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The Newberry herald. (Newberry, S.C.) 1865-1884, March 15, 1883, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026909/1883-03-15/ed-1/seq-1/

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SFamilY. Companion, Devoted to Literature, Miscellany, News, Agriculture, Markets, &c,
Vol. XIX. .NEWBERRY, S. C., THURSDAY, M RCH 15, 1883.0o 1
ti IS PV$LlsR=D,
k.x .$Br THURSDAT IORNING,
1. Newberry, B. C.
~ TROS.FP. REUKR,
Fd andProprIetor.
~4~W!SS .oo per .smuun
InvarITly in Advanoa.
The per ts "Pat the expiration e
w- tCafar k"it Is
H mark denotes expiration o
I BIGGEST ANDB R8
STOCE OF
&OTHING
: R =IITED IM,iEWBERY,
CAN BE FOUND AT
c1I31T& J11CP)PQCk'SI
a 3ery Article i the MIae of
. GENTLEMEN'S WEAR,
FROM A FINE PAIR OF
Shoes up to a Hat.
.R B ERWEAR a Specialty.
A FINE ASSORTMENT OF
S othing for Youths.
Announcement No.11
W ed- offer special inducements, for the
next- sizty -days, to all who may want
- de Clothing or Furnishing Goods,
Roots, Shoes, &o. Our bargain table
is.ee reglenished by adding thereto
mny garments in good styles and without
det, from broken suits, all of which will
be ..sold, or given away, without regard to
eo- This feature is especially full in
Tis'a and Boys' Clothing. Call and get
-.Overeoats for Men, Youth and
Royas low as two dollars.
WET & J. W. COPPOC.
Jan 4, 1-tf
WseRaueous.
IE OLWA:S ARE COMING
NeW Is THE TIME TO RE.
PARE FOR TRW.
FiMEST VARIETY OF TOMCAL FRUiT IN
S-MARKET
~'Fresh Oranges Every Week.
COCOANUITS,
ORANCES,
L.ACA CRAPES,
Pents,
JITsi.
Cnrrants.
g~ Orders Alled with dispatch.
B' C ART & 00.,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
Nov. S0, 41-Om.
L SUBSCRIBE FOR THE
WEEKLY PALMETTO YEOMAN,
COLUMBIA, S. C.
It is an8 page paper, designled forthe peo
flled with interesting matter-Famfly
Three Months, 50 Cents-payable in ad
vance. For Six Names and Nine Dollars an
Extra Copy for one year. Seiens fur
nished. The DAILY YEOMA, an after
noon paper, is $4 a year.
C. K. McJUN EIN.
40-cf Editor and Publisher.
Clubbed with the HaSr,AL at $3.25
RI1N CETRAL HOTEL,
(Formerly the Wheeler Hoube,)
COL UMBIA., S. C.
TIS0IOlYOI RENOVATED,
REFURNISHED AND REFITTED.
TERMS, 32,00 TO 33.00 PER DAY,
SJOIN T. WILLEY, Propriet'r.
Nob. 10. 4ft-tf
H-ME4IDE IOE
OR
NOVELS
For the Seaside, Chimney
Side, Sunny Side, Shady
Side, Right Side, Left
Side, or any
other side.
A large lot just received at the
HERALD BOOK STORE..
Feb. 5, 6-45
ALSTON DINNIt HOllSB.
Passep:ers on both the up and down
trains have the usual time for DINNER at
Aiston, the junction of the G. & C. R. B.,
and the S. U. & C. R. R.
Fare well prepared, and the charge rea
gonable. RS. M. A. ELKINS.
*WRIGHT'S HOTEL,
COLUMBIA, S. C.
This.-new and elegant House, with all
modern improvements, is now open for the
-reception of guests.
8. L.WRIGHT &SON,
1$ ar. 19, 12--tf Pro rietors.
DR. E. E. JACKSON,
R I1g(lST AND CIEIST,
COLUMBIA, S. C.
SEmoy, to tore two doors next to
Orders promptly attended to.*
Apr. 11, 16-tf.
.Iseeuaneous.
C. C CHASE,
Proprietor,
Newberry, S. C.
Rooms comfortable and newly fur
nished.
Table well supplied with the best the
market affords.
Servants attentive to every want.
Permanent and transient boarders
amply accommodated.
Satisfaction guaranteed in every
particular.
Feb. 22, 8-tf
I -Can Tell You How to Be
Tour Own Doctor !
If you have a bad taste in your mouth,
sallowness or yellow color of skin, feel d
pnet.stupid and drowsy. appetita nn
st legnfeent headache or dizzi neP, you
are ns.9Nothing will arouse your
Liver to act on and strengthen up your sy8
tem equal to
SIMMONS'
HEPATIC
COMPOUND
Or Liver and Kidney Cure.
REMOVES CONSTIPATION.
RELIEVES DIZZINESS.
DISPELS SICK HEADACHE.
ABOLISHES BILIOUSNESS.
CURES JAUNDICE.
CURES LIVER COPLAINT.
OrEzcoNES MALARIL BLOOD PO8ONLNG.
REGULATES THE STOMACH.
WILL REGULATE THE LIVER.
WIL LEGULATE THE BOWELS.
THE LIVER AND KIDNEYS
Can be kept pfectly hathy in any ceH
ate by takinge an oc casional dose ofu
SIMMONS' REPATIC COMPOUND,
THE GRRAT VEGsEtABLE
UVER ANID KIWiEY MEDICINE.
DOWIE & MOISE,
PEOPRIETOS8,
WHOLESALE DRUCCISTS
CHARLESTON, S. C.
- FOR SALE EVERYWHERE..&
And in Newberry by Dr. S. F. FANT.
Nov. 2, 4L-ly.
GERMAN KAINIT,
(Direct importation.)
PERUVIAN GUANO,
(Direct from the Agent of the Peruvian
Government.)
FISH GUANO,
(6 to 8 per cent. Ammonia.)
Nova Scotia Land Plaster.
SOUTH CAROLINA GROUND
PHOSPHATE,
Fine ground and of high grade.
For sale by
HERMANN BULWINKLE,
BBRR'S WHARF,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
Dec. 14, 50--3m.
Books and Staftionery.,
ONII MOR~ AGIN
Ke6p it BIfor therblc
The largest and best stock of
BOOKS, STAIONERY
? FANCY ARTICLES
Ever shown in Newberry, at the
BUIL BOK STOlE,
Comprismng in pA,rt
Boks School Books, Pictn're Books,
Hyn Books, Scrap Books, Bibls,
cellaneous Books, and other
Plain Cards, Cristmas Cars -Reward
rted ,oadristol Board,
A B CBlocks.
Legl Cp, sil Pa r-wide and ar
row Inks-black, nue, p rle, re,
Slate Pencils, Card Cases.
Backgmo Bad,Chessmen, Domi
toy and plain ubber Rigs Era
Fancy Papetris,8 Coore Ppr Tisu
Desk, Work Boxes. No a Arks,
Pens, Tags, McGill's Fasteners.
cAndany oter articles not enumerated
CRE AP FOR CASH.
Thos. F. GRENEKER,
PROPRIETOR HERAL.D BOOK STORE,
Nov. 30, 48-tf.
ROBSON'S COTTON AND CORN
FERTILIZER.
ROBU0O'8 COMPOUND ACID PHO6PHATR.
These grades are rich in all the essentials
constituting first-class articles, carefully
prepared from best materials. Our rong
experience in the trade, together with Prof.
Shepherd's analysis, are guarantees that
they are adapted to the wants of consum
era.
For sale at market rates for cash, time or
cotton. J. N. ROBSON & SON,
TACKLINGTHE WRONG TOM
CAT.
A man be owned a terrier dog
A bob-tailed, ornery cuss,
And that there pup got that there man
In many an ugly muss,
For the man was on his muscle,
And the dog was on his bite;
And to kick the dorg-goned animile
Was sure to raise a fight.
A woman owned a Thomas cat,
That fit at fifteen pound;
And other cats got up and slid
When that there cat was round,
The man and his dorg came along one day,
Where the woman the did dwell.
And the pupp be growled ferociously,
Then went for that cat poll-meln.
He tried to chaw the neck of the cat,
But the cat he wouldn't be chawed,
So he lit on the back of that there dorg,
And bitI and clawed! and clawed!
Oh! the hair it flew! and the purp he
youldedl
As the claws went into his hide,
And chunks of flesh were peeled from bis
side;
Then he flummaxed, and kicked. and diedi
The man he ripped, and cursed, and swore,
As he gathered a big brick-bat,
That he would be darned essentially
If he dida't kill that cat!
But the old woman allowed she'd be blessed
if he did,
And snatched up an old shot-gun,
Which she fired and peppered his diaphragm
With bird-shot number one.
They toted him home on a window-blind,
And the doctor cured him up;
But be was never known to fight again,
Or own another purp,
Folks -may turn up their snoots at this here
rhyme.
I don't care a cuss for that!
All I want to show is, that fighting dogs
May tackle the wrong Tom-cat.
SUMMARY OF THE DUTIES
OF SUPERINTENDENTS OF
HIGHWAYS AND OVER
SEERS OF ROADS.
Each. -Township constitutes a
Highway District.
The County Commissioners shall
annually appoint a Superintendent
of Highways for each highway
district, who shall be a resident of
the district for which he is ap
pointed and liable to road duty,
but exempt therefrQm by reason of
hil office, He shall have general
superintendence of highways in his
district, under the direction of the
County Commissioners, to whom he
shall make a report once in three
months, of the condition of the
roads in his district.
Each Superintendent shall divide
the highways in his district into
suitable sections of not less than
two, nor more than five miles, and
appoint Overseers for each of said
sections. He shall likewise divide
all persons liable to road duty in
his district into two companies or
sqiqads and assign a squad to each
Overseer, as far as practicable,
assigning the road hands to the
nearest road, and shall require the
Overseer to call out the hands to
work the roads, repair and build
bridges of same whenever he may
deem it necessary, after twelve
hours notice, and shall require-each
hand to bring with him a hoe, axe,
mattock or other tool. He shall
determine the ntvnber of days for
each working and the tool to be
brought, provided not more than
twelve days work shall be required
of any hand in a year. For re
fusing or neglecting to carry out
any work required by the County
Commissioners, or any of them, the
Superintendent of Highways shall
be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor,
and upon conviction, before a Trial
Justice, shall be fined not less than
$10 nor more than $50. Overseers
for neglecting to call out hands and
work roads, when required by the
Superintendent, upon conviction in
Trial Justice Court, shall be fined
not less than $5, nor more than $20.
Superintendents shall jointly di
vide a highway running along the
line of two highway districts, and
shall assign hands itom their re
spective districts to work the same.
Overseers shall require their hands
to do such work on bridges, as
will preserve them in order, when
it can be conveniently done. I
bridges need such repairs as should
be given out under contract, Super
intendents shall report the same td
the County Commissioners lyithout
delay.
When any highway shall become
obstructed by storms or otherwise,
the Overseer shall summon a suffi
cient number of hands to open and
repair such highway. Any Over
seer - failing to call out hands, for
the space of a day, after application
made by any citizen, shall, unless
he has sufficient excuse therefor,
forfeit $15, to be collected in an
action in the name of the County
Commissioners. Any person liable
to work on highways and neglecting
to turn out, on* rdinary
occasions and in opening
and repairing hways, after
being summoned, shall be deemed
guilty of a misdemeanor and upon
conviction -shall be fined $3 per
day. If any person shall perform
more days labor than is required
by law, he shall be paid $1 per day
for the overplus,
All able bodied male persons, be
tween the ages of sixteen and fifty
years, are liable to road duty, ex
cept members of State and County
Boards of Examiners, School Trus
tees, members of Boards of Asses
sors, teachers and students at col
leges, ministers of the gospel, mil
lers engaged in grigt or merchant
mills, where they are kept open six
days in the week, and the warner
for five days.
The Overseer shall make a list
for the warner, requiring him to
give notice to each person of the
kind of tool to be used, which no
tice shall be given twelve hours
before the time fixed in the notice
and shall also state the hour and
place of working. If any person,
after receiving such notice shall
neglect to appear or refuse to work
according to the direction of the
Overseer, he shall be deemed guilty
of a misdemeanor and upon con
viction before a Trial Justice, shall
be fined not less than $5, nor more
than $10, or be imprisoned in the
county jail for not less than five,
nor more than twenty days. Any
person notified to work can pay to
the County Treasurer $1 per day
for the time he is required to work,
which shall be received in lieu
thereof. Overseers shall allow two
days labor for a man working one
day and furnishing a horse and
plow, or horse and cart, and three
days labor for any person working
one day and furnishing a wagon
and two horses or mules or oxen.
Overseers have power to cut down
and use timber, or use any wood,
stone or earth, in or near the high
way, bridge or causeway to be re
paired, necessary for that purpose,
but the owner shall be entitled to
compensation therefor if demande.d.
But no Overseer shall authorize the
cutting down of' timber trees re
served by the owner, or planted
for shade or ornament, either in the
fields, around the spring, or about
the dwelling house or appurtenan
ces, or the cutting of rail timber
when other timber can be pro
cured, or the taking of stone or
earth from enclosed grounds, with
out the owner's consent,
Any person prohibiting or hinder
ing an Overseer from cutting down
and using timber, or from using
wood. earth or stones. in or near
roads or causeways for the purpose
of making or repairing such road or
causeways, or for making such r,e
pairs of bridges, or shall obstruct
the passage of said roads, cause
ways or bridges by gates, fences or
ditches or any other obstruction, or
shall hinder or threaten or forbid
any traveller from travelling any
public road, shall be deemed guilty
of a misdemeanor and upon con
viction shall be fined not less than
$5, nor more than $10.
Any person removing from one
county to another, who has, prior
to such removal, performed road
duty, shall, upon the production of
the certificate, or receipt of the
Overseer of the district where he
least resided, showing the labor
performed, be entitled to a complete
discharge for the amount therein
specified,
Persons over whose lands' any
road, other than a~ public highway
shall pass, may erect gates thereon,
but shall be liable. to be indicted
for a nuisance; should they fail to
keep them in good repair.
Superintendents of Highways
shall cause road to beposted and
numbered and a pointer placed at
each fork and -for ?ieglect of this
duty, each is liable to a fine of $10.
Blank Liens for supplies and fofrent,
fo aeia thisfie
WASHINGTON LETTER.
- From Our Regular Correspondent.
W&SHINGTON, D. C., March 4, 1888.
Protection wins the battle in this
Congress. The advocates of pro
tection for its own sake whipped
into the party traces the low-tariff
republicans in the house and suc
ceeded in putting through the most
extraordinary rule ever known in a
legislative or deliberative body-a
rule by which the house might vote
to non-concur in the senate bill,
while it was not allowedto vote the
other way. Undoubtedly a major
ity would have voted for the bill as
it came from the Senate had the op
portunity been given, but by the
rule cooked up for that purpose it
was sent to a packed conference
committee, and the result is not
a revision worth talking about.
Judge Kelley and those acting with
him preferred failure to the passage
of any bill that affected the profits
of certain interests they are here to
protect and favor.
The capitol has been exceedingly
lively all the week-the final week
of the dying Congress. The gal
leries have been packed, and an
air of bustle and excitement has
pervaded the whole building. The
evening sessions appeared to be
especially interesting ro visitors,
judging from their eagerness in
swarming up the hill. The house
draws belt. There is more tur
moil, tinging repartee, excitement,
and spectacular oratory in the
lower house than in the Senate.
The members enjoy the notice they
receive on such occasions, and the
audiences enter fully into the spirit
of the proceedings. Altogether
the show is better than a circus.
'-You will 1see a regular parrot and
monkey time from now on in the
house," was the information con
fided to your correspondent early
in the week by a veteran house
doorkeeper; and then he added,
"About a hundred and ffty mem
bers are going out, perhaps never
to return again to Congress, and
nine tenths Qf them will have some
pet life and death scheme to run
through in the last three days.
They will fight and cathaul in an
interesting manner, you can depend
on it, and the galleries will have
fun enough to last a lifetime." He
was right. The Senate did not do
as much as usual in the way of
laying out pleasure trips during the
vacation. The proposition for 'a
Yellowstone park trip appears to
have fallen dead, there will be no
more -Mississippi river inquiries to
make, and Senator Ingalls' railroad
commission project was not pressed.
Mr. Anderson, of Kansas, proposed
a similar board, but a paragraph
was engrafted in the agricultural
appropriation bill directing the Com
missioner of Agriculture to collate
the facts suggested by both Sen
ator Ingalls and Mr. Anderson.
The star-route defendantg are
whistling inudly to keep their
spirits up, and bully Ingersoll is
pretending to laugh at the evi
dence of co-conspirator Rerdell,
but as a matter of fact they are
losing courage rapidly, in spite of
these vigorous efforts. On Monday
was reported about town that
Dorsey had "skipped," as they
say out west, but this proved to be
incorrect. Mr. Ingersoll is laboring
to make it appear that Rerdell is
the only man on trial, but the latter
has admitted his guilt, and however
bad the othcr defendants succeed
in making him appear it cannot
help them. He was their tool and
trusted lieutenant, and of course he
is a bad man, or he would not have
answered their purpose; but he is
now scared into telling the truth
about the whole affair, and it makes
things look very squally. He has
described the books of the firm, the
entries in them, and the check stubs,
etc., with minuteness of detail that
carries -conviction, and the defense
refuses to produce the books to re
fute this evidence, thotigh three
times served with notices by the
government to do so. The denial
of Judge Belford that he ever had
any dealings with the crowd, or
ever had -such a check as Rerdell
described, is the first ray of conso
lation they have sqtieezed out of
his testimony. But, as a matter of
fact Judge Belford's denial, which
everybody acce#ts as true, does not
impacnh Rerrdall in the least The
fact that Belford's name was written
into' a stub or even into a check
payable to bearer, could easily have
been one of the tricks of the gang.
The refusal of the defense to pro
duce the books to discredit Rerdell
is accepted as proof that in the
main, his memory regarding them
is accurate. The opinion is now
almost universal here that the only
possibility of escape for the defend
ants is through some failure on the
part of members of the jury to per
form their clear duty.
The detective scandals that are
being unirhedi are aut s ugly
as could be imagined. In reading
the revelations which daily appear
in the prints it seems wonderful
how anybody ever escaped burg
larly and blackmail. There was
a pefectly organized scheme of rob
bing private residences, and al
though 'of course there is a chorus
of. denial, the detective force ap
pears to have been as expert in
preventing recovery, except on the
payment of large rewards, as the
thieves were in taking what did not
belong to them. We even find
that, as in the case of the Chris
tiancy jewels, the detectives sug
gested and planned robberies. The
District commissioners are a good
deal stirred up over it, but'so many
facts have come out that they seem
to have made up their minds that
during their incumbency the city
was not governed to any appre
ciable extent. The President has
taken his time to find the other
District commissioner, and is evi
dently doing like one of those
old classic fellows did who went
around with a lantern looking for
an honest man. If the President
would turn his eyes away from his
own "grand old party" he wouldn't
find the object of his search so diffi
cult. Mr. Arthur's extraordinary
procrastination in the matter of im
portant appointanents is the subject
of much unfavorable comment,
Whether it arises from cowardice
and indecision, or from crafty
motives, it is equally discreditable.
PHONO.
THE LAW OF MISTAKES.
The source of almost every law
suit is to be found in mistakes of
law, says Youth's Companion. Ex
perience has proved that the ablest
men sometimes make blunders, and
the law has decided that a real
mistake of fact in an important
part of a contract will excuse the
party mistaken from performing
his part of agreement.
For instance, a man made a con
tract with one ice company and re
fused to deal with another. When
the bill was presented he found
that the latter company had sup
plied his ice. He refused to pay the
.bill, and it was decided that the
mistake freed him from liability.
A horse was sold by a trader and
paid for on the spot. While the
trade was going on the horse died.
The buyer brought suit for the
money paid, and it was decided it
should be paid back, since both
parties have made a mistake of
fact, in supposing the horse to be
alive when the trade was ended.
If a farmer intending to sell hay
sells oats by mistake instead, he
may refuse to deliver the oats on
that ground. It sometimes happens
that a bill)s paidlwith counterfeit
bank notes. In such a case the
payment is void and the receipt is
worthless.
A mistakelia the quantity of the
thing bargained for is no ground
for breakring an agreement. If a
man buys a cheap thing, with the
idea that it will serve his purpose
as well as a more expensive article,
he cannot, because he was mis
taken, send it back and recover the
money paid.
A mistake of law is no ground
for refusing to carry out a contract.
This rule is founded on the old
maxim: "Ignorance of the law
doth~ not excuse.". And every man
is supposed to know the law of the
land he lives in.
.Suppose a debtor gives his note,
proniising to pay -a sum of money
with lawful interest, thinking that
the legal rate is six pier cent. If
ten per cent. is the legal rate, his
ignorance of the fas wilhiot ex
cuse him from, paying the ten per
When well-known legal words
are used in a contract, with a mi
taken idea of their meaning, they
are binding, in their legal sense,
upon the person using them.
If land is deeded to a man'and to
his heirs, he receives the estate~ab.
solutely, although both parties in
tended that he should only have the
estate during his own life.
Some mistakes of law put an end
to agreements on the ground that
they are rather mistakes of fact
than of law. An executor of a will
pays money to a person whom he
thinTi(is an heir. If the supposed
heir be an impostor, the money can
be recovered. If, under a compli
cated will, a person buys rights
which are his already, he may get
back what he paid for them.
Mistakes of law in civil cases
only cost money; but mistakes of
the criminal law have more serious
effects, in the loss of respectability
and reputation. Here the plea of
ignorance df the law will not be
accepted. A criminal must suffer
the penalty of his deed, though he
thought it lawful when he com
mitted it.
Formerly an outlaw might be
slain by anybody; but if a private
person should now kill an outlaw,
with the idea that he had a right-to
do so, it would be punishable as
murder.
An old law book gives a curious
instance of the plea of ignorance.
Sir John Johnston, a Scotchman,
was tried for stealing and marrying
one Mary Wharton, an heiress, "to
the great displeasure of Almighty
God, to the great disparageiennt-of
the said Mary, and to the utter
sorrow and affliction ofherfriends,"
When he was found guilty and sen
tenced he asked, with surprise, if it
was a hanging matter. He was
told that it was, and'he was sen
tenced and "executed on a gibbet
before his lady's door in Great
Queen street."
Happily, the days of harsh and
cruel laws are past, and penalties
are now imposed to reform the
offenders rather than to avenge the
offense.
THE SOUTH AND THE YAN
KEE.
The impression still obtains that
the southern people cherish such a
deadly hatred to Yankees that they
will neither smell, taste nor handle
anything contaminated by Yankee
hands. This is a most egregious
error. The southern people love
the Yankee, and they show their
affection in a thousand different
ways. When they retire at night
they unbutton Yankee buttons to
Yankee made coats, wasets
pantaloons, shirts, and drawers.
They pull off Yankee boots with
Yankee bootjJacks, and divest their
feet of Yankee socks. They march
to Yankee bedsteads, turn down
Yankee coverlets, tankee blankets,
prostrate themselves on Yankee
mattresses, and lay their heads on
Yankee pillows. The bed bugs are
the only things not made by Yankee
hands, and imported from the land
of Yankees. On rising in the
morning we tread Yankee carpets,
stumble over Yankee chairs and
sofas, build a fire with Yankee coal
taken from Yankee scuttles, in
Yankee grates, catch the ashes in
Yankee pans, and use Yankee
pokers, Yankee .shovel and tongs.
We repair to Yankee wash stands,
pour water from Yankee pitchers
into Yankee bowls, and wash with
Yankee soap, then use Yankee
towels and Yankee tooth brushes.
Next we march to a Yankee bureau,
stand before a Yankee glass, and
use Yankee combs, Yankee brushes,
Yankee -powder, Yankee cologne,
in, Yankee bottles. We sit down
in a Yankee chair to a Yankee
table, covered with Yankee cloth,
Yankee knives-and forks, Yankee
dishes, and feed upon Yankee fodd.
We call for Yankee toothpicks,
seize Yankee hats from Yankee
racks, turn the key to a Yankee
lock, open a Yankee door, enter a
Yankee buggy, seize the.Yankee
reins to a Yankee harnesa, ad re
pair to our place of business and
spend the day in trading on Yankee
industry. The South is rich .in
resources, but ont people 'are so
fond of the Yankees that they
lavish their wealth upon-them.
[Memp.ni Anneat
- p -
l teM eefsin .;
JOB" -
TERMS C Y8A
A CIW .
"Papa, what r a
"A person who tries:
people drink more w'kl
"How do
men drink 3lore lsky a:'"
"By pssing a
against mking: an fe
ca#ng drinks."
"Pow does this law J
~Bcasethey:
dn"el hdi dku
Mytisb~t r
"b-it good thdrlnc
pcrapnyer o
-Nv donk top.:In
-If t i'og --
ar to a
theseothings.
soul but peol~ea tb
TheNord donot a
cOh t act aalst
many bad pesplo
"Wel .no;I a
Cliertan
"Ioade u wa_lairie
"0IeI it
yon to go to lf
as ornit&ee. -
deterie
8ed or ecrY~i
There w ne:a
gonss atheb
l0on de
he go a:ega nia -
time h rats K
loie gt wthe
and fied;am bu ooy.
caray r i obeago
Seest hno .ot.at
ch angianknsyew a
hesel
bod eterm ldnneve uema
seleoghiue
ii 4h. ~he
Thewln gustt
tie t e ubl*
Many vetridt
werelyutred t b goii

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