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The Newberry herald. (Newberry, S.C.) 1865-1884, April 12, 1883, Image 1

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I ' 7'1oM1,; J." -C kC' :.'' ci .It_ SY8'C "2. .. . , r . ,4_.rt y, a'xY a - - .'
A Family Companion, Devoted to Literature, Miscellany, News, Agriculture, Markets, &c,
Vol.: XIX. INEWBERRY, S. C., THURSDAY, APRIL 12, .1883.No15
YM.Y THUBSDAY MORNING,
it Newerry, S. C.
Editor and Proprictor.
3ms$g.O per .afsuim
favarablyhi Advan.
Sat at the expiration of
bThe 4 mark denotes expiration of
.ieelanseolrs.
portant Notice I
ying and selling for
CASH ONLY
nbled to offer to the public
" : OTD AD RC8ICL
ines, Liquor eadis
, AND TOBACCO,
the Inest and best French
randes, the celebrated
>KAKER RTE
-= fr #.nily use, at prices which defy
COMPETITION.
RT'ER'8 TIVOI BEER
-. yuse, one dozen Pint Bottles
orders will receive prompt atten
= With thanks for former patron
$tothis house; I respectfully solicit
tinuance of the same.
f,,, SL ,TTNER,
nder Newberry Opera House.
ATTENITION !
r .. e ti $ers :
9 low Brand,"
DIAIrrD O BLE IOE,
Rpan " &! lancy's Preium
GUA N O.
--:0:
MY STOCK OF
&IROCERIES
SFull and Complete.
tl...aict a call from my friends and
tgUaratee satisfaction.
JB. Wheeler.
ABNOW I& TIE TIME TI) PRE
PARE 141E TREA.
~ '~R~STVARiETY OF TROPICAL FRUIT liN
~&-Ps~kranges Erry Week,
~' ~COAN TS,
ORANCES,
MALACA CRAPES,
Northern Fruits.
Apples,
Figs,
Peanuts,
Raisins,
Nuts,
Citrona,
- 0 * rders filled uith dispatch.
OE
NOV~ELS
For the Seaside, 'Chimnney
Side, Sunny Side, Shady
Side, Right Side, Left
Side, or any
other side.
A arge loust reevedat thE .
Feb. 5, 6-4Z
giflRifON HE II0I8
AND HIS
DISEASES.
Containing an "Index of Diseases," which
gives the syrmptoms, c-use, and the best
treatment of cacti; a table giving all the
principal drugs used for the horse, with the
~> ordinary doe, eifects, and a:ntidote when a
poison; a table with an en.graviag of the
horse's teeth at different ages, with rules
~-for telling the age of the horse; and other
s alable information Call and get a copy.
DERALD) B0OE STORE.
Aug. 18, 14-tf.
not, nife is swepngby, go and
dare bef ore yo die, somnething
mTmighty and sublime leave behind
to conquer t.ime. $66 a week in
werown town, $5 outfitt free. No risk.
2~eyhneW. Capitalnot required. We
wifuns you everything. Many are
making fortunes. Ladies make as much as
men, and boys and girls make great pay.
Reader, if you want business at which you
ean make great pay all the time, write for
toH TA.rr Co., Portland,
47-ly
ALiTONe DiNER ilOuSE.
Passen.ers on both the up and down
trins have the usual time for DI NER at
iston, the junction of the G. & C. R. R.,
-and theS.U& C.R. R.
Fare well prepared, and the charge tea
-sonable. V R.M A. FJINS.
Oo. ,,41 -tf
DR. E. E. JACKSON,
DRNGST AND MliRIST,
COLUMBIA, S. C.
Eemoved to store two. doors-next to
Wheeler House.
Ordeae prompdly attended to.
A? U -5~..
Misceflaneous.
Young men and maidens contem
plating marriage, or who are
about to enter into con
nubial bliss in the
near future,
- or
Young men who correspond with
maidens in reference to church
going are cordially and af
fectionately invited to
examine a very
handsome 4
lot of
Wedding and Invitation
PAPER, CARDS
AND
ENVELOPES,
AT THE
HERALD STORE.
A SPECIALTY
Is made by
SWAUMED
In
Gentlemens'. Suits,
Which are
CUT AND MADE BY FIRST
CLASS HANDS
Fits gasranteed. A fine stock of
Gents Furnishing Goods,
Always on hand.
Write or when in city call on
SWAFFIELD,
Feb12 tf COLMMBIA.
I Can Tel You Bow to Be
Your Own Dector I
If you have a bad taste in your mouth,
sallowness or yellow color or skin, feel de
spondent. stupid and drowsy, appetite un
steady, frequent headache or dizziness, you
are -bilious." Nothing will arodse your
'Liver to act on and strengthen up your sys
tem equal to
SIMMONS'
HEPATIC
COMPOUND
Or Liver and Kidney Cure.
REMOVES CONSTIPATION.
RELIEVES DIZZINESS.
DISPELS SICK HEADACHE.
ABOLISHES BILIOUSNESS.
CURES JAUNDICE.
CURES LIVERCOMPLAINT.
OVECOE ALAIAL BLOOD POISOING.
REGULATES THE STOMACH.
WILL REGULATE THE LIVER.
WILL REGULATE THE BOWELS.
THE LIVER AND KIDNEYS
Can be kept perfectly hcalthv in any cli
mate by taking an occasional dose of
SIMMONS' HEPATIC COMPOUND,
THE GREAT VEGET&BLE
LIER AND KIDNEY MEDICINE.
DOWIE & MOISE,
PROPRIETORS,
WHOLESALE DRUCCISTS
CHA RLESTON, S. C.
Mr FOR SALE EVERYWHERE. ..t
.And in Newberry by Dr. S. F. FANT.
Nov. 2, 44-ly.
Books and Stationery.
ONC MORE, AGAIN
keep it BIfor the Pubilc,
The largest and best stock of
41 BOOKS, STATIONERY
L AND
FANCY ARTICLES I
Ever shown in Newberry, at the
UNIDNOK STONE,
Comprising in part
Books School BBoks, Pictre Books,e
ehsmnos, S c Boos,Bibles.
cellaneous Boks, and other
Photo. and Auto. Albms, Visting Cards,
Plinrdsristamas arods,Rear
A B C Blocks.
WriCga psh as NoeLetter, Cp,
Envelopes, all sizes, Le ad,
Slate Pencils, Card Cases.
noes Checks,Games, Toy' Pits,.Slates,
toy and plain, Rubber, Emngs, Era
sers, Chalk Crayons.
Fancy Papetere, Colored Paper, 'rIlssne
Paper, God and Silve Paper, Wriig
Pons, Tags, McGill's Fasteners.
Cand any eethe articles not enumerated
CREAP FOR CASH.
Thos. F. GRENEKER,
PROPRIETOR HERALD BOOK STORE,
Nov. 30, 48-tf.
SUBSCRIBE FOR THE
WEEKLY PALMETTO YEOMAN,
COLUMB[A, S. C.
It is an S page paper, designed for the peo
ple, iled with Iateresting miatter-Farnily
Reading, News, Markets, &c. Subscription:
One Year, $1 50; Seven Months, $1.00:
Three Months, 50 Cents-payable in ad
tance. For Six Names and Nine Dollars an
noon paper, is34 a year.
C. V. McJUNKIN,
0-if tclirn Paa.
*eef.
LITTLE AH SID.
Little Ab Sid
Was a Christian Kid
A Cute little cuss, you'd declare
With eyes full of fun
And a nose that begun
Right up at the roots of his hair.
Jolly and fat
Was this frolicsome brat,
As he played through the long summer day,
And braided his cue
As his father used to,
In Chinaland, far away.
Once o'er a lawn
That Ah Sid played upon,
A bumblebee flew in the spring.
"Melican butterfly!"
Said he, with winking eye,
"Me catchee and pull off um wing."
Then with his cs.p
He struck it a rap,
This innocent bumblebee
And put its remains
In the seat of his jeans,
For a pocket there had the Chinee.
Down on the green.
Sat the little sardine,
In a style that was strangely demure,
And said with a grin,
That was brimful of sin,
"Me mashee um butterfly, sore,"
Little Ah Sid
Was only a kid
Nor could you expect him to guess
What kind of a bug.
He was holding so snug
In the folds of his loose-fitting dress.
'-Ki-ya! KI-ylp-ye!"
Al,Sid cried, as he
Rose hurriedly up from that spot,
"Ka-yi! Yuk-a-kanI
Dam um Mellican man!
Um butterfly belly much hot?"
-San Francisco Wasp.
THAT BAD BOY,
-0
REFORMING THE OLD MAN.
--O
"I guess I've fixed pa this time
time so he will never touch liquor
again," said the bad boy. "I seared
him so his bald head turned gray
in a single night."
"What under heavens have you
done to him now?" asked the gro
cer man, in astonishment. "I hope
you ha'ven't dore anything you will
regret in after years."
"Regret nothing," said the boy,
as he turned the lid .of the cheese
box back and took the knife and
sliced off a piece of cheese and took
a few crackers out of a barrel, and
sat down on a soap box by the
stove. "You see 'ma was annoyed
to death with pa. He would come
home full, when she had company,
and lay down .on the sofa and snore,
and he would smell like a distillery.
It hurt me to see ma cry, and I
told her I would break pa of drink
ing if she would let me, and she
said if I would promise not to hurt
pa to go ahead, and I promised not
to. Then I got my chum and
another boy, quite a big boy, to
help and pa is all right. We went
down to the place were they sell
arms and legs to folks who have
served in the army, or saw mill, or
a threshing machine, and lost their
limbs, and we borrowed some arms
and legs, and fixed up a dissecting
room. We fixed a long table in the
basement, big enough to lay pa out
on, you know, and then we got
false -whiskers and mustaches, and
when pa came in the house drunk
and laid down on the sofa, and got
to sleep, we took him and laid him
out on the table, and took some
trunk straps and a sircingle, and
strapped him down to the table.
He slept right along all through it,
and we had another table with the
false arms and legs on, and we
rolled up our sleeves and smoked
pipes, just like I read that medical
students do when they cut up
a dead man. Well, you'd a dide to
see pa look at us when he woke up.
I saw him open his eyes, and then
we began to talk about cutting up
dead men. We put hickory nuts
in our mouths so our voices would
sound different, so he wouldn't
know us, and I was telling the
other boys about what a time we
had cutting up -the last man we
bought. I said he was awful tough,
and when we had got his legs off
and had taken out his brain, his
friend come to the dissecting room
and claimed the body, and we had
to give it up, but I saved the legs.
I ooked at pa onthe table, and he
began to turn pale, and he squirm.
ed around to get up, but found he
was fast. I had pulled his shirt up
under his arms, while he was
asleep, and as he began to move I
took an icicle, and in the dim light
of the candles, that were sitting on
the table in beer bottles, I drew the
icicle across pa's stummick and I
said to my chum, 'Doc, I guess we
better cut open this old duffer and
see if he died from inflammation of
the stummick, from hard drinking,
as the Coroner said he did." Pa
shuddered all over when he felt the
icicle going over his bare stummick,
and he said, "For God's sake, gen
tlemen, what does this mean? I
am not dead." The other boys
looked at pa in astonishment, and I
said, "Well, we bought you for
dead, and the Coroner's jury said
you were dead, and by the eternal
we ain't goin to be fooled out of a
corpse when we buy one, are we,
Doe?" My chum said not if he i
knowed hisself, and the other
students said, "Of course he is dead.
He thinks he is alive, but he died
day before yesterday, fell dead on
the street, and his folks said he had
been a nuisance, and they wouldn't
claim the corpse, and we bought it
at the morgue." Then I drew the
icicle across him again, and I said,
"I don't know about this, doctor. I
find that blood follows the scalpel
as I cut through the cuticle. Hand
me the blood sponge, please." Pa
began to wiggle around, and'we
looked at him, and my chum raised
his eye-lid, and looked solemn. and
pa said, "Hold on, gentlemen.
Don't cut into me any more, and I
can explain this matter. It's all a
mistake. It's all a mistake. I
was only drunk." We went in a
corner and whispered, and pa kept
talking all the time. He said if we
would postpone the hog killing he
could send and get witnesses to
prove that he was not dead, but I
that he was a respectable citizen I
and had a family. After we had I
held a consultation I went to pa <
and told him that what he had said
about being alive might possibly be
true, though we had our doubt. We 4
had found su;h cases before in our
practice East, where men seemed
to be alive, Lut it was only tempo- 1
rary. Before we had got them cut I
up they were dead enough for all
practical purposes. Then I laid
the icicle across pa's abdomen, and
went on to tdll him that even if he
was alive it would be better for
him to play that he was dead, be
cause he was such a nuisance to his<
family that they did not want him, I
and I was telling him that in his
lifetime he was very cruel to his I
boy, a bright little fellow who was
at the head of his class in Sunday
school, and a pet wherever he was(
known, when pa interrupted me and
said, "Doctor, please take that I
carving knife off my stomach, for it
makes me nervous. As for that
boy of mine, he is the condemndest
little whelp in this town, and he is
no pet anywhere. Now you let up
on this dissectin' business, and I I
will make it all right with you."
We held ancther consultation and t
then I told pa that we did not feel
that it was doing justice to society '
to give up the body of a notorious
drunkard, aft:r we had paid twenty I
dollars for the corpse. If there I
was any hope that he would reform i
and try and lead a different life, it I
would be different, and I said to<
the boys, "G entlemen, we must do I
our duty." Then I took my icicle t
and began fumbling around the i
abdomen portion of pa's remains, <
and my churn took a rough piecc <
of ice and began to saw his leg off,
while the other boy took hold of the j
leg and said h~e would catch it when i
it dropped off. Well, pa kickeg4
like a steer. He said he wanted t~o
make one more appeal to us, and
we acted sort of impatient, but we
let up to hea.r what he had to say.
He said if we would turn him loosei
he would give us ten dollars morei
than we paid for his body, and thati
he would never drink another drop 1
as long as hie lived. Then wei
whispered some more and then toldi
him that we thought favorably of
his last proposition, but he must
swear, withhs hand on the leg of a
corpse we were then dissecting,
that he would never drink again,
and then he must be blindfolded
and be conducted several blocks
away from the dissecting room. be
fore we could in oMm1an He said
that was all right, and so we blind
folded him and made him take a
bloody oath, with his hand on a
piece of ice that we told him was a
piece of another corpse, and walked
him around the block four times,
and left him on a corner, after he
had promised to send the money to
an address that I gave him. We
told him to stand still five minutes
after we left him, then remove the
blindfold and go home. We watched
him from behind a board fence, and:
he took off the handkerchief, looked
,t the name on a street lamp, and
round he was not far from home.
He started off saying : "That's a
aretty narrow escape, old man. No
more whiskey for you." I did not
ee him again until this morning,
mnd when I asked him where he
ras' last night he shuddered and
said, "None of your darn business.
But I never drink any more; you
-emember that." Ma was tickled
mnd she told me I was worth my
weight in gold. Well, good day.
rhat cheese is musty." And the
)oy went and caught on a passing
;leigh.-Peck's Sua.
JMr_tJ1m O .
RILL ARP ON THE PHILOSO
PHY OF STEALING.
PLUNDER AND PISTOL-POLE AND
VINCENTISM-COUNTRY LIFE CON
TRASTED-SPENDING TOO MUCH
AND WORKING TOO LITTLE-BRAIN
AND HEART TBOUBLES, AND SOME
APPROPRIATE POETRY THEREON.
VrittenfortbeCultivator and DixieFarmer.
I wonder what is the matter with
Ur folks-what makes stealing
md suicide so popular of late. with
ur people. No,- I don't wonder
rery much either, for I think I
mnow. Every time I take up a
iewspaper now a days. I find a
resh case; somebody gone to his
leath by his own hand. These
eem to be two favorite modes of
etting out of trouble-to steal out
)r die out. I don't allude to small
>ilfering by willing thieves, but
tealing by respectable, well-raised
)eople-stealing with "good inten
ions," the kind that the old preach
r said "hell is paved with." Steal
ng by degrees to get money to
peculate upon and make more
noney to pay it back with, and
iave enough left to splurge on and
ive high and keep up with society
~r a little ahead. It is an easy
hing to spend other people's
noney, and it is still easier when
he money belongs to the public or
corporation with a great many
nembers. If Mr. Polk or Mr. Vin.
ent had been the treasurer of one
ich .man, they would have never
hought about stealing two or three
iundred thousand dollars from him.
.t is a kind of consoling idea that
tealing from the State, don't hurt
~nybody much, even if the speecu
ation fails and the money can't be
laid back, The loss is only about
0 or 75 cents a piece all around to
he people and nobody will be
kurt very much after all. It won't
ciake anybody so dreadful mad.
And that is a fact. It don't
ciake anybody very mad; they
ciake a good deal of noise about
t, but I saw in one paper, that Mr.
yolk had the sympathy of a large
ircle of friends. Plundering the
ublic has got to be so common,
hat it don't surprise anybody very
nuch and is looked upon as a sort
~f privilege that belongs to the
fice of treasurer, or cashier, or
ciember of Congress. The exam
le is set at Washington by those
ai high places, and it has spread all
ver the country. When it suc
eeds it is smart and sharp and
hifty; when it fails or is discovered
Sbig fuss is made and sometimes a
nock trial and that is the end of
t. Georgia, Alabama, and Ten.
esse, have had trouble with their
reasurers-the same sort of trou
>le-all growing out of using
he State's money, and I see
hat the treasurer of the city of
savannah has been doing the same
hing. Cashiers and other bank
>fficers, are subject to similar temp.
~ations, and every now-and-then
et caught and go up. That is
worse than plundering a State, for
phe circle of injured persons is
smaller and their individual loss
much arreater A man's c ondem
nation of the crime is proportioned
to his loss. Two years ago a bank
broke that had two thousand dol-'
lars of mine and my children's
money and we never got a cent of
it. The State stepped in and took
all the assets; well, we have been
two thousands dollars mad ever
since, for an officer of the bank
lost the money on cotton. We
would rather he would have plun
dered the State out a million, for
this was all we had and was hard
earned money. It is the easiest
thing in the world to forgive a man
for defrauding some, other man,
but when he defrauds us its the
hardest. I'm not mad at all with
Polk or Vincent, on the contrary,
they sorter have my sympathy, but
that two thousand dollars has
knocked charity cold and it's cold
yet.
But there is one atonement that
always brings sympathy, and that is
death. There is a iind of heroism,
a desperation about suicide that
commands sympathy; and not un
frequently admiration and respect.
We say it takes a brave man to
fight in battle or fight a duel, ebut it
takes a braver one to put the pistol
to his own head and fire. It is the
remedy of despair and of repen
tence and of unutterable woe.
But why should our people, our
well raised sensible people, steal or
kill themselves? Carlyle said that
England had a population of thirty.
ty-eight millions 'mostly fools,"
but these men, generally speaking,
are not of that class; they are
smart - devilish smart - perhaps
too smart, too brainy, too esthe
tic; they think too much and work
too little; they want too much and
are ambitious; they are not content
with their lot, but long for the lux
uries of life and want them without
labor or toil; they want a $2,000
salary to pay $5,000 of expenses,
they work nothing but their brains
and their desires. A sound mind
in a sound body, makes a perfect
man, and no man can have a sound
body withont exercise; he must
labor in some way and get tired
and rest, and that gives rest to his
brain, for the brain is at rest while
the body is at work-this is the
law of our being. A man who
lives in town or city and takes but
little or no exercise, and keeps his
brain always excited and at work
planning for more money, will get
off his balance after awhile, and if a
sudden reverse of fortune comes
he give up and takes to drink; or
opium, or kills himself. It is not
the farmers who steal or commit
suicide; it is the fast young men of
the towns and the cities; they get
crossed in love or have a bad run
of luck at cards or in cotton futures,
or have stolen money from their
employers to keep up with society,
or got into some other devilment,
and so the mind gets tottering and
the misery is ended with death. It
is not the death of one or two in a
town, that is of so much conse
quence, but it is the misery of the
living, for where.one man kills him
self there ai-e many who don't, but
who are just as miserable. Many
a one thinks about it but has not
the courage to do it, and it comes
from spending too much and work
ing too little. Farmer boys don't
do it; they have no occasion to
spend, and if his girl wont have
him, he makes the best of it and
tries another. His mind is well
balanced and labor does it; city
people live in too much of a hurry,
too much excitement; even Sunday
don't bring 'em rest, and while the
preacher is talking gospel, they are
thinking about to-morrow's trade;
they can't help it. I never knew
but one business man who didn't
read his Sunday's mail. Women
don't kill themselves often, and
when they do its for something a
man has done-some disappointed
about love-not a brain trouble,
but a heart trouble. Something
like Hood wrote about
"One more unfortunate
Gone to her death."
Or like Goldsmith wrote about:
When lovely woman stoops to folly,
And learns too lite that men betray,
What art can soothe her melancholy,
What charm can drive her grief away.
The only art her grief can smother
And stiSe every burning sigh,
And bring repentance to her lover
And wring his bobom-ie to diel
BILL AR.
OUR NEW YORK LETTER.
From our own Correspondent.
OUR DAILY MURDERS-FENCEH FLATS
AND FIE-FIE--THE BBOOELYN
BRIDGE AND BLUNDERING BLOCK
BEADS-GIN, GINGER AND GRACE
LESS GREE.
NEW YoRK, April 10th.
The removal of obnoxious per
sons by knife and pistol has been
progressing with due diligence.
Most of the murders were by Ital
ians who are very fond of cards,
stale beer, lust and assassination.
A late arrival was a notorions bri
gand, who committed 21 murders in
Sicily, and for whom detectives
were waiting here, having been noti
fled by the authorities on the other e
side. He managed to slip away,
however, here as skillfully from
the steamer that brought him as
he boarded her. One of the judges
before whom two of these stiletto
shovellers were brought was accos
ted by a friend who; with myste- C
rious nods and winks, remarked, '
'Me no got lawyer. Me no dam <
fool. Me know American fashion. v
How much do you want?" Out n
came a roll of bills, and a much- I
yanked organ grinder was "run in" C
in a very demoralized condition.
A little shooting in "high life"
high enough; gamey so to speak
has created quite a little breeze. a
Two mining brokers in partner
ship were great friends. One was t
married with a wife a victim to i
opium habit. Introduces friend as
companion, brotherly friendship,,
springs up, friend cures opium hab
it, but wife prefers friend to hus-,
band. Husband leaves her to her- r
self-and friend-for four weeks
hoping she'd mend her ways; finds
the prescription no cure for the
complaint. Fires friend out of the I
house; wife sulks-takes.walks and i
won't say where; quarrel; separa
tion; cross divorce suits, suits for.
damages, alimony, possession of n
children, etc. Husband and ex
friend still very friendly in busi
ness matters. Wife's mother in
far West hears of scandal. Horri- c
fied. Sends brother to reclaim sis. 3
ter. Repentant sinner agrees to
go,- not that morning, some other
morning. When brother goes to
rescue, ex-friend objects, fires stat
nette of Venus at brother. Brother f
drew his "old gun," kills ex-friend.
Shrieks; police; autopsy; reporters;P
reporters; reporters; open mouths; '
reporters, etc., etc. All very dra
matic.
The Brooklyn bridge will, it is.to
be hoped, be open about the middle
of May for pedestrian traffic, at
any rate. Of course the bone-hun-1
ters are on the wing for spoils,
like turkey buzzards, and rings are
formed to grab all the patronage,*
and put up jobs in the interest of
one or more railway schemes. Then
the proposed opening has set the
idiots to work with plausible prop
ositions, while a good many people
who either don't know better or
don't take time to think aboit, en- e
dorse. For instance, one set of
fools wants a grand double proces- r
sion of trades, with bands of music
countermarching between Brook
lyn and New York at the opening,. f
and another convention of donkeys c
want the Grand Army to parade in i
mid-air on Decoration Day. There a
wouldn't be much of a bridge left
if either of these sapient sugges
tions were carried out, and I fancy <
the wiseacres will be reminded that I
when one comes to a bridge it is i
always in order, in order to avoid
the dangers of vibration, which the
tap of even a single drum may (
cause, to "walk your horses." 3
The temperance fanatics and a
high-license liquor men are both
waging war on the beer saloons,
which really are the least harmful I
of any refreshment places where al- C
coholic stimulants are sold. In r
the German quarters of the city
especially the beer gardens and
beer tunnels are really poor men's a
clubs, very orderly and unobjec- e
tionable. The way some pious men
beat the devil round the siwmp is
funny though. They go to drug
stores and very unnecessarily ex
plain that they never drink liquor,,
but want some special extra qual
ityr of gin for medical use. They
manage to sample it pretty freely.
and then say they must trust to the
judgment of the clerk, as
really are not ceteto
Then ivrapped In a
ADVfIRNSIR IL?
Adveragsun asr at1 ,afr:
10 re (es fsd1) for fi
and 75 com a: iwhemw er
oublce la
Nodoes Of' I~Wgu.
ofrnapect, sam e --a parIui
adve ss,.
]re I s oia f t
Adv?rtl ibs ieot
and chargedsaeorag. -
Specialomiret and ikt
Users.wit berad.eun
TERifS AE -
On goes to the deaon 'de
Wpy these good men" -
gith toothaches or a a
lown, is r
n a drug store wi:.aa rj
y and handsove
art, begging for nediCiG.
lerk makes up a dose wk
ramenti chiely, whieh
he patient has no idea is
ad secures a. faithM ne
)ne clerk who was eitert
cientious or too full o
ged to drive away
fsteady customers ai
ralking papers for
ollowing dobe for -d$s
ot-drops, gum 4ui .a
une pepper.. The vaia;""
eo tried to miD e .
reat mistake was en -
A GmL WHo Sm *
AcKwAn.-In 't&IQ'.:
)akland, Aroo.tnaoou4
3 a girl who pe
f spelling diRu ug
rard without hestao. _"
a Hattie M. reia' . e
ast her twelfth bfirtday
es with her pareas
t a spelling oateh
a the school which elia
ut any warning, she e b
udience some ten mintes.
rords selected at random,.aeo
heir difficulty of .
Pithout any previous keowWge4
rhat they *ere to be, K h
orrectly, except-one orstwo
he could not sel1-n he
ray, and when prompte4in
listely reveid it.,
rords which she
ndivisible, e All of
pelled as rapidils.theiu
ollow without a siingle
oent of a letter.
A woman in Oosknah
early half of a skirt trek
lothes wringer before
hat her babfywas in the sidkt.
ras anawfu sr ainrj~
A boy will go in
ool around the fster o h~
ace hewill haveams b~
hobic dread of iI a pintre
r. a basin.
ats with :east-Iron crowni1
e fashionable thislalL. Th
esigned especially for thios who
ike part in torehllght proehneuis
kely tobe interrupted by aso.
f bricks. -
A woman havng read in a oN
bout a simoon that "sweptIo
lainn,'.' is urging her- hnsadt
et one of them new fangled thig -
or her to use in the kitchen. i
Curran was once aske&dby
udge on the jnch, '-Doye e
nything ridiculous in tiiei?
Nothing but the head," was th
sply.
The individual who sawaumoude
ghting with a piece of linmbeEw
heese readily realized that U e
attle was not always to th
Irong._
The mosquito has six, legs a~
nly one mouth. Let us therefore
e thankfnl that if it does bite~
Plant your neighbor's eans early
)ne under each fruit tree will help
our crop and do your neighet.
ood turn besides.
Many people wish they inli
ve their lives over again; in nine '
sass out of ten they would only
epeat them.
There is frequently more love. ii
frown than there could be na
mile.. "As many as I ove, re
uke and chasten."
Froma.the manner in
aid blame are dealt
rorld, sen honest ias
- ~ ;p

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