OCR Interpretation


The Newberry herald. (Newberry, S.C.) 1865-1884, March 08, 1883, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026909/1883-03-08/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

MAECH.
- - -. 1 2 31
4A5 6 7 8 9 10
4 2 13 14 15. 16 .17
18 29 20 21 22 23 24
52 ,27 28 29 30 31
+ r A BEANS AS A FARR
CROP.
' The TJma, the most popular
. ea among amateurs and market
Sardeners, is slow in finding its
igay into the gardens of farmers.
:'Be dry beans sell for several dol
lars bushel, and the market has
Sver been adequately supplied.
SAina beans are easily raised, and
as bountifully as most other
pole beans; and they continue to
lossom and bear until killed by
he frost. We know of no reason
hy they can not be made a
leealty, like hops or tobacco, and
rown on a wrge scale. They
= ould require better soil and treat
ment than the common field bean,
at s the price is three times
greater, these could well be afford
ed. A rich gravelly or sandy loam
suiti them best, and the phosphatic
Manares are well adapted to them.
k On ths kind of soil we have not
found them to run too much to
svines, even with heavy dressings of
c..ompost prepared from muck and
stable manure. The vine' is a
strong grower, and requires abun
at nourishment- The pods are
formed quite thickly from the top
to the bottom of the poles. -They
want the full benefit of the sun, and
the row anning north and south,
should. be four feet apart, and the
hills four feet apart in the row.
planting we prefer toputthe
eye downwards, and not more than
one inch deep. The first of June
is early enough for this latitude.
This bean needs frequent cultiva
tion, until the vines shade the
ground.. This crop is well suited
for farmers remote from cities and
markets. The market gardener will
not grow Lima beans to sell dry,
because they are worth more in the
green state, and he can sell al he
es a raise. But the farmer, how
Sever remote from the city, can
n- arket- his whole crop in the
winter, and be well paid for his
% labor.-American Agricultmrist for
Miarcha.
WORE I1N THE ORCHARD.
Nursery trees should have been
ordered earlier. If yet to be done,
do itat once. When trees arrive,
Sunpack them, and if not ready to
iplant at once, heel them in. The
*operation of heeling-in is a temn
~porary planting, where the roots
are covered with soil and kept from
sjary. Open a trench in a dry
piaoe, and lay in the trees at an
angle of 450, and cover the roots
and about half Of the stems with
fine soil, taking care to leave no
open spaces. When this is well
done, the trees may remain for.
Ssome weeks. Take care that all of
Sa soi't are put together, and that
there can be no mixing of varieties,
or confusion as to labels, when the
trees are taken out to be planted.
Planting the trees should not be
hurried. The treatment to be
given before panting is described
on page 126. Before the tree is
p!anted remove the label placed
upon itat the nursery. If labels
~.are to be used, apply .the one de
~7termined upon ; but it is better to
recognize the varieties by their
postion, according to a record of
the planting. Make the hole wide
enough to allow all of the roots
to be extended. Do not set
~< the tree any deeper than it stood
before. If any of the fibrous roots
are matted, separate and spread
them apart. When the hole is part
ly filled, water may be applied with
a watering-pot, to settle the earth
in among the roots. When the
roots are well covered, the soil
may be pressed gently with
the foot, to make irm. After
Ste hole isllled, make acoical
mound of earth around the stem,
this may be a foot or 18 inches
taghih, and will support the tree
s. gainst the winds better than
# takes. When the growth begins,
the mound is to be levelled.
- Aericas Agriculturalist for March.
Cooa Smtr.-Pat two table
sof cocoa shells into alit
2'tie el water ;add to them.a pinlt
of boln'water, and boil for one
hour ; strain, add a pint of rich
milk, let it come oa boil, then
sweeten to taste and serve. If
liked stronger, add more shella in
making it. This is a nourishing
and palatable drink when tea and
enfee are not allowed.
A YOUNG MAN'$ PERIL.
There were in to see a lawyer yes
terday-Mary Ann and her mother.
Mary Ann was a little embarrassed,
but the old woman was calm.
When they spoke about a breach of
promise case the lawyer asked :
"What evidence have you got ?"
"Mary Ann, produce the letters,
commanded the mother, and the
girl took the cover off a willow
basket and remarked that she
thought 927 letters would do to
begin on. The other 651 would
be produced as soon as the case
was fairly before the court.
"And outside Qf these letters ?"
queried the lawyer.
"Mary Ann, produce your diary,'
said the mother. "Now turn to
the heading of 'Promises,' and
and tell how many times this mar
riage business was talk over."
"The footing is 214 times," an
swered the girl.
"Now turn to the heading of
'Darling' and give us the number
of times he has applied the term to
you."
"If I have figured right the total.
is 9,254 times."
"I guess you counted pretty
straight, for you are good in arith
metic. Now turn to the heading
of 'Woodbine Cottage' and tell us
how many times. he has talked of
such a home for you after mar
riage."
"The footing is 1,395 times."
"Very well. This lawyer wants
to be sure that we've got a case.
How many times has Charles
Henry said he would die for
you?"
"Three hundred and fty," an
swered the girl as she turned over
a leaf.
'How many times has he called
you an angel "
"Over 11,000, mamma."
"How about sqeezing hands ?"
"Over 384,000 sqeezes."
"And kisses ?"
"Nearly 417,000."
"There's our case," said the
mother as she deposited basket and
diary on the lawyer's table. "Look
over the documents, and if you
want anything further I can bring
in a dozen neighbors to swear to
facts. , We sue for $1G,000 dam
ages, and we don't settle for less
than an eighty acre farm, with
buildings in good repair. We'll
call again next week. Good day,
ir !"-.Detroit Free Press.
CHlEAP LIVING IN SAXONY.
Americans with small incomes,
who find living in New York and
other large cities terribly expen
sive, would tio well to emigrate to
Saxony, where everything is more
reasonable.
A correspondent of the Chicago
News writes that while everything
was exceedingly cheap in Saxony,
none of the Americans with whom
he had been talking had been able
to live ou less money per diem
than it cost them to live at home,
but they had all lived more lux
uriously.
"I am tr.king music lessons here,"
said a young fellow from Cincin
nati, who does not talk much. "I
take t.wo lessons a week. I pay
all the teacher aked."
"1 am paying fifty cents per les
son to a teacher of German," said
anothei-.
"I paid $15 for this suit of
clothes," said another, "and I
couldn't buy it in the United
States for $40. They were made
to order for me." - .
"I pay twelve marks, or $3, per
month for my room, with coffee
every morning," said another.
"I rode in a beautiful carriage
from 11 o'clock until 6 o'clock yes
terday. I had a splendid driver. I
had beer and so did he. The day's
amusement cost me $3. It would
cost more than that for the privi
lege of taking off your hat toan
American backman."
Other adventures and experien
es of a simimar character were gone
over. I have just given enough to
show why it is that people of small1
means in England flock to Saxony.
They can live well here for what it
would cost them to live poorly at
home. Americans have not taken
advantage of the inducements of.
fered by Dresden or Leipsie as
yet, because Americans do not live
like the 2nglish on annuities. But
to persons in America who have an
income from rents or invested cap
ital of, say, $1,000 a year, the in.
duements offered by this delight
ful country are beyond computa.
tion.
Grace in the soul willashow it
slf in the life. It is apower that
works through every faculty in
ding goona
.IeceUaneous.
TUTT'8
ExE.CTORANT
Is eom d of Herbal and Mucianous prod
nct,whchprmete the substanceofJthe
Lungs, expectorate. the acrid matter
thatoollectuin the Bronchial Tubes,andformsa
soothing coating, which relieves the ir,
ritation that causes the cough. It eanses
thcmwhe eeb b y disase
ates the circulation of the blood, and bracesthe
nervous system, SIght eolds Oten end in
ensmpation. It isdangeroustoneglect
them.= Apply the remaedy popl. A
tetof twenty years warrants the asserti tha
noremedyhaseverbeenfoundthatisas
initsefectsasTlT'8II ECTOA .
snge dose raises th e egm, ues
i mtion,and its use ily cures themost
obstinate cough. A pleasant cordial, ehld
dran take it rei. For Croup it is
invaluable and shonld be in every famly.
TUTT'S
PILLS
ACT DIRECTI.YO EI
Cures Chills and ver Dyspepdya
Sick Headache, Bil Colie,Constpa
tion, Rheumatism, Piles, Palpitationof
the Heart, Dizziness, Torpid iver, and
Female Irregularites. If you donot"feel
very well," a uingle pill stimulates the stomach,
iestoresthe appetite,umpartsvigorto thesystem.
A NOTED DIVINE SAYS:
Dn. Turr:-Dear Sirs For ten years I ITSe
been a martyr to Dyapepaia,Constipation"and
l'iles. Lnast springyour phis wererecommended
tome; Iusedthem (but with little faith). lam
now a well man, have good appetite, digestion
perfect, regular stools, 1les gone, and have
ired fory pounds les They are worth
:'..r weighln, god.
RE V. It.1. SIM!PSON, Louisville, Ky.
otaL *TT'S MANUAL of Vselhal)
Receipts FREE on application.
May. 16, 18-ly.
J?AT&TS.
fend a rough sketch or a
moe f invention to
GER .LEMON,
Was.ington, A C., and Preliminary
in tbe mde t
ehag,o all LTnittd S=M" d of the
sam classoflftTShtiofls and be advised
whether or not a pateat can be obtained.
a ylthayorinventionispatentable,
$0, to pay Go ent of $15 and $5 fOe
drawings required by the Government. This ipay
( ) a d teab l e w v h e n a p p l i c a t i o n i s m a d e . W h eanv b e A n t o r y t v 1 1 pn d n o e e .m u
th_yo inventiIs patenltable Wnes It really %s
r as his best judgment an derne hence,
you can rely on the adie given after saprelhnminary
Regitati1hd.]O91Ron of Labels, rapaMark$aDd POgeS-iseSCU vrf8ec A andd
ool ie Cseur. Cae. Fs2prpe a en
in vor fdReAband@oed
to secore -ou own paten and biled,a hand
of the ea may lead to success. Send me a
witnrequest addressed -to the Commialsones of
Patents that he recognize 1loos .E. LExoa, of
Was D. ,as y atotrney the e -
g"1 fh ,..tle of the invention andao'ed
n r appliation. An examination and
.10 Este utig emember, this office has be
l=ecfhlcpratoin = U65 d refence can be
gvm atopk clients in almost every county in the
U.PamphletrltintoPatentsflreeuponrequest
GEORGE E. LEMON,
Attorney at L and Solicitor of American
415 Fifteenth Street, WASHiNGTON, D. C.
Ventioa this paper.
J. K. P. GOGGANS. D. O. HERBERT,
GOGGANS & HERBERT,
Attorneys-at-Law,
NEWBERRY, S. C.
"Strict Attention to Business."
Nov. 2,4-ly .
1785-1883.
Chronicle ad Constitutionalist
AUGUSTA, GA.
The Chronicle and Cc,nstitutionalist is
rapidly approaching the completion of the
irst century of existence. The paper we
publish Is essentially a type of modern pro
grs, which demonstrates that this estab
bhed journal has become better and
stronger as it increases in years. The men
who have, from one generation to another,
worked upon it, and helped to make-it a
ower in te land, submit. and will submit,
the common lot of humanity and pass
away from this earth and its struggles, but
the result of their labor remains, and will
continueto reain. The workmen die, but
The Ch ronicle of to-da is an improve
ment upon the Chronicle of the past. The
Chronic"s of the future will be an improve.
ment upon -the Chronicle of to-day. The
world moves on, and the paper moves
with it. WonderfunHnventions, in the- last
half century, hay' '~.ven an impetus to all
material things,and the press has shared in
the advantages of great dsoveries, just as
it has also stimulated them. The Chronicle
heaspaeno pains or expense to furnish
the pu0l with the news of the day from all
pas ofthe-wor'ld, and it will take pleasure
and pride in perfecting this service from
time to time. The Chronicle has endeavor
ed to take high and noble views of public
policy, and to sustain all good ends and
The hronicle has essayed to 'encourage
virtue and to make the 1lot of man. and wo
man all the brighter and better for the com
mon weal. The Chronicle strives to be a
newspaper in the best sense of the term,
and to advance, in that mission, the inter
ests of all the people. The conductors of
the aper cannot and do not expect to be
ialile, any more than they expect to
please evrbd. In all human affairs,
mistakes of Jtdment will occur. and con
tet op n will arise. We will, how.
ver mii strive to commit as few
errors as possible, and to enter such con
icts as cannot be avoided with a proper
Te Chronicle enters the new yar with
exceptional advantages. Its daily edition is
a wellflledeght-PgepaPer. Its scond edi
tion, for the evening malls, is eight pages,
with the afternoon markets and telegraphic
reports. It takes the place of the tri-week 7
edition. Its mammoth weekly paper u
editio0n the coiest ad ceamiest news of
etand freset edtoria and miscellan
eos matter from the daily is poured. Its
market reports, onvering nearly one page,
will be an especial feature, prepared each
week for the country reader.
Its news service will be sustained by
trained and scholarly corresPudents inthe
three capitals-Atlanta, Clumbia -and
Washingtn-while It will strive to ha.ve a
news representative in every neighboring
The mail facilities of this per are now
superb. Four daily trains distribute its
editions in South Carolina and three in
a eorg It reache althe prncipal pints
lication-reaching Columbia at 1ii. H. The
fast mail schedule of the Georgia Railroad
lands the Chronicle and Constitutionalist
in all towns along the line early in the
forenoon, while its issue is- unfolded in
Atlanta and Athens by noon each day.
.TERMS, PER YEAR: -
Morning Edition......... ---...$10 00
Eveningdition............--.-.-- 600
Sundaydition............ ... 2 00
"CHRNCEAN C STTUTIOA -S.
PTrICK WAL.SH, President, Augusta, Ga.
I Ipeople are always on the look
out for chances to increase their
earnings, and in time become
wealthy; those who do not im
prove their opportunities remain in pover
y.We offer a great chance to make mone
Wewant many men, women, boys andgil
to work for as right in their own localites.
Any one can do the work prperly from the
first start. The businesswl p ymore than
ten times ordinary wages. Exesive out
it furnished free. No one who engages
faills to make money rapidly. Yucan do
vote your whole time to the work or ony
yrsare moments. Full Information and
all tat is needed sent free. Address STIN
son & Co., Portland, Maine. 47-ly
-. LYON&HEALY
State& Monroe Sts.,Chiago.A
4r p.qnee el
wah8-1 sa on .IUUIf
Ragl RoasE.
Celmbia & Greenville Railroad.
PASSENGER DEPARTMENT,
COLVMBIA. S. C., Nov. 4th,1882.
On and afterMonda November 6, 1882, the
PASSENGER TRAIN will run as herewith in
dicated upon this road and Its branches.
Daily, except Sundays.
No. 52. UI' PASSENGER.
Leave Colunmbla,A - - " 11.42 a m
" Alston, - - - - 1.02 p m
" Newberry, - - - - 2.11p m
"Ninety-8 , - - - - 8.58 p m
Hodges, - - .6 p m
Belton, - - - pm
Arrive Greenville, - - - - 8.06 p m
No. 58. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Greenville, .- - + - 10.80 a m
Belton, - - - 12.16 p m
" Hodges - - 1.41 p m
Ninety-1z, - - - 259 p m
e, - - - 48 pm
Aston 5.42p m
Arrive Columbia,F - - 7.00 p m
SPARTANBUEG, UNION a COLUMBIA RAILROAD.
No. 52. UP PASSENGER.
Leave Alsten, - - - - 110 p m
" Strother, - - - - 2.15 p m
" Shelton, - - - - 2.57 p m
" Santu,, - - - - 4.28 p m
Union, - - - - 5.20 p m
Jonesville, - 6.25 p m
Arrive Spartanburg, + - 8.15 p m
No.58. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Spartanburg,R. & D. Depot, H 1250 p m
" Spartanburg, S. U. & C. Depot,G 101 p m
" Jonesville, - - - 2.09 p m
" Union. - - - 2.60pm
" Santuc, - - - 8.29 p m
" Shelton, - - 4.21 p m
" Strother, - - - 4.58 p m
Arrive at Alston, - - - 5.89 p m
LAUSENS RAILWAY.
LeaveNewberry, - - - - 4.47 p m
Arrive Laurens C. H., - 8.40 p m
Leave Laurens C. H., - - - 8.45 a m
Arrive Newberry, - - , 12.40 pm
ABBEVILLE a3NCL.
Leave Hodges, + - + - 5.00 pm
Arrive at Abbeville, - - + 6.12 p m
Leave Abbeville, - - - - 12.28 pm
Arrive at Hodges, - - - - 1.85 p m
BLUE RIDGE RAILROAD AND ANDERSON
BRANCH.
Leave Belton 6.28 p m
" Anderson 7.55 p m
" Pendleton 8.55 p m
Leave Seneca C, 10.58 p m
Arrive Walhalla 11.40 p m
Leave Walhalla, - - 6.40 a m
Leave Seneca C, 7.54 a a
" Pendleton, - - 9.18 a m
" Anderson, - - 11.10 p m
Arrive at Belton. - - 12.09 p m
CONNECTIONS.
A. With South Carolina Railroad from Char
leston.
With Wilmington, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad from Wilmington and all
oints North thereof.
With Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad from Charlotte and all points
North thereof.
B. With Asheville & Spartanburg Rail Road
for poipts in Western North Carolina.
C. With A. C. Div. E. & D. R. R., from all
points South and West.
D. Wi A.& C.Div., . & D. R, R., from At%
lanta and beyond.
E. With A. & C. Div., R. & D. R. R., from all
points South and West.
F. With South Carolina Railroad for Charles
ton.
With Wilmington, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad for Wilmington and the North.
With Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad for Charlotte and the North.
G. With Asheville & Sprtanburg Railroad
from Hendersonville.
H. With A. & C. Div., R. & D. R. E., from
Charlotte and beyond.
Standard Time used is Washington, D. C.,
which is ffteen minutes faster than Columbia.
J. W. FRY Superintendent.
M. SLAUGHTER, General kassenger Agent.
D. CARDWNLL, Ass's General Passenger Agt.,
Columbia, S. C.
South Carolina Railway Company.
CHANGE OF SCHEDULE.
On and after Dec. 17th, 1882, Passenger
Trains on this road will run as follows un
til further notice:
TO AND FROM CHARLESTON.
GOING BAST,
Leave Columbia *8.00 a m .58 p m
Arrive Charleston 12.55 p m 1230 p m
GOING WEST,
Leave Charleston t7.00 am *5.20 p m
Arrive Columbia 11.28 a m 10.0 p m
tDaily. *Daily except Sunday.
TO AND FROM CAJIDEN.
GOING EAST,
Leave Columbia *800a m *6.58p m
Arrive Camden 1.10 a m 10.00 p m
GOING WEST
Leave Camden *7.00 a m *5.00 p m
Arrive Columfblia 1128 am 10.09p m
*Daily except Sundays.
TO AND FROM AUGUSTA.
GOING RAST,
Leave Columbia *8.00Oam *6.58 pm
Arrive Augusta 2.00 pm 7.05a m
GOING WEST,
Leave Augusta '7.05 a m *4.1Op m
Arrive Columbia 4.5 p m 10.9 p m
*Daily except Sundays.
CONNECTIONS.
Connection made at Columbia with the
Columbia and GreenvilleRBail Road by train
arriving at 11.28 P. IL, and departing at 8.58
P. N. Connection made at Columbia Junc
tion with Charlotte. Columbia and Augusta
ail Road by same train to and from all
oints on both roads with thirough Pullman
Bleeper between Charleston and Washing
ton, via Virginia Midland route, without
change Connection made at Charleston
with Semers for New York on Wednesdays
and Saturdays; also, with Savannah anld
Charleston Railroad to all points South.
Connections are made at A with
Geora Railroad .and Central Rilroad to
and frm all points South and West.
Through tickets can be purchased to ail
points South and Wet yapplying to
D. MCQUEEN.zetColumbia.
D. C. A -,.P .A
JOHN B. PECK, General Managrer.
Charlotte, Columbia & Augusta B. L.
OFFICE GENERAL PAsENGER AGENT,
:Schedule in efeSeptember 3,1882:
No. 53 DAILY-MAlLr AND EXPRESS.
Leave Augusta, A...............75a m
Arrive at Clumbia, B..............1.45 a m
Leave Columbia, B..............11.52 a m
Arrive at Charlotte, C........... 4.15 p m
Leave Charlotte................ 5.00 p m
Arrive at Statesville.........7.05 p m
NO. 47 DAILY-MAIL. AND EXPRESS.
Leave Augusa, A....-.......... 6.00p m
Arrive at Columbia, D...........10.25 p m
No.19)LOCALFREIGET,daily except Sundays
(With Passenger Coach attached.)
Leave Columbia...............5.00 a m
Arrive at Charlotte.............. 3.15 p m
SOUTH WARD.
No. 52 DAILY-MAIL AND EXPRESS.
Leave Statesville.................. 7.00 a m
Arrive at Charlotte.............. 9.05 a m
Leave Charlotte. C............... .2.00 p m
Arrive at Columbia, B............ 6.30 p m
Leave Columbia, B...............37 p m
Arrive at Augusta, A...........10.50 p m
. No. 48 DAILY-MAIL AND EXPRESS.
Leave Columbia, D...............6 15 a m
Arrive at Auguta, A............102a m
No.18 LoCALEREIGIIT, daily except Sundays
(With Passenger Coach attached.)
Leave Charlotte.................5.00 a m
Arrive at Columbia............. 3.32 p m
CONNECTIONS.
A-With all lines to and from Savannah,
Florida and the South and Atlanta, Macon
and the Southwest.
B-With South Carolina Railroad to and
from Charleston.
C-With Richmond and Danville Railroad
to adfrom all int North and Carolina
D-Connect with the W. C. & A. R. E. for
Wilmington and all points on the Atlantic
Pullman Sleeping Cars on Trains Nos. 52
and 53 between A and Washington,
D.-C., via Dani~l cabu andChr
lottesville. Also, on Trains 58and 53 b)e
tween Charlotte and Richmond.
Numbers 47 and 48 run solid between Au
taand Florence and carry Pullman
1eeprs between Augusta and Wilmington
and tween Augusta and Wilmington.
Above schedule Washigtntime.
G. R. TALCoTT, Sueinedent.
M. SLAUGHTER, General Psegr Agt.
D. CARDWELL, Ass't General Fasnger
Agent, Columbia, S. C.
Asheville and Spartanburg Railroad.
SPARTANBURG, S. C., Septemnber 1, 1881.
On and after Thursday, September 1, 1881,
passenger trains will be run daily (Sundays
excepted) between Spartanburg and Hen
dersonville, as follows:
Dl' TRAIN.
Arrive at Hendersonvi'le.........7.30 p m
*DOWN TRAIN.
Leave Hendersonville............ 8.30 a m
Arrive E;. D. ept,Spartanbulrg.12.00 m
Both trains mae connections for Colum
ba and Charleston via Spartanbur. Union
and Columbia and Atlanta and Charlotte by
Air Line. JA MES ANDERSON,
Superintendent.
TgN NO PATENT, NO PAY
Is our motto. We have
PATIi]N ntpocurijatento,
Caveats, Trade--Marks. Co etc.,n
this and other countries. t' ud Books
giving full instructions in Patents. free.
Address E. S. A A.P. LACEY, Patent Att'vs,
60 F5 Washngton,D. C. Jan. 11, 2-tf.
Ngfor Soldiers on any dis
D1NIf1ease, wound or in ury
Fees, *10. Bounty,
Pay, Discharges for Do
AdesC. N. SIE CO,60 F B. ah
ington, D. C. Jn1 -t
Hotel
The Crotwell Hotel,
A LARGE THREE STORY BRICK. BUILDING.
Only Hotel with Electric Bells in Newberry.
Only Hotel with Cistern Water.
CENTRAL OFFICE OF TELEPHONE EZCHANGE.
MRS. EMMA F. BLEASE,
PROPRIETRESS,
NEWBERRY, S. C.
This commodious and spacious Hotel is now open and fully prepared to entertain al
comers.
The Furniture of every description is New, and no effort will be spared to make all
persons patronizing the establishment at home.
The Rooms in this Hotel are spacious, well lighted, and the best ventilated of any
Hotel in the up country.
One of the Beat Sample Rooms in the State.
All horses entrusted to our care will be well cared for at Christian & Smith's Stables.
TERMS.
BOARD BY THE MONTH, $30,00; WEEK, $10,00; DAY, $2.00.
LOWER RATES BY THE YEAR.
The Table shall be furnished with the very best. Nov. 2, 44-1y.
clothinag.
Read's Read! Read!
I will close out the Balance of my Stock of
WINTER CLTING
-AT
Greatly Reduced Prices!
EN'S YOUTHS'I BOYS 5 SUITS,
ALSO, A LINE OF
OVEPCOOATS
The object of this reduction is to
Make Room for a Large Sprint Stook.
Now is your chance. Call and examine my prices.
M. L. KINARD,
Opposite Grand Central,
Feb.1, 5-tf COLUMBIA, S. C.
WJGO.X!'S.
e p o Mpe o ^o y
.oar4 oa C , 'E
CHAL N S
SOUL GUN, ihl mmnatd
DISOVE BNEiiges gadw
Au CID PHOPHTE forcopotig
ASHELEENT maeo las o otn ri n es
GENUIINE LEPODS ALNANT more ietfo
N. .-ANnPASER
For tems Ilusrae Alanc an crs drethe o
De . 21 51I-6m.
AACIFICACIPHSPH AT.
DSSLEDGao areOtE highest grade;adkp owtotrgadt ot stets
tmnofACI POurc s P Er for mpst asinti tt,Gogi,NrhCrln
FrtrsapytAnS LiNT mde ros Tloats, for CtonGriadPes
the Mine FROS Germ , Arntedpue
Dec. 14, 50--ADSCO.NCPOU .ETONND;C
GROUNDR DRIEDPIIS, ANTEOD,
Sca Fomuas a d to ordeu i ytm C liT enic DMAL.
Sp c a i nd m e s forE LAh R or f rhe nf rmrs,.mF C
Dov. 2, 48-6.
THE PACIFIOTH GUAOROMAN
gives Ghe yaos ase , and thehstrae an e ts o ihu eadt otsteta
piny fall uru uste for the se, 1it thea ithsSteGora,N thC oln
ndinr el se efe c, ill susantite we
o tes a ply it Aenravingo the rosTws rt
hosestethadferen ages FihRST& O,Aen,
Eryor dyeling th ege d the th e an Aother.geeouhtjsf w
ar,bl whoma io CaE l N a d t pla hco inpy.co iao rgnad utr
Ades MSELE LAA,For futhrlefrmtonaiqurea
8ERAL BroadSTyEewYr.HRLOFIE
mwbu,mlnE n life i sweepi by,go and
will frsh you eerytig(n r
gives thems,mgtvms.ocuuse,eandethe bes
tretmet o eab; tale ivig al t eay as__ well._ No__one_can__fail __om
fA eig 1, ag4- fthhc n ohr h taie. -o1anwr
7..
Bay what you need in Dry Goods r
and Milinery of
WI. 3. Yoi.x.g
132 Naii St., Co11Na, &C"
and save money.
Jan. 25, 4-8m
Hardware, #c. L ..
HART & O PA
HARDWARE MERCHA.
SOLE ACENTS FOR
LADOW DISC PULVE=RING HARROW
THOMAS SMOOTHING, THOMAS PULVRI NG A000 8
LANE HARROW,
THE AMERICAN BARBED FENCE WIRE
BUFFALO ST1NDAgD
-AGEnTS FOR=
Genuine Farmers' Friend and Avery
-FOR AIZ
STEEL BULL TONGUE8 SCOTERS.. TWM BHVEi
BOLTS, GRASS ROD, SINGLETRR$ TIN WAR& WOO
HOUSES,EPING GOODS, CARPENTERS', COOPEB8'; =yB
ISTM' and BLACKRMiTHS' L"
-A FRmE AssoR?Tul - -
- ENGLISH, AEUIAN. AN GEMBAN
MUZZLE AND BRECH LOADING
--STATE AGENTd FO
KEMP'S MANURE AND COTTON SEE:
Ii,rr.erNen
.. po" ,k r a.wit- -
y R-r axo,-s hals
No.2L-&
-igleees
50seks,Cbck, eaeh'y
IfnBEis H R
Athe NeStoe n etl e
YIOHN AND GUITA -STING
aoacsPRaDER seoac. naans 10ij~am~~
HABRT A& COT., NE-I 1 ai~'4 '
Watemakingka, Repairng
- Done Cheap Sor wih istchLo.
Cav anow hand mysocn prRices.
aUnsortements
SPWTALU ~Ub3~!hes
I EUTRAUI.N
Watehuarlig agd.Repairlu
Cell andaexamine m'stork and.prmc.s
EDUARD SCHIOLTZ. '' S
Nov.21I, 4'i-tf. -
A Great Cause of lanai Misery
l.w L..t,n. lo..estoe.!
Just ublished, a new~edition of Dx. OUL
VERWELL'S5 CELEBRATED ESSAY on the
radial cure of S1EETNNe3L or navninal -
wane Involuntary miannal Losses, g
SUMPZON, EPILESPTadrFis induced by~1I
selfnngenoe or sexnet extravaganoe, &5. - h CIN
Te celebrated author, In this admnchl the largest dCUie 6bIn
essay, clearly demonstrates from a nti al nsacei
years' successftlpractice, that the alrigwold.-~va~g
consequencesoself-abusemaYbe aial ~~ gainertt'
cred; pointing outs mode of cure at oncean
simple, certain, ad efrfetl by means of
which every suaferer, no matte what his
condtion may be, may cure himselt cheap- teanes
ly, privatl and radically.t cine
U- This cur should 'be in the hands works, and oths
of every youth and every man in the Jadogm,publWR k
ent, under seal, in aplain envelope, to cpe ymall,.1 , o
any address, on receipt oflsix cents or two
postage stamps. Address -A4&eMnu
TEE CULYEIWJrXEnmaL. go.
41 Ann St., ew Yerk. .
Post ofmce Box,460 Xar. s018-ily. r s rT~~
L R. 5T0K3 10OW DOmYB.
STOKE$' & DDORFEY, m
BOOK BINDERS,
PAPER RULERS,

xml | txt