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The Newberry herald. (Newberry, S.C.) 1865-1884, May 03, 1883, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026909/1883-05-03/ed-1/seq-4/

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MAY.
8 9 10 1112
1 14 15 16 17 18 19
122 23:,24 25 26
28 29 3Q 31 - -
Ps VAL
- I laisppident of
{ &uthera Liv. Stock Jouraal
angt 6 ssa itfthe=followin :
-m, is no crop grown with as
eertsinty of a bountiful
"'1 and at as little cost for labor,
ts:eeoi p. There.are but few
figs ata that yield such enor
onmoas crops a: forage and of such
== n nt quality, and there is no
t~ iser in the world that enriches
hN s l ib their vin&e turned under
xb&k green. Unlike all commer
dal brtiliaere, its value is not ex
bsimeted in one. crop, but its good
oti can be , seen for several
ar. Even where the vines are
Y- mowed or eaten off by stock, and
negoleing ft but their roots, a
.inked improvement can be seen
in the succeeding crops for several
eas. I believe when aheavy crop
f of eines is turned under, that it
. IH improve the yield of any crop
A e t 1e 50 per cent, if not 100. In
80 I planted peas on the poorest
ed of a certain piece of corn land,
intending to turn them under in
the fa. The wet season prevented
my doing so. The next spring
K881-the tenant working that
3and, before I knew it, had cut the
dead vines off and burnt them,
leaing nothing but the roots of
the pea vines. The whole out of
land was planted .in cotton the
same day and all worked alike ; but
the cotton on the part planted in
. peas was earlier and far superior to
the other. Last year I planted
piece of land in corn; the
whole cut was planted the same
day and received the same atten
tion through the entire season, and
from the time the corn was threE
inches high I could tell to the vr
row where the peas were planted
asfar as I could see the corn, and
this part of the land made twice au
much corn as the other end, thai
lead formerly been the richest.
Last year I plowed six acres oj
poor land that would not make ter
bushels of corn per acre, and plant
ed in peas. They had no worn
during the year, but they soor
e overed the ground so completela
Sthat it was with difficulty any on
could walk through them. Fron
this land I gathered twenty-fiv
bushels per acre and left a gooi
many in the field for my mules
hogs' and cows, all of which ar
extremely fond of them. Nothing
in the world fattens all kinds o:
stock faster than a pea field.]
planted some later in my corn a
last plowing, running my plante
up in the side of the bed. The:
also made a good crop. They cai
be planted this way or on whea
or oat stuble, or earlier in the
season: and you can either gathe;
the peas, mow the vines for hay
pasture them or turn the 'vines un
dor and double the yield of youl
land. They .are- little harder t<
mow than moat grasses, butlId<
not think they are more difficul
than a heavy crop of clover. The:
will make from five to eight toni
Sper acre of the best hay that il
grown and are preferred to clove:
rbecause it is a more certain crop
its yield is larger, the hay is bette:
and requires less trouble and ex
pense to prepare the ground ;an<
~jthey will grow and make a goo<
crop on ground so poor that clove:
would starve out. To drill then
will require about one bushel tV
veacres ; to sow. broadcast oni
buhlper acre is about riglit
With improved implements the;
can be planted and harvested al
cheaply as any crop made. -Afte:
cutting my oats in June I intend tV
som fot or fity acres of th<
stubble in peas, running the Chi
cago Screw Pulverizer over it once
and Ilowing them at the time witl
the machine. One hand and si:
mules can prepare and sow ten t<
twelve acres a day and put then
in in the most thorough mlnner
*This is all the wo& they will ge
till they are ready to be mowed
If you only want to save enougl
peas to plant another year, as soo1
as they begin to ripen pick off wha
you want for seed and then moi
the vines, but few then will shatte:
out and tha stock can eat the peal
*with the vines.
We all know that to plant corn
ca tsor wheat on the same land fo:
bears that the crop will rndown
bu fthe ground is planted is
es,and even if the vines ari
mowed or pastured and nothing
but their roots left, the land wil
grw richer ,bad the yield will in
Lerease, with the sameknhad of rol
planted on it year afIer yearibut i
the vines are turned under, thiei:
value will astonish any one whi
never tried it. Stock ofalkindi
revery fond of the hay and cai
bewintered and kept fat and sleel
with scarcely any other food,i
they have plenty of well care
pea-vin. hay.
farU me
THE FIRST ARTICLES.
The first steel pen was made in
1830.
The first air pump was made in
1654.
The first lucifer match was made
in 1798.
Mohammed was born at Mecca
about 570.
The first iron steamship was
built in 1830.
The first biloon ascent was made
in 1798.
Coaches were first used in En
gland in 1569.
The first steel plate was dis
oovered in 1880.,
The first horse railroad was built
in 1826-27.
The Franciscons arrived in En
gland in 1569.
The first steamboat plied the
Hudson in 1807.
The entire Hebrew Bible was
printed in 1488.
Ships were first "copper-bottom
ed" in 1783.
Gold was first discovered in
California in 1848.
The first telescope was used in
England in 1608.
Christianity was introduced in
Japan in 1549.
The first watches were made at
Nurenburg in 1477.
The first saw makers' anvil was
brought to America in 1819.
First almanac printed by George
Von Furbach in 1460.
The first newspaper advertise
ment appeared in 1652.
Percussion arms were used in the
U. S. army in 1880.
The first use of a.locomotive in
this country was in 1829.
Omnibusses were firstintroduced
in New York in 1830.
Kerosene was first used for light
ing purposes in 1826.
The first copper cent was coined
in New Haven in 1687.
The first glass factory in the
United States was built in 1780.
The first printing press in the
United States was worked in 1620.
Glass windows were first intro
duced into England in the eighth
century.
The first steam engine on this
continent was brought from En
gland in 1743.
The first complete sewing ma
chine was patented by Elias Howe,
Jr., in 1846.
The first Society for the Promo
tion of Christian Knowledge was
organized in 1698.
The first attempt to manufacture
pins in this country was made soon
after the war of 1812.|
The first prayer book of Edward
VI. came into use by authority of
Parliament on Whit Sunday, 1549.
The first coach in Scotland was
brought thither in 1551, when
SQueen Mary came from France.
It belonged to Alexander Lord
Seaton.
SThe first daily newspaper ap
peared in 1702. The first- news
paper printed in the United States
was published in Boston, on-Sept
25, 1798.
The first telegraph instrument
was first successfully operated by
S. F. B. Moree, the inventor, in
1835, though its utility was not
demonstrated to the world until
1842.
SThe first Union flag was unfurled
on the first of January, 1776 over
the camp at Cambridge. It had
thirteen stripes of white and red,
and retained the English cross in
one corner
aAN INcIDEN~T IN PAxiEs CAREER
A writer in the Soutkern World
says that a warm friendship sub
sisted between yohn Boss, the cel
ebrated chief of the Cherokees, and
John Ho ward Payr. Payne was
staying with Boss in a miserable
cabin in Georgia where Boss had
soughtj a refuge at a time when
the Cherokees were ordered to
quit - Georgia. A militia party ar
rested them, and they started for
Milledgeville one drenching night,
Payne on a horse led by a soldier
who presently began humming
"Home Sweet Eome." "Well, I
certainly never expected to hear
that under isuch circumstances,"
said Payne. "Do you know who
wrote the words ? "No, do you?''
quoth the militiaman. "I did."
"Oh, you did. Well, then, go
ahead and repeat them, or I'll
bounce you off that horse and lead
you instead off him." Payne re
peated them with feeling, and then
sang them. The man in command
was much impressed, and said the
composer of such a song should
rif he could help it never go to
prison. Arrived ,at Milledgeville,
they wer~e, much to their surprise,
discharged alter examination and
oss said he entirely attributed
this leniency to ""Ho0e, Sweet
Home."
silscellan.eous.
PILLS
A DISORDERED LIVER
IS THE BANE
o t Itisforthe
o etc been
e a
saamel arW oemM noe hera oy an
soeoe dtia dlsses ssd el3ss. I wa
e a o gh ai o o r .
greakinWton,eDoC.
sten- t as b.illbe~ nae iha
ggniteastates
tbea ay G nen t is s
-m whe pueno me.en.u
TUlTS HAIR DYE.
a t*ai "*oie sat d dosGrnw
at one z s1fttaur.
Oliob. 8a Murry Street;. New York
Dr~o Re Abu1
May. 16,1 I-lv.
PAThNTS
end a rough retch
model of -our Invention to
GEORGE E. LEMON,
Washlste , D C., and sa Preaerica
Exam iaatioa will be made, withoart
ch. e, oen allsUnite s,tents of the
ssmaelano avenionsandyea beadvised
wbbr or not a patent an be Obtained.
G.& oVi Go e eof a 5 o
abewe liation is mtde. WhfenAllow Ia the
ti A and the final tt Gwoer ndonn~
seo " n btinnga atntwill not advs yo
et m hs best judgment can determinle "hence,
itsrlyo the adiegiven after adint
BeMrtatSiai of Labelsr aed
hp1aiOnI reiof R8dected, Abandoned,
Cases made. If you have ndertaken
to secrelowammpetenbaad filled. ainkilltili hanA
succSem Send me a
wri eQult dd:eseato heComminioner of
Patents that he racogaise Gaoas L. Lxoi. Of
Ws= D. ento and attothca the dat of
B emember, thisthsoffIce has been
In.ooel dnoelt6l,and reference can be
cl ients in almost ever COUntY in the
II S. Yamphlt reltingto Patentsafreeeuponre*WIuL
GEORGE E. LE MON,
,tos.e ad Forellan Patentst
fSS: Ifteeinth Street, WASBINOTON, D. C.
XEston thb puper.
TH BLATCNIEY
PUMP!i
BUY THEBEST.
BLATCHLEY'S
TRIPLE ENAMEL
PORCELAIN-LINED
O3
*PUM P
Donofg
0.0. ,ATCI.EY,Manuf'r,
Mar. 28, 13-6m.
Trade
"SALUDA CRO.UP OIL."
Mark.
A vegetabte compound and an in
fallible remedy for Croup.
Prepared by the Saluda Medicine
Company, Newberry, So. Ca. Price
50c. per bottle.
For sale by all Druggists.
April 2, 14-6m.
WANTED
50 Cords of
DRY PINE WOOD.
Apply to
C. C. CHASE,
Newberry Hotel.
March 19, 12-tf.
T. D. DAWKINS,
B.A.BBE R,
-IN THE
Newberry Hotel Saloon.
I would respectfully inform my former
patrons and the gentlemen generally that,
having established myself under the New
berry Hotel, with the assistance of Maurice
Gnt, every effort*will be put forth for the
comfort of my customers.
Mar. SO, 1882. 18-tf.
ou frc hn esto in re e thei
weathy; thos who do not Im
prv teio pportnti"rmin'n'.oro*n
o wokforu right n theirn on localities.
frns start. The bsess wil pa ore than
te time ordinar wage Exeieot
oe 'rwhole tim t the work or onl
oh sarelled ss fFullInfomationan
SoN Co., Portland, Maine. 47-17.
J. K. . GoGGANS. D. 0. HERBERT.
GOGGANS & HERBERT,
Attorneysat-L a w,
NEWBERRY, S. C.
"Strict Attention to Business."
Nov. 2, 41-17y
jLYON&HEALY
State & Monroe Sts..Chcago.~~
U ~CTAOC ,
o af C . and Ottt, Rsa
Feb.8-1y.
RIGHT'S HOTf!L,
COLUMBIA, S. C.
This new and elegant House, with all
modern improvements, is now open for the
reception of guestsd.WRGT&SN
Mar.a 19 1 o-. Pro rietora.
Iail Roads.
Clumbia 4 Greeivmlle Railroad.
PASSENGER DEPARTMENT.
CoLUBU. S. C., Apr. 16th, 1882.
On and after Monday, April 16, 1882, the
PASSENGEE.TRAINS will run as-herewith in
dicated upon this road and its branche'
Daily, except Sundays.
No. 62. UP PASSENGER.
Leave Zolumbia,A - - 4 11.47 a m
" Alston, - - - 1.00'p m
New ,- - - - 2.10 p m
u HieyS - - - -88
" Hodge - - - 4.56 p m
" Belton, , - - - 6.19 p i
Arrive Greenville. - - - - 8.06 p m
No. 58. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Greenville, - - " - 10.30 a m
" Belton, - - 12.18 p m
" Hodges, - 1.40 p m
" Ninety-Six, - - - - 2.89 p m
" Newberry, - - - 4.82 p m
" Alston 5.40 p m
Arrive Columlia.F - - 7.00 p m
SPAETANBURG, UNION a COLUNBIA RAILROAD.
No. 62. UP PASSENGER.
Leave Alston, - - - - 1.15 p m
" Strotber, - - - - 2.01 p m
" Shelton, - - - - 2.32 pm
" Santuc,- - - - - 83.25 p m
" Union, - - - - 04.00 pm
" Jonesville, . : - - 4.8 p m
Arrive Spartanburg, - 6.53 pm
No.58. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Spartanburg, R. & D. De t, H 1255 p m
Spartanburg, S. U.& C. Depot,G 1.04 p m
" Jonesville, - - - 2.08 p m
" Union. - - - 2.47 p m
Santuc, - - - 3.3a p m
" Shelton, - - 420p m
Strother, - - - 4.51 pm
Arrive at Alston. - - - 5.38 pm
LAUVENS RAILWAY.
Leave Newberry, - - - - 4.40 p m
Arrive Laurens C. H., - 7.3o a m
Leave Laurens C. H., - - - 9.45 p m
Arrive Newberry, , - - 12.41 p m
ABEVILLB BRANCB.
Leave Hodges, .. - - 5.00 p m
Arrive at Abbeville, - - " 6.12 p m
Leave Abbeville, - - - - 12.23 p m
Arrive at Hodges, - - - - 1.85 p m
BLUE RIDGE RAILROAD AND ANDERSON
BRANCH.
Leave Belton 6.22 p m
" Anderson 7.01 p m
" Pendleton 7.51 p m
Leave Seneca C, 8.40 p m
Arrive Walhalla 9.06 p m
Leave Walhalla, - - 9.35 aM
Leave Seneca C, 10.07 a a
"9 Pendleton, - - 10.48 a m
" Anderson, - - 11.35 p m
Arrive at Belton, - - 12.20 p m
CONNECTIONS.
A. With South Carolina Railroad from Char
leston.
With Wilmington, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad from Wilmington and all
points North thereof.
With Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad from Charlotte and all points
North thereof.
B. With Asheville & Spartanburg Rail- Road
for points in Western North Carolina.
C. With A. & C. Div. E. & D. R. E., from all
points South and West.
D. With A. & C.Div., E. & D. R. R., from At.
Janta and beyond.
E. With A. & C. Div., R. & D. R. R., from all
points South and West.
F. With South Carolina Railroad for Charles
ton.
With Wilmington, Cplumbia and Augusta
Railroad or ilhington and the North.
With Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad for Charlotte and the North.
G. With Asheville & Spartanburg Railroad
from Hendersonville.
H. With A. & C. Div., E. & D. B. B., from
Charlotte and beyond.
Standard Time used -is Washington, D. C.,
which is fifteen minutes faster than Columbia.
J. W. FRY, Superintendent.
M. SLAUGrTE, General Passenger Agent.
D. CARDWELL, Ass't General Passenger Agt.,
Columbia, S. C.
South Carolina Railway Company.
CHANGE OF SCHEDULE.
On and after Dec. 17th, 1882, Passenger
Trains on this road will run as follows un
til further notice:
TO AND FROM CHARLESTON.
GOING EAST,
Leave Columbia *8.00 a m .58 p m
Arrive Charleston 12.55 p m 12 30 p m
GOING WEST,
Leave Charleston t7.00 am *5.20 p m
Arrive Columbia 11.28 a m 10.09 p m
t Daily. *Daily except Sunday.
TO AND FROM CAMDEN.
GOING EAST,
Leave Columbia *'800 am *6.58 pm
Arrive Camden 1.10 a m 10.00 p m
GOING WEST
Leave Camden *7.00 a m *5.00 p m
Arrive Columbia 11.28 a m 10.09 p m
'Daily except Sundays.
TO AND FBOM AUGUSTA.
GOING EAST,
Leave Columbia *8.00 a m '6.58 p m
Arrive Augusta 2.00 pm 7.05a m
GOING WEST,
Leave Augusta '7.05 a m *4.1Op m
Arrive Columbia 4.05 p m 10.09p m
*Daily except Sundays.
CONNECTIONS.
Connection made at Columbia with the
Columbia and Greenville Rail Road by train
arriving at 11.28 P. M., and departing at 8.58
P. H. Connection made at Columbia Junc
tion with Charlotte. Columbia and Augusta
Rail Road by same train to and from all
points on both roads with through Pullman
Sleeper between Charleston andl Washing.
ton, via Virginia Midland route, without
change. Connection made at Charleston
wih Smers for New York on Wednesdays
and Satunlays; also, with Savanna and
Charleston Railroad to all points South.
Connections are made at Augutawith
Geori Railroad and Central Rilroad to
and frm all points South and West.
Through tickets can be purchased to all
points South and West by applying to
D. MCQUEEN , Agent, Colambla.
D. C. ALL EN, Gi. P. & F. A.
JOHN B. PECK. General Manager.
Charlotte, Columbia & Augusta R. R.
OFFICE GENERAL PASSENGER AGENT,
.Schedule in effect September 3, 1882:
No. 53 DAILY-MAlL AND EXPRESS.
Leave Augusta, A...............7.35nm
Arrive at Columbia, B............11.46 a m
Leave Columbia, B..............11.52 a m
Arrive at Charlotte, C............. 4.15 p m
Leave Charlotte................ 5.00 p m
Arrive at Statesville.........7.05 p m
No. 47 DAILT-MAIL AND ExPREss.
Leave Augu.t................6.00p m
Arrive at Clumbia, D...........10.25p m
No.19 LOCAL FREIGHT, daily except Sun?ays
(With Passenger Coach attached.)
Leave Columbia...............5.00 a m
Arrive at Charlotte................ 3.15 p m
SOUTHWARD.
No.52 DAILY-MAIL AND ExPREnss.
Leave Statesville.................. 7.00 a m
Arrive at Charlotte.............. 9.05 a m
Leave Charlotte. C. .........2.00 p m
Arrive at Columbia, B............ 6.30 p m
Leave Columbia, B.............. 6.37 p m
Arrive at Augusta, A............10.50 p a
- NsO. 48 DAILY-MAI AND ExPREss.
Leave Columbia, D...............6 15 a m
Arrive at Augusta, A............102a m
NO.1l8LoCAL FREIGHT, daily exceptSundays
(With Passenger Coach attached.)
Leave Charlotte.................5.00 a m
Arrive at Columbia............... 3.32 p m
CONNECTIONS.
A-With all lines to and from Savannah,
Florida and the South and Atlanta, Macon
and the Southwest.
B-With South Carolina Raifroad to and
from Charleston.
C-With Richmond and Danville Railroad
to and from all points Not and Carolina
Central Railroad.
D-Connect with the W. C. A A. E. E. Ior
Wilmington and all points on the Atlantic
Coast Line.
Pullman Sleeping Cars on Trains Nos. 52
and 53 between A sta and Washington,
D. C., via Danville, bynrgb and Char
lotteville. Also, on Tans 5s and 53 be.
tween Charlotte and Richmond.
Numbers 47 and 48 run solid between Au
sta and Florence and carry Pullman
leepers between Augusta and Wilmington
and btween Augusta and Wilmingtn.
Above schedule Wash ntm.
G. R. TAIWOrr, Sprtedent.
H. SLAUGHTER, General Psegr Agt.
D. CARDWELL, Ass't General Pasnger
Agent, Columbia, S. C.
Asheville and Spartanburg Railroad.
SpARTANBURG, S. C., September 1, 1881.
On and after Thursday, September 1, 1881,
passenger trains will be run daily (Sundays
excepted) between Spartanburg and Hen
dersonville, as follows:
UP TRAIN.
LeaveRE. A D. Depot at Snartanburg.4.20 p m
Arrive at Hendersonvill'e.........7.30 p m
DOWN TRAIN.
Leave Hendersonville............. 8.30 a m
Arrive B.&AD. Dept,Spartanburg.12.00 m
Both trainsmae connections for Colum
ba and Charleston via Spartanburg. Union
and Columbia and Atlanta and Charlotte by
Air Line. JAMES ANDERSON,
Superintendent.
TA UlillV NO PATENT, NO PAY
U1lU'1!II''~ is our motto. We have
jjjJj i had 14 yaseprec
.in procuring ~Patents,
Caveats, Trade-Marks. C yrgts. etc., in
this and other countries. Ou and Books
giving full instructions in Patents free.
AddressRE. S. A A.P. LACEY, Patent Att'vs,
604 F St., Washlngton, D. C. Jan. 11, 2-tf.
N8for Soldiers on any dis
ease, wound or injury.
PENSIO Fees, $10. Bounty, Back
Pay, Discharges for De
serters, etc., procured. 14 years experience.
Address C. M. SITES A C0,, 604 F st., Wash
ng ton, D. C. JaR.11, 2-tt.
Engdnes, Sc.
HEADQUARTERS FOR
I HCTUI___ MWICIIII.
F. A. SOHUMPERT & Co.,
are Agents and have for sale the following improved Agricultural Implements:
Threshers,
Steam Engines,
Saw Mills,
Grist Mills,
Cotton Gins,
Cotton Presses,
Cider Presses.
McCOBmIK'S IAOHINESI
Harvester and Binder,
Table Rake,
Dropper and Mower,
Horse Rakes,
Harrows,
Globe Cotton Planter,
SULKY AND WALKING PLO WS,
CULTIVATORS,
CHICAGO SCREW PULVERIZER, CANE MILLS AND EVAPORATORS
AND OTHER I>EMOVED AGRICULTURAL IMPLEKENTS.
If you want anything of this kind give us a call before purchasing elsewhere.
Warehouse for Machinery in the new building on corner Caldwell and Har
rin on streets, below Christian & Smith's Livery Stables.
)fr. 5, 10-tf.
SPOLLARD,
Nos. 734 and 736 Reynolds Street,'AUGUSTA, GA.
COfTON ATh AIl CODhSSII EUCfIAIT
AWD DEALER IN
Machinery of all Kinds,
Also Disston's Circular Saws. Rubber and Leather Belting. Steam Pipe. Water and
Steam Gauges. Connections. Whistles. oil Caps. Pop, Globe and Check
Valves, Governors, Wrenches. etc., together with every article of
Steam and Water Fittings. Findings, etc.
GENEEAL AGENT FOR
TALBOTT & SONS.
Talbott's Agricultural Engines (on wheels.) Portsblo Engines (on skids) Stationary
Engines. Tubular and Locomotive Boilers. Turbine Water Wheels. Corn
and Wheat Mills. Saw Mills. Shafting, Pulleys, Boxes, Hangers and
Patent Spark Arresters.
WatertowD Steam Engine Co.
Watertown Agricultural Engines ,.. wheels.) Portable Engines (on skids.) Dairy
Engines (for small buildings.) Vertical Engines. Stationary Engines (with
and without cut of.) Return Tubular Boilers (with two flues.)
Locomotive and Vertical Boilers. Saw Mills, etc., etc..
C. & G. COOPER & CO.
Cooper's SefPropelling (tratio) Engies. Farm Arcultural Engie na wheturn
CopPortablfPpell Ennes(on skids.) Stationary Engirmnes. Loomotv angndetur
Tubular oilers. Corn and Wheat Mill. Portable Mill (with portable
bolt attached.) Smut Machines. Dustless Wheat Separators
and Oat and Weed Extractor. Saw Mills
(double and single.)
J. W. CARDWELL & CO.
Card raulid Cottn Presses Hors Power (outed and down.)Howhser .
Corn Shellers and Fe Cutters.
Johnston Harvester Company
-AND
EMMERSON, TALCOTT & Co.
epers and Binders.,epr and Mower Combined. Singl Binders, Reapers, and
FAIRBANKS & CO.
Fairbanks' Standard Scales, all sizes and patterns. Alsrmn Cash DraworS.
MANUFACTURER of the FOLLOWING MACHINES.
NeitPress.(ta orate pwer. Smith's Imprved Hand Power on andSr
Hay Press. Cotton Gin Feeder. Cotton Condenser.
New Virginia Feed Cutter.
Engines. Cotton Gins, &c., repaired in a workmnlike mtanner.
Orders solicited and promptly executed. For further particulars, circulars, general
iormation, etc., apply to W . P L A D
W. F. GAILLARD, Ag't., for Newherry'
Hotel.
The Orotwell Hotel,
A LARGE THREE STORY BR ICK BUILDING.
Only Hotel with Electric Bells in Newberry.
Only Hotel with Cistern Water.
CENTRAL OFFICE OF TELEPHONE EXCHANGE,
lMRS. EMMA F. BLEASE,
PROPRIETRESS,
N EWBE RRY._S. C.
This commodious and spacious Hotel is now open and fully prepared to entertain at
coTrhe Furniture of every description is New, and no effort will be spared to make all
Pe Raonog en bs oere spacious,ome.l lighted, and' the best ventilated of any
Hotel in the up country.
One of the Best Sample Rooms in the State.
All horses entrusted to our care will be well cared for at Christian & Smith's Stables.
TERM~S.
BOARD BY THE MONTH, $30,00; WEEK, $10.00 ; DAY, $2.00.
LOWER RATES BY THE YEAR.
The Table shall be furnished with the very best. *Nov. 2, 44-ly. -
NEW YORK HlOFFING
Everybody is delighted with the ta,stef iJjul IIfI lAIIi
and beautiful selection made by Mrg. La
mar, who has NEVER WAILED to please her AND THE
custoers New Fall circular just issued. NEWBERRY HERALD
Address MRS. ELLEN LAMAR, FOR
8717 Broadway, New York. $2.25 Per Year.
Nov. 20, 48-ti.
E. N. STOKES. joHN DOwrE. We have perfece aragement wrth
Fort Wayne. Ind., that enable us to offer
STOKES & DORSEY, ou sbsrb a flsels egiulue
BOOK BIN DE RS, on which it is pria.nt h Arine
which is iapidly takn rank as one of the
aR 0 MaflulaCliiesi mti:"n fo " t e ~~r~ sefli
ad his daughters. As it costs you almost
---,ND--a4thing, suppose you try it one year.
-PAPER RULERS', H UTRAVNE
Main Street, Columbia, S. c' TH UM DV N E
J20, T 2 2EEA9OSE -t f ublisked a* Sumter, S. C., by,
tr-ioeek Bae busiess now eor 1Two practical prnters; th frer having
the public. Capital notneeded. We nublished the first daily newspaper issued in
will star you. Men, women,rbos ar nlumbi, ovrtit years ago, being well
s. No eis the time Yo ca work inknow byalt ciADiNis tebs d
buiess. No othber business will pay you vertising medium In the County for Ker
nearly as well. No one can fall to makeen- chants and other business men.
ormus pay, byengawinguattoncn.oCostlyr
ry Goods and . iuasry.
New and Seasonable Goods
are bein received eve day.. Our Stock is
arge and complete in a departments..
Spring and Summer Goods
[n full line will be offered at greatBargain
Eamine them.
Larch 2813 tf C. BOUKNIGHT, EX'R. & 00
COLUMBIA, S. C.
Bay what you need in Dry Goods
and Millinery of
WV. J. Younlg,
132 Main St., CGltmMa, S. C.,
and save money.
GT G3;
1Tan. 25, 4-6m.
Hardware, Sc.
HART &OMPANY,
IIARLWARE MERCHANTS
SOLE ACENTS FOR
LADOW DIBC PULVERIZING HARROW,.
THOMAS_ SM (#rEW, .rHOMAS PULVERIZIIG HABROWn
LANE HARROW, ;
THE AMERICAN BARBED FENCE WIRE,.
BUFFALO ST4NDARD' 8o
-AGENTS FOR
Genuine Farmers' Fritend and Avery Plows. -
--FOR AL
STEEL BULL TONG UES SCOOTERS, TWISTER& 8HOFELE ,
BOLTS, GRASS RODS, SINGLETRBEE, TIN WAR&, WOOD WARER
HOUSEKERPING GOODS, CARPENTE'RB', COOPERS', MACHIZ(
ISTS' and BL ACKSMITHS' T OOLS.
--A FIN~E ASSOR'MR1NT OF
116115, ArctAI AND GeRma
MfUZZLE AND BRElEOH_LOADING GUNS~
--STATE AQENTS FO
KEMP'S MANURE AND COTTON SEE.B SRA E
HmyvARTS & 00., .. - .haresto ,
Nov. 2, M-1y.
ASHLEY PHOSPHATE CO0
CHTART.ESTON, S. 0,
SOLUBLE GUANO, highly ammonlated;
DISSOLVED BONE, highest grade ;
ACID PHOSPHATE. for composting;
ASH ELEMENT, made of loats, for Cotten, Grain and Peas;
GENUINE LEOPOLDSH ALL KAINIT, imported direct from
thebKines In Germany, and warranted pure;
(ENUINE FLOATS, of highest grade, product of the Duo Atomizer ;
SMALL GRAIN SPECIPIOC;
COTTON AND CORN COMPOUND;
GROUND DRIED FISH AND BLOOD,
GROUND RAW BONE
N. S. LAND P!LASTER,
Special Formulas made to order. 00TTO0 SEED MEA.
Special indacements for cash orders.
For terma, Illustrated Almanacs and cards addres the Co.
Dec. 21, 51-Sm.
.l Escellaseessa.
Wkatches, Clocks, Jeteelf'. -.
At the New Store en hotel Lot.fRAL uN
I have now on hand a large and elegant
asortment of ._
ATCHES, CLOCKS, JEWELRY, ~
Silver and Plated Ware,^
IOLIN AND GUITAR STRINGS,
SPECIACLES AJD mFCTAcLE CASEB,up~.
WEDiNG AND BIRTHDAY PRESENTS..
All orders by mail promptly attended to.
Watmaking aid Repairing hl.
Done Cheaply and wida Dispatch. ad$zopeol. -
Call and examine my stock and prices.
EDUARO SCHNLTMAN Si
...A - -
74Ran mra;ma <. . :g

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