OCR Interpretation


The Newberry herald. (Newberry, S.C.) 1865-1884, March 20, 1884, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026909/1884-03-20/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

~m arbtn
2 3 4 5 6 7|81
9110 11 12 13 14 15
16'- 17 18 119 120 21 22
231 24 125 26 127 28 29!
30 31 - -
HOW TO FEEM CO3RSE WODa
flER.
The old practice so long followed
in the west of merely gathering the
ears of corn and leaving the stalks
to be tramplegbygWtfto be$urn
ed orflowed wider, geyrs lesipop
ular yry-ye. Iash sesPn a
greater Aumberof eudivators iaiake
tbe efibrt to sa!e their corn ftodder..
Of course fodder which is not cut
until after the grain is ripe is not
equal in feeding value to corn fod
der grown for fodder only and har
vested before the ears have develor. -
ed. Still, it is well worth saving,
as the experience of farmers has
proven.
In addition to cornstalks every
farmer.has more or less coarse fod
der4suoh as strAw, meadow hay and
the like, which he does not always
know how to dispose of to advan
tage. These coarse fodders fed
alone are not sufficient for any
kind of stock, and it is poor econo
my to attempt to feed them in this
way. The analyses of straw, corn
fodder and meadow hay show them
to be incomplete foods, hence .tA
utilize them to best adlintage the
must be supplemented with food
that will supply the deficiency. Is
it is nitrogenous and fatty elements
which are lacking in these coarse
fodders. cotton-seed cake or linseed
oil cake are excellent materials.
Farmers who have tried small ra
tions of cotton-seed cake with their
coarse fodder have reported an in
creased value of the manure pile,
which more than pays the cost of the
meal, leaving the gain. on their
stock so much -oear profit.
When large numbers of stock are
fed and the corn crop is designed
as food for this stock, the plan is
sometimes followed of reducing the
grain and fodder together to fine
shavings by means of a powerful
cutter run by steam or horse power;
this compels the. stgeg to eat the
corn .andc, fodder tgether,. -saves
waste and labor of shocking and
husking the corn. This system of
feeding the corn crop enables the
farmer to shock the croy- while the
the stalks are still green ,and thus
the fodder will have thrice, the
value of stalks standing in the
ground while the life dIried out of
them. The earlier the corn is cut
the more valuable will be the fod
der.
When the whole corn crop) is fed
together, feeding stalks as well as
grain, the ration is still 'oo poor in
albuminoids to make a complete
food alone. Of course, cattle are
fattened every year wholly upon
corn. Still this rati<m is greatly
improved by the addition of linseed
or cotton seed cake or meal. Lin
seedl and cotton seed cake are bet
ter for this purpose than other nit
.rogenous'foods. becaugej they con
tain n'large per cent.s of oil which
counteracts the tendency to consti.
pation from the dry fodder andi
starch of the corn.-New York' World
NTIRRNG THE SOIL.
Sir J. B. Lawes says : '-Dividing
the constituents which exist in our
erops into two portions we learn
that carbon and water are obtained
from the atm'osp)here, while the nit.
rogen and mineral substances are
dlerived from the soil. The atmos
p)here, furnishes from ninety to
a ninety-five per cent. and the soil
five to ten per cent, of the dry sub
stance of crops. The~ eteck of fer
tility' which exists in'oils, itgg
generally large;-is fo't-mas par
in a latent form. The nitrogen,
for instance, which is in combina
tion with carbon, does not appear
to be available to any extent for the
food of plants until it has 'been
separated from the carbon, and by
combination with oxygen has as
sutmed the form of nitric acid. . s
manuring properties we know are
then very great. The various me
chanical oprations which take la:ce
on the farm or in the garden-plow
ing. (digging. trenching, harrowing.
rolling, hoeing-have for their one
object the tormnation of nitric acid.
A fertile soil is one competent to
liberate and rend er available fot e
userofplants a.$ierable~agio'
of nitrogeu, tyhfleisin abuwdaut sd-'
snIs one iniwlach. the ops. ?g
enabled tda takdj1p an'. unasi'al
aiornnt of tUgs ad*-e pl fo5d.kiy
mamisof theirroMs." i7hus it tis
-thatif4cts aeumu$te ioku enaijde
M phlo86phical obei*-erf tV accot
for rhe value of the operations
which practical men have found to
be necessary in cultivating- crops.
Frequent distuibane of the soil is4
one of these, and it~s results are, as
above shown, necessary to the prep
humorou5.
XTWO TP4WSLND DI#R
4 '0O4TH. 21
'A man in arge active busir4ss,
in New York, said in our hearing:
"The worst oversight of my young
er days was that somebody did not
instruct me to take care of my teeth.
At 50 years of age I have but eight
natural teeth left, and I could well
aford to pay even $2,000 apiece to
e&.b )alf 4we-o-r more -that
Iee s1y logp. lanation
he put it in this way: "Artificial
teeth are at best a very poor substi
tute. I am in a large business that
needs a good deal of strength of.
body and mxp All strengkt es
trom good fooell disgeitl tut
Perfect diges4 only ta ce
when fooflis YougWdritied
(chewed) atdjbxed wi tIikiva,
and good, firm, natural teeth are es
sential for this. So, if I had bet
ter teeth I could do a great deal
more of profitable business, and
earn additional money enough to
pay a great price for several of
them. _
This is worth thinking of by the
young. Here are some good rules:
1st. Never eaQk- nuts witbhe teeth
or bite--verg a 4r9bstAnces; it
breaks or cracks the enamel and
hastens decay.-2d. Always brush
the teeth before going 'to bed, it
not in the morning also, and use a
wooden or quill tooth-pick (not pins
or other metal), to remove any food
from between the teeth. If left
overnight it ferments and injures
to terth. Use 9nj a moderately
stilr tqoth-brnsh at6ry stiff one in
jures the gums, and romotes decay.
-:3d. Do n6t use~any of the -Bough.'
ten" tooth-powders, unless it be
finely .powdered orris root. The
most * active tooth-powders, which
whiten the teeth quickly, contain
injurious acids or alkalies. Chir
coal, however fine, is not good; it
has the "grit" and wear of diamond
dust.-4th If the slightest decay
begins on any tooth, have a relia
blp, lgllffl -dentist plug it- firmly
aionce. Itwll'be oe of the best
pos?ible investments of' asmall sum
for the future.-American Agried
turist for D(,cember.
"A LITTLE CLOSE."
In one of our hotels recently,
says the Portland (Me.) corespon
'dnde ofthe BostoneGl~obe, f resi
dent ofone of the country towns in
this State told several stories in re
gard to his townsmen,. and of one
fazpily in particular, all the members
of which have the reputation of be
ing "-a little close." One of the
sons at last made np his mind to be
married, and concludcd, after long
thinking, that he ought in some
way make a change in his usual ap
parel; buit ebuld not dheide exactly
what the dlang6 shobid consist in,
and at last concluded to consult
with his father, and the. old man,
after hearing him. through thought
the matter, over and at last said :
--Joe, what have you bean paying
for your hatt?'
-A dollar;" replied the son.
"Then," said the old man, giving
John a slap on the shoulder, "I'll
tell you what to (do. Liz is a good
girl ;adI yoi(d bettr 4b the" thing
hat, Joe."
Th le members of the family were
not too close to invest in fancy
stock and the father .and sons own'
ed a very valuable Jersey cow. in
commnon, and -the ;Jersey" seemedl
to be always present in the thoughts
of each. one of them. One morning,
after Joe had settled down' on a
farm of his own. a you,nger krother
mnasle his appearpance.at. bis house
and said, half crying:- "Joe, we're
in trouble at home."
"The Jersey isn't dead, is she,"
shrieked the alarmed Joe..
-Not quite as bad as that," re
granh itlf
A failure establishes only this,
that our determination to succeed
wie not stron~g enough.
6OCe4
THE NCE W ged
an mv pe as the ga
rOnffa CNY6 CEN YER
Ant wan te in every twn Sapl fee
Addrte Goi'cmp rsosofJmeac
THE A~m~~LruTEMPERANCe niER,
What Struck an Old Soldier.
''It will soon be twenty years since the
war closed."
Under the hot sun of August, 1882, the
village of Dover, N. J., lay still as the
sphinx in Egypt, while Elijah Sharp of that
place, slowly and softly spoke of the past.
"Yes," he said, "I was in the army and saw
many of the sights of those fearful years. I
was finally discharged from disability, re
sulting from sunstroke. I came home mis
erable in health and spirits;-so enfeebled that
I took cold on the slightcst exposure. Life
seemed *orthless to me; I live only in
memory."
"That was sad enough," I said, dividing
my last two cigars.
"That's so," responded Mr. Sharp; "but I
got over it. Outgrew it? Not exactly. When
in that condition I began taking PARKER'S
Toxic, and my health began to improve
right away. I was astonished at it, and so
was my wife. I piled on the flesh and
could eat anything. My ambition ba7ed up.
I could attend to business, and now-expect
ing that I have to take care about exposing
myself to the hot sun-I am as well as I was
th~e day I enlisted. What differences there
are.io things-guns ad.yonet-s kill ; 1'Aa
ae.a's TL gc saves. a
:lusprpa10o.--wLich has TI known
as PARKER's GINGER ToiC,-wiI hereafter
be called simply IREu'S ToNIc. As un
principled dealers are constantly deceiving
kr dus4otnors by 'substimting inferior ar- C
tie,knder the name of ginger. andas gin
r,is rea1ly an. impo.rtant ingredient, we
Stheamisleading word.
The,rgis no change, hosyever, in the prep
arat i4selF, iad ally bottles remaining
in tie hands of dealers, wrapped under the
name of PArnsWs. GiNER TONIC, contain
the genuine medicine if the fac-simile sgna
tare .of ' scox &Co.;. is at the-bottom of
the oatvsife v1enp N. mr: 1-1m,
TUTT'S
Pi LLS
TORPID BOWELS,
DISORDERED LIVER,
and MALARIA.
From these sources.arise three-fourths of
the diseases of the human raec. These
symptoms Indicate their existence: Loss os
Appetite, Bowels costive, Sick Head
ache, fIuness after eating, aversion to
exertion of body or min ErActation
of food, Irritability of temper, Lqw
spirits, A feeling of having neglected
some duty, Dizziness, Fluttering,at the
Heart, Dots before the eyes, highly col
ored Urine, CONSTIPATION, and de
mand the use of a remedy that acts directly
onthe Liver. AsaLiver medicine TUTT'S
PILLS have no equal. Their action on the
Kidneys and.S luWo rompt; removing -
all hrapurfies M t se trreo "scav
engers t Me6 s e, producing appe
tite,soand d 0s 'rul retools a clear
8e' ig os6 rS
cause no nausea or ping nor Infsrfere
Nith dai Ofit rpd.
IQ: MALAIA.
IN ~E L(1A9 MAtLA
"I -baie had ' i p*aWli Coiftipa
-tion two years, and vtried ten different
kinds of Pil8, and 'UTT'S are the first
that have done me any good. They have
clouned me -out 'nicely. My 1ppetito 2s
splendid, food digests ready, and I now
have natural pasages. I feel like a new
man." W. D. !DWARDS, Palmyra, o.
SoldaGfe,25o.PdeMurraySt.Y
TUTT8lAIR DYE.
.GRAY HAD QR WI.KERS changed in.
Vtst!y to a'bsY'BLACK 'by a single ap.
plication of this DYE. Sold by Druggists,
or sent by express on receipt of $1.
__ Office, 44 Murray Street, New York.
TUTT'S MA!. GF LSEFIL REPUETS FREE
July 19, 29-1y.
. -As;.i E i n:. r
n:sommem iE.".-aeSm
L M INIImm m fa
-Li
f
S
SITTERS
ThaWant of a Re1JphiO 19iuretle,
Which, while a4cting as a atimumilant of the
kidneys, neither excites nor irritates themt,
was lonmg since supplied by Hostetters
Stomach BitLters. This SIne medicine exerts
the reqisite degree of stimulation upon
these organs, without producing irritation,
and is, therefore, far better adatpted for the
putrpose than unmledici.t(d excitants often
resorted to. Dyspepsi, fever mnd ague, and
kindred diseases. are' all cured ly it.
For sale by all D ruggists and' Dealers.
2euerally.
COTTON SEED!
COTTONEW
I vil) >av (15c.)m fifte en cenits eas~h
per Buiilor 10.000 Bashels :,OUND <
DRY COTT'ON SED 'delivered to<
mne :.t this pIlac b)efole the tingt of nexti
November. Will exebaumge Cotto,n J
Seea tmeal for- Cotton Seed.
W. F.. HOL LOWAY & CO.,
Oct. 31-Gm. ' Pomnaria, S. C,
Lier, Kidney or Stomadh Trouble.
Svpoms:pnre blood, costive bowels,
irregular appetite, sour belching, panina in.
side, back and heart, yellow urine, burning.
when urinating, clay -colort'd stools, bad
:breaths no ie for workq, e vl~~ers,
*rtiity, -witlih iogq r ugh,
.lluy,hea~ stui4 itabk pa:1l, loss
of menoi' fgtgy ft. l,these troubles
"SW AYNE's PiLLS"' are a aure cdas. Do
(30'Pills), by masil, 25 eta.. 5 bor $I.00. A4
dress. DR. SWAYNE & SON, Philada., Paw
So(l)y Druggists. Jais. 54-ly.
A FULL LINE OF
Hats.
Boots,
Shoes,
Trunks,
Clothing. &c. &c.,
Cani be found
't the -,Q0 ' RUEFS,
At the OLI) ESTABLISHMENT
-OF- 1
42ti M. FOOT.J
for the working class. Send to I
111lent for postage, and we wil
biox vi' sample goods that will put
you in the wa.y of making more money inliilu mI;mfr-,aoa. v alal
-few days than you thought poss!ble at any
business. Capital not required. Wye will
start you. You can worlk all the spare
time~ only. The work is universally adapted
to both sexes. young an d old. You can easily ..
eagr; 50 cents to -c~r evening. .That all
3 0 f#nthe:bsiess,w we
maetsuprlee fe to all who
are not wefl satisfied we will send Si1to.pay
for the trouble 'of writing us. Full paticu
lars., directions, etc.. sent free. Fortunes ti
wil be made by those who give their whole ii
time to the work. Greal suocess aboltei 2
sur. ont dla. thrt now.' as~
C. BART & CO.,
UHARLESTON, S. C.
The largest Importers of Foreign Fruits in the South, offer for sale a well
selected stock of
Lpples, Oranges, Bananas,
Cocoanuts, Lemons, Nuts,
Dried Figs, Raisins, Potatoes,
Cabbage, Onions, Peanuts,
And everything else that a First Class Wholesale Fruit
tore should have.
COUNTRY ORDERS FILLED
WYITH DISPATCH.
'et.25-Gm.
HEADQUARTERS FOR
i[1IC01TUIL IIIiIIS A MACIlY.
F. A. SCHUMPERT & 00.,
re Agents and have for sale the following improved Agricultural Implements
Threshers,
Steam Engines,
Saw Mills,
Grist Mills,
Cotton Gins,
Cotton Presses,
Cider Presses.
W[cCORMIOIK'S MIACOTTNESI
Harvester and Binder,
Table Rake,
Dropper and Mower,
Horse Rakes,
Harrows,
G-lobe Cotton Planter,
SULKY AND WALKING PLO WS,
CULTIVATORS,
|HICAGO SCREW PULVERIZER, CANE MILLS AND EVAPORATOR$
AD OTHER IPROVED AGRICULTURAL IMPLEXENTS.
If you want anything of this kind ive us a call before purchasingelsewhere
Warehouse for Machinery in the new building on corner Caldwell and Har
inTon streets, below Christian & Smith's Livery Stables.
ar. 5, 10-tf.
Out of Jaws of Death.
Th is gentlemon who outlines his case b)e- SEND FOR PRICE LIST.
>w his is a man considerably advanced in
fe; and is noted for his sterling integrity, McE L REE'8
.s hest-offoc ing Yatesville, Upson county' Jewelry
Ir. John Pearson's State- PLC
ment. 2KNST
In the Spring of 18821i was attacked with HREN,SC
very bad cough, which continued to grow LAGTSTC
rorse until fall, when I got so weak that ILOETPCS
ould not get about. I tried a great manyi THWT.
inds of medicines. but continued to grow
*rse. I was notified that I had consumup- I EPIIGASEILY
ion and would probably die. Dr. Holloway
naly te ton twr hrewe'ses In Re
antoimroe,ad y hetie udusd ___PALACE_______
p oe otte wa ale o et n y ee ~ - -____s____INeST. ____
gain.Iam ow inexcelent halth.r am -od RTo , All Hi,
triter They mantutcWrrs Seand othe ov.15-y
botten o comened tain ita rgt EEAEOF RD
way Aftraon. wo orrthreerdoses, Ibe
arloimprovee, d1 byhile sein on ue
pe mane, mytl wsable tagen wit afeeHEOL ES
gvr ainano in exelln which. sonmo
fe ad by hemorrhaers rom ther ns aopnon suhaeti
evernio.gr.Feverpromdmencthatshe could H S
erieothe manufaturees and t w.e sheo
stateendto of Bevnj. sFle. he a.t- S R FEE
Early n Noveber, /N1,rwile seingro
henmcine, physca toldfe hat hae thaY HEOLES
oedvetreain he stdeicae sonoi
:et on hermrhgte groee wings adr.
evr ollg. Fev commencedlo, he madR
oledithe ease opeless. d r..ek shoeadW Ih~ADJ~ L
van rueded the .aBiigrewetoLng Tete / HewStoeBnBHtel,
e dosican fod that he thouhrtani
aeti her stomach, afte aoree thiDrd 42I
oloay her consuttion. otine hey mede assrmeto
egilay eandto h the ytien ad pro- tq
otes, wt aeor,l e Bre r'btwaRk abo vi the WTh NES CLtore o JoEWELRY.
ouse. ShIE is una,W in better health thani shte
heM*ugestorrsa*ed iig~l~ * hae sII.r an4 pated Warey
av~ a family of sixrchildrek, some of them g
Mr. Hearndon's post-office is Yatesville, SpEncLE AN SDEC!ACLE C48D
Epson county, Ga. He is a thoroughly re:
able man in every particular. iWEDOING AND BIRTHDAY PRESENTS,
Feb. 28-1m.
IX ZNDLZs YARIErY.
____ All ordr bmiall prouptly atteded tc
~ Done Cheaply snd with Dispatch.
Call and examine my stock and prices.
~ ~ 3EDUARO 88HOLJ.
No. 21,47 f
N ov.3, 3 -1y i . O N & E A '
bokeersl for' ess thana
oe onr ricefasbesg
Rail Roads.
tambla ? Greenvlle Ralroads
PASSENGER DEPARTMENT,
CoLUMBIA. . C Feb 1th 1884,
and after Moaday, ieb. 4, 1984, the
INGER TRAINS will run as herewith in
pon this road and its branchei
Dailly. except Sundays.
. 8. UP PASSENGER.
& A. -Junction .... 11.2 a m
oia,A - - * 11.50 a m
- - - - 12.56 p m
ry, - - - 2.02 p m
- -p
Ar* ', - - - - 6.50 p.m
- DOWN PASSENGER.
Leavi e, - - - 9.55 a m
" s - - - 11.25 pm
- - 1236 p z
Pix, - - - - 1.48 p in
": y, - - - 814 p m
4.19 p m
Arrive mlumbia,F - - 5.20 p m
Arrive W., C. & A. Junction. . 5.88 p m
SPARTANBURG. UNIONA COLUMBIA RAILPOAD.
No. 68. UP PASSENGER.
Leave Alston, - - - - 1.10 pm
" Strother, - - - - 2(6 p In
" Shelton, - - - - 2.46 p m
" Santuc, - - - - 882p m
" Union, - - - - 4.15 p m
" Jonesville, - - - 457 p m
Arrive Spartanburg, 4 - 6.15 p m
No.52. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Spartanburg, R. & D. Depot, 11 11 05 p m
Spartanburg, S. U.& C. lepot,G 11.15p m
Jonesville, - - - 12.25 p m
Union. - - - 1.10 p m
Santuc, - - - 147pm
Shelton, - 240pm
" Strother, - - - 3.14 p m
Arrive at Alston. - . - 4 07 p m
LAUARNS RAILW.LT.
Leave Newberry. - - - 8.20 pm
Arrive Laurens C. H., - 7.10 p I
Leave Laurens C. H., - - 9.C0 p m
Arrive Newberry, - - 12.40 p m
ABBEVILLE BiAliCH.
Leave Hodges. - - - - 4.30 p m
Arrive.at Abbeville, - - - 5.8) p m
Leave Abbeville, - - - - 11.3) p m
Arrive at Hoges, - - - - 12.30 p m
BLUE ,IDGE RAILROAD AND ANDERsON
BRANCH.
Leave Belton 5.25 p m
" Anderson 6.00 p I
" Pendleton 635 p m
Leave Seneca C, 7.30 p m
Airive Walhalla 7.67 p m
Leave Walhalla, - - 8.46 a m
Leave Seneca C, 9.15 a m
"1 Pendleton, - - 1C2 a m
.". Anderson, - - 10.47 p m
Arive at Belton. - - 11.21 p m
FREIGuT, PASSENGER COACH ATTACHED.
Leave Belton 6.15 a m
Williamston 7.10 a m
" Pelzer 7.37 a m
PiedE6nt 8.25 a m
Arrive Greenville 9.25 p m
Leave Greenville 3.45 p m
" Peidmont 4.52 p m
- Pelzer 6. p m
Williameton 6.25 p m
Arrive Belton 7.10 p m
CONNECTIONS.
A. With South Carolina Railroad from Char
leston.
With Wilmington; Columbia and Augusta
Railroad from Wilmington and a1
points North thereof
.'With Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railrpad f-om Charlotte and all points
North t4ereof
B, With Asheville & Spartanburg Rail Road
for points in Western. North Carolina.
C. With A. & C. Div. R. &,D. R. R., from all.
points South and West.
6.i With A,. & C. Div., R. & D. R. R., from At.
- I laate and beyond.
Mr -With A.. C. Div., R. & D. R. R., from. all
points South and West. ... -
P.: Wifh South Carolina Railroad for Charles
too.
With Wilmington Columbia and Augusta
Railroad for Wilmington and the North.
With Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad for Charlotte and the North.
0. With -Asheville -& Spartanburg Railroad
from Hendersonville,
H. With A. & C. Div., R. & D. R. R., from
Charlotte and beyond.
Through Coach for Hendersonville will
be run from Columbia daily.
Standard .ime used is Washington, D. C.,
which is fifteen minutes faster than Columbia.
J. W. FRY, Superiatendent.
31. SLA UGHTR, General P'assenger Agent.
"D CA RDWULt, Ass't General Pasienger Agt.,
~Columnbia. S. C.
South Carolas Railway Company.
CHANGE OF SCHEDULE.
On and after Jan. 20th, 1884, Passenger
Trains on this road will run as follows un
til further notice:
TO AND FROM ClHARLEs'TON.
GOING EAST,
Leave Colu,nbia *6.40 a ms 15.84 p mn
Arrive Charleston 11 23 pim 10.10 p m
Go12NG WEST,
Leave Charleston t7.00 a ms '4.00 p mn
Arrive Columbia 11.40 a mn 10.35 p m
tDaily. *Daily except Sunday.
TO AND FROM CAMDEN.
GOING EAST,
Leave Columbia *6 40 a mn *5.34 p mn,
Arrive Camden I.55a mn 8.35 p a
Leave Caniden *7.15 a m *4 15 p mn
Arrivp Columbia 11.40 a m . 10.35p m
. Daily except Sundays.
TO AND FROM AUGUSTA.
GOING EAST,
Leave Columbia *6.40 a m *5.34 p in
Arrive Augusta 12.05 p ms 7.10 a ms
GOING.WEST,
Leave Augusta e6.08 a as *5.00 p m
Arrive Columbia 11.40 p m 10 35 p m
*Daily except Sundays.
CONNECTIONs.
.Connection made at .Columbia with the
Columbia and G reenville Rail Rload by train
arriving at 11.28 P. M, and departing at 6.58
P. 31. Connection made at Colu'mbia June
tion with Charlotte. Columbia and Augusta
11ltOil(ol by saine trin' to and fiom all
points on both roasls w 4h thr?ougll Pjilimau
Sleeper between Charleston andi Washing.
ton, via Virginia Midland route, without
change. Connection made at Charleston
with Steresor New York on Wednesdays
and Saturdays; also,.with Savannah and
Chiarleston Railroad to aD pdlnts-South.
Connections are made at Auguta with
Georgia Railroad and Central Rlroad to
and fom all points South and West.
Through tickets can be purchased to all
points South and Wesg by applying to -
D. McQUEEN, Aent, Columbia.
D. C. ALLE:, G. P.& F. A.
- Joux B. Pica, General Manager.
'Asheville and Spartanburg Railroad.
.SPARTANBURG,.S. C., September 1, 1881.
On and after Monday, October 3st,18q8,
passenger trains will be rundaily (Sundays
between Spartanburg and Hen.
'Z,eare.&D.Deft apy..f
eArrive at HIeade ,le . . ... a
DOWN TR.'
1,ae We drson$J1e............ s.0sim
Arrive R. D. . bur.1.30 p m
* Iohtlis m a clions for Coluin
Y>ia and Charlestun via S partanburg.'Union
and Columbia and Atlantaand Charlotte by
Air Line. . . .4AMafS ANDESSON,
v - - - - uperlinnd6nt.
8.D. FRIDAY. - J. G. FRIDAY.
FRIDAY & BROS,
China, Crockery and
lINWARE,
House-Far.aishing cseds,
LAMPS, OILSr
PICTWRE FRAMES,
FilNdi GdOB, &rP.,
NEIT DOOR TO II. EHILICH & SONS,
Main Street,
COLUMBIA, S. C.
Oot. 24-81w.
PATENTS
Obtained. and all other businesa in the U. R.
Patent Offce attended to.tor MODERATE
FEES.
Our-offce is Opposite U S. Patent Omce,
and wetan obtan.Pat sin less time than
nasam NO. CHARGE UNLES; OBTAIN
We refer, here, to .the Postmaster, the
Supt. of'Money Order Div., and to.the offi
elals of the U. S. Patent:Ofee. For oirnnlar,
advice, terms, and refegsnees to actual
olet. In your own Stgteor ontynwite
1834 TRE iM
CONSTITUTION
TEI DAILY CoSTIrUTION has come to
be a necessitoevery intelligent man in
the r e oftacrutin
Fo t next ear It will be better than
ever. Nealy $1 .000 is now being invested
by itsproprietors In a new building, pres
ses and outft, In which and with which it
can be enlarged to meet its increasing busi
ness, and improved to meet the demands of
itsWgowing constituency.
THE DAILY AND SUNDAY CONsTITUTION for
I8 will be better an4. tuVer than ever, and
in every sense the best paper in the reach
of the people of the Southeast.
One Year $10, 0 Months $5, 2 Months $2.50.
1 Month $1.00
THE WEEKLY C0N0TITUTION
starts the new year with 13,060 subscribers
who pronounce it the largest, best and
cheapest paper within their reach.
It consists of 8, 10 or 12 pages (a.s the de
mand of its business or the news may di
rect) filled with matter of the greatest inter
est to the farmer.
AT LESS THAN3 CENTS A WEEK
this great budget .of news and gossip will be
sent to your fireside to entertain every
memberof your household,
One Year... ..............$150
Six Months. ............. 100
In Clubs of Ten, each... .. ..125
In Clubs of Twenty, each......... 1 00
With an extra paper to the getter up of
the Club.
THE YEAR OF 184.
will be one of the most important In our
history. A President, Congressmen. Sena
tors. Governor, Legislature-are all to be
elected.
Very important issues -are to be tried in
the National and State elections. The Con
stitution in its daily or weekly edition will
carry the fullest and freshest news In best
shape to the public, and will stand as an
earnest champion of Democratic principles.
Address, THE -CO'.%S11TVTION.
THE
hN cle & C0.08thtiopalig,
AUGUSTA, GA.,
-AND THE
NEWBEBRY EUALD
for one year at $3.50.
The Augusta CiunomcL AND CONST1TU
TIONALIST is the largest weekly newspaper
in the State. It is a ten page seventy column
paper. It contains all the important news
of the week, and Is filled ith intesting
and instructive readins to the farmer, me
chanlc, business and professional man. Its
Washington, Atlanta and Columbia letters
with its full telegraphic service, market re
ports, editorialsand general news make it
one of the iot reaiable and one of the
best newspaperin the Smuth.
The CXaoNICLE ANQ) CONSITIUTIONAIST
can be read In any household. It is free
fni sensationalism.
THE AMECAN FARIER
Established 1819, and for more than a Third
of a Century undef the sams
Devoted to FAEM, I DMXAMhBG,
nam fG,: KAE GARUN~
the D POULTIL YAND, ep, e
Special attention is'paid to FertIliers and
anares, including those of commerce and
the tarm.
Report opmentta FWre. MUIP
ar" notable leiure of its i0sue-.
There is-aHne Department', with charm
ing reading and practical. suggestions for
the ladies of the laZp household. .
The most competent, successful and ex
perienced men and women have charge of
the several departments.
No Farmer in the Atlantic States, frovi
Delawre to Georgia. "can afford to be
without" this old and reliable adviser and
Guide on.farm work. -
he. American Farmer is -published twice
every month, (on the Ist and 15th). It is
beautifully printed on fine white -paper in
clear type. $L0 a year. To clubs of live
or over, 41.00 each.
Handeome, Valuable and Useful Premiums
are given to all those who will take time
and trouble to collect subscribers.
SAM'S SANDS A SON, Publishers,
126-Baltimore-St., Baltimore, Mid.
'The HERALD and the Ameriean Farmer
will be clubbed together and sent to any
address for *3.00 for One year.
THE EVENING
Chronicle arnd Constituoildst,
Augusta, Ga.,
.--AND THE--..
NEWDERRY HERALD
will be faruished for 1884 at $70
The EVNING (HRONICLE AND CONSTITU-.
TIONALIs7 is the lretand cheapest Daily
newspaper in the Suth. It contains eight
thousand words of telerph per day from the
New York AMsociated "Press. This service is
supplemented by full special from .Atlants,
'Columbia and Washington. As a newspaper,
the CHlioNICLE Is one of the beat in the
South. It is newsy, progresuive, reliable and
free from the demorabizin'g details of crime.'
TilS PAPER~
IN CLUB WITH
~DEVY'S
L.ADY'S BOOK
wil .be seat for- one year to any
address on receipt of $g.,0 which should be
sent to the publisher of the JIERALD.
GOOEY'S LADY'S BOO0K
Is recognized as the leading Fs,hion and
Home Magazine in America. The leading
attractions for 188& are the-f.ollowing:-:
.4 BeaUt.ful Colored Fashion Platesexne
uted bythe French process represent
styles and colr.produced especially for
a.nd:. published exclusively in GODEY'S
'r4AD'Y'S BOOK.
le.EngishPlaesof Fashions In-black and
"Whie,.llutraingleading styles
1 - Finely Executed Ste~el Engravings by
A th6 bet artists; inade' or GODEY'S
UJADY'S BOOK.
1igsved Portraits of Ex-prelsidnts of
.Lthe U. S., which form a. part of what Is
known in GODEY'S IADY'S BOOK as the
PRUSIAJg Fortrait Gallery,
Igne by a short p1ogra
usratn ashions and fancy.
p perspct~ eDesi ,s iowli
Cottages of all tieseri ns,
200 ODEY'S so
Celebratedhousehold cookingreceipts.each
havng ee tetedbypractical houbekeep
14 PAGES #f SELECT ItiSI0,
whom are.
MARION H A RLAND, AUGUSTA de BUBNA,
CHEISTIANEEID, Mrs. SH.EFFEY PETERS,
ELLA ..ODAN-CHURCIf, H EL EN MATH
The Art Department w Il~ be-under the di
rectosoW.MacLeod,uraofCorcoran
Gallery of Art, Washington, D). C. All other
depitents under equally competent dl.
8tBESCIP'ION Price*2.00oper Yea..
For utrther informationbend for.ciren'
Samnplecopy of.GODEY'S LADY'S BOO~
cr.a tao.T avoid errors write
ad4esg'giogCounty and
1006 Chestant Street, Philadelphia,P
J..Z. SALTER, 7
Phot apgl Fk
Newberry, S. C.
Call atbis Gallery.over
LeaveR's Furnitr Store,
Examineh I won and p~roeie grorhe
nice Photographs. He -uses the In
stantaneous Process making a Picture
in oae second. Hesitate no longr to
carry the sweet babe for it's Pture.
Copying and enlarging froin Old Pic
tures done with Artistic Finish.
ORDERS SOUCITED.
HENRY STEITZ,
Importer and Wholesale Dealer In
Foreign & Domestic
FRIT,
.-APPLES, OBANGE8g
BANANAS, COCOANUTS,
LEMONS, PINEAPPLES, POTA
TOES, VIONS, PEANUTS,
CABBAGES, &C.
S. E. *dft-if kEEi
& MARKET STREETS,
cJHARLESTONT, 8. C.
Nov. 8, 45-6m.
MONEY10-LHEN.,0!!10'
Bf THE A400NA:
BANKING COMPANY
NREW YORK RD B09TONL
FarmMortgage Loans
Negotiated! on
Improved
Farms & Titations.
FOR NEWBERRY COUNTY,
Apply to
0. L. SCHUM PEIRt.
Attorney and Counsellor,
48-3m. Xewberry. S. C.
1TCING fILR-Sypts ad~ Cun.
The systems are noisture, e ia
tion, intense itchIng Incre se h
lng, very dstressfipartieul t
seems as it plniorm
about the r ctum Vte W
.rymiteas p abers Iowedtoew,n ale
scaly, cru Skin Dmas fOU"Mail
A SON, ThH1ada., Pa. Sold by Druggists.
Jan.8S4-ly.
GERMA#il KAINIT !
And other FertUizer.g Tons
genuine Gernaan K(ainit direct Impor
tation, and all Fertiizers, .
HERANNBUL.WINKL E,I
KERR'8 WHARF,
CII ARLESTON, 8. C.
Nm1iTRALIZIc CORDIAL.
Wnwta io Opium and will
pasSpalg iystesen esch3ea,~
tg eeing dem
a .aunih~.u c sm
Pnfrimetio and rices.
Dec 13-3mem -inN.hde.
-e~ Yord si en 7or0
P~~~.9 dos 8pre ys~

xml | txt