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The Newberry herald. (Newberry, S.C.) 1865-1884, June 07, 1883, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026909/1883-06-07/ed-1/seq-4/

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ARTIFICIAL FEEDING OF
LAMBS.
It frequently happens that arti
ficial feeding of lambs is necessary,
and to do it successfully good judg
ment is required. The point is to
promote a healthy and rapid growth,
and not allow the lambs to scour.
The milk of some cows, especially
Jerseys, is too rich, and should be
diluted with a little warm water.
Farrow cows' milk, alone, is not a
good feed, since it frequently
causes constipation. It may be
given by adding a little cane mo
lasses. Milk, when fed, should be
at about its natural temperature,
and not scalded. Lambs, and es
pecially "pet" lambs, are often
"killed with kindness." Feed only
about a gill to a half pint at first.
After the lamb has become accus,
tomed to the milk, it may be fed to
the extent of its appetite. When
old enough, feed a little flax-seed
and oats, or oil-meal if early fatten
ing is desired. There are various
methods of feeding young lambs
artificially. A satisfactory way is
to use a one quart kerosene oil can
with the spout fixed so as to attach
a nipple; the milk flows more freely
from this than from a bottle, on
account of the vent. Let ewes and
'lambs have clean, well-ventilated
apartments. When the weather is
mild and warm turn them out into
the yard. If it is not convenient
to let the ewes out, arrange parti
tions and pens, so that the lambs
may enjoy the sun-light.-American
- Agriculturist forApril.
CANKER WORM.
This is how I got rid of them on
four hundred apple trees (says a
correspondent of the GermantoWn
Telegraph). I took one barrel and
a half of tar, warmed it in a pail
with half rain -water, and applied it,
about four o'clock in the afternoon,
with a large paintbrush Imade
E a ridge around the body of the tree,
-about half way_.to the limbs, and
repeated it every day for thirty one
days, having commenced on the 3d
of April. The habits of these de
structive worms are peculiar. The
miller that lays the egg for the
worm commences coming out of
Athe ground as soon as it begins to
thaw in the spring, and immediate
ly crawls up the tree and lays its
eggs in and on the buds, which
hatch' as soon as the tree begins to
leave, when its work begins. These
millers are hardly ever seen in the
daytime, and they never climb the
trees except at night. From a half
hour to an hour after snndown they
appear topop out of t.he ground and
start for the tree. The female has
no wings and gets stuck in the tar,
and that is the end of it. I had a
man who tarred the four hundred
trees in about two hours ; some of
the trees had been only fcour years
set out. The tar was applied to
the bark. No harm resulted from
it to the tr-ees, but the worms were
exterminated. 'This was done some
six years ago. My trees had been
stripped for five years of fruit and
leaves, but not a canker worm has
been seen since,
SUBSOILING.
There is no doubt, says the
PrairiLe Farmer, as to the benefit
derived from subsoiling-that is,
loosening the earth below the fur
row of the turning plow-under
various circumstances. For in
stance, in stiff soils imperfectly
drained. and in the case of lands
that have lost much of their origi
nal fertility by continuous cultiva
tion. Experiments have demon
strated this fact, and removed the
question beyond the realm of profi
table controversy. In the cases
mentioned, the roots of plants pen.
etrate more readily and deeper in
the earth, and thus are brought in
contact with food necessary to
t heir growth. But in gravelly or
sandly soils, subsoiling may be, and
generally is, injurious, for obvious
reasons. Instead of penetrating
the subsoil and rendering it more
loose and porous. the object should
be to make the subsoil more com
pact and tenacious, so that the
surface soil or tilth will retain
moisture and the fertilizing mat
ters that may be supplied by ma
.nures or the roots of vegetation
left by the crops that have been
grown partly for the purpose of
making the soil more compact and
fertile..
WANTS TO BE A BIRD.
An Iowa girl poet sends us a
poem, the first line of which is ai
follows:
"I would I were a bird "
That settled her hash. No birds
need apply. What in the wid(
world a decent-looking, healthy girl
wants to be a bird for,- is more
than we can imagine. Granting
that an Iowa girl poet is as hand
some as a statute, how like thundea
she would look as a bird, sitting or
a rail fence on one leg, scratching
her feathers with one claw or hop
ping down under a gooseberry bust
scratching for angleworms witl
her bare toe nails. If the girl poe1
bird should fihd an angleworm shi
should run away and scream. Bu1
maybe it is not that kind of a biri
she wants to be. There is no kini
of a bird that can have so much fat
as a girl. As a girl she can go t<
all places of amusement, dance anc
flirt and get mashed, but as a bird
with nothing on but feathers, sh(
would catch cold. Imagine a gir:
poet flying around in the trees,
bopping from limb to limb. Shf
would have the whole town watch.
ing her, and making remarks
Think how a girl poet would feel it
she was a bird, and should be moult
ing. She would watch every feathei
that dropped off; and wonder how
long the feathers were going tc
hold out. And then if the gir]
poet was a bird she would have tc
set, if she was tha6 kind of a poet,
or a bird, and the setting would
commence just when there was the
most going on in society, and sh
would have to stay right by re
gardless, and after the poet biri
got off of the nest she would lool
sick and it would take her si
weeks .to recruit up so as to maki
a decent appearance in bird society
If a girl poet desires to be a birc
in order to get out of the dutie:
of life, so as to have a high oli
time chirruping around, stealing
cherries, and singing the livelong
day, she makes a mistake. Birdi
may seem to be free from care, ani
to have a soft thing, but they have
a heap of trouble. There is thi
same jealousy and back biting
among birds that. there is amons
human beings, and a good-looking
well dressed bird, who has an:
style about her, and is a trifle in
dependent and jolly, will find tha
she will get her feathers rumpled
and be called names, and she wi]
wish some boy with a bean snappel
would fire a load of beans righ
through her. Our Iowa poet doe
not say what kind of a bird tha
she would like to be, but we can'
think of any kind of* bird tha
would be as good as a girl. 0
course she wouldn't want to be
canary bird, or a mocking bird in
cage, and have to sing for hemj
seed and mocking bird food, and
look out for cats. She would prob
ably want to be a wild, out door
go as you please sort of bird. Well
tere is none of that kind that are
perfectly safe, and who always havy
a good time. If our girl poet birn
was a duck or wild goose, sb<
might be flying along some da:
when there would be a puff o
smoke under her, and she wou4d
feel as though she had a hot box
and would go off-and sit on
muskrat house all night picking
No. 6 shot out of her meat, or th<
second joint or elsewhere as the
cae might be. There wouldn't be
much fun in that. If she was
pigeon she would be caught i
trap and have her neck wrung
And whatever kind our peet migh1
be, she would have to scratch grave
for a living, and eat worms. Th<
outlook would be first class. Th4
only bird she could be, and be
success, would be a hen, and have
rooster scratch for her, and~ther
and there would be the drawback o:
aving to share the worms her owr
darling rooster might find with a
whole flock of hiens. If our Iowi
girl poet has got a fair job in hea
business, and can have any sori
of an extra dress to wear to partiei
and can catch on to a fellow onc4
in a while, and does not want th<
earth, she should cease repining
let this bird scheme go, and be
contented as a girl. A girl can dis
count all the birds in the woods
and be in no danger of being sho1
by boys with slings.-Pecks Sun.
A Nebraska mnonument to a horsi
thief is simply a stake at the heai
of the grave and a sign reading
"It would have been cheaper foi
im to go afoot.''
Arkansas women love to whistle
And what is more lovely than tulipi
well blown ?
The tax on matches has been re.
Rail Roads.
Columbia & Greenville Railroad. ]
PASSENGER DEPARTMENT.
COLUMBIA, S. C., Apr. 16th, 1882.
On and after Monday, April 16, 1882, the
PASSENGER TRAINS will run as herewith in
dicated upon this road and its branche
Daily, except Sundays.
No. 52. UP PASSENGER.
Leave Columbia,A - - * 11.47 a m
" Alston, - - 1.00 p in
Newberry, - - - - 2.10 p in
" Ninety-Six, - - - - 3.88 p in
? Hodges, - - - 4.55 p m
" Belton, , - - - 6.19 p in
Arrive Greenville, - - - - 8.f05 p m
No. 53. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Greenville, - - + - 10.80 a m
" Belton, - - - 12.18 p in
" Hodges, - - 140 p m V
" Ninety-Six, - - - - 2.89 p m
" Newberry, - - - 4.32 pm I
"Aiston - - 5.40 pi t
Ar:ve Columbia,F - - 7.00 p m
SPARTANBURG, UNION a COLUMBIA RAILROAD.
No.52. UP PASSENGER.
Leave Alston, - - - - 1.15 p in
Strother, - - - - 2.01 p.m
" Shelton, . - - - . - 2.382 p m
"c Santue, --- - - .-825pm
" Union, - - - -4.00 pm i
" Jonesville, - , - - 4.88 p m i
Arrive Spartanburg, " - 6.58 pm t
No.53. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Spartanburg, R.& D. Depot, H 12 55 p m
"c Spartanburg, S. U.& C. Depot,G 1.04 p in
"t Jonesville, - - - 208pm
" Union. - - - 2.47 p mn
" Santuc, 3- - 2.8p
Shelton, - . - 4 20 p m
Strother, - - - 4.51 p m
Arrive at Alston. - - - 5.88 p m
LAURENS RAILWAY.t
LeaveNewberry, - - - 4.40 pm .
Arrive Laurens C. H.. - - 7.83 a m'
Leave Laurens C. H., - - - 9.45 p m
Arrive Newberry, - - 12.41 p in
ABBEVILLE BRANCH.
Leave Hodges, " - - - 5.00 p in
Arrive at Abbeville, - - + 6.12 p in
Leave Abbeville, - - - - 12.28 p m
Arrive at Hodges, - - - - 1.85pm i
BLUE RIDGE RAILROAD AND ANDERSON
BRANCH.
Leave Belton 6.22 p m -
" Anderson 7.01 p in
" Pendleton 7.51 p m I
Leave Seneca C, 8.40 p in
Arrive Walhalla 9.05 p in
Leave Walhalla, - - 9.85 a m
Leave Seneca C, 10.07 a in
" Pendleton, - - 10.48 a m a
c" Anderson, - - 11.85 p in s
Arrive at Belton, - - 12.20 p m s
CONNECTIONS. a
A. With South Carolina Railroad from Char- I
leston. . t
With Wilmington, Columbia and Augsta
Railroad from Wilmington an allI
points North thereof.
With Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad from Charlotte and all points
North thereof.
B. With Asheville & Spartanburg Rail Road
for points in Western North Carolina.
C. With A. & C. Div. R. & D. R. B., from all
points South and West.
! D. With A. & C. Div., R. & D. R. R., from At'
lanta and beyond.
E. With A. & C. Div., R. & D. R. E., from all
points South and West.
F. With South Carolina Railroad for Charles
ton.
With Wilmington, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad for Wilmington and the North.
With Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad for Charlotte and the North.
G. With Asheville & Spartanburg Railroad
from Hendersonville.
H. With A. & C. Div., R. & D. R. R., from
Charlotte and beyond.
Standard Time used is Washington, D. C.,
which is fifteen minutes faster than Columbia.
J. W. FRY, Superintendent.
I. SLAUGHTER, General Passenger Agent.
D. CARDWELL, Ass't General Passenger Agt.,
Columbia, S. C.
South Carolina Railway Company.
CHANGE OF SCHEDULE.
On and after Dec. 17th. 1882, Passenger
Trains on this road will run as follows un
til fhrther notice:
TO AND FROM CHARLESTON.
GOING EAST,
Leave Columbia *800 a m t6.58 p in
Arrive Charleston 12.55 p m 12 3C p m
GOING WEST,
Leave Charleston t7.00 a m "5.20 p in
Arrive Columbia 11.28 a mIn 10.009 p m
tDaily. *Daily except Sunday.
TO AND FROM CAMDEN.
-GOING EAST,
Leave Columbia *800 ain *6.58p m
Arrive Camden 1.10 a m 10.00 p m
GOING WEST
Leave-Camden *7.00 a m *5.00 p m
Arrive Columbia 11.28 a m 10.09 p mi ]
*Daily except Sundays.
TO AND FROM AUGUSTA.
GOING EAST,
Leave Columbia *8.00 a mn *&.58 p m
Arrive Augusta 2.00pin 7.05 am
GOING WEST,
SLeave Augusta *7.05 ai m 4.10 p m
Arrive Columbia 4.05 p m 10 09 p in 1
*Daily except Sundays.
CONNECTIONs.
Connection made at Columbia with the
Columbia and Greenville Rail Road by train
Larriving at 11.28 P. 31., and dlepartini at 6.58
P. . Connection -madleat ( olnmba Junc
lion with Char-lotte, Columbia and A ngusta
Rall Roatd by same train to and from all
Ipoints on borth roadis with through Pullman
sleeper betweel Charleston anid Washing
ton, via Virginia Midland route, without
change. Connection made at Charleston
Swith Steamers fomr New York on Wednesdays
and Saturdays; also. with Savannah and
Charleston Itailroadt to all poinmts Sout hi.
Connections are made at Augusta with
Gearg'i lailroad and Central Railroad to
and from all points South andl West.
Through tickets can he pumrchased to all
points South andm West, by- applying to
D. McQUE EN. A gent, Colambia. {
iD.C. A LL EN, G. P. &F. A.
JOHN B. P'ECK. General Manager.
GLENN SPRINGS,
SPARTANBURG CO,, S, C,
The Proprietors of this Celebrate d
fWatering Place respectfully announce
that it will be opened this Season on
the 1st of May under the same man
agemnent as last year.
TERMS OF BOARD.
Per day... .. .. .. .. .. $ 200
Per week. .. .. .. .. ....12 00
Per month. .. .. .. .. .. 30 00
Children under ten years of age and
colored servants, half price. Liberal
reductions for large families.
Messrs. A. Tanner & Son, will run a
daily Stage Line from Spartanrg
and Glenus, making the best rail road,
coWIlectionl.
W Special attention given to ship
ping of Water.
SIMPSON & SIMPSON,
May 3, tf. Proprietors.
Sampson Pope, I. D.,
Office-Opera House,
NE WB ERRY S. .
In addition to at general pratctice paiys
especial attention to tihe tieatmient of
diseases of Females, and Chronic dis
eases of all kinds includinig diseases of
the Respiratory and Circulattory Sys
tems-of the Bowels, Kidneys, Bladder.
Rectum, Liver, Stomach, Eye, Ear,
Nose and Thlroat, of the Nervous Sys
tenm and Cancerous Sores and Ulcers.
Correspondence solicited.
April 2, 14-ly.
Trade
"SALUDA CROUP OiL."
Mark.
A vegetabte comipoun:d aiid ain in
fallible remedy for Crou p.
Prepared by the Saluda Medicine
.Company, NeB berty. So. Ca. Price
50c. per bottle.
For sale byV all Druggists.
A pril 2, 14-Gmi.
J ... P. GoGGANs. D. 0. H ERBERT.
GOGGANS & HERBERT, ~
Attorneysat-law,
NEWBERRY, S. C.
"Strict Attention to Business."
Nov. 2, 1-13y.
.Misceuaneous.
[883, SPRING 1883,
AND
SUMMER STOCK
OF NEW AND ELEGANT
DLOTHING]
AND a
GENTS' AND YOUTHS'
URNIUING GOODS,
.11 of which were bought at lowest
rices for Cash, and therefore can be
old at ROCK BOTTOM PRICES.
~RIGHT & Js W1 COPPOCk
Will Not Be Undersold,
nd they therefore cordially invite any
nd every man who needs anything in ]
heir line from a pair of
Shoes up to a Hat,
cluding Socks, Drawers, Under and
)veIshirts, Collars, Pants, Vests,
,oats. to call at their store in
Mollohon Row
o be convinced of what they say. -
Call early and call late
All you may want relate,
Ask for Clothing, Hats or Shoes,
Or anything else you choose
And you shall have it from
kRIGlT & J. W. COPPOCK.
Mar. 28, 13-tf C
Can Tell You How to Be
Your Own Doctor!
If you have a bad taste in your mouth, ri
allowness or yellow color of skin, feel de
pondent, stupid and drowsy, appetite un
teady, frequent headache or dizziness, you
re "bilious." Nothing will arouse your
,iver to act on and strengthen up your sys
em equal to
IMMONS'
HEPATIC
COMPOUNDC
Or Liver and Kidney Cure.
.EMOVES CONSTIPATION.
RELIEVES DIZZINESS.
DISPELS SICK HEADACHE.
ABOLISHES BILIOUSNESS. A
CURES JAUNDICE.
CURES LIVERCOMPLAINT.
OVERCOMEs MALARIAL BLOOD POIsONING.
REGULATES THE STOMACH.
WILL REGULATE THE LIVER.
WILL REGULATE THE BOWELS.
THE LIVER AND KIDNEYS T
;an be kept perfectly healthy in any cli
mate by taking an occasional dose of
SIMMONS' HEPATIC COMPOUND,
THE GREAT VEGET&BLE
LIVER AND KIDNEY MEDICINE.
DOWIE & MOISE,
PROPRIETORS,
NHOLESALE DRUCCISTS C
CHARLESTOiN, S. C.
A3 FOR SALE EVERYWHERE. ft
And in Newberry by Dr. S. F. FANT.
Nov. 2, 44-ly.
SAgehts Wanted For The C
ELESTIAL YMBOL
ITEEPRETED. Ey Rev.H. W. Morris, D.D.
rhe grandest object of Creation is the
nlu. Centre of Life, Light. IHeat-, At
raction and Chemical Action. Its
natural wonders and spiritual teach
ngs are alike manrvelous, and make a
ok of absorbing and intense interest.
Lhe great problems of the Material
jiverse unfolded and illustrated.
lature shown to be a Revelation of
od In the noblest and most perfect :
ense. Highly commuendedl. "Every ;
act of nature i4 made to re-peat some!.
esson of His gospel.--. Y. Eran
elist. "B3oth seientitic and devout.'
Te. A. C'. Gecorge, D. D., Cicago. * A
trtling revelation concernihng the i,
vodeCrs andi glories of the Sun.-;
Ulder J. W. Me'Garrey, Lexiutfon, Ky1..
Interestingf, inIstructive anid very sug
~etive.'-Bshop, Jaggar of Ohio. it
els fast and p,leaIses all. Address, J.
. McfURDY & CO., Philadelphia, Pa.;
ininnati, 0.; ChIcago, Ill.; or St.
ous, Mo
May- 8, 18-2m.
'T'ENTS.
nd ea rough sktcuo
Washington, D) C. und aPrelimnry
hin clr ofiventon and yo wilbe advised
hteornt a paen )an e obtaGne ef
fo fare aised tyu dnvrnio ;apaenbe
en 60 to pa o aern , daents 1 and 6.th r
tle whe appicaiorn aie. en awd e
ted Cse )adte Ifinaa oerten e
D C. shsbetJdmn an deen hn, o
ucareyon the dueention ade abt preimiaryf
4aia i *had. ~) s Patent arene the
egEsronRoE LaE.s TraEMONk,an
L sereyouoaptenud olle aflb Amrhan
rteno reques paddesdtheCmisoero
tsate reonie Sts. .Ch o ,of C
,WesyCLU. embe, tsofc ha. be
This nerain aelg,and Houeerence ca be
Iodmrvmn aimst ever oent In the
ceptionmphle gueating .o y<etreupnrqet
8.RG . RLHT&MON, a
Lttrn19 a2t, LaPnSlctror Aricans.
~ an FoeizaPatnts
Engines, _c.
4 HEADQUARTERS FOR
ELCIf[LT IMPlEMIfSIDMACIIIlIY.
?. A. SOHUMPERT & CO.,
re Agents and have for sale the following improved Agricultural Implements:
Threshers,
Steam Engines,
Saw Mills,
Grist Mills,
Cotton Gins,
Cotton Presses,
Cider Presses.
[cCO1{3ICSK'S M.AACHINESI
Harvester and Binder,
Table Rake,
Dropper and Mower,
Horse Rakes,
Harrows,
G-lobe Cotton Planter,
SULKY AND WALKING PLO WS,
CULTIVATORS,
HICAGO SCREW PULVERIZER, CANE MILLS AND EVAPORATORS
AND OTER IPBOVED AUBIcULTUR&L IMPLE>ETS.
If you want anything of this kind give u. a call before purchasing elsewhere.
Warehouse for Machinery in the new building on corner Caldwell and Har
uton streets, below Christian & Smith's Livery Stables.
Mar. 5, 1(--tf.
J. POLLARD,
Nos. 734 and 736 Reynolds Street, AUGUSTA, GA.
AND DEALER IN
MachiiMery of all Kiinds,
so Disston's Circular Saws. Rubber and Leather Belting. Steam Pipe. Water and
Steam Gauges. Connections. Whistles. Oil Caps. Pop, Globe and Check
Valves, Governors, Wrenches, et:., together with every article of
Steam and Water Fittings, Findings, etc.
GENERAL AGENT FOR
TALBOTT & SONS.
tlbott's Agricultural Engines (on wheels.) Portable Engines (on skids) Stationary
Engines. Tubular and Locomotive Boilers. Turbine Water Wheels. Corn
and Wheat Mills. Saw Mills. Shafting, Pulleys, Boxes, Hangers and
Patent Spark Arresters.
Watertown Steam Engine Co.
atertown Agricultural Engnes (on wheels.) Portable Engines (on skids.) Dairy
Engines (tor small buildings.) Vertical Engines. Stationary Engines (with
and without cut off.) Return Tubular Boilers (with two flues.)
Locomotive and Vertical Boilers. Saw Mills, etc., etc..
C. & G. COOPER & CO.
3oper's Self-I'ropelling (tra.ition) Engines. Farm Agricultural Engines. (on wheels.]
Portable Engines (on skids.) Stationary Engines. Locomotive and Return
Tubular Boilers. Corn and Wheat Mill. Portable Mill (with portable
bolt attached.) Smut Machines. Dustless Wheat Separators
and Oat andl Weed Extractor. Saw Mills
(double and single.)
J. W. CARDWELL & CO.
ardwel1 Wuhct TrcsnPrsSeparator and Cleaner. "Ground To" Tresher5
Corn Shellers and Feed Cutters.
Johnston H{arvest~er Company
-AND
EMMERSON, TALCOTT & CO.
capers and Binders. Reapers and Mowers Combinedl. Single Binders, Reapcrs, anm
Mowers. Cultivators and Grain Sowers.
FAIRBANKS & CO.
Fairbanks' Standard Scales, all sizes and patterns. Alarm Cash Draw's
[ANUFACTUREER of the FOLLOWING MACHINESe
ebet & Goottrich Improve<d IX!. (ottoni Gin. Itt-d's P:atent .\nuton:tty- I'ow. r scre a
Press. (stenti rii wat pvr m ,;ih' ederovd in'i nPow- Cotton and
New virginia Feed -'utter.
E:ngies. Cotton Gias. &c., repaired In a workmanlf!1ke~ m.mnI1r.
Or,!er-s soli;cited aeut pr,amptly ex -cated. Fo,r lartlier p urticulatrs. eirum! Lr4. geeoraml
iormat Pen etc., aply to
W. J. POLLARD.
W. F. GA ILLA RD, Ag't., for Newberry
Hotel.
rho Oro.twellHtl
A LARGE THREE STORY B-.ICK BUILDING.
)nly Hotel with Electric Bells in Newberry
*Only Hotel with Cistern Water.
ENTRAL OFFICE OF TELEPHONE EXCHANGE,
MRS. EMMA F. BLEASE,
PROPRIETRESS,
NEWBERRY,. S. C.
This commodious and spacious Hlotel is now open and rally prepared to entertain at
The Furniture of every description is New, and no effort will be spared to make all
~rsons patronizing t.hc establishment at home.
The Rooms in this Hotel are spacious, well lighted, and the best ventilated of any
otel in the up country.
One of the Best Sample Rooms in the State-.
All horses entrusted to our care will be well cared for at Christian & Smith's Stables.
TERM~S.
BOARD BY THE MONTH, $30,00; WEEK, $10,00O; DAY, $2.00.
LOWER RATES BY TIHE YEAR.
The Table shall be furnished with the very best. Nov. 2, 44-ly.
THE BLATCHLEY
PUMP!BOKBNES
BUY THfE~BEST. Bak Bok M uf1rrs
BLATCHLEY'S
TRIPLE ENAMEL -N
S PORCELAIN-LUNED PAE RUES
SEAMLESS TUBE Mi tet ouba .C
:COPPER-LINED
P U MV P uy2,152 0t
Do not be inte rosBs nhes~wbfr
C.c~ LATCHILEY,Manluf'r, usNoisteim.Ticawrkn
308 MARKET ST., Philad'a. sprtieorivyurwlelneoth
Writs to me for name of .nearest Agent. bsns.N te uieswl a o
Mar. 28, 13-rl6mwel.N n cntltmaen
otor chances to incres tei eaiyanhorbl.AdesTU&
e"rn is, ad in time becomeCo,AgsaMle.4-y
ove their opportunities remain in pover- nmnt iei weigb,g n
We offer a great chance to make money, *IT*dr eoeyude oehn
e wnt many n, wonmen, bos girls fIlmhtadsbieeaeein
s start. The buiness willrpyfiro thnertignwCatlnoreuedW
ni tmes ordinary wages. Expensive Out wl ~rIhyueeyhn.Mn r
* f*urnihe fr ooe wou enage aigfrue. L de aea uha
ilstomae ony apdl. ouca d. me,an. oyn gTOir.JOH mae rETy.
x ? Cain Sortea,dColainea, 8. C.
Dry Goods alud 1Na e "88ery.
New and Seasonable G
Are being received even day. Our St k
large and complete in.a.1 departments.
Spring and Summer Goods
In full line will be offered at great Sa
Examine them.
March 28 13 tf C. BOUKN1GHT, EX'R. &
COLUMBIA, S. 0.
Bay what you need in Dry Goods
and Millinery of
W. J. Young,
132 Main St., Colambia, S. C.,
and save money.
UG
Jan. 25, 4-6m
Hardware, c.
HART & COMPANY,
HARD WARE MERCHAlN
SOLE ACENTS FOR
LADOW DISC PULVERIZING HARROW,
THOMAS SMOOTHING, THOMAS PULVERIZING HARROW.:__
LANE HARROW,
THE AMERICAN BARBED FENCE WIRE,
BUFFALO STANDJ"D
-AGENTS FOE
Genuine Farmers' Friend and .AveryPi
-FOR SALE
STEEL BULL TONGUES, SCOOTERS, TWL922B$, SHOVELS
BOLTS, GR ASS RODS SINGLETR EES, TIN WA(kP, WOOD -
HOUSEKEEPING GOODS, CARPENTERS', eOOPERS,. MACH1
ISTS and BL ACKSMITHS' /00L89.
--A ' ASSOETME..'T OF
ENGLISH, AMibAL4GERIAN
MUZZLE AND BREEC DING
---STATE AGENTS For
KEM!P'S MAANURE ANtI COTTON SEED SPRE
MANURE 8S
the c.a. t the a..bD.IImehSaUdings
HrART & O. - - hrls
Aubtb.thna New Ster en otlet
Ihe now t nhanh d a lre an elgn
aso a len of .tyb wu. a~
USil and Pl3U.at~ie0I Ware,U4 .
SILI AD UIAR WTRILS, IGITASOBODCS
SF.CTAEESAN SPCTAEE AS
WIAJEDM AND JDYPESENTS.O
Atl trders byo oai protl tdDIA.
Iathaki ng hn?lrge aneepairn'.~Ag
WDTnES ChaLOCKSd WELRYsptch
Caliv and Plamied stckapre.
- I . I ~. -s A RK-o~q
Done Chaply anewitheDspatch
Call an examie my aock wn prnce
EDUARD SCHOLTZ. mu~c v
Nov. 21, 47-tf
DIR. E. E. JACKSON,
9l11GGIST AND CIIMI8T,
COLUMBIA, S. C.
Remcoved to store two doors next to
Wheeler House.
Orders promptly attended to
Apr. 11, 15-tf
NO PATENT, NO PAY 4W800feet of lmoc aP3
is our m'tto. We have gg meg cu4t3f.oeEati
had 14 years experience - Ozr En=ha are
Caveats, Trade-Marks. Cop.yrIi t, etc., in fu-n ate
this an I other countries. Our Hand Books glne not, 5tsd.
iving full instructions In Pa nts free. Cat.Of. If
Adress E. S. & A. P. L ACEY, 1'at t Att'vs, orPral
04 F St., Washingt&q, D. C. Jan. 11, 2-tf. lar Saw-Eill~
i8Ngfor Soldiers on any ds
Pay, Discharges for De- ATa~:~ ~
ddres C. t.SIS E CO. 60 tWash
ngton, D. O. -. 1 E ,-tf.~ a ~ 7,2- -

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