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The Newberry herald. (Newberry, S.C.) 1865-1884, March 27, 1884, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026909/1884-03-27/ed-1/seq-4/

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farm, 0arbmn * *US48b.
MARCH.
8 T WiTi
--- -. 1
2{ 4 5, 6. 7 8
9110 11 12 13 14 1
16 17 18 19.20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 |28 29
30 31 --i--K-K
SORE SHOULDERS IN
HORSES.
Farm h6rses are most liable to
have sore shoulders ii early sprn,
when unaccustomed to work. If
humanity does not lead to care in
prevention and cure, interest will
iOm'p it,. foi certainly a horsA
with'sound shoulders will do more
work than if these be swollen and
lacerated.-Preventiou is better
than cure. The first point is to
secure good, well-fitting collars
those of soft leather; of equal hard
ness on both sides. Many collars
are stuffed more solidy- on one side
than the other, and should be re
jected. The horse should be fitted
to a collar at the shop, as two verY.
seldom have shoulders exactly alike.
I have often wondered that farmers
do not have collars made specially
for each horse. The cost would be
amply rapaid as it is slight compared
with the increased service that
would thus be secured. I prefer a
collar stuffed with hair. The lea.
Vier should be kept well oiled, es
pecially where meeting the shoulder.
Pure neat's foot oil makes the leath
er soft and pliable, and is a good
preventive and cure for sore shoul%
ders. Cloth collars are now' made
and cloth pads to cover the entire
collar face. I know-they awe good
and recommend them to other far
mers.
Early in the spring, at .least two
week before plowing commences,
begin bathing the shoulders of each
work horse with strong sait brine.
I keep in the stalls an old fruit can,
and a rag tied to the end of a cob;
and it takes but a moment to throw
in a handful of salt r
stir it IUW
--Mi have never I
a with sore shoulders s
I have taken to carefully selec
collars, keeping them soft with
and bathing frequently wfth
salt water.
The best cure for sore shouli
in-rest, and this may be secu
without stopping work, by .!ren
ing the pressue from the irrita
spot. One method is to cut.alo
narrow slit in the hame groove
p)osite the soreness, remove p;
of the stuffing and make a little<
p)ressioul by p)ounding the face os
the sore. The slit will not
jure the collar. Another method
to use pads above .and below tj
tender spot, to keep off the pressur
A fter considerable -experience
corsider the best pad one made t
stuffing a coat sleeve with ha'
about one inch thick between tl
collar and shoulder, but thinne
where it passes under the hame
Hay works into lumps less than rage
hair or wool, and is elastic enoug]
to Spring the collar from the~ shogi
ders when the draft slackens, iv
ing them opportunity to cool and
rest.--J. M. Stahl. int American
Agricultur,ist for March.
SUMM3ER MANAGEMJENT OF
PIGS.
Every farmer should make the
best of his resources. Grass is a
cheap food for pigs, and a most
healthy and profitable diet. Much
of the profit on -pigs must come
from a p)roper use of grass as a
summer food. Some have express.
ed very grave doubts whether pigs
can be fed at a profit ian .eu J
their lives but we doenot think there
is any doubt about it. Fo%Of tbN
best feeding will not pay for the
food given pigs, then they must
be'considere~d unprofitable animals
.-aa position wholly untenable, as
it has been abundantly proved that ti
the pig is the best utilizer of food e
on the farm. We fully believe in ti
the use of grass for pigs, and, if al
obliged to keep pigs constantly in pr
pen, would carry the grass to them, ha
purely as a matter of health, but ra
better health will make better thrift. cr<
We know that pigs will pay a prof. th<
fit when Rvery poundj of food from phi
the first to thie last day of .their wil
live ischagedat the market price. J
But this ?enuires full feeding, 'with bii
due regard to every precautip0wfor
health.-Ntina Live-Stock J'our
An C2o postmistress has resign- to p
ed to get married. Poor thinig ! Tibe
She'll have often to wait 1'o ade
layed male.L
THE SHErLAND POxY.
The native live stock of Shetland
cannot generally be commended,
but the well-known pony of that
part of the world is perfect of his
kind. As carts would be out of
place on the steep sides of the hills,
ponies are kept by every family
for the purpose of carrying peat for
winter use. The fuel, after being
dried, is placed in baskets called
"cassies," one of which hangs on
each -sidthe, Wnal' ack, a
stoag brai-bacAlmirably-sdapt
ed for the purpose of bearing heavy
burdens. The "Sheltie" is an ani
inal which for many generations
has been bre_,and trained under
pecial and pkOtiar circumstances,
and hence hi- physique and geiey
al character,.his heieditary insfi't
and intdflignee his small size and
his purity' ad fixity of type. A
pony belonging to a breed which
has had to pick its zigzag way
down a steep declivity during many
generations must be sure-footed.
By the same rule, a pony, whose
grooms and playmates include a
dozen juveniles-the chrildren of
the neighborhood, who roll about
underneath him or upon his back
must be gentle, and the,same pony,
living on the scatbold'on 8ii- some
times, rather than on herbage, must
be hardy. The pony of the Shet
land IsIes is, in fact, the offspring
of circunstances. Ile is the pet of
the family, gentle a the Arab's steed
under similar training. le will
follow his friends indoors like a dog,
and lick the platters or the children's
f47ceg Us h ais n'bre kick in
iimWtian a cat, and no more bite
thai a puppy. There is no pre
cedent or his running away, nor
for his becoming frightened or tired,
even wher ' s has carried some
stout laird from Lerwick to his
house, many Scotch ilUes, across
the hills. He moves down the rug.
ged hillsides with admira6le circum
5pection, loaded panier fashion,
with two heavy "cassies" of peat
a seedi
ders iang them headlong to grief
>een spongy trap, he carefully sme
ince surface, and is thus enabled t
tin cumvent the danger. In the
ter the Shetland pony wears a
the smatd-ffltdharemg
sutdto the occasion.2 ITis
lers winter garment is well adapte
rdProtecting him against the fog~
v-damnps of the clinate.'iise
ted ingly wamand comfortable,
close to the wearer's dapperf
and is not bad-looking when
art But when the coat grows ul' toiv
e-t spring, at the season wheu the
erone should appear, it becomes
rshabbiest garment of'the kind
you often see. Its-very amplit
and the abundance of the mate
erender it more conspicuous. w.
it peels and hangs for awhile <
vand wdrnout, and then falls bit
ybit till the wvhole of it disappet
e QCArAT- SrPERIoR To QUAN
r TY.-"My dear," said an Ausi
-man to his wife, after p)erusing t
'evening paper, "are you aware
the fact-Cluaman's brain weig
-three and a half pounds;
"You've just read that, hiaver
you?"
"Yes."
"WVell, dosen't the article sa
that a woman's is somewhat Ia
ger?"
"It certainly does."
"And it also informs ,you thata
woman's brain is of much finei
quality?"
Yes."
"Well, then, just concentrate your
three and a half poun'd intellect on
that scuttle, and figure out how
much it will weigh after you bring
it up full of coal from the cellar."
1!e mW j de
>adetl fo ahejo e iisi
earchi of information .-.Texas Sif
mgs.
Recent intelligence informs us
ist the whistle of the locomotiv'e
2gine will soon reverberate ainong
Le hills' of Galhlee and roll, in echo,
ong the banks of the Jordan. The
climinary survey for a railroad
s been made from the Mediter
nean Sea to Damascus. It is to
>ss the Kishon, hug the foot of
Carmel Range, pass close to the
Is of Galilee and detour to the
in of Esdraeron. Nazareth depot
Ibe 12 miles from the town.
t. fine railroad bridge will beU
It over the 'Jordan, crosainl YC
chi the road will follow the river b
he bridge Oferlooking the west
shore of the & Sa of Tiberias0
s far *ej-ste is deterun
company has secured the righlt ma
tsteam tugs upon the Lake of'fo
rzas. a
sk v-lith . Thesn
What Struck an Old Soldier.
'-It will soon be twenty years since the
war closed."
Under the hot sun of August, 1SS2, the
village of Dover, N. J., lay still as the
sphinx in Egypt, while Elijah Sharp of that
place, slowly and softly spoke of the past.
"Yes," he said, "I was in the a my and saw
many of the sights of those feerful years. I
was finally discharged from c.sability, re
sulting from sunstroke. I came home mis
erable in health and spirits; soenfelbled that
I took cold on the slightest exposure. Life
seemed worthless to me; I live only in
memory."
"That was iad enough," I said, dividing
my lasr two ei,-ar's.
"That's so." responded Mr. Sharp; "but I
got over it. Outgrew it? Not exactly. When
in that condition I began taking PARKER'S
To-ic, and my health began to improve
right away. I was astonished at it, and so
was my wife. I piled on the flish and
could eat anything. My ambition b!a%ed up.
I could attend to business, and now-cxpect
ing that I have to take care about exposing
myself to the hot sun-I am as well as I was
,he day i enliszed. What differences there
are in things-guns and bayonets kill ; PAR
KER'S Toic saves.
This prepara.ion, which has been known
as I'AKER's GINGEi ToNic, will hereafter
be called simply PARKER'S ToNic. As un
princip1d dealers are c4hstantb deeci%ing
their cubtotners by sibsti_in*;oi ar
tie!es uider the name of grigeralas gin
ger is really an important ingredie.b we
drop the misleading word.
.There is no change, however,.ia-he prep
aration itself, and all bottles remaining
iq tbqhands of dealers, wrappe4 undeiLthe
name of -PAUKEt'S Gioi.- Tomc, contain
the genhtine medicine if the fac-imic signa
ture of Hiscox & Co., Is at:the bottom of
the outride wrapper. Mar. 1-ltas
TUTTIS
PILLS
TORPID BOWIELS,
DISORDERED IMYEqt,
and MALARIA.
From these sources arise three-fourts of
tho diseases of the -human rae Theso
symptomsindieste theirexiten - oss ot
Appetite, Bowels costive, Sick Head
ache, fuUness after eating, aversion to
exertion of body or mind, Eructatipu
of food, Irritability of temper, Low
spirits, A feeUng of having neglected
some duty, Dizzincss, Fluttering at the
Heart, Dots before the eyes, highly c91
ore& Urine, CO1MTIPATION, and de
of a reme(d that acts directly
on the Liver. AsaLiver mcdJcino TUT''S
PILLS have no equal. Their action on the
Kidneys.andSkinisalso prompt; zemioving
all impurities: tlrough these three " scav
engers of the system," -producing appe
tite,soand digestion, regular stools, a clear
skinandavigorohs body. TUTT'SPILLS
cause no nausea or giiping nor interfere
with daily work and are a perfect
ANTIDOTE TO ALARIA.
HE FEELS IT -A IEW KAN.
'I have hWd Dyspsia, with Constipa
tion,two years, and nave tried ten different
kinds of pllU, and TUTT'S are the first
that have.4one me any good.- They have
cleaned me qA nic Y. -My appetite is
splendid, fo6d'4Ust readily,and I now
have natural pa es I feel ike a new
man." W. . EDW D, Palmyra, 0.
Soldeverywhere,S5c. Offire,44 MurraySt.,'.Y.
0EPT
', and
in the
US tbe,T TT
win- -
coat
thick
d for A
and_
ceed- ln
orm,
tie w.
yard -
new
en Te Want of a Reliable Diuretic,
e hich, while acting as a stimulant of
;ed kdneys, neither excites nor irritates the
by Sto"mach eitTrs; Tii~dicnecx
the requisite degre'e of stimulation u~
rs. teseisorgns, ithoat prouigi~iai
pups han unmedicated, excitants oft
TI- kindred disease's a2 ' cel by itage
inFor sale by ail Druggists and' Dcalers
COTTON SEED!
-DRY C;OTTrON SEED, delivered t
me at tis place before the irst oif nlex
Nov'etnlber. Will exc'bauigc Cotton
Seed n lfo t CO.
Oc.- - c,u
i eulanapi h<stiv e bowels.
e,bakan eatyellow urn1utnn
ise r inty g, hl t eo sl be
dizzy llead, With ll ue dry cougfi
(30 Pills). by mail, ur tsu e cre B1.0.Ad
dres Dtt SAYNE & SON, l'hilada.Pa
A-FULL LINE OF
Hats,
Boots,
Shoes,
Trunks,
Clothin. &c.g.
Dan be found
At the LOWEST P?RICES,
It the OLI) ESTABLISHMENT
--OF
.M. POOT.
.days otha' yo thou tore moeyn n1
y free,aa roynl, .eflbleble
beonly hnwr s un. a thel spret
Joth setha, youtght o;ersaHy atd
red.cnst 5e o can eaill
*r o. want~ work alltt That 8ar
ke o.Thei unpr liedor sins,
unpwe aralled oer ; to all who i
the.tidnble..of Wrth us."F5 al ate3
.directions, etc-- sent fre. potuesn-r..
be made by'those who gie.tei Foes t
a to the work. Gra giveu ther wole~l 'nA
ion j Srt now.- Address -an.
0. BART & C0.,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
The largest Importers of Foreign Fruits i.i the South, offer for sale a well
selected stock of
Apples, Oranges, Bananas,
Cocoanuts, Lemons, Nuts,
Dried Figs, Raisins, Potatoes,
Cabbage, Onions, Peanuts,
And everything else that a First Class Wholesale Fruit
Store should have.
COUNTRY ORDERS FILLED
WVITH DISPATCH.
Oct. 25-4;m.
HEADQUARTERS FOR
AEIULTURAL implIIEI'TS AND MACEINEIT's
F. A. SCHUM]PERT & 00.,
are Agents and have for sale the following improved Agricultural Implements:
Threshers,
Steam Engines,
Saw Mills,
Grist Mills,
Cotton Gins,
Cotton Presses,
Cider Presses.
McCOB3MICIK'S MACHINE SI
Harvester and Binder,
Table Rake,
Dropper and Mower,
Horse Rakes,. .r
Globe Cot t ,. -j&NG PLOWA
In "'- - '-:L"L IVA TOP,,
S"DEPUVEi, CANE MILLS AND EVAPAR
FRE. ~ ~ YO ii nt anything of this kind (r,v ~ a c l L o c u e m s i g N
j W rehouse for X1chinery in the i gv s a call beforepurhasingels,
rmto) streets, below Christian & S1ith o orner Caldwvell an
Mar. , 10-tf. very Stables.
Out of laws of Death.
,T sgcntleman who outlines-bis case be
and bi is ma consderably advanced in SEND FOR PRICE LIST.
Mr. John Pearson's State- PA(E
Inth prngment. 224 S CN S.
a ryth Sprin 82 wsa ttackd with CALSO,SC
worse untril fall, when I got so wak rhto LAOGEST PTOCE.
kinds ofni ic about ctied greatan THWESTH.CE
worse. I as notifed that grif o wmp RE&fG A SPEIT.
ti& and vould probaly die. Dr. HollowayIIN PEILY
siyto ld Th e to t r Bcer's Lung Re- SEND KE YOUR WATCHES.
a bottle and I commenced taki- torindgot Nov. 5-y
a one fer tang two otee doss r te
botin ea n was be e n my feet ~ - -- - ---
yofd~ th a h e o n R to rer sa vd n y
ti h et Lung emed ever mad inm such as kept in a
, the -onderful cure t ae i a ae
s Statement otBenj. F IIearn.; T HESE AR E OFF ER EI
,the machine, my wife >a sen witg aonTH
seer cogh Fee e BYnTHE OLDEST
nowd by het trIN NEWBERRY,
e "*e InmeM.ecul ' FOOT.
Hendivn y f i physicie n, th l Du htI VI ~ Y L 1 l
onae of ati olnsuta ntinrey gon e h
coulddnt retano most deli a v outereiStr o H tehLt
sen o her stomac t t en agotre wthiDr. ~-- - M - FO T
noloa her conslttion ot Threymen ha v no- nhn-areadeea
o u n d ina io o tm he p a d e as rt-nt of(l pr - f I I A I
e s hoetes Dr.t Holn 11 11 ES 111S,3 EWEL
as n l st e s entfr a otte on gav em e S ie Stor enla te l are,
he I dsI ond ts a o s e coul ratesil ILNAD UTESRN
onhrsoah andtafterkanguathe thirdrIag
regular-y.andnbyCtheptiyeandewlihdDtapanct.
bote,se wsa. o Wl bu t e WCal Ean examine m stockandp Ices
hasenj)vl fr eveal yeas. bli v. 1 4-f
t e . z j I e t r r a e e i e. W a e S l e a n4 --t e W-e
wf.Iantd~' p-for T e Lies ofaYSatcsieI &IL MnroGIT S Ts.C icag
P resideunty, of. he Usa thS. ; h Th e " B ""CTA *L y Mar SEC..t r ASE
le m p in ever poa rti letaf:teat,s 4
Feb 2 Im . eE DN I I TH A R S N
Rail Roads.
Columbia & Greenville Railroad.
PASSENGER DEPARTMENT.
COLUMBIA. S. C., Feb. lth, 188I.
On and after Monday, Feb. 4, 1884, the
PASSENGER TRAINS will run as herewith in
dicated upon this road and its branchee
Daily. except Sundays.
No. 53. UP PASSENGER.
Leave W., C. & A. Junction --- 11.22 a In
Leave Colnmbia,A - - 11.60 a In
" Alston, - - - - 12.56 p m
" Newberry, - - - - 2 I2pm
" Ninety-Six, - - - - 3.37 p In
" Hodges, - - - 422 p m
" Belton, - - 5.24 p m
Arrive Greenville, - - - - 6 50 p m
No. 5'. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Greenville, - - - 9.56 a m
" Belton, - - - 11.25 p m
" Hodges, - - 1236 p In
" Ninety-Six, - - - - 1.43 p m
" Newberry, - - - 3.14 p m
" Alston, - - 4.19 p m
Arrive Columbia,F - - 5.20 p m
Arrive W.. C. & A. Junction. ----- 5.38 p m
SPARTANBURO. UNION & COLUMBIA RAILROAD.
No. 53. UP PASSENGER.
Leave Alston, - 1.10 P In
" Strother, - 2-kZ p m
Shelton, -2.45 pm
Santuc, - 322pm
" Vnion, -.1 - n
" Jonesville, - 4.57 p
Arrive Spartanburg, - .16 p m
No. 52. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Spartanburg . & 1). De-put, 11 1105 p m
Spartanburg: S. U.& C. Del)ot,G I1.35p In
joilemille, - - - 1225 p m
Union. - -- p m
Sautuc, 1 47 p mn
Shelton, - - 4p m
Strother, - - 4. p m
Arrive t Atton, 'a - 4.17 p In
LAU,-X8 RAILWAY.
Leave Newberry, - - - 3.20 p m
Arrive La-reus C. H., - - 7.10 p In
Leave Latures C. H., - - 9.G4 p M
Arrive Newberry, - - 12 40 p m
ABBEVILLE BRA.\CH.
Leave todg. - - - 4 30p m
Arrive at Abbevillc, - . - I.07 pm
Leave Abbeville, - - - 13.2pm
Arrive at Hoges, - - - 12.30 p m
BLUE RIDGE RtAILRtOAD AND ANDELIsON
ABEILLE BANCH
Leave Belton 5.25 p In
a, Anderson 6.00 p in
itPendleton 6 6 p in
Leave Seneca C, 7.30 p In
Arrive atalballa 7.57 p In
Leave Aalballa, 4- - 8.6 a in
Leave Seneca C, 9.16 a ra
" Pendleton, - - 10.02 a mn
Anderson, - - 10.47 p mn
Arrive at elton, - - 11.21 p m
FREIGHT, PASSENGER COAC ATTACED.
Leave Belton .15 a M
Willanston 7.10 a In
Pelzer 7.37 a in
Piedmont 8.25 a M
Arrive Greenville 9.25 p Mn
Leave Greenville .5 p In
Peidmnont 4.52 p m
Pelzer 6.00'p.m
Willianston 6.25 p in
Arrive Belton 71.10 p M
CONNECTI)ES..
A. With SouthCarolina RailtAd from Char
leston.
With Wilmington, Co 7bia atid Xu usta
"APee roar I O 7t.3arlotte and
B. *rth
!h Ar-hey !le& Spartanburg It
for poir.*., in 1yeetern North Cj
C. With..& ,. Div. R. & DLRP
POintem Suth and West..
D. With A. & C. DivPR. &D. R. a.,
lantasno 0.700d.
E. WitbA.&C.Div &D.
I intsswwyflizia~ Wot.
A. Wih Southi '.rlk.a*road for
IT Ston. .
Run . ". Colubia 'and
With ia Wilmin tn udsth
'Where. 'T1~Z,ColuA'ia anud
.rnrod for Charlotte dthe
M . With Ashei'le & Spartanbu
frdm Ifendersonvilfe g
. With A. & . Div. R. & D. R. E
Charlotte and beYtd.
Through Coac for Ienderaonvii
be run froim Columbia daily.
Standard Time used is Washin ton
Which is fifteen minutes faster tau Colu
I H r- ---. W . rFIajttY adth.
fromHeners'nyPartanburg
S.oth CA.r&C.iv., R.ika Cr.
Chntt and n
Train o thi r f r ldersonvil
whitan a e il r eun asol
Coul fnte An'tG r
To AND FRQ3M CIIARLEsTON.
Leave Coluia OZNG a T,
Arrive Charleston 11 23 p m 0
ONGWEST,
Leave Charieston~~ fy.0 a'n 40
Arrive Colum bin 11.00 a in *4.00
tDaily. *Daily except Sunday.1.3
TO AND FRO3M CA3MDEN.
Leave Columbia~ G 40T,
ArAive Camden 40 ,a mian
GOING WEST
Leave Camden '7.1 a 15 ~
. Arrive Columbia . 11.0 a m * 15 3
*Daily except Sondays. am 1.5
TO AND FRtOM1AUGU.sTA.
LveColumbia 'J4 - n '13
Arrive Augusta 12.05p an 7 a
K , GOING WEST,
Leave Augusta e6.s n '50
A rrive Columbia J1.'4Opa m *5
*Daily except Sundays.
. CONNECTIONS.
CConnetion made at Columbia with
.Columbia and Greentville Rail Road byi
arriving at 11.28 P. M., and depar.ting at
P. C.onnection miade atClm?
ati itoad bCy ao tr mo an frn
pints on both roads with through Puli
Sleepr betee Charleso adWair
change. Connection made at Chres
ih Steamers forNew York on WVedada
Charleston Railroa to l points hu
Connctions are maile at Au '
Georgia Railroad and Contralu Rfroad
and from all points South and West.
-Trough utickets can be purchased to a
s. C.E A e C ba
JonNr B. PECE. General Managg-r. A
Asheville and Spartanbu.rg Railroad
Passengr tans wilb ru al (uay u
excepted) between Spartanbuy (Sandayen
dersonvmte, as follows: ranRe
Leav U. D. UP TINpr
Arrive at H s tatnug13 p xi
...........5.30 3p m
Leave Hlendersonville....... 0ai
Arrive R. & D. Dept ----r-a- -.......80 a
Both trains makeonSpatansr C1.3p
: iab Charleston ia Spttnsburr Uio
an CLne aan Atlanta and.Charlotte by
-i ie JAMRS ANDERSO'N
Superitprenet
WANTED!
BIOBOADERS
I an now p)repared 'to furnish Fir t
Class Board, wIthout lodging,t
young Inery and old men. Fare od
andl charges low. Dinner furnisheti to
country' men at 25 cents each.
FIRST DOOR ABOVE
TODD'S GROCERY STORE.
L W. P. RISER.~
4--ti
bt me, and alOther business in the U.S.
aEn. 01catnded to for MODERATE -
Ou ~ e is btposie U S. Patent O1mee,
ose remote frorn WASHIGTNieta
~end MODEL Or DRAWING. Wedvs
to patentability free of charg;adw
ikX CHIARGE U"NLESS WE OBTAIN
t MnyOrder .h and to beu of
mnts in yonr Own Stat or country, act
C. A.SNOW &Co. t
et PatntOmce, Washington, D. C
~ a week at home. #5 Oonttfree. Pa 0'
~absolutely sure..N:rsk Capital not
~required. Render, if yous want basi. '
Regear whioh persons of-ethex sex,
mto ld a ~ er tpay all te U
1884'. T HE 1884
CONSTITUTION
THE DAILY CONSTITUTION has come, to
be a necessity 1a everY intelligent m1n in
the range of its circulation.
For the next year -it will be better than
ever.. Nearly $100.000 is now being invested
by its proprietors in a new building, pres
ses and outfit, in which and with which it
can be enlarged to meet its increasing busi
ness, and improved to meet the demands of
its growing constituency.
THE DAILY AND SUNDAY CONSTITUTION for
184 will be better and !jller than ever, and
in every sense the best paper in the reaeb
of the people of the Southeast." '
One Year $10, 6 Months $5, 3 Months $2.50.
1 Month $1.00
THE-WEEKLY ONSTITUTION
starts the new year with 13,0W0. subscribers
who pronounce it the largest, best and
cheapest paper within their reach.
It consists c. S. 10 or 12 pages (as the de
mand of its business or the news may di-,
rect) filled with matter of the greatest inter
est to the farmer.
AT LESS TIIAN 3 CENTS A WEEK
this great budget of news and gossip will be
sent to your fireside to entertain every
member of your household,
One Year...........................$150
Six Months....... .........1 00
In Clubs of Ten, eich......... .1
In Clubs of Twenty, each......... 100
With an extra paper to the getter up of
the Club.
THE YEAR OF 1831.
will be one of the most important in our
history. A President. Congressmen, Sena
tors. Governor, Legislature-are all to be
elected.
Very- Important issues are to be tried in
the National and State elections. The Con
atitution in its daily or weekly edition will
carry the fullest and fresh-est news in best
shape to the public. and will stand as an
earnest champion of Democratic principles.
Address, THE CONSTITUTION.
THE
chfonfle & conslfutionalist,
AUGUSTA, GA.,
AND THE
NEWBERRY HERALD
for one year at $3.50.
The Augusta CHRONICLE AND CoNSTTU
TIONALIST is the largest weekly newspaper
in the State. It i.i a ten page seventy column
paper. It contains all the important fews
of the week, and is 1illd with interesting
and instructive readini to the farmer, 'e
chanic, bnsiness and professional man. Its
Washinge6n, Atlanta and Columbia letters
with its full tWlegrnpiic: service, market re
]6rts, editorials and geheral 3ows -make it
one of the most -readable and oneof the
best newspaper in the South. . .;,
The CHROXICLE AND CONS'TIUliTIONAUST
can be read in any household. It is free
fi-om sensationalism.
TH EIMERICI 11ER
FItablished 1819, aid for more than a !rd
of a Centary under the same
dL points the DIRY G,O BL T GA
fl Road SpecI attention is paid to P.er
rolina. tnes, ncluding those Ot Comm
from all
areua notOf ROPresentative Farni
from At ar notable feature of ts Ie
There isU oartDe~ wail.
Ifign al~ reading and prpt=1:lit
ff.9m all prial s e
th adies of thejar huggest
Chirles. ost competent, successful
teriene( men and women have cl
!Outhe several departradfir&
e orth. DO Farmer.n the Atlantic State
" Deaar to eorgia. ,can afror(
tu guta withut this old and relable adv
ta.road Guide on farm work.
The American Farmer is puaishe
eeyMonth, (onthIsan13b
from beantifully printed thn tnea adith
le will or over, $1 c0 'ac. 3 ear. To club.
D. C., Kand$ftle, Valuable and Useful Pr
obia. are given to all those ujo will t
lent, and trouble to collect subscriber
reAgt SM'S SA NDS & SON, Pubish
-,8 Bahilmore St., Bialtimore
T-.--ET HE andl the. Amerian ;J
)any. address for $:l.00 ftogether dn sent
enge THE~ EVEN(ING
Chrenicle and Cntituig
pta
pam ---AND THE
mNEWBERRY. HERALl
will be furnished for18S1 at $7 00
The EVENINGC CHIICONICLE AND Cox
~ INLis T s the largest an t cop ta
thousand words of telegnaphprdyfe
Stree frmteemo-a
THIS PAPE,
IN CLUB WITH
hentteu.i ol
DDYSLADY'S BOOK
0 sorecognxzed as. the leading Fash.inia
attracti,?o gggm1ae Ihe foll.ow adg:
Beautiful Colored Fashion'P4tso
,cutedl by the Frenich poeg
""tfi ad cor aUipg d fashin ,
and ubli eGe( CZfaD
PEl ls)?ates of Fshions in black an
2 F i n l ? cu. r a t i g l a n g s l e .
1 Eg avjPrtrste, oafoGO
"the a.edP whi fof Ex-prehidents
knowni in GODEY'S.LADY t
PRESIgMTIALj Portraft Gate-y
eah beiegcaccoti,panied by a sotb
~54Pugo. Utmrating Faashions anldfandy
Pae frhitectunal Desig*sha,
Cott esor e e of Houses a
and expIext-instructionst~ e.wt'f
havn bo 4 ose byc & thec
24 PAGES OF SELECT MUS
ahom are. , minentriter,non
Th Ar Deartmeet ilbeunder the di.
lalr fAt, Wango,D. C. l ohr
SUBSCRIPTION Price $2.00 per Year-',
Fo fute in Lom n A~ ed f r cfrcular
c.tmp taken. oY L Y BOOK
GOIEPS LAI'bg1.
S1006 Chestnut Street, Pl1h9adeIp~gp
a.,
of
J.-Z'SALTER
Newberry, S. C
Call at his Gallery over
LUMPllS. Furuur -Star,-m
Examine hisavork,4Md- prod&resae
Miee- h,e - he Hmue-I,i-u
staWt.nepus. zocess making a Pieture
in one secon .' Hesitate no longer to
carry the sweet babe for it'$ Picture.
Copying and tnlarging from Old Pie
tures done with Artistie Finish.
ORDERI-SOUCITE1.
Feb.9-S8t.
IENRY STEI 17,
Importer and Wholesale Dealer in
Foreign & Domestic
FRUTIT,
APPLES, 'ORANGES,
.: -BANAK
LEMONS, PINEAPPLES, P0'
TOES, ONIONS, PEANUTS,
CABBAGES,&C.
S. MER .M -49"IMC
& MARKET STIEETS,
OHARILESTON, S. C.
No. 8, 4&-6m:
MONEY TO JIN1
Bf TE CAROUNA
BANKING COPAN
OF
NEW Jg A! JJ0 7N.
F arm,
Neg
"Farms..
eree and
' Clubg - u
cFORt19
andex. Attrn
arge of 4g-SC
a. rrom
I to be
Iser"d
d twice
It is
euniume
- TONIC
a i .Ui Ufr n,re**'ne
nJU.dase renra ?etaad em
-ai *SPecrfly
Eu A I ZINMC Cpogg
York Offlee70 EVided-Ln
PANRAN'S
a-tr
toi hic. And -
IeM

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