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The Newberry herald. (Newberry, S.C.) 1865-1884, January 03, 1884, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026909/1884-01-03/ed-1/seq-4/

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8 910. 1 12
2 23. 24-2526
_y8 3 .31 -
> r bDEN O S4# AYS.
an readly raise y
Ef garden vegetables
- e~iier wo would
fsra pro
b et easily
ce most pro
"nweire therea e
~ '~kedbare -
Sanod the earlier
&th b the price they
ot%rmer gow late
to raise elkinds, he
sow theeed in the
Sep tha.plants through
: a cold frame, or sow
y ri in a hot bed and
plantsto be ready to
the groundisin con
method isout of
st:ay of farming, but there
that sbout it that can not be
ned Opions are always
iade nid; il'ths bulbs are bunched
sol whle two-thirds grown,
the e p Is -aery p"fbtable one.
+ eete ra L as readily iaised~as
' el D, and when the ears are
are in excellenf con
V'r fod4er; these will
y tie- cultiv4ion; leaving
? lhat ia, ,.. i for the ears clear
,oft. eek peas and string
bess areasily'raised, aid if piek
are at bad will pay well, as
ne a toes, beets, etc. The
" oa ere '1;1p ggested, with the ex
t arf prl cabbages, are as
: s ratised eginmy farm crops.
.r7 boel for those near a local
6makatrial of these at
Sand:graduallyincrease the
,/av . 1 m gardening. offers a
~ elie, to thosevwho fnd that
-frmn nosntjy" and those
to grow more. profitable
crops shonldlookV its possibili
ie Thie works - enderson,
H~~sBtiR,.and n, each give
ehtii aid to the cnltivator.
Success willkin part,' depend upon
"' iinlit~ sggply of manure, quality
OfS ~ and the e. ter of the
.~rI te ities are
~-P. gMtlyfator o-a- profitable re
ou n fioiawell conducted farm
gaden.--Dr..Thierber, in Amcrican
Agic ulttList for .December.
C 05 TTIlvG TIUBER.
~An expf on timber, writing to
nexcbange, says: Timber should
b&ut*wridg $he fall of the sap.
-- liseaes auf fruit are
. sap is rising. As soon
rsrefully formed and
a' ugscolor, oi i.n the
asa the cone1becomes ripe,
-e shletime to commencedfell
- oig, and continue doing so ntil
ti4efbuds begin to form agaig.
7 of the eap softens the
~bch if felled when fini of
sapigelagt to. sp!it in* seasoning
S4tosipus woods, such as pine; form
exaudation of resin at their
dsa film which prevents the
of~s~ap, hence it is best to
tr'~ igthibark from pine loges a
ee ln thasa hard
ed bs-to quarter the" logs
bhi~oi the center,.as if left entire
areapt to split radially along
~.&duhI ye.iy In the case
wodii'the size required
~'iInot admit of quartering, it is
~ ~ ~iaabektostrip off the bark and
sme-cuet ends with cow man
ar. This, if left.,.on for a- few
weeks, effectually prevents splitting.
The sapetiority of timber cut in -
-season over that cut out of season
will make ample .amneds for any
loss of time caused by carrying out
the practice systematically.
Gaa.-We tare asked for a rekne
dy for gapes in chickens: bThy
are numerous and witha ite care
generally sucqeesfu?l. It is. not a
deses, but the resuit of the irri
tation cased by a parasitic worm in
the wind.pipe. These may be re
moved by making a loop of horse
iftir, introducing it into the wind
phe,, then gi-ving two or three
twists and withdrawing it. Another
method.is to take a fether, strip
off the web to an inch of the end.
moisten, insert .to the boMomi of
.' twind ppanwithdraw a.bs
c_If the featder be dip d ir
turpentimer ors-e so
ltidao of carboiaid, suchr doruis
-as are not caught wi!i be killed
and sedieezed up? inother method
us foaiigate -wiilr sulphur or eor
beie cid, thus: Place ahot brick
- itnte bottom, then-place a basrd
n theoy of the brick with an iti
hotejarthe center, throngh the-hole
~ ~hee&teaspoonful of lowers of
attiu or carbolic seid, put in the
~>~ees sAd corer the box for ,a
Iewsco. Thasbe dns
)v rthle 'ceus wilWNbe
p anah 'te swerms.
'te Y. LE, {NS ABOUT
TOADS.
Qh, papa, see what a great ugly
toad Do get a stick and kill him
before he gets away," said Tommy
Gray o as he was walking in the gar
enith his father.
"Why do you wish to see him
killed?' said his father.
'-Qh b6ea6ue he -is such an ugly
thng, and I am afraid he will eat
up everything in the garden. You
ow we illed several .bugs and
worms which we found here' last
enuing; am- sure this toad is
uor wose-tbar they."
"Wiolled the bugs and wvrms
bause_ they- were' destroying our
loire(raId vegetables. This poor
the4 nerer destitys a plant of any
kind about the place. Besides, he
is one of our best friends. These
inseets'that are doing so much
harm in your garden are just what
heuses for his food. I have no
doubt that he kills- more of them
every day than we did last evening.
If you can find a live bug, place it
near him, add see what he will do."
Tommy lo6ked about, and soon
found three bugs, which he placed
near the toad, and then stood back
a short distance to see the result.
Soon the bugs began to move away.
The toad saw them; and made a
quick-forward motion of his head.
He darted out his tongue, and in.
stantly drew them, one by one, into
his month. Tommy clapped his
hands with, elight.
"How can such a clumsviooking
fellow use his hcad and tongue so
aenily?" said Tommy; and he -ran
off to fnd more food for him.
The next even'ing Tommy went
again into the garden, and soon
ipund the object of his search ready
for-his supper. At first the toad
was shy, but be- soon learned to
sit still while Tommy .placed the
food pear him. Then he would
dari out his tongue,. and eat the
bugs while Tommy was close by.
Finding that the boy did not hurt
him, he soon lost all fea^ and be.
came a great pet. Tommy named
him Humpy, e;nd says he would not
hve him killed now for anything.
Our Little Ones...
TWO DOLLA RS AHEAD.
The "drop game" is frequently
played by thieves in city banks.
While some customer of the bank
is counting the money which he has
drawn a stranger calls attention tc
a bill Nhich has apparently been
dropped by the depositor. The
customer stooped to pik it up, and
on re'gaining his !e0t generally finds
some if not all the money which he
has been conting gone, togethbei
with .the stranger. The following
story is told of how ex-Senato!
David Davis once outwitted a
wouldbe thief.
The judge was making a deposit
at a Washington bank:, and stood
counting a large pile of money at a
desk. A well-dressed young man
stepped up and, with a bow and a
emile, said: "-Judge, you have drop
pd a bill." Sure encogh, here lay
a clean, crisp, genuine two doliar
bill at the depositor's feet. "Thank
you" blandly answered the judge,
placing his ponderous right boot
over the bili on the floor, and calmn
ly resuming his counting. Thc
sharper, tiken aback by the coolness
of the proceeding, disappeared, and
te judge was $2 ahead by the
transaction.
TJIE ANO3IINABLE SIiIRIT
SCOLLARt.
The shirt collar originated in
fraud and hypocrisy. In the days
when men first wore linen it came to
be the fashion to leave more or less
of that linen exposed at the neck~
to prove the cleanliness of that uu
derneath. This naturally took the
form of the collar. Then a genius
caught on to the idea of cutting out
a separate piece of linen in the
shape of the overhanging part and
afixing it to the top of the shirt.
These bits of linen could be put on
clean very day, thus they thus giv
en the public the impression that
they, represented the cleanliness of
the uinsen garment to which they
were attached. They were ineffect
fraudulent,certificates of such clean
liness. Hence, the collar is but- a
base subterfuge of ancient origin.
I s a the gold wash on the pinch
's jewelry, the rouge on a dead
oltiin, or immrolutuous
-outline of a new pair of corsets.
Th ollar is a useful aid 't-o the
crat in strangling the neck and
makig it-unduly sensitive to cold.
The collar did not attain its p3r
fection of fraudalener and the
heigt of' its iniquitou's hypocrisy
untill starch was invented to gloss
and stiffen it. When this happened
manulind forgot that it.was a cheat.
The collaris an unmitig'ated nu's
anse la &ut weather, and of very
little pr9tection in cold. it is a
HEADQUARTERS FOR
LiICIITHEI MPJEKTZ AD MACINKY.
F. A. SOHUMPERT & 00.,
ire Agents and have for sale the following improved Agricultural Implements:
Threshers,
Steam Engines,
Saw Mills,
Grist Milis,
Cotton Gins,
Cotton Presses,
Cider Presses.
McCORMICK'S MACIIINE SI
Harvester and Binder,
Table Rake,
Dropper and Mower,
Horse Rakes,
Harrows,
Globe Cotton Planter,
SULKY AND WALKING PLOWS,
CULT IV A T O R S,
CHICAGO SCREW PULVERIZER, CANE MILLS AND EVAPORATORS
AND OTHER IMPEOVLD AGEICULTUELL IMPLEMENTS.
If you want anything of this kind give n a call befcre pnrchasingelsewhere.
-Warehouse for Machinery in the new building on corner Caldwell and Iar
,ngton streets, below Christian & Smith's Livery Stables.
Mar. 5,10-tf.
W. P. ]OLLARD,
Nos. 731 and 736 Reynolds Street, AUGUSTA, GA.
ZD.TFO FACTR -AND COImIG M1RCHANT,
AND DEALER IN
Machiinery of a1 Kinds,
Also Disston'a Circular Saws. Rubber and .Leather Belting. Steam Pfpe. Water and
Steam Gauges. Connections, Whistles. -Oil C tps. Pop. Globe and Check
Valves, Governors, Vrenlies, etc., togct:;er with every article of
Steam and Water Fittin s,Findings, etc.
GENERAL AGENT FOR
TALBOTT & SONS.
Talbott's Agricultural Engines (on wheels.) Portable Engines (on skids) Stationary
Engines. Tubular a d Locomotive Boilers. Turbine Water Wheels. Corn
and Wheat Mills. Saw Mills. Shafting, Pulleys, Boxes, Hangers and
Patent Spark Arresters.
Watertown Steam Engine Co.
Watertown Agricultural Enges (on wheels.) Portable Engines (on skids.) Dairy
Engines (or small build .) Vertical Engines. Stationary Engines (with
and - thout cut off. Return Tubular Boilers (with two flues.)
Locomotive and Ver}ical Boilers. Saw Mills, etc., etc.,
C. & G. COOPER & Co.
Cooper's Sclf-P (traotion) Engines. Farm Agricultural Engines (on wheels.)
Portable En on skids.) Stationary Engines. Locomotive and Return
Tubular ers. Corn and Wheat Mill. Portable Mill (with portable
bolt attached.) Smut Machines. Dustiess Wheat Separators
and 9at and Weed Extractor. Saw Mills
(double and single.)
J. W. CARDWELL & CO.
Crdwell Wheat Threshers, Separators and Cleaners. "Ground Hog" Threshers.
Hydraulic Cotton Presses. Horse Powers Quted and down.) Power
Corn Shellers and Feed Cutters.
Johnston Harvester Company.
-AND
EMMERSON, TALCOTT & CO.
Reapers and Binders. Reapers and Mowers Combined. Single Binders, Reapers, anti
Mowers. Cultivators and Gr:n~n Sowers.
FAIRBANKS & CO.
Fairbanks' Standard Scales, all sizes and patterns. -Alarm Cash Drawsrs.
MANUFACTURlER of the FOLLO)WING MACHINES.
Nebett & Goodrich ImprotedlXL Cotton Gin. Reid's Patent Automatre Power Scre w
Press, (steam or water power.) Smith?s Improved Hand Power Cotton and
Hay Press. Cotton Gin Feeder. Cotton Condenser.
New Virginia Feed Cutter.
E gines, Cotton Gins, &c.,'repiaired in a Workmanlike manner.
Or solicitedand promptly executed. For further particulars, circulars, general
inb en, etc., apply to ~ . P L A D
W. AILARD,Ag't., for Newberry
frthe working class. Send 1
cf1flents for postage, and iwe wilI,c
WUJJmail you free, a royal, valuable LitJ
you in the way of makng more money In a
few (:ays than you thou t osible at any i u ra
business. Capi 1 not ru e. We will SAUL.*I15 .Ii
start you. You can wor all the'spare
time only. The work is universally adapted iie~cu' nlaehtlo h
to both sexes. young and old. You can easi ly ' 1
earn 50 cents to 25 every evening. That all itil:lCptlCovnely10
who want work maeLst .The bo . ess, we ead:ndn siltollh trt
mako this upara'leed offer ; to all who
are not wellesatis5ed weowill send $1 to py erlie;o h iy pi l h
for the trouble of writing us. Fnli paten yc l
as, directions, etc.. scnt free. Fortunes 0 .SALS rpitr
wiil be made by those,who give thelr whole h huad sadHue
time to the work. Great success jabsolutely Laec
sure. Don't delay. Start now. Address 4- i
stilson & Co., k'ertland, Main.N. 22-ly._____
SSend six ccnts for postae ,V1iI~
and receive free. a costl v
A RZ box of goods which will help -________
you to more money rightCOTNSE
away than anything ese i this world. All,
of eit her sex, succeed from first hour. Thc
broad road to fortune opens before -the
workers, absolutely sure. At once address, C T O E D
hue & Co. AugWASHIMaiGe.Nov.D.2-.
~~j ~ Th oul r pa ae ote l -of cth
Daio:i Capital.SEE Convenientl o
.~ . ete. :md l ccibe oton teSeet
- ea-lie fof otn Scit.Oe lh
oea.- ..STALES PrIDo.
~ ~ . Late Dfthsousand Island' House.
47--p. .3-m
~ ~ SamWsNTPoE,D.,
CHY TTINN SJED N,
c 8 pe bu e Ora0 Huse,SON
ts - ~ vember. Wiln txagea prCtice payd
C 2 - epal ortCotton toee. amnto
SD ysassonemls, and Ch roneld's - C
Satm-osonh B oe in, Blad.,
- REct WBEroahY, Ear.
o eNsecial Trat,to to the treatment ofs
diseasCoresondeea liiand.Crni i
tem ani. Cancerous Sorcs and Ulcers.
8 April 2, 14-ly.
-. - tecorf -nnatrs opnins
pa.thlt.ree ofocharge. Smnd for circalar
-LYON&H EA LY For wourid.disealse orOt
to &onroe Sts.,Chico- )~ TI II' her disability Widows,
we ad&.dnirInino children and de.
bib. ai".Ida,when death resulte. (;laims reopened, res
'.Kn!ta, CSAU.toration, increases, bounty, back pay and
us*Um. dischatrg' s obtained. Apl at once, delay
- ""and ress, i'a Iistamp. the established firm
Rail Roads.
"elambia & Greenville Railroad.
PASSENGER DEPARTMENT.
COLUMBIA. S. C., Nov. 18th 1888.
On and after Monday, Nov. 18, 1 S3, the
ASSENGER TRAINS will run as herewith in
licated upon this road and itabranehe'
Daily, except8undaye.
No. 53. UP PASSENGER.
Leave Columbia,A - - * 11.50 a m
" Alston, - - - - 12.58 p m
SNewberry, - - .6pm
" Ninety-Six, - - - - 8.5 p m
" Hodges, - ' - - 4.25 pm
" Belton, - - 5-38 p m
arrive Greenville, - - - - 7.02 p m
No. 52. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Greenville, - - , - 955 am
Belton, - - - 11.25 p m
Hodges, - - 12.35 p m
Ninety-Six, - - - 1.48 p m
Newberry, - - - 3. p m
Alston, 4.14 p m
Arrive Columbia,F - - 5.29 p m
BPARTANBURG, UNION a COLUXBIA RAILROAD.
. No. 63. UP PASSENGER.
Leave Alston, - - - - 1.10 p m
" Strother, - - - - 206 pm
" Shelton, - - - - 2.46 p m
" Santuc,- - - - - 334pm
" Union, - - - - 4.25 p m
" Jonesville, - - - 5.08 p m
Arrive Spartanburg, * - 6.25 p m
No.52. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Spartanburg, R. & D. Depot, H 11.00 pm
Spartanburg, S. U.& C. Depot,G 1L12p m
" Jonesville, - - - 12.26p m
" Union. - - - 1.20 p m
" Santuc, - - - 1.57 p m
" Shelton, - - - 2 50 p m
" Strother, - - - 3.24 p m
Arrive at Alston. - . - 4.11 p m
LAURENS RAILWAY.
Leave Newbarry, - - - 3.40 p m
Arrive Laurens C. H., - - 7.eb p m
Leave Laurens C. H., - - 9.00 p m
Arrive Newberry, - - 12.38 p m
AIDEVILLE BRANCH.
Leave Hodge, .. - - 4.30 p m
Arrive at Abbeville, - - - 5.33 pm
Leave Abbeville, - - - - 11.36 p m
Arrive at Hoges, - - - - 11.30 p m
BLUE LIDGE RAILROAD AND ANDERSON
LR.ANCI.
Leave Belton 5.31 p m
" Anderson . 6.C4 p m
" Pendleton 6.44 p m
Leave Seneca C, 7.30 p m
Arrive-Walhalla 7.54 p m
Leave Walballn, - - 8.15 a m
Leave Seneca C, 9.00 a m
" Pendleton, - - 941 a m
" Anderson, - - 10.29 p m
Arrive at BeltoN, - - 11.06 p m
CONNECTIONS.
A. With South Carolina Railroad from Char
leston.
With Wilmington, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad from Wilmington and all
points North thereof.
With Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad from Charlotte and all points
North thereof.
B. With Asheville & Spartanburg Rail Road
for points in Western North Carolina.
C. With A. & C. Div. R. & D. E. R., from all
points South and West.
D. With A. & C. Div., E. & D. R.i., from At.
1ata and beyond.
E. With A. & C. Div., R. & D. E. R., from all
points South and West.
F. With South Carolina Railroad for Charles
ton.
With Wilmington, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad for Wilmington and the North.
With Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad for Charlotte and the 'orth.
G. With Asheville & Spartanburg ilroad
from Hendersonville.
H. With A. & C. Div., E. & D. .. R., from
Charlotte and beyond.
Through Coach for Hendersonville wil
be run from Columbia daily.
Standard Time used ii Washington, D. C.,
which Is fifteen minutes faster than Columbia.
J. W. FRY Superintendent.
31. SLAUGnTxR, General f'assenger Agent.
D CAnDWELL, Ass't General Passenger Agt.,
Columbia, S. C.
South Carolina Railway Company.
GHANGE OF SCHEDULE.
On and after Dec. 17th, 1888, Passenger
Trains on this road will run as follows un
til further notice:
TO AND FROM CHARLESTQN.
GOING EAST,
Leave Columbia *8.00 an m t.58 p m
Arrive Charleston -12.55 p m 12.30 p m
GOING WEST,
Leave Charleston t7.00 a m *5.20 p in
Arrive Columbia 11.28 a m 10.09 p m
fDaily. *Daily except Sunday.
TO AND FROM CAMDEN.
GOING EAST,
Lg teColumbia +8 00n m G.8 pm
Arive Camden 1.10 a mn 10.00 p m
GOING WEST
Leave Camden *7.00 a m *5.00 p in
Arrive Columbia 11.28 a m 10.09 p m
*Daily except Sundays.
TO AND FRlOM AUG USTA.
GOING EAST,
Leavc Cokumbia *S.00 a m *0.58 p m
Arrive Augusta 2.00 p m 7.05 a. m
GOING WEST,
Leave Augusta '7.05 a mn *4.10 p in
Arrive Columbia 4.05 pim 10 09p m
*Daily except Sundays.
CONNECTIONS. -
Connection made at Columbia. with the
Columbia and Greenville Rail RoAd by train
arriving at 11.28 P. M.. and departing at 6.58
P. M. Connection made ati Columbia Junc
tion with Charlotte. Columbia and Augusta
Rail Road by same train to and from all
points on both roads with through Pullman
Sleeper between Charleston and Washing
ton, via Virginia Midland route,. without
cange. Connection made at Charleston
with Steamers for New York on Wednesdays
and Saturdays; also, with Savannah and
Charleston Railroad to all points South.
-Connections are made at Augusta with
Georgia Railroad and Central Railroad to
and from all points South and West.
Through. tickets can be purchased to alU
points Sonth and e4by applying (O
D. MCQUEE, A nt, Columbia.
Li. C. ALLN, G. P.& F. A,
JOHIN B. PECK. General Manager..
Asheville and Spartanburgiatlroad.
SPARTANBCEG. S. C., September 1, 1881.
On and after Monday,.October 3st,1843,
passenger trains will be run-daily (Sundays
excepted) between Spartanburg and Hen
dersonville, as follows:
UP TRAIN.
Leave R. & D. Depot atSpa.rtanbur .1.3i0 p m
Arrive at Hendersonville.........5.30 p m
DOWN TRAIN.
Leave Hendersonville........... S.0) a a
Arrive R. &.D. Depot, Spartanburg.11.30p m
Both trains make connections for Column
bia and Charleston via Spartanburg. Union
and Columbia and Atlanta and Charlotte h
Air Line. - JAMES ANDERSON,1
Superintendent.%
A FULL LINE OVE
Hats,
Boots,
ShoeS,
Trunks,
Clothing, &c. &.
Can be found
At the LOWEST PRICES,
At the OLD ESTABLISHMENlT
-OF
42ti M. FOOT.
oil CIT GFWENGIN SAW NLLMUg
A FVEL
aMER
TAYLOR MFG. Co.
Put a Brand on Him.
"Women are a necessary evil," he said,
bringing down his flit hard on the counter
to emphasize the heartless remark. It was
in the viilage store at West Milton, Saratoga
Coun:y, and the speaker was the central
figure of a rro-..p cf bcholic phiosophers.
Be was homely', slovenly and simy;3.
"There's where I differ from you al:o
getLer," said Mr. George T. Graham, of the
sa.e piace. "Woman are mostly what men
make 'em. When hnsbancs are brat:s wives
will fall into submission or make home hot
for the men ; and they're unnatural in either
character. Love them, and especially be
good to them when they're sick, and you'll
have no trouble. There's my own wife, now.
She's suffered a good de;l.with dyspepsia,
nervous prostration and other ailments that
took the bloom off her cheeks and the spring
out her 'rteps. Well, she saw an advertise
ment of "Parker's Tonic," and thought it
would be just the thing.for her case. Gentle
men, I sent five miies after a bottle. She
:ook it. I sent again after more. So several
times. Trouble ? Why, if you could see how
much good it has done her you would say
that women are the greatest of God's bless
rrgs, and "Par::er'lifTonic" is the next.
This preparation, 'which has been known
as "Parker's Ginger Tonic," will hereafter be
called simply "Parker's Tonic." This change
has been rendered necessary by substitutes
imposed upon their customers by unprinci
pIed dealers under the name of ginger ; and
as ginger is really an unimportant flavoring
ingredient, we drop the misleading word.
'llhere is no changc, however, in the prepa
ration itsclf, and all bottles remaining in the
hands of dealers, wtapped under the name
of "Parker's Ginger Tonic" contain the
genuine medicine if the fac simile signature
of"Hiscnx & Co., is at t-:e bottom of the
outside wrapper, Nov. 20-1m.
TUTT'S
TORPID BOW EL
DISORDERED LIV ,
and MALARIA.
From these sources arfe three-farts of
the diseases of the hnmnan race. - These
symptoms indicate. the:r citenco: Loss of
Appetite, fowele costive, Szci ead
ache, fallneess aiter catnr, aversfo-n to
cxertiont of body or mind, Eractation
of food, Irritability of temper, Low
spirits, A feeliag of ha.ving neglect_
sime'duy, Ditiass, zinttrrang mmt th\
Heart, Dots before the eyes, highly col
ored Urioeg COYSTIPATION, and de.
mard the use of a remedy that acts directly
on the Liver. As aLir=rcdieinc 'i'i"S
PILLShave no ozle]. Tl:cireti:nonthe
Kidneys and Skin is aso r_etept; removin
all impurities through t cez threc e'cav
engers of the system," pro":ducin:: nre
titie,sound dig'eston, re;iu1ar stools, a C7e::"
skinand a vigorous ociy. TU.''T'S Pr:_ S.
canto no nausea or griprg nor inter.ere
ith dal7 worL and are a perfect
ANT!DOTE TO MALA?!A.
E FEElLS .i ; A i'iEW 3L7.
"I have had Dyspepsia, with Constlpa.
tion two years, and have tried ten different
kinds of pills, and TUT'S are the first
that have don me any good. They have
cleaned me out -nicely. My appetito is
splendid, food digests readily, and I now
have natural nassa; e. I feel like a new
man." W.Th EDWARDS, I'armyra, O.
..aldeverywhere,25c. O2cc,41 urraySt.,N.Y.
TUTTS HAIR DYE.
GRAY HAn on Wmou changed in.
Etantly to a GLossY BLACI by a single anp
plication of this DYE. Sold by Druggists,
or sent by express on recelpt of S1.
O;nce, 44 Murray Street, New York.
TUTT'S MANUAL f USEE. RE!PTS FR
July 19, 29-Iy.
0gSTET1E
STOXAC
.As an invgorant. lostttrM Momach
i tters has receised the most positive en
dorsement from eminent phys icians, ::nd
has long occupied a forcmost rank among
standardi proprietary remedies. Its pro
erties as a alteratve of disordered cond i
tions of the stomach, liver and bowels, and
a preventive' of malarial diseases are no
less renowned,- and have been accorded
emphatic prfessional recommendation.
F'or sale byDruggists and Dealers, to whom
apply frHostetter's Almanac For 1884.
41O0.00 A WREK !
WXe canllguarantee the abovec amomit
to g'oo, active, energetc
AGENTS I
Ladies as well ais gentltemeu't, mal:ke a
succeSs ini the butsinss. Very: little
ce'pl requiiredl. We have a hlouse
hold htrtle as salable as dour.
It Sells Itselfl
You do niot nee to e.xplaits eralits.
There is a rich htarve.st for all who emt
brace this golden opportunity. It
costs yon~ onlg' one cent to icarnf what
our business is. Buy ar postal card
an rite to us an we will sendl you
ou ps~rospctu an in ill particulars
FRE E!
Aud we know you w ill derive more
good than y-ou have any idea of. Our
reputation as a mamaefntunng com
pany is suchl that we caunot atf'ordl to
deceive. Write to us on at p)ostal and
elve your address plainly and recivc
ull part iyulars.
BUCKEYE M'E'G CO.,
.Marion, Ohio.
Sept. 20--ly.
W ANTED.
COTTON SEED!
COTTON SEED!
I will1 pay (15c.) -fifteen cnts cash
per Bushel for' 10.000 Bushcrs SOUND
DRY C;OTTON SEED, delivered to
me at this place h.e ore the lirst of next
Novemnber. Will exchrauge Cotton
Seed meal for Cotton Seed.
W. F; IIOLLO WAY & CO.,
Oct. 3--3m. Pomnaria, S. C,
Three Times A~Day
Is not too often to use it. yet if once
a day the teeth stre brushed with
WooDs ODONTINE the greatest cha nge
is observed. Insteadl of b)rovin, stain
ed and ugly looking spots on ther teeth
you will see a bright row of polished
pearles, where the teeth atre sound
and even wheni they are not perfect
they will be kept from~ furthe decay.
WooD's.ODom"se contains ifothing
which can possibly injure the:teeth but
on the contrary is beneficial to teeth
gums and breath. Tsnde supplied by
*W. C. FISHER,
Wholesale Agent. Columbia, S. C.
.For sale-by Dr. S. F. Fant and W.
Peham. Feb. 28, 9--ly
NEW AND0.4 ~ 7
STOCK OF
FALL AND WINT..
CLOTHING,
AD
GENTS FURNISH!ING
GOODS,
AT
J. W. COPPOCK'S,
UNDER NEWBERRY HOTEL.
I would respectfully call the atten
tion of my friends, patrons, and the
public generally to the' fact, that I
have just returned from the Northern.
markets where I purchased an elegant
Stock of
Men's. Youths, Boys and Children's
Clothing, Furnishing GoodiHats,
Boots and Shoes, Trunks, Va
lises, Umbrellas &e.,
(In store and still arriving)
Black and ' Colored
Worsted Coats and Vests,
and Fancy Cass Pants for Dress,
Colored Cass Business Suits,
All of the latest fabrics and styles.
Especial attention is invited to. my
line of
GENTS FURNISHING GOODS,
and
NECK WEAR
of style, finish-ard color that cannot
fail to please the most fastidious.
The public is respectfully - asked to
examine my stock and prIces before
purchasing.
Respectfully,
3. W. COPPOOK.
S. D. FRIDAY. 3.e. FRIDAY.
FRIDAY & BO.
DEALERS IN;
China, Crockery and
Glassware,
TINWARE,
House-FnrnIshIng Goods,
LAMPS, QJL;
PICTRE FRAMES;
FANCY GOODS, &C.,
NEIT DOOR TO M. EHRLICH k SONS,
Main Street,
COLUMBIA, S. C.
Oot. 24-3m.
THIS PAPER
IN CLtJB WITH
ODEY'S
LADY'S BOOK
st t he pulser of h aa
GOOE Y'S LADY'S BOOK
attractins fr 1881 are the folloi g
Beutfl"ord ' Fashio
OEatsof Fashions in black and
LADY'S BOOKrit,md.o OE
'~h .S,whic form a pato hat I
known in GODEY'S LaDY's BOK as the .
PRESIDENTIAL Portrait GaHlery,
each being acompanied by a short biogra
20i0. stcODY M
1erso Are uleushin. n sown
CotItEes ofaldsrion/s. '
-and Pems,ci byntwrite fr s, aop
A2I0 HAOL EU S deB
24PA ES O C ELE1ESAT
whomtae.
SUBRIOTION Prc AUGU0T perYea
Fo furthDertenfomtill endr threlt
So ourn adress, giving Cotyan
1ler6o0At C hesntone, Phi. lldeher
re Hscrcevedhi
Fo ofute Iort ed fcla
Sapl coyoM E' AD'S BORDER
Expresy or drevg onte ande
and6 aretu beg made upha Pa
8lHWAFFD liLP
A H$7.00ceival Dhi.
Cstoo mpShrts ulo
ANtD CAlSSMDEREAR
MADEi TO O7RDER
sag ie of eGetm nesnshn
stnd SilhUmrts awyn
Feb12 tf COLtiMBIA.
PA INjIlaourm~1.W have
ABOVE ISTHF
SENTATION O.
WE SEL
Twenty
THE S: E
MAC.
WHICH "'E .
THE MOST
'LAR MAO1J
IN THE
Finished in the bs
the lateSt improven ,=t
the. bobin; the most
of table, with
drawers and
s ta n d s H E : A r I
We dopoA.
l you seewt y
wisl-to ', 1
n Sewin 4W"
nearest -
sendthf
tonoRr
pay for r " f ;;;:
82
Sep..
Importer and h
Foreign&
.. "y ' I- Yr T
LEMONS,
TOES; -}
A1
.I hgave no,e
WATM
Silveran -
VILIN
All or4 by mail pro~asp
c0
CalLand e ZIo
Nov. 2i, 47-t - .
CHRONICD AI*
D3.
e ca t -c
esea-dR.ud
eigh-foo lenths -
iy els foihu
eosob f Ea~ue . eut1(eerf. o
Board~ in 0 .:i~n u~ ia b zi - -
eightfuot e. -:
Tc

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