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The Newberry herald. (Newberry, S.C.) 1865-1884, April 05, 1883, Image 1

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A Family Companion, Devoted to Literature, Miscellany, News, Agriculture, Markets, &c.
Vol. XIX. NEWBERREY, S. C., -THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 1883.No14
liner
- , ~ I i*Pi/LISBBD
- $3Y THURSDAY YORNING,
At Newberry, S. V.
I 808O. . GREEEKER,
Editor and Proprietor.
se.epe -emme
Invariably in Advance.
sppae is stopped at the expiralon o
spert wasod it is paid.
SThe b4 mark denotes expiration o
.aseeuaneou&
Imortant Notice !
Baying and selling for
OASH ONLY
am enabled to offer to the public
A TED AED AIEMCA
88 [liquors Brandies r'
CIBAR, AND TOBACCO, -
sTso the finest and best French
;randies, the celebrated
family use, at prices which defy
COMPETITION.
" i TNE'S TIVOLI SEER
i family use, one dozen Pint Bottles
- ~ A rders will-receive prompt atten
tion. With thanks for former patron
ngeto this house, I respectfully solicit
r a eongnuance of the same.
O. ALETTNER,
Under Newberry Opera House.
Feb. 22,8-3m
F -22S3
ATTENTION !
Fertiliers :
Plow Brand,"
IIOU} SOLUBLE BONE,
-AND
- I.oias & Qancys Premium
GU A N O.
--:0:
MY STOCK OF
ROCERIE S
-A Full and Complete.
3 solicit a call from my friends and
guarantee satisfaction.
D.B. Vieeler.
Ib.35L7-tf
~ IEaOiLIOA1S ABE IOMG
SADRNOW IS TIETIE T@PRE
- PAIR FOR THEE.
b UffEST VAMImT OF TROPICAL FRUIT IN
EARKW.
Fies Oranges Every Week.
- RAAAS,
OcOANUTS,
ORANCES,
MALACA CRAPES,
Northern Fruits.
-Apples,
Peanuts,
Raisins,
Nuts,
- Citron,
Currants.
0 Orders filled with dispatch.
(Ce BART & 00.,
CIIARLESTGN, S. C.
-Nov. 30, 41-8m.
SEAID IVE
OR.
NOVELS
For the Seaside, Chimney
Side, Sunny Side, Shady
Side, Right Side, Left
Side, or any
* other side.
,large lot just received at the'
E RERALD BOOK STORE.
Jsk. 5, 8-4t
~ TIBATfBlON HE HORSE
AND HIS
DISEASES.
Containing en "Index of Diseases," which
gives the symptoms, cause, and the best
treatment of esen; a tabld* giving all the
-principal drugs used for the horse,. with, the
* ordinary dose, effects, and antidote when a
poison ; a tab;e with an engraving of the
horse's teeth at different ages,'with rules
for telling the age of the horse; and other
valuable inrormnation Call and get a copy.
For sale at
DERALD 9001 STORE.
Au.18, 34-tf..
Tnot if issweeping by, go and
I! mighty and sublime laebhn
to conquer time. *66 a 'week in
yorown town, P5 outfit free. No risk.
~vrtIgnew. Capital not required. We
wilnfms you everything. Miany are
wmakng fortunes. Ladies make as much as
men,And oysand girls make great pay.
.1eaer1i you want business at which you
caa make great payall the time, write for
~~uasto H. H.L.nTrT Co., Portad,
L LSTON DINmIlI: HOIJ8B.
Passen.ers on both the up and down
Strains haeteusual tiefrDINNER at
lston, the junction of the G. a C. R. R.,
and the S. U. & C. R. R.
-Fare well prepared, and the charge rea
L sonable. MR. Y. A. ELKIN~..
Oct. 9, 41-tf
DR. E. E. JACKSON,
IRIJ 8I1 0 N IISIT,
COLUMBIA, S. C.
Removed to store two doors next to
Wheeler House.
Orders promptly attended to.
Apr. nI 1ir.
. tIsceUaueous.
Young men f.nd maidens contem
plating marriage, or who are
about to enter into con
nubia:. bliss in the
near future,
or
Young men who correspond with
maidens in reference to church
going are cordially and af
fectiont;tely invited bo
examine a very
handsome
lot of
Wedding and Invitation
PAPER, CARDS
AND
ENVELOPES
AT THE
HERALD STORE.
A SPECIALTY
Is made by
SWA!!E
In
Gentlemens' Suits,
Which are
CUT AND MADE BY FIRST
CLASS HANDS,
Fits gaaranteed. A fine stock of
Gents Furnishing Goods,
Always on hand.
Write or when in city call on
SWAFFIELD,
Feb12 tf COLMBIA.
I Can Tell You How to Be
Your Own Doeter I
If you have a bad taste in your mouth,
sallowness or yellow color of skin, feel do
spondent. stupid and drowsy. appetite mn
steady, frequent headache or dizziness, you
are "bilious." Nothing will arouse your
Liver to act on and strengthen up your sys
tern equal to
SIMMONS'
HEPATIC
COMPOUND
Or Liver and Kidney Cure.
REMOVES CONSTIPATION.
RELIEVES DIZZINESS.
DISPELS SICK HEADACHE.
ABOLISHES BILIOUSNESS.
CURES JAUNDICE.
CURES LIVERCOMPLAINT.
OrzacoxBS WALARIAL BLoOD POIsONING.
REGULATES THE STOMACH.
WILL REGULATE THE LIVER.
WILL REGULATE THE BOWELS.
THE LIVER AND KIDNEYS
Can be kept perfectly healthy in any cli
mate by taking an occasional dose of
SINIONS' KEPATIC COMPOUND,
THE GEAT VEGETAELE
UVER AND KIDNEY MEDICINE.
DOWIE & MOISE,
PROPRIETOBS,
WHOLESALE DRUCCISTS
CH A RLESTON, S. C.
M- FOR SALE EVERYWHERE. 40'
And in Neberry by Dr. S. F. FANT.
Reeks and Statfonery. .
ONII M9R, AGAIN
Ke6p ii efore the Publici
The largest and best stock of
| BOOKS, STATIONERY I
FANCY ARTICLES"
Ever shown in Newberry, at the
iDLDBOK STONE,
Comprising In part
Blank Bos, Memorandum Books, Pocket
Hyn Bks ca,Books, Bibes,
chkinds oBks.e
Phoo and Auto. Albums, Visiting Cards,
Cards,t EnrvnsCromo Perle
A B C~ Blocks.
Writin Pprs-such as Note, Letter, Cap,
Lea a,Bill Paper--wide and nar
Slat Pencils, CadCss
noes, Checs Gs , To Paints. Slatos
toy and plain Rubber Rings. Era
Fancy Paptrns Coore aPaper Tise
Desks, Work Boxes. Noah's Arks,
Pens, Tags, McGill's Fasteners.
And many other articles not enumerated
CH EA P FOR CASH.
Thos. F. GRENEKER,
PROPRIETOR HERALD BOOK STORE.
Nov. 30, 48.-tr.
SUBSCRIBE POR THE
WEEKLY PALMETTO YEOMAN,
COLUMBIA, S. C.
It is an 8 page paper, designed for the peo
ple, filled with interesting matter-Family
Reading, News, Markets, &c. Subscription:
One Year, $I 50; Seven Months, $1.00:
Three Months, 50 Cents-payable in ad
vance. For Six Names and Nine Dollars an
EaCoyfr.4eer Sp'I'J e imenr-:
noon paper, is $4 a year.
C. M. McJUNKIN,
40h- th thd5:tor and Pblisher.
of
th
hi
Two children were making most of the day gli
In the sand their castles building,
While out in the harbor the sunset gold
Was every vessel gilding VC
But the sea came over the castles dear; 1
And the charm of sunset faded;
Oh, after a labor is -lost, may we th
Go happily home as they did.
For we build and build in a different way, Ya
Till our beads are wise and hoary;
But after it all the sun goes down,
And the sea-'tis a common story. en
-Atlantic Monthly. gii
-640- Dc
There was in the State of Ohiab
A maiden named Helen Maria,
Who ever would sail CO
Down a banister rail yo
When she thought there was nobody nigh t
her,
Now her brother, whose name was Josiar, lid
Fixed the rail with a piece of barbed wire;
But it wouldn't be best
To tell you the rest, me
For we are blushing already like dar. to
-Ex. the
#tltdtb ftgg. the
or
tel
THE IRONBOX. O
-0-a
"He's come, Mr. Herman." aw
"Come ? Come at last ? Are you
sure of it Joe ?" sai
"Sure as taxes," said Joe Pop- thi
pinger, with a confident nod of his de
head. "He's taken that old house tul
-The Haunted House, the neigh
bors all call it-and he's moved in
to it, bag and baggage, which ain't far
much by the way."
"Any servants with him, Joe?"
"Only one-a crooked old wo- an
man, as threw a porringer of hot
water over me when I called to ax an
if I could be of any use. If they w
only owned a black cat, I would l
have the whole kit of 'em up for roi
witchcraft. I never did come th<
across such a rum lot in all my
life.," sh(
"Did you see the old man him- Fr
self, Joe ?"
"See him, Mr. Herman ? I seen yo
bundle of old bones tied around Nc
the middle, with a palm-leaf pat- to
terned dressing-gown and a flannel wo
aight cap on his head, and s'posed
here couldn't be two such out- sai
landish customers going. He'was ab
running in and out from the fur- mo
aiture cart like a crazy spider." "B
"That will do, Joe. Here is half bet
i crown for you.
-'Thank 'ee, sir. Much obleeged of
bo 'ee, sir." g
And the stable-boy, who belonged qi
;o the inn, shambled away, grin- bet
hung and pulling at the front of his ma
sap. while Herman Franklyn lean- doi
ad against the pillar of the porti- up
So. old Milner Molineux had vex
arrived at last, the rich and eccen
bric relative on the reversion of
whose fortune, real or supposed, heer
liad all his life long been building lik
a.erial castles, At last-and Her
man resolved the very next day to
call and pay his respects, although as!
the old woman with hot water did "
not add to the delights of contem- at
plating this visit.
"If I hadn't heard from his law- ing~
yer that he had taken a lease of the fri
Stone House," mused Mr. Frank- co)
lyn, "I certainly should have never Fr
buried myself in this out-of-the- ha
way place waiting his advent; and'
if I hadn't thought I could work in- dic
to his good graces, I never should tre
have taken the trouble to hunt him
up. Heighu ! Sometimes I think ret
it would be easier to work for do
money than to inherit it." the
And so the next day Mr. Frank- up
lyn called.
Mr. Milner Molineux received.
him very coolly, sitting among his cai
treasures, like Marius amid thesp
ruins of Carthage. But Franklyn se
noticed that he kept one hand on
the ring of a padlocked iron box
beside him as he talked.
"Well, young man, and what do w
you want ?" he asked, impatiently,
when the old woman who evidently an
considered Mr. Franklyn no sub- re
ject for the hot-water treatment, lyl
showed him.in.
"To inquire after your health, "E
Cousin Milner," said the young an
man smoothly. th:
"Hump ! My health is well Co
enough ! Better than you wish it, thi
I dare say."
"My dear sir~ " gr<
"But it will make no difference no
to you," acidly went the old man, hit
still nervously fingering the rings sp
the iron box. "I don't deiy
at I have a treasure to leave be
id me"-Herman Franklyn's eyes
stened-"but it will be to those
o consult. my wishes more than
u have done."
"But my dear Cousin-"
"Words are all very well," said
old miser, shrugging his shoul
rs, "but deeds speak the loudest.
u know very well my aversion to
Ltrimony-and yet you go and
age yourself to get married to a
1 who hasn't a penny. Eh ?
n't you ?" in a rising inflection
e a bark. "And then, after
)lly disregarding all my wishes,
u expect me to leave you this
s"-tapping, as he spoke, on the
of the box.
'But, Cousin Milner, if you wish
I will certainly adapt myself 1
your opinions. I did not know I
'Stuff and nonsense !" yelled
old man, "What you know of I
didn't know is perfectly imma- l
ial to me. Leave me to* my
>ks and to my writing. That's
I ask of any man living."
3o Mr. Franklyn went moodily
ay.
'I must break my engagement,"
d he to himself. "That's the first
ng. What the second will be
ends entirely on fate and for
ie."t
Tosie Hall was sitting in the
m-house kitchen, peeling pota
s-no very romantic occupation, i
I still one which was to be ful
ed, . in spite of all the guitars
I worsted work in creation. She
s a black-eyed, damask-cheeked
1, with velvety eye-brows, and a
mnd, red dot of a mouth; and in
se dark eyes glittered a light,
f resentful, half anguished, as
looked straight at Herman
inklyn.
'I understand," said she, "that
i want to break the engagement.
w that your rich uncle has come 1
the neighborhood I am no longer
rthy of you."
'It isn't that, Josie, believe me," l
I Franklyn, twisting himself i
iut, with the red signals of keen
rtiflcation blazing on his cheek.
at I think perhaps it would be '
ter for both of us-"
'And I haven't the least doubt
it," passionately interrupted
de, with 'heaving breast and .
vering lips. "A th<ousand times'
ter; for I value the love of no
n who can leave me thus. Pray
't waste your time in conjuring a
any farther excuses. They are
te unnecessary. I wish you a
y good morning."1
knd she went on peeling her po
yes, while 'Herman Franklyn
pt out of the house, feeling very
a a whipped cur.
ar a day or two he was heartily
Lat eof himself; but the rwr
last.
fir. Milner Molineux fell ill. Be
ill, he was frightened. Being
~htened, he was solitary. And
sequently he sent for his Cousin
mnklyn, a thing he never would
re done in health.
'You don't think I am going to
,do you Herman ?" he asked
mulously.
'Oh, there is no danger at all,"
asured the young man, as the<
~tor had that morning said that I
patient's spirits must be kept
at all hazards. .
'And you won't leave me ?"
'Certainly not, if my presence I
be any satisfaction to you," re
mnded the delighted fortune
ker.
'But that girl you are engaged
'grumbled Mr. Molineux; "she
n't like it."
'Do you think I could persist in
pthing contrary to your wishes ?"
roachfully asked Herman Frank
L. "The en'gagement is broken."1
'Good !" croaked the old man.
ngagements are a humbug in
y event. Engagements to girls
~t haven't anything is still worse.
usin FranH.yn, you've more sense
~n I gave you credit for."
Day by day, Miner Molineux
w worse. On the fourth after-1
n he sent for a lawyer, and made1
will. On the fith he became
ww.hless. On the sixth he died.'
"My fortune is made now,"
hought Hernlan, who had listened
it the door during the interview
with the lawyer, and heard direc
ions given connecting his name
with the padlocked iron box where
)f the key hung around the dead
nan's neck. And he felt that
fosie had been well sacrificed.
"But you don't mean to say that
)ld Molineux hadn't got anything
tfter all ?" said Widow Hall.
"Nothing but a few old sticks of
'urniture and some rusty'coins as
io decent shopkeeper would give
hange for !"
The widow'r eyes shone through
ier spetacle-glasses.
"Lor' o' mass !" said she. "And
rhat was in the iron box as every
ody had so much to say about
he iron box that was willed to
?ranklyn ?"
"Just the sheets of paper con
aining a dictionary the old man
tad been writing all his life. Man
iscript the lawyer called it what.
ver that may be. He thought it
ras worth a deal of money-and
e'd spent his all in hunting up old
)ooks as nobody but himself ever
eard of and traveling about the
ountry to pick up information."
"I am glad of it !" cried Josie,
pringing up with sparkling eyes.
'I never was so glad of anything
a my life. He's served right for
ince."
Mr. Franklyn called the next
lay, meek . and subdued. If Josie
;ad been a model heroine she
vould have thrown both arms
round his neck and vowed that she
oved him better than ever. But
he was only a very human little
irl, so she stood up with dignity,
nd said, "I wonder at your assu.
ance in coming here after all that
uas transpired, Mr. Franklyn."
"But, Josie-"
"There is the door, sir," said
rosie, "Please to walk out."
And there was nothing left for it
iut to "walk out."
Old Milner Molineux sleeps
uietly in the village graveyard and
nblic rumor has added yet another
host to the spectral population of
he Haunted House-a yellow
isaged old bogey, who wears a
rig and carries in his hand a pad.
)cked iron box.
From the New York Times, Editorial.
l'HE SPINDLE iN TH E SOUTH.
STRAW SHOWING THE WAY THE
WIND BLOWS.
he New England Xannbheturers, Unable to
Compete with thsSoutheraN lBs, Appeul
to the ailroads hr Eelp-A signtl
eent Artiule frem a Lea4dng New
York Paper.
The appeal of the New England
~otton manufacturers to the trunk
ine railroads to help them by re
Luctions in freight charges to meet
he increasing competition of the
outhern mills is natural and
haracteristic. A beneficent and
aternal government protects them
~y a high customs tarifffrom foreign
ivalry; they now ask the railroads
o be equally beneficent and pater
Lal, shielding them from domestic
ompetition by giving them low
ates on goods shipped to the West.
['hey want a high tariff on the
ither. Luckily, the Constitution
orbids the levying of duties by
tates without the consent of Con
~ress. Were it otherwise, they
night besiege the Legislatures of
he Western and Northern States to
hut out the products of the Georgia
nd South Carolina mills by a pro
ibitory duty. The spirit of help.
essnsss engendered by habitual re
iance upon a protective tariff nat
irally and inevitably inclines these
f?ew England manufacturers to
meek outside aid the moment their
omfortable monopoly is threatened
rom any quarter; and the growing
ut dangerous custem among great
ommiercial interests of forming
>ffensive and defensive alliances
rith the railrdiads suggested to
hem the source from which the
nost effective, help was to be ex
ected. A manful contest with the
southern mills for the possession of
;he Western field is about the last
;hing they would think -of. The
mervating 38 per cent. duty on
:heir goods nfits them for such
exertions. Mr. John Roach would
have our-ships built at home though
they cost twice as much as on the
Tyne, and the manufacturers of
New England and their represen
tatives in this city would cheerfully
beggar all the railroads in the
country before the natural advan
tages of the South as a cotton man
ufacturing region should be allowed
to turn the productive energy of
Fall River and Pawtucket into
other ehannels.
The special favor asked of the
railroads is a change in the classi
cation of domestic dry goods and a
reduction of charges. These "do
mestics" are now shipped as first
class freight on the railroads of the
trunk line pool. At the present
rates the Eastern merchants and
manufacturers complain that they
cannot compete in Cincinnati, Louis
ville, St. Louis and other distribu
ting centres in the West with the
Southern manufacturers, who have
not only the advantage of working
with their raw material at their
very doors, but are able also to
effect a considerable further saving
in commissions, as their sales are
made to Western merchants by
their own agents. The margin of
difference is already wide enough to
cause genuine alarm for the future
of the cotton manufactures of the
New England States. What this
margin will be when the Southern
manufacturer has learned by ex
perience to make fuller use of his
advantages the Eastern mill-owners
have as yet scarcely dared to in
quire.
Yet this is a point which neither
the railroad managers nor the man
ufacturers can afford to overlook.
It was made sufficiently clear at
the conference in Commissioner
Fink's office on Wednesday, the
proceedings of which were reported
in the Times, that the relief afforded
by lower freight rates from New
England to the West must be tem
porary in character. The Southern
railroads will make corresponding
reductions, and, as their rates are
high, they can go further in such a
war than the trunk lines. But the
rapid extension of manufacturing
in the South and the introduction
of improved methods, added to the
advantages already mentioned, must
within a short time leave the New
England mills out of the race for
those coarser and heavier grades of
cotton goods in which the value of
material employed, rather than the
labor expended upon it, deter
mines the selling price of the finish
ed article. The competition ofrthe
Southern mills is not as yet for
midable in the amount of product.
The Northern States had, in the
census year, 291 cotton mi,fl~ runs
ning 10,094,850 spindles and 214,
962 looms, and consuming 1,381,
598 bales of cotton; while the
Southern States had 160 mills, run
ning 583,696 spindles, and consum
ing 188,744 bales of cotton. The
rate of yearly increase in consump
tion, as shown by Mr. Atkinson's
supplementary inquiry, and by
more recent unofficial reports, is
considerably greater at the South
than in the Northern States.
So long as the New England
manufacturer must pay from $2.20
to $4 a bale for freight on his raw
material, making his yearly freight
bill on the same amount of cotton
from seven to ten times that of his
Southern rivals so long as he must
pay also a considerably higher rate
of wages, and, on the average, a
higher price for the power that
drives his spindles and looms, he
cannot reasonably hope to com
pete, on similar grades of goods,
with the mills of Georgia and the
Carolinas. The advantages at pre
sent efnjoyed by the Southern man
ufacturers are, moreover, certain to
be increased. Many of the South
ern milfs are now equipped with
old and worn-out machinery, and
few of them have well-trained or
competent operatives. But even
under these imperfect conditions
the profits of cotton manufacturing
there are far greater than in New
England, as is shown by the high
dividends of some of the leading
Southern mills. Butthe NewEngland
manufacturers have a field of their
own in which they may defy South
ern rivalry. On the finer yarns and
plain goods, on prints and fancy
woven fabrics they will have little
difficulty in maintaining their su
premacy for a long time to come.
It would be wiser for them to ac- I
knowledge defeat on the coarser t
grades of goods in which the South
ern manufacturer finds 'his chief b
profit, instead of attempting by b
scarcely legitimate means a h6pe- b
less resistance, and turn their at- r
tention to branches of manufacture b
in which climate, a more skillful h
class of operatives, and a far t
readier market give them an un- t
questioned superiority. to
MR. GBENEKEE : I clip and send 0
you the encolsed article, written by' c
a lawyer of the Richmond Bar. A g
sacred theme, ably handled and o
stamped with the signet seal of o
genius, it touches a tender chord to b
which every Southern heart respon- p
sive vibrates. MAGOIz. - G
Williamston, S. C. t.
ti
HOLLYWOOD MONUMET,
RHIHMOND. VA.
A
BY FRANK E. ANDERSON.
a
Upon the summit of a frowning
Virginian hill in the lovely ceme.
tery of Richmond-that pantheon
of departed greatness-there towers
grimly to the sky acolossqi heap of
rugged stone which to the South
em heart brings a feeling akin to
tears; for on it are the, simple
words, simple yet how eloquent,
"To the Confederate Dead." A
cenotaph to the ashes of a people's
hopes, this stately gray pile of un
hewn granite is in the shape C
of a pyramid, facing::":B four
quarters of the compass as the
deathless fame of the dead whom It
commemorates confroatethenations
of the earth-and clamberingvinee,
the ivy, the Virginia creeper,t
fragrant English
it in their arms as our bearty-l
stainless names of hieru
no more. In the Spring, the grassa
mate the soil about it, as though a
very iussulman it spread Its green
carpet for angels' feet to tread in
prayer,, and the white daisies blend
with the violets, and, those quaint
humpty - dumpties of the foral
world, the saffron hued snapdragons,
to make the spot one of. peculiar
loveliness. A short distance to g
South, the James-historic stream a
of song and story-sweeps on to- 2
ward the sea, butpauses as it passes j
to chant a diapason mass for those, gj
"the dead, but living," east, north
and west, the Southern Mecca Lost
Cause hems it in; and crowded at
its feet, lying in their last, longE
sleep, their .generals in their midst, a
the Confederate warriors, wrapp~ed 4'
in their winding-eets of earth, are ti
slumbering in that bivouac wiih ti
'only the reveille of the resurreeston- a
xmrn.shall break. No monumental
marble marks eacir soldier's head
(for as yet the Union mothers butI
the Northern dead, step-mothers'
her Southern souB) yet on asimple
slab of locust wood there is a num
bered strip of zinc, and but too of- t'
ten on the muster-rolls which keep i
their names, it answers to the single a
word "Unknown"-unknown to men, a
but known to God and Fame. Fit. C
ting surroundings, these, to this '
memorial raised by gracious South- '
ern womeii's hands to mark the
spot where the sons of the South C
are buried.
A. word in particular as to thisa
monument.~ It is ninety feet high
and covers forty-five feet of ground,
built of quarry faced stone in2
irregular blocks, and at a cost of0
fifteen thousand dollars. Under
the supervision of $he talented0
architect, Charles HI. Dimmock, the
corner-stone was laid, December
3d, 1868, and finished by the su
perimposition of the capsoe, a
November 8th, 1869. Its inscrip
tions are not very good. On the
northern face is, "Memoria in
Aeterna," a motto of which it hias y
been wittily said, "It will, we fear, .
be Iatin belonging to a lost lan- 11
guage as well as to alost cause;"
on the east, "To the Confederate
Dead," an inscription faultless andi
Greek in its pure simplicity; on e
the south, "Numini et patrias ~
asto," the punning maxim of the.
house of Aston; and on the west,
,'Erected by the Ladies of the Hol
lywood Memorial Association, A.
D., 1869," another most sensible d
legend of love-and tenderness.
In all other respects what more
appropriate memorial could wei
have? Its weather beaten g4
erd r am aa -
der tatr D . td --
Sad
iy locks o
y the
assie is'
1 their
WO& WYL1904V
ingsck there
heir tatted - -em*
ye Greeks reared a
oseeory of Laemed
canerne arI no -
wn, ou r trfiie.
8rO, beCatOen it 1i5 b
,J)eWr linmota
a el laes --nd
iGressreaen
ettele, -I, aveibeen ,
I to thze coutes
:ee of ot
sta ich I fo n Id __ .
btain e aM
n$
r. Y. ta% sys r ----
be aoon-pe -',f
rntr bS e
typa
ahe If hav be
aime.de
one abotiest
rely MeIgAnt4 -~drh~
*ction of tibp la
ositi.vegrac e, -
tanyways, --wmn z
Ifaptvatedbyhld q
A Ln a d r a n ---a
lend tells us tth sushow C
Irlfoew years old. kaIuk
atready forbe& 7is
ght she found theJlre
ig hier prayere. Ths as
easaid: d6
ere a toitstruck he~ m
What a rumpus there mml li
dar house?' She then
ke concluding line of the - aj5
ad samblednto bed.
How Oun Rican i a~ *
WL.-Many of the weultei
i New York began pa&si? "
ould was 'a cowboy; Jaei.es
:eene came from England IU=
renty dollarslfa his pockt3ie
[atch began b~y dealing- --
iss;"D. Appleton kept .a
ore; Jame WatsonMe Wsbwit
m*ty clerk;Henry Willard 3rs
~porter; Leopard W.N
as aprinter; . C.OdIa$nws'
ermont school taaher; Chare
Conor was born of the ppgn=dIiqf
-ish parents, andPeterCeioper -
hatter's apprentice.
In 1870, the United States h'
3,000,000 sheep yielding 1O0000
P0 pouneds of wool; and in 180
3,000,000 sheep yielding 25AO0
30 poundsof wool.
He who stabs you in the
ear the sale of the RevisedTe4
ent has fallen of fo amon ?
e -
The murders in theUnlta~~
mat year averaged two a ay
recutions two A"week.- No c
i - 1~
Thewst miseabe
ourt of hiso n~7.
- .&

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