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The Newberry herald. (Newberry, S.C.) 1865-1884, October 04, 1883, Image 2

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The HIer&td.
T. F. GRENEKER, EDITORS.
GEO. B. CROMER. f
NEWBERRY, S. C.
THURSDAY OCT. 4 1883.
1 A PAPER FOR THE PEOPLE.
The Herald is in the bghest respect aFam
ily Newa r, devotel to the material in
teresta of th- people of this County and the
State. It circulates extensiveiy, and as an
Adve medium offers unrivalled ad
vantag'es or Terma, see first page.
FARMERS AND FERTILIZERS.
The farmers of Pickens County
held a mass meeting a few days ago
and adopted resolutions requesting
rti the fertilizer companies, merchants
and others who have made advances,
to make a "reasonable reduction on
all such advanees." They also de
cided, in view of the short grain
crop, that it would be patriotic in
"those citizens engaged in the dis
tilling of grain to discontinue the
same as soon as practical." We
sympathize with the Pickens farm
ers, but the drouth was not more
disastrous in their county than
elsewhere throughout the State.
There can be no wrong in asking
those who made advances for agri
cultural purposes to grant another
year's indulgence, and in many
cases it will be best for all interested
to do so ; but the farmers have no
right to demand a reductior The
guano 'me.chant, like other trades
men, exposes i wares for sale,
but compels nobody to buy ; and
the debt for fertilizers should
be stled in a satisfactory manner.
if possible-in an honest way, at
all events. The boy who owes
for a bag of shot, would hardly ask
for a reduction in the price agreed
upon, on the ground that he used
the shot without bagging any game.
But it would be as reasonable for
to do so, as for a farmer to try
ade the payment of a guano
on the ground that the fertili
was expended without benefi
cial results. The guano merchant
is no more responsible for the
drouth, than the hardware merchant
is. for the poor marksmanship of the
bo.While this is true, it is also true
tat many men will not be able to
pay out, and if those who have
made advances can see their way
clear to make reasonable reductions,
or togrant a year's indulgence, we
shall rejoice with the farmers.
We agree with the Pickens farm
ers . that it would be patriotic in
those "engaged in the distilling of
grain to discontinue the same." We
need the corn, but we do not need
whiskey. A drouth that would
leave the distilleries dry would be
an-unlooked for blessing
UNIFOR31ITY.
The law requires the State Board
of Examiners to adopt a "uniform
series" of text books for use in the
public schools. A short time ago.
the Board did adopt a cataloguee of
text books, about as uniform as
-* a clown's costume. For instance,
following the "series", adopted by
the Board, one teacher may use
Appleton's readers, another Mc
Guffey's, another Reynold's, and
still another. Swinton's. There is
uniformity with a vengeance ! If
there is a public school teacher in
this State who could possibly adopt
a less uniform "series" of readers.
we move that he be at once elevat
ed to the State Chair of stupidity
or made a member of the State
Board of Examiners. "-Series" does
not mean --Catalogue."
Mrs. Mary E. Bryan begins her
"random talks" in the Stenny South,
- with this sentence : "On a hazy,
dreamy aftcrnooni this week I drove
to see a new industry ini the burgh
near which my own vine and fig tree
blossom." The "new industry" is
a rabbit ranche, which, by the
way, is not as unusual as a fig
tree that blossoms-this the writer
will discover by a closer observa
tion of her own and other fig trees.
The County Fair is two weeks dis
* tant. W~hat preparations are the
farmers making in the way of Ex
hibits ? The manageme11t of the
Joint Stock Company has not been
in accordance with our notions of
business, but the company under
stands what it is doing, andl we are
anxious for it to succeed. A suc
cessful County Fair cannot fail to
benefit the agricultural interests of
our county.
The Columbia Register is in favor
of Hancock for the Presidency; the
Netcs aad Co'urier says, with em
phasis, "Hancock wiii not do."
Has it ever occurred to you that
' there is an abundant scareity of
men who weill do? Think about it,
brmthers.
The Keor-ee Courier appeared
last week in a new dress-much
more attractive than the old. We
are glad to learn that our esteemed
contemporary is prospering.
- Senator Bayard can hardly speak
of Governor B. F. Butler without
holding his nose-his own nose, we
mean; tho we 'fancy that he would
like to tweakjhat,of the "Hero .of
Five Forks, and God knows how
many spoons."
A few mornings ago, Lizzie Wa
rora, of Columbia, aged four years,
fell into a ,well sixty feet deep,
without being seriously hurt. The
water was five feet deep-but fortu
nately -the girl's father happened to
be near and rescured her.
On the morning of the 28th Miss
Elizabeth Seegers. aged about .25,
a patient in the Lunatic Asylum,
from Lancaster County, leaped from
a second-story window of the Asy
lum to the ground falling 25.feet.
She sustained some serious but not
fatal injuries.
On the 26th the Democratic
State convention of Massachusetts
re-nominated Gen. B. F. Butler for
Governor. Frederick 0. Prince, of
Boston, was nominated for Lieuten
ant-Govenor. but he has since de
clined the nomination. He cant
stand the "Beast."
The following changes in the sal
aries of South Carolina postmasters
take effect to-day (October 1st:)
Beaufort, from $1,600 to $1,400 ;
Camden, from $1,500 to $1.400 ;
Charleston, from $3,000 to $3,300 ;
Columbia, from $2,300 to -$2,500 ;
Florence, from $1,000 -to $1,100;
Georgetown, from $1,100 to $1,0 ;
Greenville Courthouse, from $1,900
to $2,000 ; Newberry Courthouse,
from $1,800 to $1,600 ; Spartanburg
Courthouse, from $2,000 to $1,900 ;
Sumter Courthouse, from $1,700 to
$1,600.
A CHINESE FUNERAL.
PUhILADELPHIA, September 30.
Hog Chuck, a Chinaman, who died in
the almshouse on Wednesday last,
was buried to-day with interesting
ceremonies. The body was encased
in a handsome walnut casket, with
a plate on the lid bearing the date
of the birth and, death of the dead
Celestial. The bottom of the casket
was filled with Chinese coins, and
the body was covered with peculiar
Chinese perforated paper with let
tering on it. . At the grave the Rev.
Mr. Lyle repeated the Lord's Prayer
in Chinese and English, after which
a number of ribbons which were
bound about the body were removed
and thrown upon the coffin. The
casket was then lowered and while
the gravel was being shovelled upon
it the Celestials cast meats, rice,
tea, baked dough, roast chicken and
a black bottle among the dirt. On
the way to the- grave a Chinaman
seated beside the driver threw rice
and paper along the ground travers
ed. Ten thousand people witnessed
the ceremonies at' the grave. It
was intended to have had some ser.
vice in the Church of the Epiphany
(Episcopal,) but the crowd wa.s so
great that it was impossible to get
into the church. Mayor King re
fused to allow the New York Clhi
nese band to go in the procession
and the police stopped the fire cere
mionies in front of the house from
hich the deceased was taken to
the grave. Nearly all of the Chi
ese in the city attended the inneral.
PLATFORM OF THE BLACKS.
THE ADDREss ADOPTED BY THE
LOUISvILLE CONVENTION.
LorisvrLLE, Ky., September 2'7..
-The National Colored Conven
tion late last night adopted the fol
lowing address:
The National Convention of
colored men assembled respectfully
present the following as embracing
and presenting their views and sen
timents:'
First. That we are grateful for
and rejoice in the miraculous emnan
c1pation that caine to our race
twenty years ago. The shock of
embattled arms was the lullaby of
a nation born in a day. We can
not forget the great sacrifices of
the women and heroic men who
made possible the struggle in which
treason and slavery were consigned
to a common sepulchre. nor would
we be unmindful of the measure of
devotion and patriotism that white
and colored soldiers rendered the
nation.
Second. That we are not insen
sible to the fact that the Congress
of the United States has spread
upon the statute books many laws
calculated to maks, us secure in our
rights as citizens. Nor would we
be forgetful of the magnificent
amendments to the Constitution in
tended to rendler forever impossible
the crime of human slavery.
Third. We do not ask for any
more class legislation. We have
had enough of this. But we do be
lieve that many of the laws intended
to secure to us our rights as citizens
are nothing more than dead letters.
In the Southern States almost
without exception, the colored peo
ple are denied justice in the courts.
denied the fruit of their honest
labor, defrauded of their polhtical
rights at the ballot-box. sh- out!
from learning trades. cheated out of
their civil rights by innkeepers and
common carrier companies, and left
by the States tG, an inadequate op
portunity for educational and gen
eral improvement.
Fourth. We ~regard the labor
question, education and sound mnoral
trining naiamomm to all other
qulstions. We believe that these 1
questions, espe ially in the South,
need recasting, Jand that plantation
credits and t'he mortgage system
shoul<th.e aolsd.- 'hat llonest
labor shoul be remunerated. That
the la:dho rs of the South should,
recognize t t' this qh'estion is to
be solved_ encouraging negroes. _
to industry,ito frugality and to busi
ness habit' , by; seising them t
acquire an'interest in the soil, by
paying thefn-honest vnes forhon
est work, by making them content
and happy in the land of their na
tivity. 'he white men and owners
of the soil in the South can settle
the question of labor and capital
between white and black.
Fifth We believe in a broad
comprehensive system looking to
ward the education of young colored
girls so that they . may become in
telligent and faithful women, and
of young colored boys that they
may learn trades and become use
ful men and good citizens. The
religious and moral training of the
youth of our race should not be
neglected. The hope of every peo
ple is in adherence to sound social,
logical and ethical principles. The
moral selement in character is of
greater value than wealth or educa
tion, and this must be fostered by
the family and encouraged by the i
pulpit.
Sixth. The failure of the Freed
man's Savings Bank and Trust t
Company is the moral of our time.
It was established to receive the
earnings of persons heretofore held i
in bondage and, the descendants of
such persons. It was established
by the Government and thought to
be solvent. In changing its charac
ter trustees transcended their an- l
thority and thereby made them
selves.liable. The Government, in
appointing special machinery to
close the insolvent institution, vio
lated the United States statutes in
bankruptcy, and should therefore,
reimburse the creditors of the bank.
Seventh. The distinction made
between white and black troops in t
the regular army is un-American, l
unjust and ungrateful. White men
can enter any branch of the service,
while colored men are confined to
the cavalry and. infantry service, I
and in the appointment of civilians
to regulate the army we believe it
the . duty of. the President to con- _
sider the claims of colored men.
This distinction is carried into the
navy.as well.
Eighth. It is not our province
to dictate the policy of the Govern
ment or the action of our fellow
citizens in the several States. It
is a matter that their circumstances,
patriotism and needs should shape.
Ninth. As a race struggling and
contending for our political and
civil rights.we are not unmindful of
the efforts of Ireland to gain her
rights, and we extend to our Irish
friends.our profound sympathy and
best wishes.
Tenth. We earnestly desire, the
abolition of the chain-gang convict
system, and the admission to trade
unions.of men of our own race and,
to employment in commercial par
suits.
Eleventh. In nearly every State
in the Union, both North and South,
our race are not allowed to enter
freely.into .trades or gain einploy
ment in the higher walks of life.
Thlis is uuworthy of our institutions,
and hurtful to the reputation of our
country at hoitpe and abroad.
After adopting the above address, s
the Convention adjourned and the 1
members dispersed to their hiomes.
The gross revenues of the post- t
office for the year ending June 30, 1
1883, were $44,827,473 ; for the year
ending June 30, 1882, $41.265,31 7.
Increase for 1883 $3,562.156. Stamps
sold in 1883" $42,923,561, in 1882
$3,533,317. Increase for 1882 $3,- I
390,244. - -
IN MEMORIAMI.
Associate- Reform Presbyterian. -'
Dr. 'WM. W. MCMoRIE, died at the
home of hisa daughter and son-in-law.
Mr. and Mrs. Cotield, ini Union Coun
ty. S. C., August 22nd, 1883.
The subjeel.of this notice was born
in Newberry County, S. C., April 15 h,
1803. The date of' his birth carries
him far back into the annals of his n-a
tive County, wher-e he was not only
born, but where he spent all his life
until a fewv year-s after the late war.
Eighty years and four months of life!
~Iow many ev-ents transpire in fomi
score years !At the time the deceased
was born there were only sixteen States '2
in this great Union, Je't'erson w'as
President, and the eountry full of liev- 2
olutionary soldiers. While a few, a .a
very few, exceed fourscore years, the
great mass of mnkind fall long beforer
it is, reached.
T1hie writer has probably been led in- t
to this reflection, not only .by looking I
back over- the long and lovely life of.
an intimate friend, who was descended
from, and honored by a 'ong and up-'
right life, one of the olest and most]
respectable families of New;berry Coun
ty. but because he was on the mother's<
side a 1b100( relation of General Daniel
Mogan of Revolution ary fame..
Di-. McMorrie.-at an early period min
his life, chose the profession oi medi- a
eie ; and, having compjleted a regular
course of study in the Medical Co'llege 1
of PThiladelphia, lie prac-ticced that pro
fession for a time.
Hlavingz united himself with the As
sociate Reform Church. he was or
dained a ruling elder in 1858. in the
cogregation of Thompson Street,
church, at New~ber-ry C. HI., under the
pastoate of Rev. HI. L. Mr-phy. He
was especially fond of this ofilee, and
servedl in it efficiently and neceptably
as long as he lived, within the bonds of
the congregation. Soon after the close
of the war, however, he remoived to
Alabama with his wife, both lieing
then somewhat ndvanced in life, and ]
having no single chiidren, to muake hist
futur-e home with one of his dlaughters I
and his son-in-law, Mrs. Nannie Af. and 1
Rev W. M. Grier, D.D. lthough hei
r-turned to South Carolina in 1871c
with his son-in-law. he was never again
actively connected with his congrega-(
tion. (
As every' personl hars an ininer as well1
a an outer life, so hias every family.r
Threc is a line the .,tranger isnot al
lowed to pass-a sacred precinct where
the domestic affietions operate. But
as we may judge of the former by its3
udge of the latter by thp respect, the
:onfidence, and affection seen to inter
;hange between its inmates. In the
atter. moreover, we have the testi
nony of the members of the family.
me in favor of another. Judging by
t11 these, Dr. 3cMorries was the bus
>and and father of a lovely and happy
amily. In both these relations he was
,entle, kind. and indulgent. le raised
even children; but only three daugh
:ers, viz., Mrs. Johnson of Alabama,
Ars. =Dr. Grier of Due West S. C., Mrs.
,ofield of Union County, S. C., and
>e step-son. J. C. S. Brown of New
)erry, survive him. They all bear a
ender and loving testimony to these
acts.
No man excelled him in affability.
tospitality and liberality. Possessed
>f a mind naturally strong, he had
:ultivated and stored it well ; so that
iis conversation was highly attractive
mud instructive. His hospitality was
iterally unbounded. At his door the
isitor always met a cordial welcome,
nade with a grace and manner that at
mce bespoke the gentleman of the
ruest type of the old school. Of his
heeriul liberality, let the enterprises
>f his day bear witness; and of his
ieighbors who needed his endorsement
ir other aid in pecuniary matters,
nany both living and dead can testify!
During the last ten or lifteet years
>f his life he was afflicted with paraly
is. As is generally the case with this
lisease, though at first comparatively
ight, it increased in severity until
inally his suflferings were great, being
)ractieally unlable to walk for several
-ears before hi. death. As he did all
is atlliction!, and misfortunes, lie bore
t with Christian patience and forti
ude. He was always cheerful ; but it
vas not diflicult for his friends to see
hat he anticipated death from it, even
chile the summons was yet a long way
of. He literally obeyed the Saviour's
njunction, "Watch therefore ; for ye
mow not what hour your Lord doth
ome." When, therefore, the sum
nons did finally reach him in the
olemun watches of the night of August
21ad. 1883. it founq him prepared to
eave forever the scenes of earth. with
hat quiet Christian resignation that
:an say. "I have finished my course, I
ave kept the faith: henceforth there
s laid up for nie a crown of righteous
tess with the Lord, the righteous
ruge, shall give to inc at that day."
To %vards the closing hours of his life,
ue often requested the 23rd Psalm to be
uugfor him. What a comfort for the
lying to feel that they can appropriate
he promises of this sweetest of all the
"salms! Probably the last words he
vas heard to sav were in answer to an
nquiry, at a time he was making a low
toise as of light moaning, whether he
mauted anything. He replied, "Only
teaven. W. H.
.ilaster's Sales.
TATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA,
COUNTY OF NEWBERRY.
IN THE COUR' OF COMMON
PLEAS..
E. P. Chalmers, Clerk.
v..
Valter F. Koon, Admhiistrator, et. al.
By order of the Court, I will sell, at
muhlic outcry, before the Court House
.t Newberry on the first Monday in
sovember 1883, all that tract of land,
ii the County and State aforesaid,
ontaining ninety-eight acres, more or
ess and bounded by lands now owned
y Mrs. L. C. Jloozer, Mrs. Carrie M.
odley, C. H. Suber, Henry C. Koon
,nd lands of Thos. B. Wadlington dec
eased.
Terms cash-Thle purchaser to pay
or pap)ers.
SIL AS JOHINSTrONE, Master. N.C.,
faster's Office 4th day of Oct. 1883.
40-4t.
iTATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA,
COUNTY OF NEWB3ERRY,
IN THE COURT OF COMMON
PLEAS.
.Jamens B. Clary-, et.al.
Samnuel Warren Reid.
By order of the Court, herein, I wvill
li at public outcry, before the Court
louse at Newberry, on the first Non
av in November 1883, all that tract
f 'land. in the County and State afore
aid, containing one hundred amnd
wenty-four acres, more or* less, and
onfded by lands of William S. Chal
aers. Thomas A. W. Chmalmuers. Jave
halnmers and the homestead tract of
osephm Reid deceased.
Termns.-The p)urehmaser wvill be re
ured1 to pay in cash one-half of the
urchase mnoney, and to secure tihe
alance payable at twelve monthms,
ithi interest at the rate of seven per
ent. per annum from tihe day of sale
my a bond, with at least twvo sufficient
ureties anid a nmortgag'e of the p)remnis
es and to pay for pape~rs.
SILAS JOHINSTONE. Master, N.C.,
fasters Office 4th (lay of Oct. 1883.
40-4t.
iTATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA,
COUNTY OF NEWBERRY.
IN THlE COURT OF COMMON
PLEAS.
v s.
Francis G. Lyles, Administratrix.
By order of tihe Court, herein dlated
thi, July 1883. I will sell at public
uterv. before the Court House, at
fewf>erry, oln the first Monday in No
-ember 1883, in one tract or nine, as
hail be indicated at time saidl sale, the
cal estate of which John L. Lyles died
ized and possessed lying in the Counl
y and State aforesaid. containling one
Llm'dred anId eighty acres more or less.
,nd( bounded by lainds of Mrs. Cath
rine JIardy, Mrs. Nance. John.F. Ox
~er, amnd lands of the estate of John
. Lyles.
Ternms.-Thme pulrehaser~ will lbe re
uird to pay in cash one half of the
mreha~se money, arnd to secure the bal
nee payable at twelve months with
uterest from the day of sale, by bond
und mortgage of the premises sol.
SILAS JOHINSTONE, Master, N. C.
laster's Oflice. 4th day of Oct. 1883.
40-t
iTATE OF SOUTHI CAROLINA,
COUNTY OF NEWBERRY,
IN THE COURT OF COMMON
PLEAS.
;arah E. T. Chick. as Excutrix of last
will of Petus W. Chick, dleceased,
vs. Louisa V. J. Farr, et. al. Defen
danfs.
Complaint for Relief.
Pursuant to the order of the Hon. 4T.
IL Hudson presiding Judge herein, no[
ice is hereby given that all persons
tolding demands against the estate of
'etus W. Chick deceased, either as ani
ndividual. or as a member of the firm
R. Moorman and Company, or as a
cember of the firm of P. WV. and R.-S.
hick, or as a member of the firnt of
hiek and Oxuer are required to render
pon oath their respective demands to
Ie ou~ or before the 27th day of Oetober
ext, at my office at Ncwberry C. HI.,
s.C.
SILAS JOLINSTONE, Master, X. C..
faster's Office 27th day of Sept. 1883.
IPERT & CO
BOARD.
Students wishing board in Charles
ton, can obtain comfortable accommo
dations. at low rates by addressing
Mrs. W. T. WHITE,
No. 26, Archdale Sr., Charleston,
40.-3t.* S. C.
WANTED.
COTTON SEED!
COTTON SEED!
I will pay (15e.) tifteen cents (.ash
per Bushel for 10.000 Bushels SOUND
DRY COTTON SEED, delivered to
me at this place before the first of next
November. Will exchange Cotton
Seed meal for Cotton Seed.
W. F. HOLLOWAY & CO.,
Oct. 3-3m. Pomaria. S. C,
ai.
For the Cure of Coughs, Colds,
Hoarseness, Bronchitis,Croup, Influ
enza, Asthma, Whooping Cough, In
cipient Consumption and for the re
liefofconsumptive persons in advan
ced stages of the Disease. For S^le
by all Druggists.-Price, 25 Cents.
April 1-84.
8WXFFmLT
Has received his
FALL and WINTER
Stock of Imported Cloths
AND CASSIMERES,
MADE TO ORDER
Expressly for his trade on the other
side of the Great Dampness
and a:-e being made up in
the Latest Styles.
FIjt Ui1MLIDEPEI) 8111 FS
At $7.00 a Half Doz.
Custom Shirts and
GENTLEMEN'S UNDERWEAR
MADE TO ORDER.
Large line of Gentlemien's furnishing
goods and SLIk Umbrellas, always on
hand.
Feb12 tf COLUMBIA.
$100.00 A WEEK!
We can g arantee the above amount
to goodl, act ive. energetic
AGENTS I
Ladies-a.s w.ll as getemn make a
success ini the business. Very little
.rpital req tired. We have a house
hold article as :alable as tlour.
It Sc11s Itselfl
It is used every lay in every family.
You dho uct nleed to explain its merits.
There is a rich harvest for all who em
brace this golden opportunity. It
costs you o dhy one cent to learn what
our business is. Buy a postal card
and write to us and we will send you
our prospces ~s andl full p)articullars
FR E E!
Andl we !:. yot will derive more
goodl than y ou have any idea of. Our
reputation ::s a manufacturing comn
pany is suih that we cannot all'ordl to
decive. Write to us on a p)ostal arnd
give your :'eldress plaiinly and receive
fall partienlar:s.
Bi'CKEYE M'F'G CO.,
Marion, Ohio.
Sept. 20--7
NEWi AND ELEGANT
STOCK OF
FALL AND WINTER
CLOTHING,
AND
GENTS FURNISHING
OOns,
AT
J. W. 00PPO0K'S,
UND)E; NEWBERRY HOTEL.
I would respectfully call the atten
tion of my friends, paros and the
public get.erally to the fact, that I
have just rcturned from the Northern
markets whetre I purchtasedl an elegant
Stock of
Men's, Youths. Boys and Children's
Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats,
Boots and Shoes, Trunks, Va
li-. * Umbrellas &c.,
(In stare and still arriving)
Black and Colored
Wor. ed Coats andl Vests,
and Fa'ucy Cass Pants for Dress,
Colored Cass Business Suits,
All of tL.e latest fabrics and styles.
Especial men'Itionl is invited to my
line of
GENTS :TURNISING GOODS.
and
NECK WEAR
of style, lE.ish and color that cannot
fail to lease the mnot fastidious..
The public is respectfully asked to
examine my stock and prices before
purchasin:
Res ( : fully,
J. W. COPPOCK.
DRY GOODS
FOR THE PEOPLE
I AT
?W. T. TARRANT'S.
I would respectfully call the atten
tion of the public, together with their
wives, cousins, uncles and aunts, and
the balance of mankind and woman
kind, and any one else who may be in
town or in the county, to my Large
and Elegant Stock of Goods-the lar
gest ever opened in this market. I
would call special attention to the fol
lowing lines:
LADIES' GOODS,
Including DRESS GOODS. such as
CASHMERES, WORSTTDS,
(Black and colored)
SILKS, SATINS, CORSETS, &e.
LADIES' JACKETS from $2 to $15.
LADIES' CLOAKS from 83.50 to $20.
A splendid line of the aboue articles,
that cannot fail to please hi price,
quality and style.
LADIES' HAND-MADE SHOES,
the very best and every pair warrant
ed at $3.50.
A Fine line of Perfumery and Toi
let Soaps.
MY STOCK OF
READ Y-MADE
CLOTHING,
IS VERY' LARGE, AND OF
ALL QUALITIES AND PRICES.
I ASK AN EXAMINATION.
Men's Suits from $:; to $35. Boys'
Suits from $250 to $15.
HATS
in great variety-Wool Hats. Fur Hats,
Stift Hats, Soft Hats, for men and boys,
from 50e. to $5.
Trunks, Valises, Traveling
Bags,
A big stock-from 75 cents to $18.
RUBBER GOODS for Gentlemen
and Ladies-the very thing for the
Winter season. Rubber Mats, &c.
CROCKERYof all kinds and grades
-a superior line.
SHIRTS, COLLARS AND CUFES.
Flannel Underwear-elegant variety.
KENTUCKY JEANS (all wool)
from 25c. to 50c. Men's Cassimeres
from 50c. to $1.50.
DOXESTICS, Bleached and Up
bleaohed, from 61e. to 121c. ChecW
Hlomespuns, Georgia and Athens Mills,
10c. all throught.
Extra heavyMA RSEILLES QUILTS.
TIN BED-ROOjf SETS-from $2.50
to $4.50..
SADDLES, (including line
Kentucky Saddles,) Harness, Bridles
of good make and material.
BOOTS & SHOES.
My stock of Boots anid Shoes, cannot
be excelled. Bay State Boots and
Shoes-eable-screw. A good boot from
$1.25 to $5. Children's Shoes from
25c. to $2.
H1EISER'S CELEBRATED
HAND-MADE BOOTS AND 3HOES.
JA R PE TS AND R[S.
A Large Line of Carpets, from 25. to
$1A)0, includin ,THREE-PLY, EX
TRA SUPER, TAPESTRY BRUS
SELS, VELVETS,&c., and embracing
the NEWEST AND BEST STYLES.
A large aasortnments of Rugs..
Everybody is invited to call and in
spect my stock and p)rices. Tihe above
is only a small sample. Comec and see
for yourself, and I guarantee to give
you satisfaction.
Very respectfully.
W. T.TARRAN.
WANTED.
50.000 bushels COTTON SEE D.
BY
J. N. MARTIN & Co.
39--3t.
NOW OPEN AT~
COLUMBIA, S. C.,
OF FALL AND
WINTER C LOTHING
For MEN, YOUTHS and BOYS.
One of the best selected stocks
that we have ever placed on our
Counters.
OVEBOOATS
Are gotten up in 5 styles as fol
lows:
SACKS, ULSTERS, ULSTER
ETTES, REVERSABLES
and the latest is the
NEWV MARKET
and are made in all grades of goods.
The patent Flexible brim Silk Hat
that will fit any shaped head. Also a
flne line of Soft and Stiff~ Hats in all
styles.
GENT'S FURNISH
ING GOODS
Underwear, Shirts, Hosiery, Gloves,
Collars and Neckwear of all grades.
TO THE
LdDIES OF \EBERR1,
Our Boys and Children's stock of Cloth
ing is the largest and most stylish that
we have p)laced oc our Counters.
Suits and Overcoats of every descrip
tion.
All orders addressed to my care will
receive prompt attention and if the
goods do not suit I will exchange, or
refund the money.
Respectf ally,
M. L. KINARD,
7-+t* COMIRA,S C.O
NEWBERRYM
Friday,0OT.19
NOW ALL UNITED M~ CNE
VAST and COLOSSA L ~X HBIT10EK
NO OTH ER SHOW. H AS IF T HESE FEATURES
HERDS OF ASIATIC ELEPiIANdT' I OV F O F G IR A FFE
INEAFCAN EEPH ANTS *0! 6'f. rEK OFOS can
TEONLY WOOLY ELEPHA'T AF1VE TON R
A SCO RE O F LIOUNS i 7'FIV.E B.ENAL Wiia
A SCHOOLff.F SE LION PEFORM1Nt
A BLUE NOSE MANDRIL 1 U3.I , EDKMLYUON.
BRAZILIAN TAMINOIR FEATI. E SO
Two HORNED HORSS4 *~ lAC
BAOLONS -
MONKEY-~
100 Artists "
gO Great Riders ~~
6 Bands of MusiC .. +20,
Teof Aerialists WEEHBTT.MFE 24 Srsa
SCORESofACROBATS TO ALL THJE PATRONS 6 ro
STRONGEST MAN Livig OF CUR GREAT
STIRK BICYCLE TROUPE SNY:**..
6 FRENCH EQUESTRIENNES CARONi FREffCf
MOST GORGEOUS PAGEANT ~.~4SMf.ES OF&SEET
66C A GES O F 'AN IM-A LS .4A TRIIUSANO'NELANO
THE CARNIVAL OF VENICE RE VI VED A G- ITTER;UO -ROAL
GLISTENING WI'H GOLD AND) SY' .vA tWOUSA)4D COSTLY
THF. FEATURE OFAAL . ?.SI A P'!UOFUI
HIPPOPO TA M A41 r&A FE
fot withstanding the Encr'"r f'-'e ereding sa vaste. E
the Admission i , nt . e iun u> rJI ?!.c w charg.e -
STOYES! STOVES!! STOVESU MR
80 COOK STOVES.
28 HIEATING 8TOVE8. 8
We have now in Store another - 4
C AR LOAD
of those splendid Cook and Heating Stoves, sneh as we hqIi pest
four years, with such generar'stsfactionl.
Bought inlarge qatities at very low prce nd theuNi
crops are short and the ahnof every onew&S wBLea ~c
money "go a lone way" we are offerlog Iin as)~~eaa
been offered in l'fewberry.
All we ask is an examination of our Stove*Iiree sure e canpe~a$
in price and quality.
Please call it
-S. P. BOOZm!R'p,.
HARDW ARE ADSTOVE STO5
Sept 20 2m
FOR SA LE ! NOTrICE.
The ereditors of ,the Esatet
Ten tons COTON SEED MEAL. uel W. Cannon, deceased, .e
BYtnoied to present .theirdIj
BY ~ttested to our Attorney, W.Ht
J. N. MARTIN & Co. Jr., Esq - A.B~CJO
39-3t. RE
LSt. * Administraten. a
Reduced In Price.ln ii
A job lot of Music, vocaIU VIR
anid instrumental, AD ESONS..
Single Peice 5cts each~ Th Chapest first-elass ~oII1
Sothfo-bys Frcirculars dra,
.Double " 10cts " w. J. LIGON,, -
Must be sold. Call and H. G. REID,
sehis mui. aug. 1,n1-2mos.
seHtERAL B00K STORE.
NOIC. COTTON SEEDr
All persons indebted
to the undersignediCOTTON;_SE~D
either by note or ac-I .
count must settle by Ipr bushelfr, nOo~Bs
October 15th, next, or E1)Y COTTON SEED
no further indulgence Iember. illa xi
will be given. Iseed malfor Cotton
Dr. S. F. FANT.
38-ti. Sep, 26, 9i~~

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