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The Newberry herald. (Newberry, S.C.) 1865-1884, February 21, 1884, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026909/1884-02-21/ed-1/seq-4/

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FEBRUARY.
S T WTF
43 4 5 6 7 | |9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
I/ 18 619 201 22-.23
9 24 25126 27 28 291
A WESTERN FARMER TALKS
TO THE POINT.
Many centuries ago an old Greek
writer on farming eaid: A farmer
should be a seller and not a buyer."
Thi maxim isas good to-day as it
ever wa. It is still the business of
a farmer to producefor sale. Some
thinghe must buy, but as a rule
he will be the worst for it if he de
parts from his legitimate business
to trench on that of the dealer by
buying to sell again. In the regions
west of the Missouri River farriers
have to contend with two special
di-culties: distance from market
and want of capital. In any new
country the first products are
usually balky, which aggravates the
difficulties of distance from market.
Not long ago it took the price of
two bushels of corn to pay for trans
porting one; that is corn sold for
twenty cents, and it cost forty cents
to send a bushel to New York. The
first remedy is to condense products
before shipping. A bushel of fifty
six pounds of corn may be con
deneed into ten pounds of pork,
which can be freighted anywhere
for less than half it would cost to
ship the corn. Grain may be con
densed into butter and cheese by
feeding it to cows. This condensa
tion leads to other incidental but
important advantages, notably a
diversifying of products.
The most marked improvement
in Western farming during the past
decade is in this direction. But
there is still room for more. Many
thousand hogs are shipped alive to
Chicago every year, and their cured
meat is reshipped to the same place
to be retailed. This double ex
pense of freightage over many hun
dred miles is a waste of labor that
ought to be stopped, and would be
but for the scarcity of capital inei
dent to new countries. Certainly
every farmer should cure his twn
pork. There is absolutely no good
reason why we should import
canned corn from Maine, tomatoes
from Maryland, not to mention
pickles, beans, peas, cheese, crack
ers, etc. These can all be grown,
and prepared here as cheaply as
anywhero. It is safe to say that
three bushels of sweet corn can be
growed in Nebraska for what it
cost to grow one in Maine, and
perhaps the same may be said of to
matoes. Some of the idle Eastern
capital might be invested here in
canning factories and other ways
with the certainty of a rich return.
-Prof. S. R Thompson, of Neb.,
in American Agriculturist for Feb.
PREP'AREFOR EARLY VEG
ETABLES.
Pla:3ts sufficient for the family
garden can be easily raised, usually
-of better quality thaL in a hot bed
as generally managed, and they
will interest t be young people who
alay like-to see tbings grow.
Boxe:s for the purpose are made of
-half-inch stuff well nailed together.
Their length should be suited to
the width of the window, a foot
wide, and the depthi of three or
four inches. In modern houses
window s Ils are rarely wide
enough to hold such a box, and it
is well to suspend it by means of a
wire at each end. Drive in a screw
near the upper edge of the end of
the box; and near the side the furth
est from the window, and a corres
ponding screw in the window casing.
A piece of copper wire twisted
around the screw in the box, and
its other end made fast to that in
the casing,will hold the box securely.
Those who regularly use such
boxes, provide the soil fer them
the autumn before. The lack of
such provision need not deter any
from trying to raise plants in this
manner. Earth from the woods is
a most excellent material for filling
the boxes. This collects in the
hollow places, and can usually be
gathered in a mild time, even in
winter. If woods earth is not to
.be had, take advantage of a thaw,
and scraping up some garden soil,
place it in a heap in the'cellar until
it is dry enough to use. i att all
heavy, it may be made porous by
adding sand, or, what is better,
fine moss. Procure some sphagnum
or peat moss, such as nurserymen
use for packing; dry it thoroughly,
and rub through a coarse wire sieve.
One part of,tbis fine sifted moss
to four or five of soil, makes an ex
cellent material for seed boxes, as
it will not become packed by the
needed waterings. As a rule, the
seeds should be sown in them about
six weeks before the plant can be
safely set out in the open ground.
When the seedings are large enough
to handle, usually when they have
made two rough leaves-those after
the seed leaves-they will need
transplanting into another box of
similar soil, setting them an inch
apart each way. Plant in tbe boxes
must have water as they need it,
and on warm days they may be set
outside in a sunny sheltered place,
bring.ing them in before the air be
comes chilly. The vegetables usu
ally started in window boxes are
early cabbages, cauliflowers, letuce,
ad tomatoes; in April, egg plants
and peppers may be thus sown.
4skrfti. 4gricMdtrft fbr FebH Mdr
BLESS IIS DEAR HEART I
VI
.-.a
In a very little elegant palace car a
entered a weary faced, poorly-dress- N
ed woman with three little children ei
-one a baby in her arms. A look w
of joy crept into her face as she H
sat down into one of the luxurious si
chairs, but it was quickly dispelled
as she was asked rudely to "start
her boot."
A smile of amusement was seen a
on several faces as the frightened "
grapi hurried out to one of the 1S
common cars. Upon one young t<
face, however, there was a look k
which shamed the countenances of a
ti
the others.
"Auntie," said the boy to the p
lady beside him, "I am going to a
carry my basket of fruit and this N
box of sandwiches to the poor 7
woman in the next car. You- are
willing, of course!' a
"Don't de foolish, dear; you may K
need them yourself, and perhaps'
the vroman is an impoEtor."
'No, I'll not need them," he an
swered decidedly, but in a very low
tone. "You know I had a hearty
breakfast and don't need a lunch.
The woman looked hungry, auntie,
and so tired, too, wi.h three little
babies clinging to her. i'll be
back in a minute, auntie; I know
mother wouldn't like it if I did n't
speak a kind word to the least of
these when I met them." a
The worthy auntie brushed a .
tear from her eye after the boy 0
left her, and said, audibly, "Just
like his dear mother."
About five minutes later, as the O
lady passed the mother and the a
three children, she saw a pretty t
sight- the family feasting as per- c
haps they never had done before;
the dainty sandwitches were eager
ly eaten, the fruit basket stood
t
open. The eldest child, with her
mouth filled with bread and butter, <
said:
"Was the pretty boy an angel,
mamma?'
'No," answered the mother, and
a grateful look brightened her faded
eyez; "but he io doing an. angel's
work, bless his dear heart!"
And we too, said, "Bless his dear
heart!"
FAST JUDGE AND SLOWV
JUDGE.
When I was a young man I spent
several years in the South, residing
fcr awhile at Fort Gibson, on -athe
Mississippi river. A great deal of
litigation was going on there aboul
that time, and it was not always an
easy matter toobh.in a jury. One
day I was summoned to act in this
capacity, and repaired to court to
get excused. On my name being
called, I informed his honor, the
judge, that I was not a freeholder,
and therefore not gnalified to serve.
"I am stopping for the time be
ing at this place."
"You hoard at the hotel, I pre
sume?"
"I take my meals there, but have
rooms at another part of the town,
where I lodge"
"So you keep bachelor's hall"
"Yes, sir."
"How long have you lived mn that -
manner?"
"About six months."
"I think you are qualified," grave
ly remarked the judge, "for I have
never known a man to keep bache
los hall the length of time you
name who had not dirt enough in
his room to make him a freeholder. j.
The court does not excuse you." N
.- S
CONvRSA TION.--A talent for con
v'ersation has an extraordinary value
for common every day life. Any
one who has this gift enters in a so
cial circle anywhere. Hlow every
one's face brightens at his entrance. i
How soon he sets all the little w
wheels in motion, encouraging the r
resources of the reserved an~d shy, da
subsidizing the facile, and making
everybody glad and happy. i
To converse well is not to en. s<
gross the conversationi It is not -
to do all the talking. It is not ne
cessary to talk with very great
brilliancy. A man may talk with
such surpassing power and splendor
as to awe the rest of the company
into silence, or exite their envy,
and so produce a chill where his
aim should be produce heat and c
sunshine. He should seek the art
of making others feel quite at home
with him, so that, no matter how A
great may be his attainments or
reputation, or how small may be
theirs, they find it insensible just
as natural~and pleasant talking to
him as hearing him talk. The t al- -
ent for conversation, indeed more
than anythirig else in life, requires
one to have more varied knowledge, y
and to have it at instant and abso- Ie
lute disposal, so that he can use S
just as much or just as little as the -~
occasion demands. It requires the eI
ability to pass instantly and withJ
ease from the playful to the serious, a:1
from books to men, and from the
mere phrase of courtesy to the ex-!
-.re .entme-nt and passion..
IALF OUT OF HIS HEAD.
"Blessed be the man,' said Don Quixote's
eary squire, "who invented sleep." San
io's gratitude is ours, but what if one can
)t for any reason enjoy that excellent in
:ntion? "Nervousness in me had become
disease," writes Mr. William Coleman, the
eli known wholesale druggist of Buffalo,
Y.
"I could not sleep, and my nights were
ther passed in that sort of restlessness
bich nearly crazes a man, or in a kind of
upor, haunted by tormenting dreams.
aving taken PARKER's ToxIC for other
oubles, I tried it also for this. The re
It both surprised and delighted me. My
rves were toned to concert pitch, and,
ie Cesar's fat men. I fe:l into the ranks
those who sleep o' nights. I should add
Lat the Tonic speedily did away with the
ondition of general debilIty and dyspepsia
:casioned by my previous sleeplessness,
id gave me strength and pcrfect digestion
i brief, the use of the To,:, thoroughly re
tablished my health. I have used PAR
E's Toxic with entire success for seat
ckness and for the bowel disorders inciden
ocean voyages."
This preparation has heretofore been
iown as PARKER'S GINGER Toxic. Here
'ter it will be advertised and sold under
e name of PAEKER'S Tonic-omitting the
ord "ginger." Hiscox & Co., are induced
make his change by the action of un
incipled dealers who have for years de
Ived their customers by substituting in
rior preparatious under the name of ginger.
e drop the misleading word all the more
illingly, as ginger is an unimpo.rtant flavor
g ingredient in our Tonic.
Please remember that no change has been.
- will be, ,made in the preparation itself.
id all bottles remairing in the hands of
alers, wrapped undr the name of PAR
E's GINGER Tosic, contain the genuine
edicine if the fac-simile signature of His
)y & Co. is at the bottom of the outside
rapper." Feb. 1-1m.
TUTT'S
PILLSI
TORPID BOWELS,
)ISORDERED LIVER,
and MALARIA.
From these sources arise three.fourths of
1o disOases of the human rate. These
rmptoms indicate their existence: Loss ot
.ppetite, Bowels costive, Sick Head
he, fullness after , aversion to
Kertion of body or mnd, Eructation
r food, Irritability of temper, Low
pitS, A feeling of having neglected
mme duty, Di-ziness, Fluttering at the
eart, Dots before the eyes, highly col
red Urine, CONSTIPATION, and de
and the use of a remedythat acts directly
atheLiver. AsaLivcr medicine TUTT'S
ILLS have no equal. Their action on the
Idneys and Skin is also prompt; removir.g
11 impurities through these three " scav
Ngers of the system," producing appe
te, sound digestlon, regular stools, a clcar
kin and a vigorous body. TUTT'SPILLS
use no nausea or griping nor interfere
rIth daily work and are a perfect
NTIDOTE TO MALARIA.
EE FEELS VLIE A NEW MAN.
"I have had Dyspepsia, with Constipa
on,two years, and have tried ten different
:nds of pills, and TUTT'S are the first
bat have done me any good. They have
leaned me out nicely. My appetite is
plendid, food digests readily, and I now
ave natural passages. I feel like a new
nan.3 W. D. EDWARDS, Palnyra, 0.
oldeverywhere,250. Office,41MurraySt.,N.Y.
TUTT'S HAIR DYE.
GRAY PL" Ol WMSKERS changed in.
tatly to a GLossi BLACK by a single ap.
>ication of this DYE. Sold by Druggi-ts,
>r sent by express ou receipt of $.
Offile, 44 Murray Street, New York.
WUTTS MANUAL OF USEFUL PECEiPTS FRUL
July 19, 29-1y.
,jSTETTE
CELEBRATED
'ToxAcH
'v wi;" work early and late the year
r .:i no, oca.si'iially, the healthful
minlc'm iparted by a wholesome tonic
bike lionenter's S:oniach Bitters. To all
Its prity and efiicio.cy as a remedy anti
preven~tv'e of d:sease commend it. It
check.s incipient rheumatism and malarial
sraiptomls, relieves constipation, dyspep
iadbiliousness, arrests premature
tlecay of the physical energies, mitigates
he infirmities of age and hastens conva
lescence. For sale by all Druggists and
Dealers generally.
W.ANTED.
.COTTON SEED!
COTTON SEED!
I ill par (15e.) tiftee cs ea -sh
e-r Brihel for 10).000 Bushel-i SOUND
RY COTTON SEED, delivered to
ec at this place before the first of next
ovebri. WVill exchange Cotton
aed matl for Cotton Seed.
W. F. HOLLOWAY & CO.,
Oct. 3-(im. Pomnaria, S. C,
Liver, Kidry) or StomacIh Troule.
Smptos: Impure blood, costive bowels,
regular appetite. sour belching, pains in
e, back and heart, yellow urine. burnmlg
hen urinating, elay-coiored stools, ha,s
-cath, no desire for- work. chills. fevers,
ritability, whitish tongue, dry cough,
zzy head, with (lull pain in back part, loss
'memory, foggy sight. For these tronules
;WAYNEs PIL LS" are a sure cure. Box.
Pills). by mzail, 25 ets.. 5 for $1.00. Ad
'es, DR. SWAYNE & SON. Philada., Pa.
>ld by Druggists. Jas. si-ly.
A FULL LINE OF
Boots,
Shoes,
Trunks,
Clothing, &c. &c.,
an e found
At the LOWEST' PRICES,
t the OLD ESTABLISHMENT
-OF
Me FOOT.
42-tf
nfor the working class. Send 10
iIIcents for postage, and 'we wil
mlilail y on free, a royal, valuable
box of sample goods that will put
uin ithe way of ina.emg more money m a
w days than you thought possible at any
tsiness. Capital not required. We will
a,rt you. You can work all tbe spare
ne only. The work Ia universally adapted
both sexes, younga;nd old. You can easily
rrn 50 cents to $5 every evening. That all
bo want work may test the tpisiness, we
ako this unparalleled offer ; to all who
e not well satisfied we will send $1 to ya3
r the trouble of writing us. Full partleu
r, directions, etc.. sent free. Fortunes
ilU be made by those who give their whole
no to the wQrk. Great success absolutely
e. Don't ti. Start now. Addrst
fison Co., l'o d, MaNe ii
C. BART & Co.,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
The largest Importers of Foreign Fruits in the South. ofl'er for sale a well
selected stock of
Apples, Oranges, Bananas,
Cocoanuts, Lemons, Nuts,
Dried Figs, Raisins, Potatoes,
Cabbage, Onions, Peanuts,
And everything else that a First Class Wholesale Fruit
Store should have.
COUNTRY ORDERS FILLED
WITH DiSPATCH.
Oct. 25-Gm.
HEADQUARTERS FOR
ASRICULTUNALILEMENTS AN AINERlY.
F. A. SCHUMPERT & 00.,
are Agents and have for sale the following improved Agricultural Implement
Threshers,
Steam Engines,
Saw Mills,
Grist Mills,
Cotton Gins,
Cotton Presses,
Cider Presses.
MIcCOURMIOK'S MIACHIINE SI
Harvester and Binder,
Table Rake,
Dropper and Mower,
Horse Rakes,
Harrows,
Grlobe Cotton Planter, -
SULKY AND WALKING PLOWS,
C U'L T I V A T 0 R S,
CHICAGO SCREW PULVERIZER, CANE MILLS AND EVAPORATORS
AND OTHER IMPROVED AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS.
If you want anything of this kind give u a call before purchaingel-eewhere.
Warehouse for Machinery in the new building on corner Caldwell and IIar
rington jtreets, below Christian & Smith's Livery Stables.
ar. 5, 10-tf.
.1,-,
WATHES CLNKS JEWVELRY,
At te Nw Stre n Hoel ot.SEND FOR PRICE LIST.
I huvc ow o had a arg ondelcantJe welry
.'issrtr..nt ofPA1LACE
224 KING ST.
WATCHES,CCAOCT, JEWELRY,;.
Silvr an Plaed Wre,LARGEST STOCK.
VIOLN AN GIJTAPhSTB1GS,LOWEST PRICES
IN '[H E SOUT H.
SPECTACLES AND1 SPECTACLE CASES DEP &IRING A SPECIALTY.
WEDDIN6 AND BIRTHDAY PRESENTS, SEND ME YOUR WATCHES.
IN ENDLESS YARIETY. ~ )1-y
Ai! orders by mail prom.ptly attenIded to.
Watchmaking and Repairing 900as of All Hinds,
Donie Cheaply and with Dispatch. iuhaskpt in a
Cali and examin~e my stock and prices.
EDUARD SCHOLTZ. ItELN Ol T~K
No.2 47if TH ESE ARE OFFERED
At Very Short Profits,
*u BY THE OLDEST
- HOUSE,
- IN NEW BERRY,
5 M. FOOT.
42-t i
Dec. 84, tf
No.3,sMr LYONH AL
A reidnt ofa th .Sh A CAT
twiceur pice. he fstestsellng bok Dr
in pAeia. Imen s a efproftts Ptoants U *
Rail Roads.
Columbia & Greenville Railroad.
PASSENGER DEPARTMENT,
COLUXmIA. S. C., Feb. Ith 1881.
On and after Monday, Feb. 4, 1584. the
PASSENG ER TRAINS will run as herewith in
ficated upon this road and its branches
Daily, except Sundays.
No. 53. UP PASSENGER.
Leave W., C. & A. Junction .... 11.22 a I
Leave Coiumbia,A - - e 11.50 a In
" Alston, - - - - 12.56 p m
i Newberry, - - - - 202p m
" Ninety-Six, - - -. - 8.37 p M
" Hodges, 422 p m
" Belton, - - -- 5.24 p m
&rrive Greenville, - - - - 6.50 p In
No. 52. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Greenville, - - - 9.55 a m
" Belton, - - 11.25 p In
" Hodges, - 1236p m
" Ninety-Six, - - - - 1.43 p In
" Newberry, - - - 3.14 p m
" Alston, - , - 4.19 p m
Arrive Columbia,F - - 5.20 p m
Arrive W., C. & A. Junction. ----- 5.38 p In
PAETANBUXG. UNION a COLUMBIA RAILROAD.
No. 53. UP PASSENGER.
Leave A!ston, - - - - 1.10 p In
" Strother, - - - - 2*t5 p In
" Shelton, - - - - 2.45 p m
" Santuc. - --- 332p m
Union, - - - - 4.15 p In
Jonesville, - 4.57 p In
Arrive Spartanburg, - 0.15 p m
No.52. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Spartanburg, R. & D. Depot, H 11 05 p m
Spartanburg, S. U.& C. Depot,G 11.15p n
Jonesville, - - - 12.25 p In
Union. - - - 1.10 p In
Santuc, - - - 1 47 p m
" Shelton, 2 40 p m
Strother, - - - 3.14 p m
Arrive at Alton, - - - 407 In
LAURENS RAILWAY.
Leave Newberry, - - - 3.20 p In
Arrive Laurens C. H., - - 7.10 p m
Leave Laurens C. H., - - 9.0 p m
Arrive'Newberry, - - 12.40 p m
ABBEVILLE BRANCH.
Leave Hodges. - - - 4.30 p m
Arrive at Abbeville, - - - 5.3 p In
Leave Abbeville, - - - - 11.33 p In
Arrive at Hoges, - - - - 12.30 p n
BLUE RIDGE RAILROAD AND ANIERSON
BRANCH1.
Leave Belton 5.25 p m
" Anderson 6.00 p In
" Pendleton G35 p m
Leave Seneca C, 7.30 p In
Ai-rive Walhalla 7.57 p m
Leave Walhalla, - - 8.45 a In
Leave Seneca C, 9.15 a In
" Pendleton, - - 10.(2 a In
" Anderson, - - 10.47 p In
Arrive at Belton, - - 11.21 p za
CONNECTIONS.
A. With South Carolina Railroad from Char
leston.
With Wilmington, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad from Wilmington and all
points North thereof.
WithCharlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad from Charlotte and all points
North thereof.
B. With Asheville & Spartanburg Rail Road
for points in Western North Carolina.
C. With A. & C. Div. R. & D. R. E., from all
points South and West.
D. With A. & C. Div., R. & D. R. R., from At.
lanta and beyond.
E. With A. & C. Div., R. & D. R. E., from all
points South and West.
F. With South Carolina Railroad for Charles
ton.
With Wilmington, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad for Wilminiton and the orth.
With Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad for Charlotte and the North.
G. With Asheville & Spartanburg Railroad
from lendersonville.
H. With A. & C. Div., R. & D. R. R., from
Charlotte and beyond.
Through Coach for Hendersonville will
be run from Columbia daily.
Standard Time used is Wahingtou, D. C.,
which is fifteen minutes faster than Columbia.
J. W. FRY, Superintendent.
31 SLAUGIITat, General 1assetger Agent.
D C&RDWELL, Acs't GenerAl Passenger Agt.,
Columbia, S. C.
South Carolina Railway Company.
CHANGE OF SCHEDULE.
On and after Jan. 20th, 1881, Passenger
Trains on this road will ran as follows un
til farther notice:
TO AND FROM1 CHIARLESTON.
GOING EAST.
Leave Columbia *..40) a mf5.34 p mn
Arrive Charleston 11 23 p in 10.10 p m
001NG WEST,
Leave Charleston 17.00 a mn *4.00 p mn
Arrive Columbia 11.4 a mn 10.35 p mn
f Daily. *Daily except Sunday.
TO AND) FRMtI CA3MDEN.
GOING EAST,
Leave Columibia 'G 40 a mi *5.31 p mn
Art ive Camden 1.55a mn S 25 p in
GOING WEST
Leave Camden *7.15 a in *4 15 p mn
Arrive Columnbiai 11.40 a in I0.25 p mn
*Daily except Sundays.
TO AND FROM A'CL'STA.
GOING EAST.
Lave~ Co'umbiat *G.40) a mt *3.11 p m
Arrive Augusta 12.05 p mn 7.10 a in
GOING wE.'T.
Leave A ugusta 'i;.08 a In *5 00 p mn
Arrive Columbia 11.40 p mI 10:5 p mn
'Daily except Sundays.
CoNNI:crIoNs.
Connection made at Columbia with the
Columbia and Greenville ltail Road by train
arriving~ at 11.28~ P. M., and departing at 5.58
P. M. Connect ion made at Columbia Junc
tion with Chatrlotte, Colunmbia ant Augusta
ial itoad by same train to andI fromi all
points on both roads with t hrough Pullnmn
Sleeper betwveen Charleston and Washing.
ton, via Virghdai: Midland route, without
change. Connection made at Charleston
with Steamers for New York on Wednesdays
and Saturdays; also, with Savannah and
Charleston Railroad to all points South.
Connections are made at Augusta with
Georgia Railroad and Central Railroad to.
and from all points South and West.
Through tickets can be purchased to all
points South andl west, by applying to.
D). McQ UEEN, A gent, Columbia.
D. C. ALL EN, G. P. & F. A.
Jonx B. PECK. General Manager.
Asheville and Spartanburg Railroad.
SPARTANBURG. S. C., September 1,1881.
On and after Monday. October 1st, l8=3.
passenger trains will be run daily (Sundays
excepted) between Spartanburg and Hien
dersonville, as follows:
UP TRAIN.
Leave R. & D. D)epot at Spartanbrg.1.30 p in
Arrive at Heaudersonville.........5.0 p mn
DOWN TRAiN.
Leave Hendersonville............. 8.00 a in
Arrive R. & D. Depot, Spartanburg.11.30 p mn
Both trains make connections for Coum
ba and Charleston via Spartanburg. Union
and Columbia and Atlanta and Charlotte by
Air Line. JAMES ANDERSON,
Superintendent.
S D. FRIDA. J. Ce. FRIDAY.
FRIDAY & BRO.,
DEALERS IN
China, Crockery and
Glassware,
TIN WARE,
Hlouse- Furnishing Goods,
LAMPS, OLS,
PICTURE FRAMES,
FANCY GOODS, &C.,
NET' DOOR TO II. EURLICH & SONS,
Main Street,
COLUMyBIA, S. C.
ot. 24-3m.
PATENTS
Obtained, and l other business in the U.S~.
Patent Offee attended to bor MODERATE
FEES. *'
Or offce is opposite U S. Patent Offce,
and we can obtain Patents in less time than
those remote from W ASI[NGTON.
Send MODEL or DRAWING. We advise
as to patentability free of charge ; and we
make NO CHARGE UNLESS WE OBTAIN
PATENT.
We refer, hero, to the Postmaster, thme
Supt. of' Money Order Div., and to the off
cials of the U. S. Patent Offce. For circu.lar
advice, terms, and references to actua.
clients in your own State or country, write
to C. A. SNO~W & Co.,
oppote Patcnt Offce, Washington, D. C.
De. 6.853-1y.
Send six cents for postage,
jp dreeive free. a costly
x fgoods which wilhelp
LLSLDgto more rnmn right
aythan a~ gl in ti .Al
steher aez, GOsne d ifmrat hour. The
-e re0e se lbsdze befoe the
1884 THE 1884
CONSTITUTION
TnE D.ILY Co3sTiriON' has come to
be a necessity to every intelligent man in
the range of its circlati.
For the next year it will be better than
ever. Nearly $100,000 is now being invested
by its proprietors in a new building, pres
ses and outfit, in which and with which It
can be enlarged to meet its increasing busi
ness, and improved to meet the demands of
its growing constituency.
THE DAILY AND SUNDAY CoNsTITUTiON for
1884 will be better and fuller than ever, and
in every sense the best paper in the reach
of the people of the Southeast.
One Year $10, 6 Months $5, 3 Months $2.50.
1 Month $1.00
THE WEEKLY ONTITUTION
startsthe new year with13000 subscribers
who pronounce it the largest, best and I
cheapest paper within their reach.
It consists of 8, 10 or 12 pages (as the de
mand of its business or the news may di
rect) filled with matter of the greatest inter
est to the farmer.
AT LESS THAN 3 CENTS A WEEK
this great budget of news and gossip will be
sent to your fireside to entertain every {
member of your household,
One Year.................... ....$150
Six Months...... .......... 100
In Clubs of Ten, each.........12.)
In Clubs of Twenty, each......... 1 00
With an extra paper to the getter up of
the Club.
THE YEAR OF 188l.
will be one of the most important in our
history. A President, Congressmen. Sena
tors. Governor, Legislature-are all to be
elected.
Very important issues are to be tried in
the National and State elections. The Con
stitution in its daily or weekly edition will
carry the fullest and freshest news in best
shape to the public. and will stand as an
earnest champion of Democratic principles.
Address, THE CONSTITUTION.
THE
Nhrud|cie & ConsliIulionalis,
AUGUSTA, GA.,
-AND TIE
NEWBERRY HEBALD
for one year at $3.50.
The Augusta CHRoNICLE AND CONSTITU
TIONALIST is the largest weekly newspaper
in the State. It is a ten page seventy column
paper. It contains all the important news
of the week, and is tilled with interesting
and Instructive readingr to the farmer, me
chaiac, business and professional man. Its
Washington, Atlanta and Columbia letters
with Its full telegraphic service, market re
ports, editorials and general news make it
one of the most readable and one of the
best newspaper in the South.
The CHRONICLE AND COSTITuTrONALIST
can be read in any household. It is tree
fiom sensationalism.
THE IMERICAN FIRMER
Established 1819, and for more than a Third
of a Century under the same
Management
Devoted to FARMING STOCK-E-ASING,
FRUIT GROWING, MARkET GARDENING,
the DAIRY, the POULTRY YARD, etc., etc.
Special attention is paid to Fertilizcrs and
Manures, including those ot commerce and
the farm.
Reports of Representative Farmer' Clubs
are a notable feature of its issues.
There is a Home Department, with charm
ing reading and practical suggestions for
the ladies of the iarm household.
The most competent, successful and ex
perienced men and women have chargeff.
the several departments.
No Farmer in the Atlantic States. from
Delaware to Georgia. "can aRfford to be
without" this old and reliable adviser and
Guide on farm work.
The American Farmer is published twice
every month, (on the 1st and 15th). It is
beautifully printed on fine white paper in
clear type. $1.'%0 a year. To clubs of five
or over, $1.CO each.
Handsme, 'Valuable and Ussful Premiums
are given to all those who will take time
and trouble to collect subscribers.
SAM'.S SA NDS & SON, Publishers,
128 Baltimore St., Baltimore, Md.
The UERALD and the American Farmer
will b -'clubb.d together and sent to any
address for $3.00 for one year.
THE EVENING
Augu8ta, G.,
--AND TIHE
NEWBERRY HERALD
will lbe furnished forISS at $700
The EIE\ING (HRtONICLiF AND) CONSTITU
TIONaLIsT is the largest and cheapest Daily
newspaper in the South. It contains eight
thousand words of teegraphi per day from thc
New Yo:k Associated Press. This servica is
supplemented by full special from Atlanta,
Columbia and Washington. As a newspaper,
the CHIIONICLE is one of the best in the
Suthl It is newsy, progressive. reliable and
tree fromi the demnora.lizing details of crime.
THIS PAPER
IN CLUB WIThI
ODE Y'S
LADY'S BOOK
will be sent for one year to any
address on recei pt of $3.50 which should be
sent to the publisher of the HEALD.
GODEY'S LADY'S BOOK
Is recognized as the leading Fashion and
Home Magazine in America. The leading
attractions for 1854 are the following :
~Beautifal Colored Fashion Plates exe
cuted by the French process, represen
ting the prevailing fashions in both
styles and color. produced especially for
and published exclusively In GODEY'S
LAD'S BOOK.
1r.;English Plates of Fashions in black and
.Lwhte, ilustrating leadinp' styles.
19Finely Executed Steel Enagravingts by
-Lthe best artists, made for GODEY'ei
LADY'S BOOK.
21 Engraved Portraits of Ex-presidents of
~the U. S., which form a part of what is
known in GODEY'S LADY'S BOOK as the
PRESIDENTIAL Portrait Gallery,
each being accompanid by a short biogra
phical sketch.
~5Paes. Illustrating FashIons and fancy
Sneedle work
19Pages o Architectural Designs, showing
Auplans and perspective of Houses and
Cottages of all descriptions.
2 Full Size Cut Paper Patterns with full
and explicit instructions for use.
200 CODEY'S MoS
Celebrated household cookingreceipts.ceach
having been tested by practical housekeep
ers before publishing.
24 PAGES OF SELECT MUSIC.
ESIDEES embracinga rich arrayoflitera
ture, Novels, Noveletts, Stories
and Poems, by eminent writers, among
whom are.
MARION HTARLAND, AUGUSTA de BUBNA,
CiISTIAN1EID Mrs. SHEFFEY PETEES,
ELLA RODMAM CHUECH, HIELEN MATH
ERS. Author of "Cherry Ripe?"
The Art Department will be under the di
rection of Win. MacLeod, Curate of Corcoran
Gallery of Ar t, Washington, D. C. All other
departments under equally competent di
rection.
SUBSCRIIPTION Price $2.00 per Year.
For further Information send for circular
Sample copy of GODEY'S LA DY'S BOOK
c. otamps taken. To avoid errors write
plaLly your address, giving County and
State.
GOBEV'S LADY'S BOOK.
1006 Chestnt Street, Philadelphia, Pa
IENRY STEITZ,
Importer and Wholesale DealerIn
Foreign & Domes
FRITIT,
APPLES, ORANGES,
BANANAS, COCOANUTSt
LEMONS, PINEAPPLES, POTA- '
TOES, ONIONS, PEANUTS,
CABBAGES, &C.
B. E. CORNER MEETINC
& MARKET STREETS,
6iHARLESTON, S. C
Nov. 8, 45 -6m.
ONEYTOLEN19M
Bf THE - CAROLIA
BANKING COMPANY
OF
NEW YORK AND BOSTON.
Farm Mortgage Loans
Negotiated on
Improved
F'arms & Plantationsf.
FOR NEWBERRY COUNTY.
Apply to
0. L. SCHUMPERT,
Attorney and Counsellor,
48-3m. Newberry. S. C.
ITCHING ?ILE-Smptoms nd C.
The systems are moisture. like peripb2p
:ion, Intense itching, increased by sM0
ing, very distressing, particulFl aU1gh
seems as It pin-worms were craw ugin
tbout the rectum: the private parts are
sometimes affected. If allowed to coAtnu
very serious results may follow.'SW
DITMENT' is a pleasant, sure cure.
ror Tetter, Itch, Salt-Eheum, Scale4-Hew
Erysipelas. Barbers' Itch, Bi
cay. crusty Skin 111spases. Bx
50 ets.; 3 ror $1.25. Address., ]DR.t
SSON', Philada., Pa. Sold by Druggists.
Jan. st-13.
GERMAN KINIT I
And other Fertilizers. Tons,
enuine Gerran Kainit direct impor
tation, and alI Fertilizers,
For sale by
HERMANN BULWI
KERR' ARF,
CAlt STON, 8.Ci
C'a
AMRIUS CE ST
DYSPEPSIA.
of food "L walter.
NEUTRALIZINC CORDIA#I
Is as pleasant and harmlees as D
Win-contaIns no Opium an.t will not
pao. Specially recommended forSosc
a1id Teeting Children.
Germnanand Engish D!retiosa naechDloe
-Price aSc. and $r.co.
larg ientsini ties asmahasaL
TE ECELSIOR oxirlToAL(0-, Bole og,
warHaLL.., S.C. U.S-A
SED E 2c. SIAMP? FOR LITTLEI BOOKQ
New York Ofic-e 70 Maiden Lane.
CHRONIC DISEASESI CUE
..New paths markedot
mor.t popular book on
SocuLr and Suzuar,
F r.Ane Hoxtz TAXI.a
treaing otbh
hcaLh and dise, N
B.F90TE, ofN
City; Price, *1.5
500,000 of hIs booksm
sold in thcUnitedStates,
Germauny and Australia. A
borough physieian, reted
- afty yearspractice,wrttes: "~
toort i*s*ri*Aisetvalet,
Scusdoresso regenercte sectei."
1paghet cofntents abl of i
curability of all Chronic Dise ;
of wh.iaver part, sent for3 tita.
* DR. FOOTWE auS Ra
B ook of Health sane
anmd ReadyRcips
128 pnges of *dvice about
habns in all seasons, andr.u
for cure of comtmon im
Aa valuable referenc book se
every famBly. By maD,
ce4 r.-= Dooss U
AGENTs.
Murray Hu[111 Publishing Co.,
129 East 28th Street, New York
PAYNE'S 90O Horse Spark-A:-ths
Portable En;:!nc has cut l0.O00ft. of Michiga Pa
Bour.. In 10 hour ,. b: ruing sabu, fr'na-the Wb
eight foot letgtha.
sawr 8.0001 h- tn 10 flours.
5 Bort -v . in mueimc.
- I. l --se-pwer on %.
1 ;~:i o .:cd ith anyc
0~ :zt .. Iia rean
C,? ber sh!eiar;'e, IMoUle
lar Sr.-Mi!, s-hafttn' or
either ca-t rr Med r's
Wroncht-Iron.Pulley, send f
ilet:ad catalogue, No.2i~
information and prices.
B. W.PAYNE SOS &
May 17, 20-ly.
.I be maUled Oi
tutomzers of-rat F*~er
t cntr! -ull'.stratoa, res c rid s
rc:ios fo,r p-:aag et-b!e.ad
ecd Plants..etc. Ru~srsm1e e
)M.FERRY & CO.
CglsC-is, Cai aCm$~

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