE & BR. iadsT . .C
Mar. 30 18--o
Evryod -a elghe wihtetseu P
an batiuslcto maeb Ms a
SPREA OHE *& BROW
Epo seonafaon b oi aIeBng ag
HERALD 9-ALSTORE
- W ANTED,
Eveyboy .~ dligte wih te tsteul A School large enough 'to justify two
andbeatifl alecionmad byMrs La ladies who will teach English branches,- 3
mar,whohu IEVI IkIKD o .peam herLatin. Music on Piano, Organ and Guitar,
cusomes. ewFal ciculr ustissed Kindergarten System, Galisthenices and
Addrea MR. ELEN LAAR, F~rrfurter information, inquire a
Now. 877 Broadway. ~ew York pr 9., 39-ti'.HEADOFC.-c
dr ot oe yo die s66
anght'and subimae reaa beid
ANDHi wil Hri t.r.Tf Co . -
DISASS an Y. ULRAEjEnSan1itaraty,
~ ~ J~d.zfDieaes"hihcUmae1rEAT al tIE ieriHAt"o
g~.'.h-a .wii.e.uae ndteAet' 1itofi# -LT~ O ofad
tretilIti of~'.erN -WEE.R'Rivig,aLSt-C
prnauig8- aa.f. rtehr.,wt t ra AAU~CLI 3~W U U?3H
zurw - k
ruy-== e
ad . Hfbary of
. .4
in~~ Nabp
B8y .wat4aced .Cel%sJ
and save m 7oney.
f a. 1. o-5 r
JMARDWAR,j mm
rmvr
NTM 0ADB C -
BLh$a. DA4To
KOU IS MA PPAW40D
IadwJ- aYT au
SOL ACnT rout :
4....LAM. apotse-te
- '- BUETA
- -sa-tm.m.
BOLT JiR.. ASK A D&..l 2aiV
ef... ase
Nov. 2, . -1'
HART &5 CO.,k -tI6 -
Nov. Z 3t-1fA0.ESBE
m.st
Attheev 8ws n useet.
fLIY Gret Ue MIEua -iser
rEEWUAR/SSELHBEATE
I reat Vns ofHmauinr
howaLot,howruin $r' th _a
Jntit nbwsshefi snew
rhetes e v.o ar, .omte - i s.Ths n
ondtiny; M ema y eueaemhea p. .idIshe
evey. cole anvy *mani tiny. -h wors an d trg-d
Se;ont, n us, iaplai ecnveoe atoe - res uFM prm
tmyieeetis ad r ectufsLib OSans OrtO- g a
ehsagev stso resosaawatss s hsag ad0 cets -
t vr othan every mne4ok the ladY. k,adohe o~s.iao
Pogstampse ox. ddre . dealery.
.?TGKES & DURVEY,. a e
h,ana pansm
PAPE RULRWEf
Halt ttenMwmaja L
-<r
C Imta & eeivflhe Ssflr"dw
- Y.ASSENGER DEPZTMENT.
-CourmrA. . C., Nov. 188
On and after nda November a the
PASSENGOERTAMS wBranas in
dicsted upon this road and its branehes.
Daily, except Sundays.
No. 52. UP PASSENGER.
Leave Columbla,A - - a 11.4 a m
" . tn, - - - - 1.OS p m
Newbeg, -. - - - 2.11-p a
" eS, - - - 8.58 p m
" Bel,oa' - - 4- 6 p m
Arrive Greenvie. - -- - 8s6 p m
No. 58. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Greenville, - - m- am
Belton, - - - 12.6 p m
Hodges - - 1.41 P u
" Ninety-,- - - - 2.60 p a
Newberry, - - - 4.88 p a'
" "e -6 .4=pra
Arrive Colum i,F - - 7.00 p M
ePArrANA&G, UNION a COL.I[3IA RALROAD.
No. 5. UP PASSENGER.
Leave Aleton, - - - - 1.10pm
" Strother, - - - - 2.lSpm
Shelton, - - - - 2.7 p m
Santee, - - - - 4.28 p ta
Union, - - - - 4 pm
" Joneaille,. - " - - 6..p m
Arrive Spartanburg, " - 8.15 p m
No.58. DOWN PASSENGEB.
Leave 8prtanburg,R. D. ,H 1250 pm
" prt 8r,. U.6 C. DoP,G 1.01p a
. Jonesville, - - - 200p m
Union. - ..5pm
" 8satu, - - - 39 p m
Shelton, - p 4.21pm
"Strother, - - - .5 p m
Arrive at Aiston. - - - '5.2D p m
LA4&E38 RAII.WAY.
Leave Newberry, - - - - 447 pm
Arrive Laurens C. H., - - 8.40 p m
Leave Laan.=C. H., - - - .45 am
ArriveNewberry, . - - " 12 4u pm
ASLYILLS BRACR.
Leave Hodges, - - 5.00 p
Arrive at Abbeville, - - 612pm
Leave Abbeville, - - - - 12.28 pm
Arrive atHodges, - - - - 1.8bpm
3LUl RIpDG ZA1LOAD AND ANDERox
3&tALCH. -
Leave Belton 6.6 p a
" Anderson 7.65 p a
e Pe dleton - 85pa
Leave eae C,. 10.S p m
Arrive Walha14 11.0 y a
Leave Walhalla, - - 6.40 a m
Leave Seneca C, 7.54 a a
Pendleton, - - 1.18 a m
" Anderson, - - - 11.10p
Arrive at Belton. - - 12.09 p in
CONNEC'IONS.
A. With South Carolina Railroad from Char
leston.
Wth Wilmington, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad from, Wil:aington and an
-onts North therei:
WiCharlotte, Co!ambia" and Augusta
Railroad from Charlotte and all points
North thereof.
B. With Asheville & Spartanburg Rail Road
for points in Western North Carolina.
C. WithA. & C. Div. R. & D. . R., from all
points South and West.
D. With A.& C. Div., R. & D. R. R., from At
lanta and beyond.
E. With A. & C. Div, . & D. . R., froin all
points South and West.
F. With South Carolina Railroad for Charles
ton
With Wimi on, Columbia and Au ta
Railroad orWlmingtouand th orth.
With Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad for Charlotte and the North.
G. With Asheville & Spartanburg R:aIlroad
from iendersouville.
H. Witb A. & C. Div., E. & D. E. E., from
Charlotte and beyond.
Standard Time used isWasbin n, D. C.,
which is 8fteen minutes faster than lumbia.
.J. W. FRY Superintendent.
N. SLAUGarga, General kaasenger Agent.
D CARDwnIL. Ass't General Passenger Agt,
Columbia, S. C.
South Carolina Railway Company.
. CHANGE OF SCHEDULE.
On and after Dec. 17th, 18M1 Passenger
Trains on this rorA will run as follows un
til further notice:
TO AND FROM CHARLESTON.
GOING EAST.
Leave Columbia :*&00 a In t.58 p in
Arrive Charleston 1. 55 p tn 12 3O p m
GOING WEST,'
Leave Char!estoa t7.00 a in *5.20 p m
Arrive Columbia 11.28 a m 10.09 p m
tDaily. *Daily except Sunday.
TO AN.D FROM CAMDEN.
GoING0 EAST,
Leave Columbir. *S00 a nm *U.58 p m
Arrive Camnden, 1.10) a m 10.0(0 p mn
GOING WEST
Leave Camden' *7.00.a in *5.00 p mn
Arrive Columbia 11.28 a m 10.0 p m
*Daily except Snndays.
TO AND FRO1 A CGUSITA.
GOING EAST.
Leave Columbia *8.O a mn %.58 p m
Arrive Augusta 200 pm 7.05 am
GOING WEST,
Leave Augusta *7.05 am *Ll10pim
Arrive Columbia 4.5 p m 10 09p m
*Daily except. Sundays.
CONNECTIONS.
Connection made at Columbia with the
Columbia and Greonville. Itiil Rload by tra in,
arriving at 11.28 1'. M.. amii depart ing at.6.58S
P. N. Conneci i'on made at Columbia Junc
tion with Chiarlotta. Columbia an,l augusta
Rail Road by same train. to and fromn all
pints on both ronds w ith throngh P'ulman
Seeper between Charle-'tn an Wash;ing
ton, via Virghin Midland rontie, withouat
change. Connection. mwle at Clu-ssIton
with Steamners for New Y.ork.'n W.md n,-.l.ays
and Saturdaye; also. with Savannah and
Charleston Railradi to all pints~ s.omb.
Connections are made at Augusta with
Georgia Railroad and Central R.ilroa.1 to
and from all points South and West.
Through tickezts can be purchased to al!
pnsSouth and Westby applyn to
D. McQUEEN, Aent Columbia.
1'.C. ALLEN G.P.&AI. A.
JOEN B. PECK, General Manager.
Charlotte, Columbia & Augusta R. R.
OFFICE GENEIIAL PAtRENGER AGENT,
LSchedule in effectCepember 3. 1882:
No. 53 DAILY-MAIL AND EXPrEsS.
Leave Auguta, A.............7.35 a t
Arrive at Clumibia, B...........11.45 a m
Leave Columbia, B.............11.52 a m
Arrive at Charlotte, C........... 4.15 p m
Leave Charlotte.............. ...5.40 p m
Arrive at 8talesville.............7.0'> p mn
NO. &7 D)AILY-MAIL AND EXPEEss.
Leave Aur'usta, A.............. 600 p mn
Arrive at olumnbia, D...........10.25 m
No. 19 LOCAL FREIGHT, daily except Sun ys
(With Passenger Coach attached.)'
Leave Columbia.................5.00 a mn
Arrive at-Charlotte..............83.15 p in
. O52 SOUTHWARD.
N.2DAILY--MAIL AND EXP as.
Leave Statesville................ 7.00 a mn
Arrive at Charlotte...............905 a m
Leave Charlotte, C............... . 2 p mn
Arrive at Columbia, B............ 6.30 p mn
Leave Columbia, B............... G.67 p in
Arrive at Augusta, A...........10.50 p mn
\o. 48 D)AILY-MAIL ANI> EXPREuss.
Leave ColumbIa, 0................6 15 a mn
Arrive at A ugusta. A............I 0.22 a ni
No. 18 .L CAt, Fiut.GCrr. daily except.itxtay5
(Wlth Passenger Coach attached )
Leave Charlotte.................5.00 n mn
Arrive at Columnbia...............' 3 2 pin
COss ECT1058.
A-With all lines to and from Savannah.
Florida and the South and Atlanta, Macon
and the Southwest.
B.-With South Carolina Railroad to and
from Charleston.
C.-With Richmond and Danville Railroad
to and from all pints North and Carolina.
Central Railroad.
1D-Connect with the W. C. A A. E. E for
Wlmn on and all points on the Atlantic
Pullman Sleeping Cars on Trains Nos. 52
and 53 between Auguta and Washn n,
D. C.. via Danville, Lynchbur and Char
lottesville. Also, on Trains 5' and 53 be
tween Charlotte and Richmond.
Numbers 47 and 48 run solid between Au
gusta and Florence and carry Pullman
Sleepers between Augusta and Wilmington
and between Augusta and Wilmingtn.
Above schedule Washingo time.
G. E. T.ALcoTr, Sprintendent.
M. SLAUGHTE R, General Passengr Agt.
D). CARIDWELL, Ass't General Passenger
Agent, Columbia, S. C.
Asheville and Spartanburg Railroad.
- SPArANBURG. 8. C., September 1, 1881.
On and after Thursday, September 1, 1881,
passenger trains will be run daily (Sundays
excepted) between Spartanbnrg and Hen
dersonville, as follows:
UP TRAIN.
LeaveRE. A D). Depot atSpartaniburg.4.20 p m
Arrive at Hendersonville.........7.30 p in
DOWN TRAIN.
Leave Hendersonville....~........ 8.30 a m
Arrive E. A D. Depo,partanbrg.12.00 mn
Both trains mae connections for Colm
bIa and Charleston via Spsrtanburg. Union
and Columbia and Atlanta and Charlotte by
Air LIne. JAMES ANDEK.-ON,
- . erWint.--...!0nt
fSufhVllNO PATENT. NO PA Y
LF!II1IJiIJ'i s our motto. We have
IIIIUIIL)shad 14 years experlene
in procuring Patents,;
Caveats, Trade-Marks. Cyrgts.etc., in
this and other countries. OrHand Books
giving -full Instructions In Patents free.
AddressE.8. A A. P. LACEY, latent Att'is
50i F St., Washlngtcn, D. C. Jan,11, 2-tf.
Sfor Soldiers on any dis
.essel ~, wound orijry
Fees,8*10. Bounty, Bak
ington, D. C Jan.11,2-tf.

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