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The Newberry herald. (Newberry, S.C.) 1865-1884, March 15, 1883, Image 4

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MARCH.
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THE KITCHEN AND MARKET
GARDEN.
We have long advocated the
planting of the farmer's vegetable
garden in long rows, and sofar
apart that most of the work can be
done?by horse cultivators. If we
. have striven for any one improve
i ment in farm life, it is to convince
the farmer that he can easily have
f>' an abundance of the choicest veg
stables at a very little cost. We
are g'lad to have help in ouren
deavor to show farmers how easy it
is to have a garden that will iot
only supply the family, but brling
in profit besides. It has come in
the shape of Mr. Joseph Harri&'
"Gardening for Young and Old,"
in which an attempt is made to
interest the boys in gardening, and
farm gardening is there treated in
the attractive manner in which
r _ farming was presented in "Walks
and Talks." Farmers in the older
States, especially if near large
towns and manufacturing villages,
must inevitably become market
gardeners on a large scale.
Raising plants, to have them
ready to set out as soon as the
weather is suitable, is an important
matter. These are started in hot
beds, in cold frames, and in boxes
in the windows of the dwelling
house. Sufficient was said on the
hot-bed and window-box last month,
The cold frame is simply a hot-bed
frame and sash, placed over a spot
of good soil. It receives its heat
from the-son by day, and this is
prevented from escaping at night,
by covering the glass with shutters,
straw mats, or even a piece of old
carpeting. The soil of the cold
frame should be about three inches
higher than the general surface,
and the frame should be where it
will be sheltered from cold winds
and will receive the full warmth of
the sun. This, having no heating
material, will not force so rapid a
~. growth, but will be found very
useful to start some kinds of
plants, and to receive those that
~-have been started in a hot-bed.
[ American Agriculturist for March.
POULTRY SUGGLSTIONS.
It is well, in cleaning out the
poultry houses, not only to take
the droppings from - under the
-~- roosts, but to rake up whatever
feathers, etc., have accumulated on
the ground. Turn up cean, fresh
earth with the fork, and scatter
over it chaff and hay seed. The
{, pleasure the fowls will take in
* scratching for seed, and in rolling
in the fresh earth, will be ample
-: satation for the labor spent.
The best way to kill and dress
fowls is to hang them by the legs,
pass a sharp-pointed knife, with
edge from you, through the throat,
just below the "deaf ear," cutting
--off the arteries running to the
head; then turn the knife toward
the neck-bone, and while turning
back the head with the left hand,
press the knife' until the neck is
broken. Take the wings in the
left hand, and strip off the feathers
with the right. They will pull off
quite easily while the body is
S warm. If care is taken, the
- skin need not be broken. Never
scald chickens in dressing, for, un
less great care is used, the thin
outside skin will be rubbed off,
which injures their appearance very
much, and reduces the value of the
fowls.
In selecting seeds for spring
planting, do not neglect to get
seed of the mangel beet, for these
-- beets make the very best green
-- food for fowls in winter. If the
water in the dishes is thrown out
each night, trouble and time will
be saved in the morning. Give
warm water to fowls if possibe.-H.
C. B. in American Agrzeudturist for
Mfarch.
SmEP.-Ewes should have dry
and clean pens and yards, with a
plenty of good, wholesome food.
lIthe wool is falling, afew ounce
doses of equal parts of sulphur and
-6Aeam of tartar will relieve the
-"irritation of the skin. Early lambs
may be pushed forward with fresh
- ow's milk, given warm, a quarter
ofapint to a meal. Do not run
an~y risks in over-feeding.
Eggs coated with butter in
which two or three per cent. of
salicylic acid has been dissolved
and then packed in dry sawdust
without touching one another will
keep fresh for a year.
"JOE'S" DASH AT POKER.
How alteautif1 Expert at theGameLst Hi
Nerve.
Albany Times.
The most accomplished lookini
colored gentleman in the hotel
porter line' in this State is Joe
who officiates in that capacity ii
the Delavan House. Unfortunatel:
Joe has an idea that he is an ea
pert at poker. He is very oftei
anxious that some of the distin
guished poker experts who stop a
the Delavan should try him of
those points, but, though Joe
makes about $100 a week at thi
Delavan, he doesn't usually hav
money to engage in any of th<
games of these experts, because hi
"bucks" the faro banks too often.
Recently a good chance wai
given Joe to show his skill. Sen
ator Woodin was playing a simpli
game against Senator McCarthy
and both of them are acknowledgec
experts in the game, when Jo+
happened in the room. Senato
McCarthy at once said: "Here'i
my man! Joe, will you take m3
hand for a few moments? There
are several people down stairs whc
want to see me."
Joe jumped at the chance. "Why,
of course, sah," he said, "if Mr.
Woodin is agreeable."
Mr. Woodin was agreeable, and
Mr. McCarthy left, first giving in
structions to Joe to play his best,
and bet up to any amount, depos
iting $10,000 in crisp notes on the
table in front of him.
"Now," said he, "I am responsi
ble for anything you may do. Bel
according to your own views and
I'll back you."
With that he went out.
Joe dealt, and received a couple
of queens. Mr. Woodin imme
diately bet $1,000. Joe's shori
hair stood on end. He tLoughi
that was a pretty savage sort of a
beginning. He'd like to wait unti]
Mr. McCarthy would come back
Mr. Woodin said that he could noi
sit two or three hours over a smal]
bet like that, and Joe must eitheo
see it or pass. Joe lost heart, and
laid down his hand, showing twc
queens. Mr. Woodin inadvertently
laid down his hand as he pulled in
the wager, and showed a lonesome~
pair of deuces.
-"For the land's sake, Mr. Wood.
in," said Joe, in terror, '-you didn'i
never bet all that money on themr
two little ones ?"
"There's the hand. If you can
find anything else in it, maybe ]
didn't."
Joe sighed.
"Well," said he, "if you do that
often with me, you'll be a poor
man 'fore Mr. McCarthy gets
back"
Mr. Woodin dealt, and Joe re
ceived a pair of aces. He bet 5250.
Mr. Woodin promptly raised him
$1,000. Joe heaved a dreadful
sigh.
"Ain't there no limit to this
game ?" he asked, helplessly.
"No, we never play with a limit,'
remarked Mr. Woodin, sharply.'
Joe looked at him a long time.
"You tried that on me a little
while ago," said he, "and I believe
you're bluffing. I see you, and I
want three cards."
He put up his money and drew
his cards. Mr.. Woodin saw his
countenance fall. Mr. Woodin drew
one card. Joe's anguish showed
itself in the heavy beads on his cor
rugated brow.
"Land's alive !" he muttered.
"Well, it's your bet," said Mr.
Woodin, calmly.
Joe had only his two aces.
"I reckon I'll pass," he said.
"Well, what sort of business dc
you call such a slow performanci
as this ?" said Mr. Woodin, in
patiently, "I'll bet $3,000 more."
Joe glared like a fallen angel ani
his hands trembled until the cardi
rattled.
"Mr. Woodin," he said, piteously
'jest do me a favor. I don't wan1
to .play no other man's money, ani
I'll never do it again. Jest drav
all dese bets and let me quit. Mr
McCarthy can do his own betting
I won't, at dem figures."
Mr. Woodin said "Certainly;i
divided up the pot again, and thei
laid down his hand. He had-jus
exactly - that same pair of deuces
Joe rushed from the room.
When the trunks of a~ leadin,
~Vicksburg belle were deposited a
the wharf of that city the othe
day, a negro bootblack exclaimed
"Cole's circus done come at last!
Young man, a diamond pin look
real nice and glistens brightly, bn
when $4 a week supports a ma:
and pin both, one or the otheri
not gennine.
.1zscellaseous,
TUTT'S
PILLS
r A DiSORDERED LIVER
of I S THE BANE th
of the present generation. It is for the
9 Cure of this disease and its attendants,
1 SICK-HEADACHE. BILIOUSNESS, DYS
PEPSIA, CONSTIPATION, PILES, etc., that
V TUTT'S PILLS have gained a world-wide
reptation. No Baredy has ever been
discovered that acts so gently on the
1 digestive organs, giving them vigor to as
similate food. As a natural result, the
Nervous System is Braced, the Muscles
are Developed, and the Body Robust.
1 Chills a: cl 3ever.
E. rvAL. a Planter at Bayou Sara La.. sa
My plantation Is In a :ualarial district. For
several years I could n)t make half a crop on
account of bilious diee see and chis. I was
nearly discouraged wk en I bogan the use of
TT T'S PILLS. The result was nrvelous.
my laborers soon becamo hearty au.. robust,
3 and I have had no further trouble.
They relieve The engorte! r. r.eleanse
the Bloed frem p~oirnua:"~ L.uocora, and
cause the bowels ., -L ntduraUy, with.
out which no one cn fee wt tl
3 Tytbiaremedy th+ ty, ani you will
ahalthyDfgextfOtt, algorousBodv.l~
-Blood, Strong easvr. nn[!d ~ YnunJ iver-.
Priee,2SCents. cc.ler.33 lurraySt., N. Y.
STUTTPS HAIR YE,
GRAY HAin or Wina rrnrhanged to a GLmiM
BtrtCi by a single ntpp:cat:on of this DvE~ It
imparts a natur colcr. -uud : s !ustar.alwousty.
od by Druggists. or :en; by expres+ on receipt
of One Doller.
Office. 33 Murray Street. New York.
Dr-. TU:TS y ..A7 of t[c:uable
lufar:natfo:a a U' Y?..-fl rs' frfa
May.16,18-ly.
fend a rough sketch or a
Washktzton, D. C., and a Preliminary
Exam caionwill be made, without
charge of all United States patents ef the
s ame elom of :nventions and you will be advised
whether or no. a patent can be obtained.
Ifyoaaread thatyourinventon ispatentable,
send $20, to pay Government fee of l~ and 53 Str
drawings regtredby the Government. Thisis pay
able when application is made. When allowed.e
attorney's fee ($S5) and the final Government fee
($50)iLspayable. An attorney whose the depends on
isnecesa inobtalninga Patent will not advise you
tbatyour invention is patentable unless It really is,
as r a his best judgment can determine hence,
, i.*isha **e"n Patentsand"'
_ Registration of Labels, Tradear, and
Re-issues secured. Caveats prprdadfiled.
Applications in reviver of Rejected, Abandoned,
or Forfeited Cases made.. If you have undertaken
tosecureyonr own patentand felled,aaksillfl hand
fingofte case may lead to suocss. Send me a
written requst addressed to the Commissioner of
Patents that he recognise Ooson E. Luxo, of
Ws n, D. C., as your attorney in the case, v
ifng etteof the Invention and about the daeof
your application. An eamination and re
l sW cttu . Remember, this ofice has
IIn iecefblopestoninc l85, aadreference canbe
given to ac clients in ost every county in the
U.S. Pamphlet relating to Patents free upon requst.
GEORGE E. LEMON,
Attorney at Law and Solicitor of American
. and Foreign Patents,
415 Fifteenth Street, WASKINGTON, D. C.
'antion this paper.
J. K. P. GOGGANS. D. O. HERBERT.
GOGGANS & HERBERT,
Attorneys-at-Law,
NEWBERRY, S. C.
"Strict Attention to Business."
Nov.2,4- ly .
1785-1883.
Chronicle and Constiutionalist
AUGUSTA, GA.
The Chronicle and Constitutionalist is
rapidly approaching the completion of the
first century of existence. The paper we
publish is essentIally a type of modern pro
gress, which demonstrates that this estab
blished journal has become better and
stronger as It increases In years. The men
who have, from one generation to another,
worked upon it, and helped to make it a
power in te land, submit, and will submit,
to the common lot of humanity and pass
away from this earth and its struggles, but
the result of their labor remains, and will
continue to remain. The workmen die, but
the work goes on.
The Chronicle of to-aay is an improve
ment upon the Chronicle of the past. The
Chronicle of the future will be an improve
ment upon the Chronicle of to-day. The
world moves on, and the paper moves
with it. Wonderful inventions, in the last
half century, have given an impetus to all
material things, and the press has shared in
It has alsoL mulated them. The Chronicle
has spared no pains or expense to furnish
the p ublic with the news of the day from all
parts of the world, and it will take pleasure
and pride In perfecting this service from
time to time. The Chronicle has endeavor.
ed to take high and noble views of public
policy, and to sustain all good ends and
causes.
The Chronicle has essayed to encourage
virtue and to make the lot, of man and wo
man all the brighter and better for the com
mon weal. The Chronicle strives to be a
newspaper in the best sense of the term,
and to advance, in that mission, the Inter
estR of all the people. The coniductors of
thepr cannot and do not expect to be
iflbl,any more than they expect to
please everyoy. In all human affairs,
mistakes of judgment will occur and con
tests of opinion will arise. We will, how
ever, mightily strive to commit as few
errors as possible, and to enter such con
ficts as cannot be avoided with a proper
spirit.
The Chronicle enters the new year with
exceptional advantages. Its daily edition is
a weUll-fileeight- page paper. Its second edi
tion, for the evening mals, iseight pages,
with the afternoon markets and telegraphic
reports. It takes the place of the trl-weekly
edition. Its mammoth weekly pa per will
compare with any in the country. Into this
edition the choicest and creamiest news of
the week is collected, and upon its lap the
best and freshest editorial and miscellan
eous matter from the daily is poured. Its
market reports, covering nearly one page,
will be an especial feature, prepared each
week for the country reader.
Its news service will be sustained by
trained and scholarly correspondents in the
three -capitals-Atlanta, Columbia and
-Wasington-while it will strive to have a
news representative in every neighboring
town.
The mail facilities of this paper are now
sperb. Four daily trains distribute Its
editions In South Carolina and three in
Georgia. It reaches all the principal points
in South Carolina early en the day of pub
lIcatIon-reachIng Columbia at11P. M. The
fast mail schedule of the Georgia Railroad
lands the Chronicle and Constitutionalist
in all towns along the line early in the
forenoon, while its Issue is unfolded in
Atlanta and Athens by noon each day.
TERMS, PER YEAR:
rMorning Edition................$10 (0
Evening Edition................ 6 00
Sunday0Ed.................... 2 00
WeeklEdition..............---. 2 00
Addesall kftters to the
"CHRONICLE ANDw CONSTITUTIONALIST."
PATRICK WALSH, President, Augusta, Ga.
IYI people are always on the look
1iiii out for chancebto increase their
earnings, and in time become
wealthy; those~ who do not Im
prove their opportunities remain in pover
tv. We offer a great chance to make money.
We want many men, women, boys and girls
to work fernus right in their own localities.
Any one can do the work properly from the
first start. The business will pay more than
ten times ordinary wages. Expensive out
fit furnished free. No one who engages
a fails to make money rapidly. You can de
vote your whole time to the *ork or only
yourspare moments. Full information and
r all that is needed sent free. Address STIir
SoN A Co., Portland, Maine. 47-ly.
.LYON&H EALY
Sae & Monroe Sts.Cicag.~~
wmsed tsadmthei
Ha.,ssd a tS. ~k
g ~ogAmata hand., ada.
Pck. S.--l
Rail Roads.
Columbia & Greenville Railroad.
PASSENGER DEPARTMENT,
COLUBAL. S. C., Nov. 4th, 1882.
On and after Monday, November 6, 1882, the
PASSENGERTRAINSwill run as herewith in
dicated upon this road and Its branches.
Daily, except Sundays.
No. 52. UP PASSENGER.
Leave Colunmbia,A - - " 11.42 a m
Alston, - - - - 1.02 p m
Newberry, - - - - 211 p m
" Ninety-Six, - - - - 8.58 p m
"Hode,- - - 4-66 pin
Belton, ' - - - 6.26 p m
Arrive Greenville, - - - - 8.06 p m
No. 58. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Greenville, - - , - 10.80 a m
Belton, - - - 12.16 p m
" Nin -x, - - - 2.59 p
"c Nwer, - - - 4.88 p m
"Aiston - - - 5.42 pin
Arrive Columabi,F - - 7.00 p m
SPARTANBUEG, UNION k COLUMBIA RAILROAD.
No. 52. UP PASSENGER.
Leave Alston, - - - - 1.10 p m
Stsother, - - - - 2.15 p m
Shelton, - - - - 2.67 p m
Santuc, - - - - 4.28pm
Union, - - ' - 5.20 p m
Joilesville, - . - - 6.25 p m
Arrive Spartanburg, " - 815 p m
No.58. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Spartanburg, R. & D. Depot, H 12 50 p m
Spartanburg, S. U. & C. Depot,G 1.01 p m
Jonesville, - - - 2.09 p m
" Union. -. - - 2.50 p m
Santuc, - 8.29pm
Shelton, - a - 4.21 p m
Strother, - - - 4.68 p m
Arrive at Alston, - - - 5.89 p m
LAURENS RAILWAY.
Leave Newberry - - - - 4.47 pm
Arrive Laurens C. H., - 8.40 p m
Leave Laurens C. H., - - - 8.45 a m
Arrive Newberry, - - a 12.40 p m
ABBEVILLE BRANCH.
Leave Hodges, - ' - 5.00 p m
Arrive at Abbeville, - - . 6.12 p m
Leave Abbeville, - - - - 12.28 p m
Arrive at Hodges, - - - - 1.86 p m
BLUE RIDGE RAILROAD AND ANDERSON
BRANCH.
Leave Belton 6.20 p m
" Anderson 7.56 p m
" Pendleton 8.55 p m
Leave Seneca C, 10.58 p m
Arrive Walhalla 11.40 p m
Leave Walhalla, - - 6.40 a m
Leave Seneca C, 7.54 a in
" Pendleton, - - 9.18 a in
" Anderson, - - 11.10 p m
Arrive at Belton, - 12.09 p m
CONNECTIONS.
A. With South Carolina Railroad from Char
leston.
With Wilmington, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad from Wilmington. and all
points North thereof.
With Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad from Charlotte and all points
North tbereof
B. With Asheville & Spartanburg Rail Road
for points In Western North Carolina.
C. With A. & C. Div. R. & D. R. R., from all
points South and West.
D. With A. & C. Div., R. & D. R. R., from Ats
lanta and beyond.
E. With A. & C. Div., R. & D. R. R., from all
points South and West.
F. With South Carolina Railroad for Charles
ton.
With Wilmington Columbia and Augusta
Railroad for Wilmington and the North.
With Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad for Charlotte and the North.
G. With Asheville & Spartanburg Railroad
from Hendersonville.
H. With A. & C. Div., R. & D. R. R., from
Charlotte and beyond.
Standard Time used is Washington, D. C.,
which is fifteen minutes faster than Columbia.
J. W. FRY Superintendent.
M. SLAUGHTER, General Passenger Agent.
D. CARDWELL, Ass't General Pasaenger Agt.,
Columbia, S. C.
South Carolina Railway Company.
CHANGE OF SCHEDULE.
On and after Dec. 17th, 1882, Passenger
rrains on this road will run as follows an
til further notice:
TO AND FROM CHARLESTON.
GOING EAST,
Leave Columbia *8.00 a m 16.58 p m
Arrive Charleston 12.55 p m 12 SC p m
GOING WEST,
Leave Charleston t7.00 a m *5.20 p m
Arrive Columbia 11.28 a m 10.09 p m
tDaily. *Daily except Sunday.
TO AND FROM CAMDEN.
GOING EAST,
Leave Columbia '8 00 am *.58 p m
arrive Camden 1.10 a m 10.00 p m
GOING WEST
Leave Camden '7.00 a m '5.00 p m
rrive Columbia 11.28 a m 10.09 p m
*Daily except Sundays.
TO AND FROM AUGUSTA.
GOING EAST,
Leave ColumbIa '8.00 a m '6.58 p m
rrive Augusta 2.00 pm 7.05a m
GOING WEST,
Leave Augusta '7.05 am '4.10p m
rrive Columbia 4.05 p m 10.09 p m
*Daily except Sundays.
CONNECTIONS.
Connection made at Columbia with the
Jolumbia and Greenville Rail Road by train
irriving at 11.28 P. M., and departing at 6.58
P.M. Connection made at Columbia Juno
;ion with Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
tail Road by same train to and from all
yoints on both roads with through Pullman
leeper between Charleston and Washing
on, via Virginia Midland rqute, without
~hange. Connection made at Charleston
vith Steamers for New York on Wednesdays
ad Saturdays; also, with Savannah and
hshrleston Railroad to all points South.
Connections are made at A ta with
eora Railroad and Central Rirad to
tad frm all points South and West.
Through tickets can be purchased to all
>ointa South and Wet baplying to
D. MCQUEEN Agnt, Columbia.
D. C. ALE, G. P. a F. A,
JomN B. PECK, General Managrer.
Jharlotte, Columblb & Augusta E. R.
OFFICE GENERAL PAssENGE AGENT,
:Schedule in effectSeptember 3, 1882:
NO. 53 DAILY-MAIL AND. ExREsS.
Leave Auguta, A...............7.35 a m
rrive at Clumbia, B. ........11.45 a m
Leave Columbia, B.............11.52 a m
rrive at Charlotte, C............. 4.15 p m
Leave Charlotte................ 5.00 p m
arrive at Statesville.............-. 7.05 p m
No. 47 DAILY-MAIT.AND EXPRESS.
Leave Augusta, ..............6.00p m
rrive at Clumbia, D...........10.25 p m
50. 19 LOCAL FREIGHT, daily except Sundays
(With Passenger Coach attached.)
Leave Columbia...............5.00 a m
rrive at Charlotte.............. 3.15 p m
SOUTHWARD.
NO. 52 DAILY-AIr. AND EXP RE8s.
Leave Statesville.................. 7.00 a m
rrive at Charlotte.............. 9.05 a m
Leave Charlotte, C............... .2.00 p m.
rrive at Columbia, B............06.30 p m
Leave Columbia, B............. 6.37 p m
rrive at Augusta, A...........1050 p m
'NO. 48 DAILY-MAIL AND EXRESS.
Leave Columbia, D...............6 15 a m
rrive at Augusta, A...........10.22 a m
50. 18 LOCAL FREIGHT, daily exceptSundays
(With Passenger Coach attached.)
Leave Charlotte................5.00 a m
rrive at Columbia.............S3.3' p m
CONNECTIONS.
A-With all lines to and from Savannah,
Florida and the South and Atlanta, Macon
and the Southwest.
B-With South Carolina Railroad to and
from Charleston.
C-With Richmond and Danville Railroad
to and from all points North and Carolina
Central Railroad.
D--Connect with the W. C. & A. E. E. for
Wilmington and all points on the Atlantic
Coast Line.
Pullman Sleeping Cars on Trains Nos. 52
and 53 between Agsta and Washingtn,
D. C., via Danville, chburgb and ar
lottesville. Also, on Tris' 52 and 53 be
tween Charlotte and Richmond.
Numbers 47 and 48 run solid between Au
gusta and Florence and carry, Pullman
leepers between Augusta and Wilmington
and between Auuta and Wilmington.
Abov' schedule Washingtn time.
G. E. TALCoTT, Sprintendent.
M. SLAUGHTER, General Pasnger Agt.
D. CARDWELL, Ass't General P'assenger
Agent, Columbia, S. C.
Asheville and Spartanburg Railroad.
SPARTANBURG, S. C., September 1,1881.
On and after Thursday, September 1, 1881,
passenger trains will be run daily (Sundays
excepted) between Spartanburg and Hen.
dersonville, as follows:
UP TRAIN.
LeaveRE. & D. Depot at Spartanburg.4.20 p m
Arrive at Hendersonville.........7.30 p m
DOWN TRAIN.
Leave Hendersonville.............. 83 a m
Arrive E. A D. Depot,Spartanburg.12.00 m
Both trains make connections for Colum
bia and Charleston via Spartanburg. Union
and Columbia and Atlanta and Charlotte by
Air Line. JAMES ANDERSON,
Superintendent.
TgN NO PATENT, NO PAY
A~I1j~~I is our motto. We have
had 14.years expriene
In procurin Patents,
Caveats, Trade-Marks. Copyrl t. etc., in
this and other countries, Ouan ok
giving full instructions in Patents free.
Address E. S. A A. P. LACEY, ratent Att'vs,
604 F St., Washington, D. C. Jan. 11, 2-tfA
Nlh IIN T(Ifor Soldiers on any dis.
111 I~I1E iIL~ease, wound or injury.
Fees, $10. Bounty, Back
Pay, Discharges for De
serters, etc., procured. 14 years experience.
Address.. a. SITESm A 00,, 601 F st., Wash.
Hotel.
The Crotwell Hotel,
A LARGE THREE STORY BRICK BUILDING.
Only Hotel with Electric Bells in Newberry.
Only Hotel with Cistern Water.
CENTRAL OFFICE OF TELEPHONE EXCHANGE.
MRS. EMMA F. BLEASE,
PROPRIETRESS,
NEWBERRY, S. C.
This commodious and spacious Hotel is now open and fully prepared to entertain all
comers.
The Furniture of every description is New, and no effort will be spared to make all
persons patronizing the establishment at home.
The Rooms in this Hotel are spacio2s, well lighted, and the best ventilated of any
Hotel in the up country.
One of the Best Sample Rooms in the State.
All horses entrusted to our care will be well cared for at Christian & Smith's Stables.
TERMS.
BOARD BY THE MONTH, $30,00; WEEK, $10,00; DAY, $2.00.
LOWER RATES BY THE YEAR.
The Table shall be furnished with the very best. Nov. 2, 44-1y.
clotkfng.
Read! Read! Read!
I will close out the Balance of my Stock of
WINTER CLOTHINI
-AT
Greatly Reduced Prices!
MEN'5' YOUTHS' BOYS' SUITS,
ALS,A LINE OFdo
OVERCOATS
The object of this reduction is to
Make Room for a Large Spring Stock.
Now is your chance. Call and examine my prices.
M. L. KINARD,
Opposite Grand Central,
Feb. 1, 5-tf . COLUMBIA, S. V.
W'.60 7.s
CHRLSTN S. y,
co Ij
aOUB E 7 O, ghl amoiated;
D.hihe g ;
ACI PHSHAE,frcmpsig
ASH0 06 . ELMeN, mad of Flots fo Cotton Grai an Peas;s v
GU IN LEPLS ALKII, motddiefo
th - ies Ge rmn,adwrrneque
. S.LADPLSTR
Spca 0omls aet re.COTNSE9EL
D . 21, 51-6m
AACIFICACIPHASPH AT.
Dec.14,HARLE.ST HARSTON ,C
Everybod GUNO heighd amittatefu;
a DISSOLVED BeetONE hihes y rade;a
Sed Cr IDt.S'AE orcmcsig
ASH Broadway , Ne deYofrk.s orCto,Gai n es
theaiesin, emusny an, arrannd u;r
SMALL GRAILDSPEFICIC
COTTflS ON AND ORNOMOUD
N.N.DAN HASER
p cial ducementd for ah orest h
Forars, Illuctr,aed Alandcs ahn card drs h o
horec. 21,t atdieen-ge,6ihrue
HERALDFE00FORTSAE.
These uanosaredo therighes,grad andkets wihu rgad oco,as he e.
and lsewerewillsubtantate
Fortems,aply o gens ate ariu Tons for ton ae s
E H. RST e want Auses
NEW YRK aine.I 47-NTED
Everbod is elihtedwit thetaseful AShoo pulicarge a e not needed. jtf wo
Sendd gor vanFercyrkoor
Addrss MS.LLENLAMA, Fr ftimer normayion,inquire atot
Newarlyk asERA.LNDobu OFFwilE
ANg. 1 8 Brada,-et.2f.9-f
Dry Gods asd Arisery.
Bay what you need in Dry Goods
and Millinery of
W. J. Young,
132 Mail St., Celmubs,8. C.
and save money.
UG
*
Jan. 25,4-6m
Hardware, #c.
4[ART & COMPANY,
HARDWARE MERHA
- SOLE ACENTS FOR
L ADOW DISC PULVERIZING H AR ROW
THOMAS SMOOTHING. THOMAS PULVERZNG HARROW
LANE HARROW,
TEE AMERICAN BARBED FENCE WIRE.
BUFFALO STANDAR A
--AGENTS FOB
Genuine Farmers' Friend and Avery Plows.
-FOR SALE-.
STEEL BULL TONGUEB BCOOTEE . TWIBTER&-E- VE -I
BOLTS, GRABS RODE SINGLETREF8 TIN WARE WOOD
HOUSEKEEPING GOODS, CARPENTERS', COOPERB', KMWaN
1T' and BLACKSJTTHS' TOOLS.
-A FINE ASSORTYENT OF
ENGLISH, AMERICAN ANB GERMAN
MUZZLE AND BREECH LOADING G
-STATE AGENTS FOR
KEMP'S MANURE AND COTTON SEED
FIB : MANIJRE.
a.mi. a..e -
d..ue.a t u..E
umnaUx=m - -*
HART 00.Smb,Uh - uh~6 1UEh~ - - CalstnS
Nov. 2, 25-ly.
.WisceUasseus.
WPatches, Elecks, Jewcelry.
WATfERESND JEWBLIfY OMNS
At the New Store on Hotel Lot. ~$rA
I have nofo hand a large and elegant
assortment of .s*a el
WATCHES, CLUCKS, JEWELRY, -
Silver and Plated Ware,
VIOLIN AND GUITAR STRING8, -
syPar.!CUs AID SPEa. CASEB,
WEDDIN AID BIRTHDAY PRESENTS,
ll orders by mail promptly attended to. adw 1t
Watchmaking and Repairing
Done Cheaply ad with Dispatch. b5dD~b~~l
Call and examine my stock and prices.
EDUARD SCHOLTZ. '
A Grat aus ofORMA Mser
ISTHEg1'RA 0
radica cureof 8731TOKDIe or emina
weakess.Invluntry eminlDLeses --
rorixcy,ceenta. andPhysicalpIrcapac
Impedimnts toMarrameaetc.:also, oN..&.
sel4ndlgece,or exul etraagaen,he. prrSCEnT nenna
esay cealydeontrte foma hityenalnesoltn4
cureapit Caus oamf cueat oesery j
crdii ayl a cure ofPiATwmsel chr eia.l
ofekey. yon eyminaln thee, IadE- grs,pblse myoy
PSn, unerntal n Pysicanlop,ocpebyml,0cmi.Bdb 4
anypadmes o reetsxcen o to
esay dUVUeLLsrae fIrom aO. th mnma~lDoaw
Porss O raceice, th Mathel-y P0V*TZ
BOOK, BandERua, _maso
lever srer, Mnumaiersha hi
Podto ay be,RS maycue imsltchap
Maen tr eet, inlba nevp, to .
any ddresh on Reci nsortw
chare fa

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