OCR Interpretation


The Newberry herald. (Newberry, S.C.) 1865-1884, April 03, 1884, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026909/1884-04-03/ed-1/seq-4/

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arm, garbtn s
APRIL.
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BUY A GRAPE VINE;
If there is one thing that we have
these many years endeavored to
secure, it is that the family of every
farmer shall have an abur dance-Lof
fruit. Not fruit now and'then, as a
luxury, but fruit as a matter of
course. ly.Jough for old and young,
as much as .the children wish at
each of the three meals,. and a plei
ty between mealawiti seme to e
to the less' provident -neighbors
To begin with, send to a nursery
for a Concord vine. Twenty-five
cents should insure a good vine,
well packed:and post-paid by mail.
Our plan does not preclude more
than one, but we wish th make sure
of one. Of course many grape
fanciers will ridicule our choice of
the Concord. We want grapes,
and plenty of them; and whoever
has a Concord vine will be quite
sure of these. Concord grapes are
vastly better than no grapes. While
we cultivate fifty 6r more better
kinds we still believe that the Con
cord is the best grape for the begin
er. When the vine comes to hand
it is to be planted. It is well to
have it near the house, and if there
is a suitable place for gif by the
veranda or "stoop," oet: it there.
Good, fair, grden soil will' answer,
and no manure is to be uscd in
planting. The vine will, of course,
have a stem and roots. If the stem
has more than three buds cut it
away at about an inch from the
third bud, counting from the
lower one. If the roots are over
two feet long, cut them back to that,
length; if less than two feet, cut off
two or three inches of the end, at
any rate. To plant the vine make
a circular hole, of sufficient diame
ter to contain the roots when exten
ded with the vine in the center.
The bottom of the hole should be
convex, or rounding, say five or
six inches below the surface at the
center, and eight or ten at the edges.
Set a stake in the center of the
hole, place the stem ol' the vine
against it, and spread out the roots
in all directions towards the outer
edge. If the roots are matted and
tangled, carefully separate them;
when the i-oots are properly spread,
throwing a little soil on them, if
needed, to hold then in place, cover
the roots with the best of the soil,
taking care to have it well filled in.
leaving no empty spaces among the
roots. When the hole is nearly
full, press down the soil firmly with
the foot; do not tramp or stamp it,
but press it squarely. There will
be nlothinug more to do to the vine
until growth begins. When the
three buds left a1pon the stern be
gin to start, rub off all but one,
leaving the lowest one, if that is as
strong as the others, and if other
shoots start during the season re
move them. The shoot from the
vine is very tender at first, and care
must be taken that it is not broken;
when it is a foot or so long it may
be tied to the stake, using a strip of
cloth, or bass matting, and it should
be kept tied up as it grows. Try
one vine, plant it properly, and
watch its entire growth; it will
teach how to grow many vines.
Ame~ rican Agjru&t urist for Maru;ch.
SUBSTITUTE FOR RAI.-Hoeing
and the frequent stirring of the sur
face of the soil are good substitutes
for rain. Thtose parts of the garden
that are most frequently cultivated
show the best results. It is proba
ble that corn, watermnelong, toma
toes, Lima beans and calibage, a,nd
possibly other plants, if well start
ed, in good deep~ soil. may go
through a two-months' drought
without very serious damage. A
deep, well-manured soil suffers much
less than a shallow soil. Subsoil
ing and manure are to a certain ex
tent substitutes for rain. Mois
ture comes from below. Under
draining is also a safeguard against
drought. The course of the drains
in the garden can easily be marked
in a dry season by the ranker
growth of vegetation above them.
Irrigation in many parts of the
country will pay. The soil, if well
prepared, could use to good advan
tage twice the quantity of water it
receives from rains during the dry
months of the summer.
When the paila of your hand
itches it is a sign that you are go
ing to get some money-when you
timorOu5.
A TEST OF PRONV.NCIATION.
The following rather curious
piece of composition was plac
ed -upon the black-board at a
teacers institutO, and a prize of
Websters Dictionery offered to any
person who could read it and pro
nounce every word correctly. The
book was not carried off, however,
as twelve was the lowest number of
mistakes in pronunciation made:
"A sacreligious son of Belial, who
suffered froM bronchitiK hviug ex
hssted his' finaes. e irdea to
make good the deficit, resolved to
ally himself to a comely, lenient,
and docile young lady of the Ma
lay or Caucasian race. le acWz
dirgly purchasedcalliope d
al necklace of -a -chamele h!
and securng a sat ofr
principal hote, he, ngal
*iter as his cdadjutor: e en
dispatched a letter of the most un,
exceptionable caligrapy extant, in.
viting the young lady to a matinee.
She revolted at the idea refuse to
consider herself sacrificable to his de
sires sent a polite note of refusal, on
receiving which ht produied a car
bine and a bowie-knife, said that he
would not now forge fetters hymen.
eal 'With the queen, wenkto an'is
olated spot, severed his jugular
vein and discharged the contents
of his carbine into his abdomen;
The debris was removed. bythe cor
oner." The mistakes in pronuncia
tion were made on the following
w(, : Sacreligious, Belial, bron
chitis, exhausted, finances, deficit,
comely, lenient,-dociLeMalay, cal
liopei cllameleon, 4, coadjutor,
Ili0apby, mitifte, sacrificable,
ymeneaislated,jugular
and debris.
RESTORING THEiR CONFIDENCE.
-Jones-"Lend me five dollars?
Smith-"Can't do it. Just paid
out my last five dollars for a big
advertisement of property stolen."
Jones-"Stolen property ?'
Smith-"Yes. I offered $8,000
reward for Jnfornmtion that would
lead to the eonViction ofthelthieves
who ettered my hoise ai& stole a
lot of jewelry and other valuables,
including a $25,000 diamond neck
lace."
Jones-"See here, I happen to
know that vou never owned $200
worth of jewelry in your life."
know it. I want to :restoe their
confidence."
-MATTEn OF HEALTH.-MrS. D.
"Who would have thought it?''
Mr. D.-Thought what?"
Mrs.''D.-"In this article on
-Health' the writer says it is far
wiser to sleep till one wakens natu
rally.'
Mr. -D.--"Oh ! I knew that long
ago."
Mrs. D.-"-You never told me."
Mr. D.---Your memory is very
short. Ilaven't I told you hundreds
of times to let mec sleep. until the
fires are fixed, the childrah dressed,
and breakfast ready to put on the
table?"-^
A GR:EAT DIFFERENCE. -"o
say that Mr. Smith gave you twen
ty dollars for bfliciating at his wed
ding, and MYr. Rrown onlygave you
two dollars ?" said tihe wife of a
clergyman to hier husband.
"Yes," he replied.
'"That seems very strange," con
tinued the lady; "Mr. Smith is a
clerk on a small salary, while Mr.
Brown, I have always understood,
is a very wealthy man."
"lie is, my dear, but this is the
second time Mr. Brown has been
married"
A woman on Broadway, New
York, was recently leading a poo0
dIe along, when a passing truck
spahd gto gda the
pet's haSbs4a,Tk
ing a beautiful silk handkerchief
from one pocket and a bottle of
cologne from another, she brushed
off the mud and then carefully wash
ed the animal's back with the co
logne. *The fool killer;failed to do
his duty on his last round.
When a bachelor says he is sin
gle from choice, it makes him mad
to ask him why the girl made
choice of some other fellow.
When at church it is always
but it is not worth while to waste
space giving this rule until the
churches are built.
When a babywries at nigbn do
not become .jdtient. Be than?
ful that it isn'1wins. -
This is leatp year.; It seems as
though nll-the years are 1eap' years,
nm. th6" Jnmj b he apdl.
What Struck an Old Soldier.
'It will soon be twenty years since the
war c!osed."
Under the hot sun of August, 1SR2, the
village of Dover, N. J., lay still as the
sphinx in Egypt, whi!e Elijah Sharp of that
place, slowiv and softly spoke of the past.
"Yes,' he Said, "I was in the army and saw
many of the sigh:s of thoc fearful years. I
was finally disch..rged from disability, re
sulting ftom sunstroke. I came home mis
erable in health and spirits; soenfeebled that
I took told'on the slightest exposure. Life
seemed worthless to. me; I live only in
memory."
"That was sad enough," I said, dividing
my last twb cigars.
"That's so." responded Mr. Sharp; "but I
got over it. Outgrew it? Not exactly. When
in that condi:iou I began taking PARKER'S
Toxic, and my health began to improve
right away. I was astonished at it, and so
was my wife. I piled on the flesh and
cculd eat anything. My ambition b!.ed up.
I could attend to business, and now-expect
ing that I have to take care about exposing
myself to the hot sun-I an as well as I was
the day I enli-tcd. What d;ferences there
are in ihings-guns and bayonets kill ; PAn
KER'S T*ONic saves."
This preparation, which has been known
as PAicKEn's GINGEn Tosic, wi!l hereafter
be called simply I'ARER'S Toxic. As un
principied Jea1ers'-ir6.;congaty deciving
their cnstoroers Oy substitutinginferior ar
ticles under' the Damo,ot'jitger, and as gin
ger is riallf an itnportant ingredient, we
drop te misleading word.
The re i chaege, however, -in tie prep
aration itself, and all bottles remaining
if T vt of dealers, wrapped under.the
nhAU 'E's GiNoER ToNkc, contain
:g I dbmedieinn if the fac-;imile sigr.a
' i$cox. -6. is at the hoUom of
ivr*pppr. 'Mar. I177-D
TVTTs
PIL LS
P, R0"Y D80
MOO B It WENi
and WA&RIA.
From these soure-ailse three-81bts of
the aeOQWS of the -human- tae. These
symptoms indicate their existence: Loss of
Appet*e, Bowels costive, Sick tead
ache, fullness after eating, aversion to
exertion of body or ind, Eructation
of food; Irritability of temper, Low
spisrAfeeling of having -neglected
some duty, IDzziness, Flutterig at t
Hep~. Dots before the eye ugay col
ored Urine, CONSTIPATION, and de
inand the use of aremedy that acts directly
ontheUver. A SLivernedicinc TUTT'S
PILLS have mo qauaL TheirAction on the
KidneyandBkl1n1 also ompt4 emoving
all impurities through J"Osc three "scar
engers of the system," producing ap pe.
tite,soand digestion, regular stools, a cicar
skinand a vigorousbody. TUTT'S PILLS
cause no nausea or griping nor interfere
with daily -work and are a perfect
ANTIDOTE TO MALARIA
HE FEELS T1IE A NEW MAN.
"I have had Dy, psia, with Constipa
tion two y and ve tried ten different
kinds of pis, and TUTT'S are the first
that have done me any good. They have
cleaned mie: nat ek. .y appetite is
splendid, food digests readily, and I now
have naWd pssages. I feel like a new
man." W. D. EDWAMDS; Palmyra, 0.
SolUeverywhere,92c. 4Office,44ieruaySt.,.Y.
TUT hAIW DYEn
GRAY HAIR OR WHIERS ehatiged in.
stantly to a GLsST BLACK by a single ap
plicat1on of this DYE. Sold by Dxuggists.
or sent by express on receipt of S 1.
Offlce,44 Murray Street, Ner York.
TUTT'S MANUJA, OF USEFUL REcEIPT FRE
July 19, 2'--ly. -
1gSTETTE
BTOXA.C
ITTER
The kidneys act as purifiers of the blood
and \When their functions are interferd
with through weakness, they need toning.
Thy become healthl'ttll active by the use
of Hstetter's Stomach titters, when falling
short of relief from other sources. This
superb stimulating tonic also prcvents and
arrests fever and ague, constipation, liver
comphlat, dvspepsia, rheumatism and other
ailments. Lse it with regularity.
F'or sale by all Drugg sts and Dealera
- gegerally.
WAXNTED.
COTTON SEED!
I'rill pa (15C.) fifteen (entst ensl
p;er Bu-hel fr 10.0)0 BuiTheis SOUND I
D)RY COTTrON SEED), d 'livered to
me att t his place befor e the lirst of next
November. W ill cehang.e Cotton
W. 1E. 110LLOwaY CX(O..
Oct. 3-Grul ~ uiMiS C.
Svmpt om s: Impute b164l ost ive bowelsa,
irregular app)etite. sour1 belchiing, pains In
side, back and heaLrt, yel!ow urmne, burning
when urinating, clay-color' d stools. bad.
breath, no desixre for wo.K, chills, fevers,
irritability, whit ish tongue, dry cough.
dizzy headt. with dull pain in back part. loss
of memory. foL'igy siht. For the.se troubles
"SWA Y NE'S I'i l.s" are a sure cure. Box,
(30J Pills), by matil, :25 ets., 5 for S.00. Ad
dress. DR. SWAYNE & SON, Philada.. Pa.
Soldl by Druggists. .Jas. M-ly.
A FULL LINE OF
H ats.
Boots,
Shoes.
Can be foundi
At the LOWEST PRiICES,
At the OLD ESTABLISHMENT
-OF
M. FOOT.
42-tf
0 fr the working class. Send 10
centslL . for postaLge, and we wil
ma5 ii,uil you f ree. a royal, valuable
box of sample goods that will put
on in the way of n:aking more money in a
few~ dtays than you thought possible at any
business. Capital not, required. We will
start yon. You can work all the spare
time only. The work is universally adapted
to both se'xes. younga-'d old. You can easily
earn 50 cents to $-> everyv evening. That :1ll
who want work mnay test the business, wa
make this unpaiatleledt offer :to al who
are n aye H satistied1 we will send $1 to pay
for the'rouble of writir:g is. Full1 particu
lars, dtirectionIs, (tc.. Se-nt fr-ee. Fortunes
will be made by those who give their whole
time to the work. Great success absolutely
sure. Don't deay Start now. Address
Stilson ? Co., Pora ,Man
C. BART & C0.,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
The largest Importers of Foreign Fruits in the South, offer for- sale a well
selected stock of
Apples, Oranges, Bananas,
Cocoanuts, Lemons, Nuts,
Dried Figs, Raisins, Potatoes,
Cabbage, Onions, Peanuts,
And everything else that a First Class Wholesale Fruit
Store should have.
COUNTRY ORDERS FILLED
I ITM DISPATCH.
Oct. 25-Gm.
HEADQUARTERS FOR
AIICULTUILIMPLIMINTIN MACI IY.
F. A. SCHUMPERT & C0.,
are Aents and have for sale the following iiproved Agricultural Implements:
Threshers,
Steam Engines,
Saw Mills,
Grist Mills,
Cotton Gins,
Cotton Presses,
Cider Presses.
McCOI3XICXi'S MACITNES I
Harvester and Binder,
Table Rake,
Dropper and Mower,
Horse Rakes,
Harrows,
Globe Cotton Planter,
SULKY AND WALKIYG PLO WS,
CUL T IVA TOR S,
CHICAGO SCREW PULVERIZER, CANE MILLS AND EVAPORATORS
AND OTHER IMPROVED AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS.
Ifon want aniything of this kind give na a call before purchasingelsewhere.
Warehouse for Machinery in the new building on corner Caldwell an<l Ilar
rington street!., below Chri-tian & Smith's Livery Stables.
Mar. 5, 10-tf.
Out of Jaws of Death.
Th is gentlaman who outlines his case he- SN O RC IT
low his is ai man conrsiderably advanced in
life; and is noted for his sterling integrity, Jc L E '
Uis post-ofmce is Yateaville, Upson county, e er
Ga. rte following is
Mr. John Pearson's State- IPLC
ment. 24KN T
In the Spring of 1882 [ was at tack~ed withCALETNS.
a very bad cough, which continued to grow ILRETSOK
worse until fall, when I got so weak that ILO ETPI S
could not get about. I tried a great many ~ TESUH
kindst of medicines but continued to grow
worse. I was notified that I had consump- RE INGASCALY
tion and would probably die. Dr. Il!oway ~ M ORWTHS
finally told me to try Birewer's Lung Re
storer. They sent to Ward's Store arnd got Nvl-y
a bottle anud I comimenced taking it right
away. After taking two or three doses, I be
gan to improve, and by the time [ had used ____ _____
up one bottle I was able to get on my feet
again. I am now in excellent health. Ilam GosofAlHn ,
confident t bat the Lung Restorer saved my
lifeatidmyneighborsarcofthesamopiniion. -d p i
It is the best Lung Remedy ever made in my
opinion. Dr. HI. promised mae thia: he would jh IltP6111 (IffL
write to the manufacturer.s and tell them of JJI.jAiIl11i UI) 3jU 1
the~ wpaderful enre it madec in mycme.
Statemenit or Benj. F. Flearn- TiS R FEE
doo. A~~ ~~Je weortyrls
Eat tyin Nuenu?jr, 158,Pwhie seninC E
my wiP' was ol.~cn w224 EINGT ST.V~
time machin . - a B CHR-ESTON S CJ.IJ2~
severep-aiimin herside,LhiEhEasTsSTOCfo.
one of he lunGoods enfirelygone.dSh
meht onehionem wif Ia tkene with at BYrTHEOLDES
sevre pm, m her ide, hica s ton Ifo!- i
mouied byhemorrehaes Dr h l and a ... ii L IUJJ~
nther cutgo leep ndi afewLn wesore
aw:i resed t Co a liig tsk le tnl Th a tt /Hw Slreo H FB e lH Lot
hec o suld o n htsh ol retain tem sdliaen rit *
meon her stomach, I ate agrete ihi Dr
dseli, my b aito pysic ian s om impoveen Dr. etw u alrean lgn
lin oa her conuttion. co tine hey macden a tsrncto
regaly amidnbyti n e he p'idntaknd pro
bottled, she casae hoales Dr. thoean
as enja,:t reor,I sevrl yc.or. hotlei Sgave ndPadWae
the LungAtetterNrwsaedorerolife.eWeLhtv
hae a dayos.Ifouda si couldrc,orco r ein VIO NAD ITR SRN S
r.eularand,' ystheotme ishe had taken SPCALEwo SETCL A
bpo cont, a. s a t wlktaot the
house Shem ino inr betielr. hWlhthns e D N8A BR DA PRS TS
haAlleojdyrs byrmailepromptlyrattendedito.
the LungaRstorerasaedghandlie.pWerhav
Mr IIcarndon'heapst-ondcowithYDiesatlh.
labl man in ad evminemypaorticdupices
IhEAveRDo handHaLareTnZeegn
WAT.HE, LOKS-tWERY
INEN .IS.AIET
Dec. a4 t
Wc :aking an earn
paentablit. U.e ofcageued o irua
Nov. 3 83-ly
wate frTh Lvs f-l
Preidntsofth U.S.Th
All uintelient paeople oante it nyOf one~C .
an becomz e ascssfl eterms free.ast
Nov. , s;~LYON.&HEALY
alS tt & Monroe Sts., Chimcago.
lla11ett Book Co., Portad Mai. ..t aI
884 THE 1884
CONSTITUTION,
THE DAILY CO:Z4nTT OXN. has come to
e a necessity to- eekty intefligent man in
Jhe range of its circulation.
For the next year'it will be better than
ever. Nearly $100,000 Is now being inveited
by its proprietors in a new building, pres
ae and outfit, in which and with which it
an !,, enlarged to meet its Increasing busi
r.ess, and Improved to meet the demands of
its growing constituency.
THE DAILY AND SUNDAY CONsT.rUTION for
L&4 will be beiler and tuller than ever, and
in every sense the best paper in the reach
Df the people of the Southeast.
One Year $10,'G Months $5, 3 Months $2.50,
1 Month $1.00
THE WEEKLY ON9TITUTION
tarts the new year with-13,OCO subscribers
who pronounce It the largest, best and
.beapest paper within their reach.
It consists of 8, 10 or 12 pages (as the de
mand of its business or the i;cws may di
rect) 1illed with matter of the greatest inter
est to the farmer.
AT LESS TIHAN 3 CENTS A WEEK
this great budget of news and gossip will be
3ent to your fireside to entertain every
member of your household,
One Year..........................$150
Six Months...... ..........1 00
In Clubs of Ten, eaeh......... 125
In Clubs of Twenty, each......... 1 00
With an -extra paper to the getter up of
the Club.
THE YEAU OF 1881.
will be one of the most importantin oui
bistory. A President. Congressmen. Sena
Lors. Governor, Legislature-are all to -be
el4cted.
Yory important issues are to be tried in
the National and State elections. The Con
3titution in its daily or weekly edition will
carry the fullest and freshest news .n best
shape to the public. and will stand as an
larriest champion of Democratic principles.
Address, THE CONSTITUTION.
T14E
Ch oidl & Constitutionalitj
AUGUSTA, GA.,
-AND THE
NEWBERRY HERALD
for one year, at $3.50.
The Augusta CHRONICLE AND CONSTITU
rIONALIST is the largest weekly newspaper
in the State. It Is a ten'page seventy column
paper. It contains all the Important heWs
of the week, and is filled with interesting
and instructive readinz to the farmer, me
chanic. business and professional man. Its
Washington,AtJanta.and: Columbia3iettei
with Its full telegraphic service, market re
ors, editorials and gezira news make it
one of the most readable and one of the
best newspaper in the South.
The CHRONICLE AND COSTITrTIONAIST
can be read in any household. It is free
fibom sensationalism.
To: EIRERICIN- FAMER~f
Established 1819, and for more than a Third
oft Century under the ame
Xanagement
Devoted to FiRMING STOCK-RAS,
FRUIT GROWING, MARkET GANVG,
the DAIRY, theYOULTEY YARD, etc., etc.
Special attention is paid to Fertilisers-and
Manures, including those of comiperce and
tbe tarm.
Reports of Representative: Farmers' Clubs
are a notable feature of its Issues.
There Is a Rome Department, with charm
ing reading and practical suggestions for
the ladies of the larm household.
The most competent, successful and e
perienced men and wonen hal'e charge of
the several departments.
No Fanner in the Atlantic'Siate. from
ILelaware to Georgia. "can afforil to: be
without" this old and reliable adv serand
Guide on farm work.
The American Farmer is published twice
every month, (on -t he 1st and 15th). It is
beautifully printed on fine white paper in
clear type. $1.50 a year. To clubs of five
or over, $1.00 each.
Handsome, Valuable and Useful Premiums
are given to all those who will take time
and trouble to collect subscribers.
SA M'S SA NDS & SON, rublishers,
128 Baltimore St., Baltimore, 114.
The ITERtALD and the Ameri0sgl Farmer
will be clubbed together andi sent to any
address for $3.00 for one .year.
TIlE EVENING
Chronidle end Canstitutiealist,
Augusta, Ga.,
--AND THE
NEWBERRY HERALD
will he fnrnishedl for 1881 at $7100
The EVENING (HRONICLE AND) CONSUTU,
liONA Ls'r is the largest and cheapest Daily
cwspaper in the South. It contains eight
liousaind words of telegraph per day from the
New Yo:k Associated Press. This- sewJee Is
mupplemented by full special from Atlanta,
Col i>bia and Washington. -As a newspaper,
he CHRIONICLE is one of the beat in the
South. It is ne wsy, progressive, reliable and
tree from the demcral zing details of crime.
THIS PAPER
- I CLUB WITH
DEY'S
LADY'S BOOK
will be sent for one year to anty
address on receipt of $3.50 which should be
sent to the pubhsher of the.H ERALD.
GODEY'S LADY'S BOOK
is recognized as the leading F .shion and
Llome Magazine in America. The leading
s.tractions for 1854 arc the following .
-gBeautiful Colored Fashion Plates exe
'II.utedl by the French process, represen
ting.the prevailing fashions In both
st yles and ceior. produced especially for
~na published exclusively in GODEY'S
L AD)'S BOOK.
1sEgihPae fFsin in black and
19jFinely Exeuted Steel Engravings by
'-the best artis,ts, made tor GODEY'S
LADY'S BOOKf.
2.Egae.Portraits -of Ex-presidentast
12- e'. ., which form a p of what is
known in GODEY'S L ADY'S B Csthe
PRESIDENTIAL Portrait Gallery,
each being accompanied by a short biogra
phical sketch.
17 P1ages. Illustrating Fashuions andfancy
Sneedtle work
1- Pages of Architectural Designs.s,howing
plans and perspective of Houses and
cottages of all descrIptIons.
1)Full Size Cut Palper Patterns with full
'and explicit instructions fr use.
200 CODEY'S iMP
Celebrated household cookIng receipts,each
having been te4ied by practical housekeep
srs before publisling.
24 PAGES O)F SELECT KIISIC.
BESIDE"S embr cing a rich arrayoflitera
UE ture, Novels, Noveletta, Stories
snd Poems, by eminent writers, among
whom are.
MIARION HIARLAND,.At'GUSTA de'BURNA,
CFIRISTIAN REID. Mrs. SHEFFEY PETERS,
ELLA RODMAN CHURCH, HELEN MATH
ERIS. Author of "Cherry Ripe.'
The Art Department will be under the di
rection of Win. MacLeodI. Curate of Coreoran
Gallery of At t, Washington, D. C. All other
:lepartmenuts under equally competent di
rection.
SUBSCRIIPTION Price $2.00 per Year.
For further Information send for circular
sample copy of GODEY'S LADY'S BOOK
!5e. Stamps taken. To avoid errors write
plainly your address, giving County and
.tate.
GODET'S LADY'S B0QK.
1000 Chestnut Street, Philadelphais, Pa
5! 0
Io - * U
Rail Roads.
Columbia & Greenville Railroad.
PASSENGER DEPARTMENT,
COLUMBIA, S. C., Feb. Ith, 1884.
On and after Monday, Feb. 4, 1884. the
PASSENGER TRAINS will run as herewith in
dicated upon this road and its branche.
Daily, except Sundays.
No. 53. UP PASSENGER.
Leave W., C. & A. Junction - --- 11.22 a m
Leave Columbia,A - - a 11.50 a in
Alston, - - - - 12.55. p in
" Newberry, - - - - 2.02 p in
Ninety-Six, - - - - 3.37 p in
Hedges, - - - 422 p m
" Belton, - - - 5.24 p in
Arrive Greenville, - - - - 6 50 p in
No. 52. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Greenville, - - - 9.55 a m
Belton, - - - 11.25 p in
Hodges, - 1236 p m
" Ninety-Six, - - - - 1.43 p in
" Newberry, - - - 8.14 p in
" Alston. - - 4.19 p in
Arrive Columbia,F - - 5.20 p in
Arrive W., C. & A. Junction. ----- 5.38 p m
SPAaTANBURG. UNION K. COLUMBIA UAILFOAD.
No. 53. UP PASSENGER.
Leave A!ston, -1.10 p in
" Strother, -2--5 p In
" Shelton, -245p
" Santue, -3.82 P
" Union, - - In
" Joneville, - 4.5 p in
Arrive Spartanburg, - 6.15 p in
No. 52. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Sparta-burg, -. & 1. Dcpot, 2+11.t5 p in
"Spartanburg, S. U. C. Depct,G 11.15p in
Jonesville, - - - 32.2 p m
Union. - - - 1.10 p in
i sa-tuc, - - 147 p m
d4 Shelton, 2 - 40-pmi
SStroher,. - - .14 p m
Arrive atAn, - Ao- 4 07 p in
LAURENiS RAILWAY.
Leave Newberry, & .3.0 p in
Arrive JaurecsC., - - 7.10 p in
Leave Laurens C. H., - - . p in
Arrive Newberry, - - 12.40 p m
ABBEVILLE BRANCH.
Leave hodges,. - - 40pm
Arrive at Abbeville, - . - 4 pm
Leave Abbeville, - 11.3) pm
Arrive atHoges, . - - 2.30 p in
BLUE RIDC RAILROAD AND ANDE.-.N
A BILLEC BRACH
Leave Belton 5.25 p in
A. Anderson 6.00 P ED
96 Pendleton 6 85 p in
Leave Seneca C, 7 .30 p in
Arrive aalhlla 7.57 in
Leave Aabhalla, - - 8.45 a in
Leave Seneca C, 9.1.5 a in
Ad Pendleton, - - 10-C2 a in
Ad Anderson, - 10.47 p in
Arrive at Belton, - - 11.21 p m
FBEI(IT, PASSENGER COACH ATTACHED.
Leave Belton 6.15 a in
Williainston 7.10 a Mn
PeClzer 7.37 a in
Pieudlmont 85 a M
Arrive Greenville 9.25 p mn
Leave Greenville 3.45 p m
Peldniont 4.512 P M
" Pel7r 6.00 p In
A Willvinmton -1.25 p In
Arrive Belton 7.10 a In
CONNECTIONS.
A. With South Carolina Railroad from Char
lesto:).
With Wilmington, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad from Wilmingto. and all
points North thereof.
With Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad from Charlotte and all points
North thereof .
B. With A eville & Sp3rtanburg Rail Road
f" r points in Wes4rn North Carolina.
C. With A. & C. Div. R. & D. m. s., from all
points South and West.
D. With A. & C. Div.. R. & D. Rt. R., from At%.
lanta and beyond..I
E. With A. & C. Div., Rt. & D. R. R., from all
points South and West.
F. With South Carolina Railroad for Charles-.
ton.
With Wilmington, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad for Wilmingtonad the Alrth.
With -Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad for Charlotte and tle orth.
G. With Asheville & Spartanburg Rairoad
from Hendersonville.
C. With A. & C. Div., I. & D. R. R., from
Charlotte and beyond.
Through Coach for Hendersonville will
be run fom Colinbia daily.a
Wih ileuminte, folumbi tand Cougusa.
R.SAGiroad Gerlisng sAtehot.
Coumia,hS -C.lt',Clmi n uut
G.oWth CArheille RSailwanbr ompaoyd
Chntt and beyo J n d.th 1. Pasne
Trsonghi oadl frnersfonvllw wull
earnveo Columbia df4ay t.3 p
SArndCarltoe used2 ps Wasintn, .l pC.,
GOI. WES,Speitnn.
Columiv , Cou.i C. 4 i 035p
Sothal Carolln Racptlwnay.Cmay
TO AND FRO CALETN. .
GOING EAsT,
Leav e Columbia *i;.40 a mn f5.34 p in
Arr ive Chardestn .55 i3 p 1.1 pin
GOING wEST,
Leave Chamlestn f7.0 a in *4.00 p mn
Arrive Columblia 11.401 a m 10.35 p in
tDail.aly except Sunday..
TO AND FROMAMDEN.L
GOING EAsT,
Leave Colunmbia *1.40 a in *5.31l p mn
Ar ive CAmdent 1.05a m 8n.10 a m
GOING wEsT,
Leave Camdn *7.15 a m *4 15 p m~
Arrive Columbhia 11.40-am 1035p m
*Daily excpt Sundays.
Loeavel ntl i Columbiaam*.4pm
CArri Auguta - 12.05il pai mI 7.10 ay tr
Leav A. nmti *n.08 a om bi. 0 p m
tioniv Carltoumbia adiigu0 3 sp
aily excepty sumanys. fomal
Conntion mhrados.at Columbia withlthe
Cleeperbaendeenvihaleto anRod ab rin
ton,ivi:at ir.ini P.il,nd deproteiatho.
chan. Connecion made at CmbalJstn
iah Roeamdr for Naew trk ton Wnesdomays
pant n tras owit h through uan
Charper betweenlCharleotonland asinth
ca.Connect.ion made at Augustonit
Georgia Rtailroad and Central Railroad to
and from all points South and West.
Through tickets can be purchased to all
points South and West, by applying to
D. McQUEEN. A ge nt, Colambila.
D. C. ALLEN, G. P. & F. A.
JoIN B. PEqC. General Manager.
Asheville and Spartanburg Railroad.
SPARTANIIURG. S. C.. September 1, 1881.
Ou andl after Monday. October 1st, i89,
passenger trains will -be run daily (Sundays
excptedi betwen Spartanburg.andl Hen.
dersonville. as follows:
UP TRAIN.
Leave Ri. & D. D)epot at Spartanburg.1.30 p m
Arrive at Hiendersonville...........5.30 p mn
Lve DOWN TRAN. a.i
LaeHe,ndecrsonville............ 8.00am
Arrive IR. & D). Depot, Spartatnburg.11.30l pin
Both trains make connections for Colum
bia and Charleston via Spartanburg. Union
and Columbia and Atlanta and Charlotte by
Air Line. JA MES ANDERSON,
SuperintenenSt.
WANTED!
SBOARDERS !
I an now l>repared to furni h First
Class Board. without lodg~ings to
oung men aind Old mler. Fare good.
anud charges 1ow. Dinne r furnis.hed to
Country 1i1en att 2.5 centsn each.
FIRST DOOR ABOVE
TODD'S GROCERY STORE.
L. W. P. R ISE R.
4-ti
Obtained, and all other business inathe U.iS.
Patent Office attended to tor MODERATE
FEES.
Our ollce is op)posite U S. Patent Oflee,
and we can obtain Patenlts in less time than
those remote from W ASIHINGTON.
Send MODEL or DRAWING. We advise
as to patentability free of charge ; and we
make NO CIIARGE UNLESS WE OBTAIN
PATENT.
We refer, here, to the Postmaster, the
Supt. of Money Order livy., and to the off
caIs of the U. S. Patent Offce. For cIrcular,
advice, terms, and references to actual
clients in your own State or country, write
to C. A. SNOW & Co.,
Opposte Patent Offie, Washington, D. C.
Dec. 6.,83-ly.
~rra w'eek at home. $5 00 outilt free. Pay
absluely sure. .5o risk. Capital not
required.' Reader, if you want busi
ne-. at which persons of (eithe sex,
yong or old, can make great pay all the
urn they work, witl abo1gtcertint)
J. ZaAITE
JZ-SALTER
Newbe.rry, -S 'C.
Call it lis Gaflery over
LeaveWs Fun1 re S ,
.e . . j i . - I -- .. I
Ekamilie his ;ok id_ xlre.some
inc.fhitprA.a. . e ..JW$ es .
stantaneous Process making a Picture
in one second. Hleitate no longer to
carry the sweet babe for jt3s Picture.
Copying and enlarging~from Old Pfc
tures-doie with ArtisticAnish.
ORDERS SOLICITED.
Feb. 9-8t.
IIENRY STETZ
Importer and olesaTe Dealer in
APPLES, ORANES
BANANAS, C6COAM0TS,
L OS, PINEAPPLES, POTA
TOES. QIONS,- FEAXUTS
CABBAGES, &c.
S. E. CORNER MEEftNC
& MARKET STREETSj
GHARLESTON: . 0.
-Nov. 8,-4-'--6m. - -
BY TE NRO
BANKING' COMPANY
NEW YORK-"D BO9TON.
Farm Mortgage .6i&
Negotiated on
Improved
hrms & ?lantations.
FOR NEWBERRY C NT,
Apply to
0. L. SCHUMPERT ''
Attoricy-wide Cunselo
48-3m. Newberry. Q
/ '
jiRON
'TONIC
FATSREUUIUS -
It w I urIfy and enrIel h5aO a,egulate
HLTH anm r 6 t-l
dise a re,iurlngacea :.ifad clieUTNO
ta.ma rER' I NcTONC. a s Und speed
c1. It .lc e rarand heaity c~pexi
-1UI~C -ia' T cc I 'a rqnt attetit
atcn trti1g : .-arrean nrra,l tt hepU,
VR. H1mEnofl'CNiC iS PCOR SA1.E d'
AMES CW5l F STOMCHI
tl, th r ,n clrrn,r adlt*
*"*""n 'ry,:a:Iar-he, C . er or s.
NEUTRALIZilNC CORDIAL
Is as pleasant and hrmless. as Rhaele.
Wlne--contdins bo Opi um and -will neot,
8Td eethng Ch id -en -
*GermnandzEnruh Diurecnseichatle.
* Price 25c. and $x.o.
arg s gize 5 ad Das In M eii
TEE1IELSIGE CHEMICAL 00., 8e01:aprIts
V':.LHA LLA, S. C. UT.6. A.
SFD A 2e. STAMPgR LiTTLE BOoE,
New York Offlee 70 Maiden laue.
PAYNE'S 10 Ho'rse Spark-Arresting
Portable Engine has cut ::0.000 ft. of Michigan.PIe
Board, itt 10 hours; burr ing sbs-frnth the saw in
eight foot lenghm.
0, 1 0 Harse ic: GOzrniee to flumaah power to
maw 8.000 fe. t cf Il.lck Botra in 10hours. 00*
?5 Borse-eil cu- 1W> 'A-)Pc in s.ani timE.
We I1-:itne atio (rAUas'r?U- to
d~ v.~in:e su any otha En
r.-n trot fitted with an -A'tomatic
Cut Ot..- f you want aSacaz
JrSawMill, SliftigdP~.
ier c: '4 or. Medda 's PLf
rught-Iron Pulley, and for car
lastratd catalogue, No.14 for
,formation and prices,
B. W. PAYNE A SOIU
May 17, 20-ly.
Coughs, (!.IS, Catarre, C.nsmpis..
All Throat, Breast and Lung A-eEiOnls
cured by thc. nld-estaRblished -S)VAYNE'
WlL.C H E RRY "'The frst doeAivesrW
$1.n0. at Dragist*. Jan. 81-ly, -
IISend six cents for ,otg
, - ad receive free. a- cos
- to more money
awui thi.a anytig world. Al

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