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The Newberry herald. (Newberry, S.C.) 1865-1884, February 28, 1884, Image 4

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026909/1884-02-28/ed-1/seq-4/

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FEBRUARY.
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PRACTICAL DRAINING
HINTS.
The County Gentleman offers some
good ideas on drainage, and we
clip out a few paragraphs for the
readers of The Cultivator who are
jM 4ow so much interested in the
Dains gbould always be cut as
sow as possible, the bottom be.
lng just wide enough to receive the
pipes, which rendbrs the drain more
eficient. The length and depth of
drains, and their distance apart,
regulate the size of the pipe that
should be used, but level ground
requires larger pipes than where
the inclination is greater. The ca
pacity of the pipes for minor drains
should be just sufficient to carry off
the maximum flow of water, for if
too large, the sediment will lodge
in the bottom of the pipes and
choke the drains.
' with the diferent meth
of underigaining, Prof. Scott
alludes to the practice which pre- e
vailed before drain pipes came into
use, of forming the drains of stones
gathered from the fields. These, t
however, are only used now on very
stony land, where it is difficult
otherwise to get rid of these hin- t
drances to cultivation. Nobody t
would now think of carting stones
to the field for this purpose. Be
Oided, double the labor is required
for the stone drain, and it is neither a
so effective nor so durable as tile
draining; while in loose soils the
stone channels are more apt to get
sifted up. A cartload of pipes will b
go a hundred times as far as a cart
load of stones, besides requiring
less excavation in laying them.
JAr. Bailey Denton has placed on
record that he has traced the roots
9 feet deep, and the roots of peren
nial grasses he has found in drains
4 feet deep, while he cites an in
stance where the roots of mangolds E
were found at a depth of 5 feet.
C)ay lands with a southern slope
require to be drained to greaterI
~f depth than lands with a northern
Saspect. But, however, much prac
tical men may differ over the value
S of deep,as against shallow drains,
Professor Scott says there can bet
little doubt ehat closer draining is
now being practiced than was form
erly believed necessary by the ad
vocates of peep draining, and the
inference is, that they are at ,the
same time draining shallower. The
excessive distance between the
drains was being resorted to by
land-owners to save expense because E
of their beiDg obliged by the enelo- t
sure commissioners to drain to a
depth 6f four feet; but a less inter- ~
vat is now being adopted, while the
minimum depth on which the com
missioners insist is placed at three t
feet, except in special cases where
-a greater depth is considered ne. a
cessary. The distance between
drains on strong clay lands, should, I
-generally speaking, be from four tu
six times the depth; on strong OarnsC
six to eight times the depth, and
on light soils eight to ten times the
depth.
FEED THE GREPE VINE -The old
-est grape growers we know always
manured their vines plenteously,
and never dreamed of giving them
too much. Of late years there has 1
risen a class of grape growers who
contend that but little manure is ]
needed; that in fact the poorer the
land the better. We are not
amonig this class. We have found
that the ricber the soil the better.
* We have even known dead animals 3
to be buried at the roots; though r
we think this is carrying the man
ure question a little too far. Vines
will sometimes fail in rich land, we.
are aware, but it is from other
causes than the soil being too rich;
- . there are other plagues in the way. s
It may be mildew; it may be the '
little dusty-looking worm which 1
sometimes strips the vine of its
foliage; or it may be the phylloxera r
which attacks the roots and plays
havoc with them; others think there r
is something in the climate, and so a
on. We do not pretend to decide s
the question; we only know that if v
we do the best we can in the culti
vationi of the vines, success will re- a
wardnusin amajority of casee; but d
when failure is the result we feel
very sure that is not high feeding. Il
The grape vine, we are confident, i
and all our experience goes to show Is
it, is a good liver, and we run less
risk in overfeeding than starving it.
-gm at1Elo*a 2WpOJ)A
HOW HE WORKED IT.
A drummer on his first trip was
eated in the same car with an old
Xperienced knight of the road, and
heir conversation turned on thir
elative daily expenses.
"I always manage to include in
oy expenses," said the elder, "hats,
>Oots, overcoats, etc., and every
[rummer who has any respect for
ds noble calling ought to do the
ame. Make the firm stand 'em."
The younger man thought that
6 very good idea, and on his return
rom his trip he included among
>ther items of expense one pair of
oots, $12.
His employers expressed them
elves as well pleased with his suc
:ess as a salesman, but objected to
>ay for the boots.
On his next trip he was fortunate
nough to meet his former acquain
ance.
"How is it?" he asked, "that
rour firm will stand overcoats as
egitimate expense when niine
:icked on a pair of boots?"
"You didn't put down boots in
our expense account, did you?"
"Certainly," said the young man.
"Well, you are a chump. You
hould have dovetailed the price
f boots into the postage stamps
nd sundries."
When the young man again sub
2itted his account his firm remark
d : .,
"We don't see any memorandum
Dr 'boots,' or anything of that na
are, Mr. So-and-so."
"No," Mr. So-and-so said softly,
D himself. "You don't see it, but
ere is a forty dollar overcoat
here just the same."-Philadelphia
kvening Call.
A VERBAL DiscussioN.-A husband
nd wife were talking grammar.
"Would you," said she, ",say scis
ors are, or scissors is?"
"I'd say scissors are, of course,"
e replied.
"Would you say molasses is or
iolasses are?"
"Molasses is, of course."
"Well, than, would you say the
kmily are well!"
"What? You wouldn't-say the
unily are well, when family is a
ingular noun, would you?"
"What would you say, then, I'd
ike to know?"
"Why, love, I'd say the family
ras not well; that you had the
-runts, that Tommy had a sore
nger, that the baby had the colic,
bat Katie had the headache, and
bat 1 wan trying to make an aver
ge by being well enough for four."
She went out of the room and
tidn't speak to him for two days.
-Merchant Traveler.
A TERRIBLE REsO,VE.-"DO you
ee that dudish looking fellow over
bere, the one that looks more like
n organ grinder's monkey than
ny of the others?''
"Yes."
"Well 1 hate aim and I am going
o drive him into an mnsane asylum,
rhere he v,ill never be heard of
gain."
"Oh! come now. In the firet
lace, you would not do such a
bing, and in the second place, you
ould not."
"But I can, though."
"How in the world can you?"
"Easily enough. There is to be
grand party tc-night, and we
ill be there."
-'Yes."
"I am to write a notice of it for
be society paper, and in less than
an forty-eight hours he will be
o crazy that the doctors will have
im locked up."
"Goodness gracious! how will
-o manage itt"
"I will spell his name wrong.
k'ening Call.
AN INTELIGENT Do.-"I thought
-o said that dog knew his busi
ess," said a metropolitan youth
ho had been out after docks and
ad hired the dog to assist him.
"So I did," was the reply; there
p't a better bird dog in this part
f the country."
"He's the worst mongrel I ever
aw," continued the youth. "Why,
hadn't been out more than a half
n hour before he left me in the
"What did ho do?' asked the
ian.
"Why the first duck I saw was
erched on a fence and, through
me trouble witb the gun, I fired
t it seven times without hitting it
nid every time I would fire the dog
rould set up a long howl.
After the seventh shot, and just
s I 'was getting a sure sight on the
ird, what does the miserable cur
o but tear apiece out of 'my pa.n
ioons and, with his tail between
is legs start on a dead run for
ome. Do you call that a dog that
dog that knows his business?"
"Yes," replied the owner patting
im on the thebhead,'"jdo."
(PidlNk el
HALF OUT OF HIS HEAD.
"Blessed be the man,' said Don Quixote's
weary squire, "who invented sleep." San
cho's gratitude is ours, but what if one can
not for any reason enjoy that excellent in
vention? "Nervousness In me had become
a disease," writes Mr. William Coleman, the
well known wholesale druggist of Buffalo,
N.Y.
"I could not sleep, and my nights were
either passed in that sort of restlessness
which nearly crazes a man, 6pin a kind of
stupor, haunted by tormenting dreams.
Having taken PARKER's ToNIc for other
troubles, I tried it also for this. The re
sult both surprised and delighted me. My
nerves were toned to concert pitch, and,
like Cwsar's fat men. I fell into the ranks
of those who sleep o' nights. I should add
that the Tonic speedily did away with the
condition of general debility and dyspepsia
occasioned by my previous sleeplessness,
and gave me strength and perfect digestion.
In brief, the use of the Tonic thoroughly re
established my health. I have used PAR
KER's ToNIc with entire success for seat
sickness and for the bowel disorders iiciden
to ocean voyages."
This preparation has heretofore been
known as PAitER's GIsozi ToNic. Here
after it will be advertised and sold under
the name of PARKER's Toxic-omitting the
word "ginger." Hiscox & Co., are Induced
to make his change by the action of un
principled dealers who have for years de
ceived their customers by substituting in
ferior preparatious under the name of ginger.
We drop the misleading word all the more
wiliingly, as ginger Is an unimportant flavor
ing ingredient in our Tonic.
Please remember that no change has.been,
or will b, made in the preparation "-V-.
and all bottles remaining in the ba1
dealers, wrapped under the name o
KER's GINGER ToNic, contain the genuine
medicine if the fac-simile signature of His
coy & Co. is at the bottom of the outside
wrapper." Feb. 1-1m.
TUTT'S
PILLS
TORPID BOWELS,
DISORDERED LIVER,
and MALARIA.
From these sources arise three-fourths of
the diseases of the human raee. These
symptoms indicate their existence: Loss of
A petite, Bowels costive, Sick Head
asfuness after eatixg, aversion to
exertion of body or mind, ErUctation
of food, Irritability of temper, Low
spirits, A feelin of having neglected
some duty, D nesu, itttering at the
Heart, Dots before the eyes, highly col
ored Urine, CONSTIPATION, and de
mand the use of a remedy that acts directly
onthe Liver. AsaLiver medicine TUTT'S
PILLS have no equal. Their action on the
Kidneys and Skin is also prompt; removing
all impurities through these three s scav
engers of the a stem," producing appe
tite, sound digeo7ion, regular stools, a clear
skin and avigorousbody, TVTT'S PILLS
cause no nausea or griping nor interfere
with daily work and are a perfect
ANTIDOTE TO MALARIA.
IE FEELS T,=H A NEW 3AN.
0I have had ,Dsia with Constipa
tion,two years, and ave tried ten different
kinds of pills, and TUTT'S are the frst
that have don me any good. They have
cleaned me out iioey y appetite is
splendid, foo digests Aly, and I now
have natural passages. I feel like 4 new
man." W, D. EDWARDS, Palmyra, 0.
Soldeverywhere,2&. Oce,44 MnrrySt.,N.Y.
TUTT'S HAIR DYE.
GRAY oR WR SKERS changed in.
tany to a GoossY BLAcK by a single ap.
plicat on of this DYE. Sold by Druggists,
or sent by oxpress on receipt of $1.
Omfte, 4 Murray Street, New York.
TUTT'S MAIUAL OF U61fl, UCEIPTS FRES
July 19, 20-ly.
-ITTEKS
They who work early and late the year
round need, occasionally, the healthu
stimulouis imparted by a wholesome tonic
like Hostetter's Stomach Bitters. To all
its purity and efficiency as a remedy and
p)reventiv~e of disease commend it. It
checks incipient rheumatism and malarial
symptoms, relieves constipktion, dyspep
sia and biliousness, arrests premature
decay of the phy'sical energies, mitigates
the mfilrmities of age and hastens conva
lescence. For sale by all Druggists an<l
Dealers generally.
WANTED.
COTTON SEED!
COTTON SEED!
I w ill pa (I15c.) fifteens cents ca-i:
per Bushel for 10.000 Bushels SOUNDJ
DRY COTTON SEED, delivered to
re at this place before the first of next
November. Will exchange Cotton
Seed meail for Cotton Seed.
W. F. HIOLLO WAY & CO.,
Oct. 3-6m. Pomaria, S. C,
Liaer, Kidney or Stonach Troue.
Symtoms: Impure blood, costive bowels,
irregar appetite, sour belching, pains in
side back and heart, yellow urine, burning
when urinating, clay-colored stools, bad
breath, no deslire for work, chills, fevers,
Irritability, whitish tongue, dry cough,
dizzy head, with dull pain in back part, loss
of memory, foggy sight. For these tronbles
"SWAYNE'S PIL LS1 are a sure cnre. Box.
(30 Pills), by mail, 25i eta., 5 1or $1.00. A d
dress. DR. SWAYNE & SON, Philada., Pa.
Sold by Druggists. - Jas. 84-ly.
A FULL LINE OF
Hats,
Boots,
Shoes,
Trunks,
Clothing, &c. &c.
Can be found
At the LOWEST PRICES,
At the OLD ESTABLISHMENiT
-OF
M. FOOT.
42-tf
(~J)for the working class. Send 10
cents for postage, and we wil
mall you iree,1u royal, valuable
box of sainple goods that will put
you in the way of making more money in a
few days than you thought possible at any
business. Capital not required. We wIll
start you. You can work all the spare
time only. The work is universally adapted
to both sexes, young and old. You can easily
earn 50 cents to $5 every evening. That all
who want work may test the business, we
make this unparalleled offer ; to all who
are not well satisfied we will send $1 to 5
for the trouble of writing us. Full artc
lars, directions, etc.. sent free. Frtunes
ilbe made by those who give their whole
ein to the work. Great snocess absolutely
gure "u't S~a tart 30u. A4drss
tilBan. .10
C. BART & 00.,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
The largest Importers of Foreiga Fruits in the South, offer for sale a well
selected stock of
Apples, Oranges, Bananas,
Cocoanuts, Lemons, Nuts,
Dried Figs, Raisins, Potatoes,
Cabbage, Onions, Peanuts,
And everything else that a First Class Wholesale Fruit
Store should have.
COUNTRY ORDERS FILLED
WI/TH DISPATCH.
Oct. 25-Gm.
HEADQUARTERS FOR
1AEIC9LTUIAIfL IM11T9 All MAC1 11Y,
F. A. SCHUMPERT & 00.,
are Agents and have for sale the following improved Agricultural ImplementO
Threshers,
Steam Engines,
Saw Mills,
Grist Mills,
Cotton Gins,
Cotton Presses,
Cider Presses.
McCORMICKI'S MACVINES]
Harvester and Binder,
Table Rake,
Dropper and Mower,
Horse Rakes,
Harrows
Globe Cotton Planter,
SULKY AND WALKING PLOWS,
CULTIVATORS,
CHICAGO SCREW PULVERIZER, CANE MILLS AND EVAPORATORI
AND OTE IMPE0VED AGEICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS.
If you want anything of this kind give us a call before purchasii-gelsewhere
Warehouse for Machinery in the new building on corner Caldwell and Iar
rin-ton streets, below Christian & Smith's Livery Stables.
5r,5, 10-tf.
CONSUMPTlON SN O RC IT
- - CURED. eer
224UNNGST
SRESTORER 4 o.~YURWTHS
BRONCHITISGodofAlHns
ASTHMA. uh's eti
THSE AORE POICEREDT
assortmnt ofI ING VIT.Y
WATCES,CLOKS,EWERY,MTS. OO.
VIOLINAND GUTAR STINGL,WEST__PRICES _
SPECTACLES AIDISPECTACLECCALTY.
WEDDINS ANDBIRTHDAYYOUSENWSTCHES.
IN EDLES VRNov. 151y
.411 ordrs by GilopsootlyAattndeddso
Watchmakingaandkeepairin
Don theal atr nd witeh DLsptc. BYTEODS
C a nhand exmnam tc and preeatH. SE
EWATCSCOLZ, - IFOT
Siv.er andltedWre.
VIOINAN1GITA SRIGS
INEDESV RIETY.
DoeCepydwit Dipth B W S
Noc.214, tf.H
)SON~ ~- -
Nov. 3, 83-1y.LYNHEAY
State & Monroe Sts.Cicag.~~
.book ever sol for less tha*
aEDettUook Cob~
884 THE 1884
ONSTITUTION
THE DAILY ConsTITUTION has come to
e a necessit to every Intelligent man In
,e range ofVis cirealWton.
For the next iear it will be better than
ver. Nearly $1 000 Is now being invested
y its proprietors in a new building, pres
es and outfit, in which and withWhioh It
an be enlarged to meet ite ineaing busi
ess, and improved to meet tfe demands of
s,gowig constituency.
Tn DALY D SUNDAY CoNsTiUTO for
384 will be better and fuller than ever, and
i every sense the best paper in the reach
f the people of the Southeast
One Year $10,6 Months $5, 9 Months $2.50,
1 month $1.00
[HE WEEKLY GONSTITUTION
tarts the new year with 13,OCO subscribers
rho pronounce it the largest, best and
heapest paper within their reach.
It consists of 8,10 or 12 pages (as the de
iand of its business or the news may di
Bect) filled with matter of the greatest Inter
st to the farmer.
AT LESS THAN 8 CENTS A WEEK
As great budget of news and gossip will be
eut to your fireside to entertain every
iember of your household,
One Year.........................$150
Six Months...... . .......... 100
In Clubs of Ten, each. ::..125
In Clubs of Twenty, each......100
With an extra paper to the getter up of
ie Club.
THE YEAR OF 1284.
rill be one of the most important in our
istory. A President, Congrcsnen. Sena
)rs. Governor, Legislature-are all to be
lected.
Ver important issues are to be tried in
ae , ational and State elections. The Con
titution in its daily or weekly edition will
arry the fullest and freshest news n best
bape to the public. and will stand as an
arnest champion of Democratic prindiles.
Address, TH E CONSTIT9ONt
THE
hlonicle & constituionalist,
AUGUSTA, GA.,
-AND THE~
NEWBERRY HERALD
Dr one year at $3.50.
The Augusta CEmosICLE AxD CoNsTrrU.
IONALIST is the largest,weckly newspaper
ai the State. It is a ten page seventy column
aper. It contains all the important news
the week, and is filled with interesting
nd Instructive reading to the farmer, me
hanic, business and professional man. Its
Fashington, Atlanta and Columbia letters
rith its fail telegraphic service, market r
orts, editoria'.s and general news makeit
ine of the most readable and one of the
cast newspaper In the South.
The CHROiCLE AND CoxsTrrtmoNALsT
an be read in any household. Itis free
Lom sensationalism.
E IMBIIN IRMER
MaabisWe 18199 and for more than at 7hird
of a Oentury under the ame
Management.
Devoted to FARKING STOC&-RAISnG,
RBUTGROWING, XA33E dAz3ENING,
he DAIRY, the POULTRY YAM, aete.c
special attention is paid to Feftis and
fanures, including those of commerce and
he farm.
RePOrCU Of Repautve Paame Cmuu
re a notable of its Issues.
There Is a Deputmt, with charm
ng reading and practical sugetions Pr
he ladies of the farm househol.
The most competent, successful andex
ierlnced men and women have charge of
he several departments.
No Farmer n the Atlantic States, from
)laware to Georgia. ,can afford to be
without" this old and relible adviser and
xuide on farm work.
The American Farmer Is published twice
very month, (on the 1st and 15th). It is
)eautifully printed on fine white paper in
:lear typo. $1.50 a year. To clubs of five
r over, $1.00 each.
andome, Valuable and Useful Premiums
re given to-all those who will take time
td trouble to collect subscribers.
8AM'S SANDS ? SN, Publh
The IJEnALD and the Ameriuau Farinet
ill be clubbed together and sent to any
ddress for $3.00 for one year.
THlE EVENING
Chronicle and Constituticalist,
Augusta, Ga.,
--AND THE
NEWBERRY HERALD
Th EVNN CN L AND CoxssTrrT
IONALIST Is the lares and chept Da i
bousn words o tepe per dayfm
ppmeted byfal special from Atlanta,
jolun 1 and Washington. As a newsape,
he CHRONICLE Is one of the beat Inthe
~outh IttIs nesy prorsiv,relial and
THIS PAPER
IN CLUB WITH
ODE Y'S
LADY'S 300K
iu the publ~hofthe *EaD
GODEY'S LADY'S BOOK
a recognized as the leading Fashion and
Iome Ngsine In America. The leading
ttacins fo 188 arhe follong: ee
td Beatifu Colre chio laes rexe
nstylesad color, proceepcalfr
$ e"f ash.i*ns I*blc and
)in elb Exe3cUed St ei E Gvng
lADY'S BOOK.
iEngrave Portrats of Ex-presldent of
~nown in GODEY'S LADY'S BOOK as the
PEESIDENTIAL PortraIt Gallery,
~ah being accompanied by a short biogra
. lltrtig Fashions and fancy
L2agesofArchitectua esigs howin
lOalSize Cut P ape ,Ptterns with full
Land explicit instructions for use.
200 CODEY'S issP
eleratehouseholdeookingreeltseach
re belore publishing.
24 PAGES,OF SELECT MUSIC.
nd Voems, by eminent writers, among
rhom are.
( ARION rA RL AND, AUGUSTA doeNA
IH EISTANEEID, Mrs. SHEFFEY BE
ELLA BODMAN CHUBCK, HELEN -AH
C, Atithoy of "Cheniy Ripe."
The cArt Deatetwill be under the di
econofWmMacLeod, Craof Coreoram
alery oAr,Wssbingto'n,D. C. All other
epatmnts undr equally competent di.
SUBSCRIPTTON Price $.00 per Year.
'or firler llfo utlnsend fo eua
5. Stam~p8 taken. To avoid errors write
~llly your address, giving County and
GODET'S LMDPS 1001.
1006 Cestant Street, PhiladslpIia,Pa
e BB *Z
p 0
O
Rail Roads.
Columbi" & Greenville Railroad.
PASSENGER DEPARTMENT, b
COLUMBIA. S. C Feb Ith 1884. a
On and after Monday, ieb. 4, 184, the c
PASSENGER TRAINS will run as herewith in- m
dicated upon this road and its brancheq I1
Daily, except Sundays.
No. 53. UP PASSENGER. 1
Leave W., C. & A. Junction .... 11.22 a 1
Leave Columbia,A - - * 11.50 a m
Alston, - 12.5p m
Newberry, - - - - 2.02 p m
Ninety-Six, 3.37 p m
Hodges, - - - 4.22 p =
Belton, 5M - - 5.24pn
Arrive Greenville, - - - - 650 p m
No. 52. DOWN PASSENGER. V
Leave Greenville, - - m- 956am
Belton, - - - 11.2pm
Hodges, - - 1236 pm
Ninety-Six, - - - - 1.43 p m r
" Newberry, - 3.14 p m e
Alston - , - 4.19 p m
Arrive Columbia,F - - 5.20 p m
Arrive W., C. & A. Junction. ----- 5.38 p m V
SPARTANBURG, UNION a COLUMBIA RAILROAD. M
No. 53. UP PASSENGER.
Leave Alston, - - - - 1.10 p m
" Strother, - - - - 2-V5 p In
" Shelton, - - - - 2.45 p m
" Santuc, - - - - - 332pm
" Union, - - 4.15 p nt
" Jonesville, - - 4.57 p In
Arrive Spartanburg, , - 6.15 p In
No.52. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Spartanburg, R. & D. Depot, H 11.05 pm h
Spartanburg, S. U.& C. lepot,G 11.15p m t
Jonesville, - - - 12.25p m e
Union. - - - 1.10 p In
Santuc, - - - 147 p m tj
Shelton, - - - 240 pm
Strother, - - - 3.14 p m
Arrive at Alston, - . - 4 07 pm
LAUnENS RAILWAY. e
Leave Newberry, - - - 3.20 p m
Arrive Laurens C. H., - - 7.10 p m _
Leave Laurens C. H., - - 9.0 p m
Arrive Newberry, - - 12.40 p In
ABBEVILLE BrANC.IH.
Leave Hodges.' - - 4.30 p In
Arrive at Abbeville, - - 5.3 p m
Leave Abbeville, - - - 11.30 p m
Arrive at Hoges,---- - 12.30 p m
BLUE UIDGE RAILROAD AND ANDERsON
BRANCH.
Leave Belton 5.26 p In
" Anderson 6.00 p In
" Pendleton 6.85 p m i
Leave Seneca C, 7.30 p In
Arrive Walhalla 7.57 p In
Leave Walhalla, - - 8.45 a mI
Leave Seneca C, 9.15 a a
" Pendleton, - 10.02 a m C
" Anderson, - 10.47 p In a
Arrive at Belton, - 11.21 p m C
CONNECTIONS.
A. With South Carolina Railroad from .Char- I
leston.
With Wilmington, Columbia and Au ta
Railroad from Wilmington anFall
points North thereof.
With Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta I
Railroad from Charlotte and all points
North thereof.
B. With Asheville & Spartanburg Ril Road
for points in Western North Carolina.
C. With A. & C. Div, R. & D. R. R., from all
points South and West.
D. With A. & C. Div., E. & D. R. R., from At.
lanta and beyond.
E. With A. & C. Div., R. & D. R. R., from all
po ints South and West.
F. With South Carolina Railroad for Charles
ton.
With Wilmington, Columbia and Au
Railroad or Wilmin on and the rth
With Charlotte, Columgba and Augusta
Railroad for Charlotte and the North. 1
G. With Asheville & S burg Railroad
from Hendersonvile.
H. With A. & C. Div., E. & D. E. R., from
Charlotte and beyond.
Through Coach for Hendersonvlle will t
be run from Columbia daily.
Standard Time used is Washin n, D. C.,
which is fifteen minutes faster than ,olumbia
J. W. FRY, Superintendent.
M. SLAUGRTEa, General Passenger Agent. I
D. CA RDWELL, Ass't General Passenger Agt.,
Columbia, S. C.
South Carolina Ralway Company.
1
CHANGE OF SCHEDULE.
On and after Jan. 20th, 184, Passenger
Trains on this road wil run as follows un
til further notice:
'10 AND FROM CHARLESTON.
GOING EAST,
Leave Columbia *6.40 a m 15.34 p m
Arrive Charleston 11.23 p in 10.10 p m
GOING WEST,
Leave Charleston t 7.00 a in *4.00 p m
Arrive Columbia 11.40 a mn 10.35 p m
tDaily. *Daily except Sunday.
TO AND FROM CAMDEN.
GOING EAST,
Leave Columbia *6 40 am '5.34p m
Arrive Camden 1.55a mn 8.35 p m
GOING WEST
Leave Camden *7.15 a m '41 ip m
Arrive Columbia 11.40 a m 10.35 p m
*Daily except Sundays.
TO AND FROM A UGUSTA.
GOING EAsT,
Leave Columbia '6.40 a mn '5.34 p m
Arrive Augusta 12.05 p mn 7.10 ii m
GOING WEsT,
Lea-ve Augusta '6.08 a in '5.00 p m
Arrive Columbia 11.40 p m 10 35 p in
*Daily except Sundays.
CONNECr10NS.
Connection made at Columbia with the
Columbia and Greenville it ail Road by train
arriving at 11.28 P. Md., and departing at 6.581
P. M. Connection made at Columbia June.
tion with Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Rail Road by same train to and from all
points on both roads with tbrough Pullman
dleeper between Charleston and Washing
ton, via Virginia Midland route, without
change. Connection made at Charleston
with Steamers for New York on Wednesdays
and Saturdays; also, with Savannah and
Charleston Railroad to all points South.
Connections are made at Augusta witb
Georgia Railroad and Central Railroad to
and frm all points South and West.
Through tickets can be purchased to all
points Suth and West, by applyn to
D. McQUEEN, Aent, Clmbia.
F. C. ALLhN, G. P. & F. A,
JoHNa B. PECK, General Manager.
Ashevlle and Spartanburg Railroad.
SPARTANBURG, S. C., September 1, 1881.
On and after Monday. October 1st,18S'3,
passenger trains will be run daily (Sundays
excePte) between Spartanburg and Hen
dersonville, as follows:
UP TRAIN.
LeaveRE. & D. Depot at Spartanburg.1.30 p m
Arrive at Hendersonville.........5.30 p in
DOWN TRAIN.
Leave Hendersonville-.............. 8.00 a m
Arrive E. A D. Depot, Spartanburg.11.30 p in
Both trains make connections for Coluin
bla and Charleston via Spartanonrg. Union
and Columbia and Atlanta and Charlotte by
Air Line. JAMES ANDE ESON,
Superintendlent.
S. D. FEIDAy. 3. G. FEIDAY.
FRIDAY & BRO.,
DEALERS I
China, Crockery and
assware,
TINWARE,
Hlonse-Fournishing Goods,
LAMPS, OL.S,
PICTURE FRAMES,
FANCY GOQDS, &C.,
NEXT DOQR TO M. EliELCW h SONS,
Main Strept, 4
COLUMBIA, S. C.
Qot. 24-3m,
PATENTS
Obtained. and all other business In the U.SB.
Patent Offce attended to for MODERATE
F EES.
Our offce Is opposite U S. Patent Office,
and we can obtain Patents in less time than
thoso remote from W ASHINGTON.
Send MODEL or DRAWING. We advise
.as to patentability free of che ;and we
make NO CHARGE UNLESS WEOBTAIN
PATENT.
We refer, here, to the Postmaster, the
Supt.. of Money Order Dv,and to the offi
cis of th . S. ,atent Ofc.Foreiel
elet in jour *y i8e~i~s~aia
OgoePatent Ofilee, owaIngto, D.,
Send six cents fr ostg
niru fl.J'ad receive free. 2.cSl
awnfthaan anydgelse in thisw i.AB,
ffthrsex, suce fotrasbour. The
bread an
HENRY STEIT4, I
Importer and Who]-sale Dealer in
Foreign & Domestic
FRUIT,
APPLES, ORANGES, -
BANANAS, COCOANUTS,
LEMONS, PINEAPPLES, POTA
TOES, ONIONS, PEANUTSt
CABBAGES, 40.
S. E. CORNER MET
& MARKET STREET
CHARLESTON, 8. 0
Nov. 8, 45-4m.
MONI TO NI
Bf THE C1UMN-,
BANKING COM
NEW YORK AND BO8T
Farm Mortgage Loaus
Negotiated on
Improved
Farms &Planimea.
FOR NEWBERRY CU;:
Ap'ply to
0. L. SCHUMPERT$
Attorney and Counsellor,
48-3m. Newberry S. C.
IT014 I-L--Sopw i h
The systems aremoisture,
tion, intense itabing, icresed by
Ing, erdistressy d Pat
seems as it pinwormsera
about the rectum: the rivate
sometimes affected. If lowedto
serious result m Dy
OTMENT's a peat, sure e -
for Tetter, Itch, Slt-Rbeem, Seule
Erysipelas. Barbers Itch, Ieinhei,
cly, crusty Skin Diseases. Box.
5 m tor $1.. Address.
* ,Pa. Sold DraggIsa.
Jan. S-17.
GERMAN KAINIT
And other Fertler To s
genuine German Kainit diret hmpos
tation, and all Fertilizers,
For sale by
* ero-sor nds
NEUTRMUZINC CO
IR as plesant and barmlem
Wine-conlsainno opium and war
pae Seielreooameddar
Priessc. afndLe.,, -
E a ll ksise ~D-t s essc
SEND A aS. BTAMP 103 Uverm -*
New York Office 70 Maiden Lane.
CHEONIC DISE ASES
New paths u.m
mont.popula en
socur. and -4
P.ws Hour sma
paeshan m.a by~
cit $dI.mb. _
uantaMas
age anum~Aus ta
Heesah -n aim
p i6mpbkeer?
caradlity of all Chros
of wtrpart,set fei3
33. vo.TN's
Bookt et Henlth
bat In aee andns'
a vaimbhle reerss bs
ce.y fa.ily. ByS
ken. .am.
?29 5as4 28tig stree, New CIC
PAYNE'S 10 Hors$pa
inhour' burih slas ar
eigh-foot lengehs.- -
Our N Homn ie C anee't
sawr8,000 feet of IIeml-ock Domr
?5&erswiU cut 10.ft in e-ni a
0..r RRe &
elIo t ril ae
g, y

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