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The Newberry herald. (Newberry, S.C.) 1865-1884, May 01, 1884, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026909/1884-05-01/ed-1/seq-4/

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MAY.
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HOW TO SUCCESSFULLY
TRANSPLANT TREES.
Many think it cheaper and better
to take up large trees from the
woods and transplant them to their
grounds or to the roadside than to
buy nursery trees. The Americat
Agriculturist says. as a rule, such
trees die; they fail because proper
precautions have not been taken.
Ia digging up the tree all the roots
outside of a circle a few feet in di
ameter are cut off, and the tree is
reset with its full head of branches.
Whoever has seen trees in the for
est that were upturned by a torna
do must have been struck by the
manner in which the roots ruv very
near to the surface and to a great
distance. When the roots of these
trees are cut off at two or three feet
from the trunk few or no fibrros or
feeding roots are left, and if the
mass of tops is left the expansion
of the buds in the spring will not
be responded to by a supply of sap
from the roots, and death must fol
low. If such trees have the tops
completely removed, leaving only a
bare pole, they will usually grow
when transplanted. The tree is
little more than an immense cutting;
but there are roots enough left to
meet the demand of the few shoots
that start from the top, and growth
above and below ground is balan
ced. We have seen maples, elms
and basswood trees, fifteen feet or
more high, transplanted in this
manner, without a failure. Some
trees treated in this manner were
planted in our neighborhood about
ten years ago. They have now as
fine heads as one would wish, and
show no signs of former rough
treatment. Trees in pastures or on
the edge of the woods are better
furnished with roots. These should
be prepared for transpl.nting by
digging down to thetroots and cut
ting off all that extend beyond the
desired distance. Tbis will cause
the formation of fibrous roots near
the tree. It will be safer to take
two years for the operation, cutting
half the roots each year. Such
trees may be removed in safety, es
pecially if a good share of the top
is removed1 at transplanting.
GROWING PoUrPKrs wrra ConN.
-Pumpkins are valuable for st ock
in autumn and early winter, or as
long as they can be conveniently
kept, though the amount of nutri
ment, in proportion to bulk to be
taken care of, and their liability to
decay, have led most farmers to
discard them, and adopt roots or
squashes for succulent food. A s a
rule, every crop needs all the
ground it. occupies, and all the air
and sunlight available. Corn is a
"sun plant," and to shade the soil
and the lower stalks with the dense
foliage of pumpkin vines, must be
more or less injurious, even if the
latter do not rob the former of any
needed nutriment. On very fertile,
new soils with short stalked varie
ties of corn, in !ocalities where
frost is not to be feared, it may be
allowable to plant pumpkin seed at
at the second hoeing, in every
third or fourtb hill, in each second
or third row. With favorable
weather, the corn wi'l produce
about the usual yield, and after the
early gathering of the corn, the
growing pumpkins thus exposed to
full sunlight, will ripen up those
pretty well developed. As a rule,
let the pumpkins have the whole
ground ; but still better are the
harder fleshed squashes, which will
probably supply more nutriment
than pumpkins, whether for man or
beast.--American Agriculturist for
MsIay.
PRUNE PIEs.--Take a pound of
prunes and soak them over night,
so that the stones will slip out
easily ; stew in some water with as
many raisins as you wish, and
sweeten ; use less water than for
sauce ; when both are soft grate in
the rind of two lemons and fill the
pie, allowing two crusta.
TART PAs.-Rub half a pound
of fresh butter into a pound of
flour ; add the yolk of an egg, a lit
tIe lump of sugar, and enough milk
to mix it properly.
Coas OywERs.-Six ears of gra
ted corn, one half cup of sweet,
milk, three tablesoonfuls of flour,I
.maand tunnar. Fry in lard.
tumorous.
SHE SHOWED HER TICKET.
The gates at the passenger de
pots which shut out all people not
having tickets for the train were
yesterday closed at the Union depot
agaist an elderly woman wearing
spectacles and using an umbrella
for a cane.
"Can't pws without a ticket,"
said the man at the gate as she
came up.
"I want to see if there's anybody
on that train going to Port Hu
ron," she answered.
"Can't pass without a ticket,
madam."
"I've got a daughter in Port
Huron I have."
"Can't help it please. My orders
are very strict."
"I tell you I want to send word
to my darter !" she exclaimed, ad
justing her spectacles for a better
view of the official.
"Yes, but we can't help that,
you see. Please show your ticket."
"I want this 'ere railroad to un.
derstand that I've got a darter in
Port Huron, and she's got a baby
four weeks old, and I'm going to
send her up word in spite of all the
gates in this depot !"
"Please show your ticket, mad
am."
"I tell yon once more-"
"Please show your ticket. mad
am."
She gave the old umbrella a
whirl and brought it down on his
head with all the vim of an old
fashioned log raising, and as he
staggered aside, she passed him
and said .
"There's my ticket, sir, and I've
got more behind it! Mebbe a man
and gate can stop me from send
ing word to my darter to grease the
baby's nose with mutton tallow if the
weather changes cold, but I don't
believe it."-Railway Age.
ELEMENTS OF HASI.-At a cer
tain house where a good many mer
chant traveler's stop, the cooking is
lone in summer in the back yard.
one day last July two or three of
them sat down to the table on which
sat a capacious dish of hash.
'Uh,' said one of them, 'I never
like to eat that stuff.'
'Why dont you?' asked the man
next to him. 'It's good.'
'I don't like it all the same. You
never know what it is made out of.'
'I do, every time, at this house.'
'Well, don't.'
'Well, I do, too. It's made out
of doors, for I saw the old lady
making it.'
The other man asked a blessing
and the hash was eaten.-Merchant
Traveler.
HE WAs A BRAVE SoLDI.
'You were in the late war, were you
not, doctor?' was a question put to
a quack physician.
'Oh ! yes,' he replied, straighten
ng himself up, 'and I was accounted
a very brave soldier, if I do say it
myself.'
'Yes,' the questioner went on
'your experience in yourprofession,
I imagine, would necessarily make
you indifferent to personal danger,'
'Why so?' asked the quack.
'Because you are so accustomed
o facing death.'-Phiiladelphia Call
'-You say that Mr. Smith gave
you twenty dollars for officiating at
his wedding, and Mr. Brown only
ave you two dollars?" said the
wife of a clergyman to her husband.
'Yes,' he replied.
'That seems very strange,' con
inued the lady;: -Mr. Smith is a
lerk on a small salary, while Mr
Brown, I have always understood,
s a very wealthy man.'
'He is, my dear, but this is the
econd time Mr. Brown has been
narried.'
"Come under my umbrella and
ave a ducking," said an impudent
ellowv to a pretty Miss in the street
n a rainy day. -'There's one calf's
ead under it already, and that's as
nany as it will conveniently cover,"
eplied the damsel.
A wit being asked by a seedy
oet whether he had written any
~hing he thought would live, replied :
Before you trouble yourself on
hat score I advise you to write
omething that will let you live.''
A man that needs forty cents'
orth of whisky to give him an ap
>etite for a fifteen-cent dinner al
ays has the dyspepsia.
The father of his country is said
rst to have learned the pleasures
f traveling on four wheels when
e took a hack at the cherry tree.
A pretty girl won a musket in
he French lottery, When they
ave it to her she asked, "Don't*
kaey gi.m a a1Adie. -wh it 9"
Climbing the Spiral Stairs.
INVISIBLE ARCH ITECTURE IN A NEW
ENGLAND PARSONAGE.
"Yes," she said. "our children are married
and gone, and my busband.and I sit by our
winter fire much as we did befoic the little
ones came to widen the circle. Life is some
thing like a spiral staircase: we are all the
time coming aronnd over the spot we started
from. on!y one degree further up the stairs."
"That is a pretty illustration," remarked
her friend, musingly, gazing into the glow
ing coals which radiated a pleasant heat
from the many windowed stove. "You know
we cannot stop toiling up the hill, though."
"Surely we cannot, and for myself I don't
find fault with that necessity provided the
advance in life is not attended with calamity
or suffering, for I have had my share of that.
Not long since my health utterly broke
down. My system was full of malat ia. My
digestion became thoroughly disordered and
my nerves were in a wretched state. I was
languid, ate a little and that without enjoy.
ing i', and had no strength or ambition to
perform even my light household duties
Medical treatment failed to reach the seat of
the trouble. The disease-which seemed to
be weakness of all the vital organs-progress
ed until I had several attacks which my
physicians pronounced to be acute conges
tion of the stomach. The last of theZe was a
desperate struggle and I was given up to die.
As the crisis had partially passed, my hus
band heard of the2 merit< of PARKEitS
TONIC as an invigorant in just such cases as
mine. I took it and felt its good effects at
once. It appeared to pervade my body, as
though the blessing of new I'fe had come to
me. Taking no other medicine I continued
to improve, and am now in better health
than I have been for a long time.'
Extract from an interview with the wife of
Rev. P. Perry Pastor of Baptist Church,
Coldbrook, Slass.
TUTT'S
PI LLS
TORPID BOWELS,
DISORDERED LIVER,
and MALARIA.
From these sources arise three-fourths of
the diseases of the human raec. These
symptoms indicate their existence: Loss of
Appetite, Bowels costive, Sick Head
ache, fullness after eating, aversion to
exertion of body or mind, Eructation
of food, Irritability of temper, Low
spirits, A feeling of having neglected
some duty, DIzziness, Flutte ring at the
HEeart, Dots before the eyes, highly col
ored Urine, CONSTIPATION, and de
mand the use of a remedy that acts directly
onthe Liver. AsaLiver medcince TUTT'S
PILLS have no equal. Their action on the
Kidneysand Skin is also prompt; renoving
all impurities through these three " scav
engers of the system," prodreLing appe.
tite, sound digestion, regular stools, a clear
skin and a vigorous body. TUTT'SPILI.S
cause no nausea or griping nor interfere
with daily work and are a perfect
ANTIDOTE TO MALARIA.
HE FEELS LIKE A NEW MAN.
"I have had Dyspepsia, with Constipa..
tion two years, and have tried ten ditferent
kinds of pills, and TUTT'S are the first
that bare dono me any good. They have
cleaned me out nicely. My appetite is
splendid, food digests readily, and I now
have natural passages. I feel like a new
man." W. D. EDWARDS, Palmyra, 0.
Soldeverywhere,2c. Office,44 Murrav St.,N.Y.
TUTT'S HAIR DYEn
GuAT HAIR oR WHIsKERs changed in.
stantly to a (;LosSY BLACK by a single up.
plication of this DYE. Sold by Druggists,
or sent by express on receipt of $1.
Office, 44 Murray Street, Ne w York.
TUTT'S MANUAL OF USEFUL RECE!PTS FREE
July 19, 29-1y.
0OSTETE
EITTE RS
'tekdesact as piurifiers of the blood
anIwe their functions arc interfered
w:. a dhrouighi weaknes-., they neced totuig.
The.v beomet hiealthftully active by the use
of 1.-totter's Stomach hitters, when falling
short of relerI fromi other sources. This
suplerbe .timutlatiung tonic also prevents and
:arrests 1ever anid ague, constipation, liver
cImplint, dyspep.sia, rheumatism and other
:.i.n.nts L se it with regularity.
For sate by all Druggists and Dealers
generally.
W ANTED.
COTTON SEED!
COTTON SEED!
I wvill pay (15e.) lifteetn cenlts (a-li
per Bushlel fitr 1(i.000 Bumhetls SOUND)
DRY COTTON SEED, delivered to
me at this place befotre the lirst of next
November. Will exchantlge Cotton
Seed meatl for Cotton Seed.
W. F. HIOLLO WAY & CO.,
Oct. 3-6im. Pomaria, S. C',
Liver, Kidagv or Stomach Troube.
Symptoms: Impure blood. cost ive bowels,
irregular alpetite, sour belching, pains in
side, back and heart, yellow urine, burning
when urinating, clay-color' d stools. had
breath, no desire for work, chills. fevers,
irritab)ility, whitish tongue, drty cough,
dizzy head, with dull pain itntac part, loss
of memory, foegy sight. For thiese troulies
"SWA YNE'.4 PIILs" are a .sure cure. hoX.
(30 P'il. by n:it, :D~ ets., 5 tot S1.00). A d
dress, DR. SWAYNE &SON, Phuiladla.. Pa.
Sold by D)ruggists. Jas. 81-ly.
A FULL LINE OF
IIats,
Boots,
Shoes,
Trunks,
Clothling, &c. &c.,
Can be found
At the LOWEST PRICES,
At the OLD ESTABLISHMENT
-OF
M. FOOT.
42-tf
fL0 ffor the working class. Send T0
li Iucents for postage, and we wit
ltlJJmail you free, a royal, valuable
box of sample goods that will put.
yon in the way of ma king more money in a
few days than you thought possible at any
business. Capital not required. We will
start you. You can work all the spare
time only. The work Is universally adapted
to both sexes, younmg an(d old. You can easily
earn 50 cents to 85 every evening. That all
who want work may test the business, wa
make this unparalleled offer:; to all who
are not well satisfied we will send $1 to pa)
for the trouble of writing us. Full partien.
lar-s. directions. etc.. sent free. Fortune-s
will b2 made by those who give their whole
time to the work. Great succes absolutely
sure. Don't delay. Start now. Address
Stilson A Co., P'ortlands Main.
0. BART & 00.,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
The largest Importers of Foreign Fruits in tLe South, offer for sale a well
selected stock of
Apples, Oranges, Bananas,
Cocoanuts, Lemons, Nuts,
Dried Figs, Raisins, Potatoes,
Cabbage, Onions, Peanuts,
And everything else that a First Class Wholesale Fruit
Store should have.
COUNTRY ORDERS FILLED
WVITH DISPATCH.
Oct. 25-6m.
HEADQUARTERS FOR
AGICUITURALIMPlEMENT Al MACHINERY.
F. A. SCHUMPERT & 00.,
are Agents and have for sale the following improved Agricultural Ilnplements:
Threshers,
Steam Engines,
Saw Mills,
Grist Mills,
Cotton Gins,
Cotton Presses,
Cider Presses.
McCORtmIICK 'S M.ACIINESI
Harvester and Binder,
Table Rake,
Dropper and Mower,
Horse Rakes,
Harrows,
GVlobe Cotton Planter,
SULKY AND WALKING PLOWS,
CU L TIVAT O R S,
CHICAGO SCREW PULVERIZER, CANE MILLS AND EVAPORATORS
AND OTHER IMPROVED AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS.
If yon want anything of this kind give u- a call before purchaAingelsewhere.
'arehouse for Machinery in the new building on corner Caldwell and H1ar
rington streets, below Christian & Smith's Livery Stables.
Mar. 5, 10-tf.
Out of Jaws of Death.
This, gentleman who outlines his case beC- SEND FOR PRICE LIST.
low his is a man considerably advanced in
life; and is noted for his sterling integrity, MIcE L RE E'S
His post-office is Yatcsvillc, Upson county, e lr
Ga. the following isJe er
Mr. John Pearson's State- PAL.iCE
ment. 24RN T
In the Spring of 1852 [ was attack ed whithAET ,SC
a very bad congh, which continued to growLAGSSTC
worse until fall, when I got so weak that ILO ETPI S
could not get about. I tried! a igreat many
kinds of medicines but continued to growv ~ TESUH
wos.I was notified that 1 ha-d consump- RPIIGASEILY
lion and would probably die. D)r. llo.ioway SEDEYORWTH.
finally told me to try Brewer's Lung Re
storer. They sent to Ward's Store and ;pt o v.l-t
a bottle and I comamenced taking it right
away. fter akingtwo orthreedoIes ISTe
gan t imprve, nd bythe ime Ihad ued A____T__T_N, __S__C.
up oe botle wa abl to et n myfeetAEGEST____STOCE. __
awrit. te takining atoe or te t ose, of be- N' UIN OL3 T
gatoy inprovee, 1d byhile Ishad usedn
thp oane. tl wifeabae tagen wiyfth a ~YTL O DS
seargainIano in exeln which. samo
lofeadmbynheighor s rom thesam pin in suha etia
Isee ung Reyever mdse coul my SE
opinin. Dr.ii.t promisd me that houldhT
onie o he lunfactr'erntellgonemof
choulderu ot re it.. madei ycaenk-e..FO T
Stment of stBc.Ien.F eagr- HESE 4 ARfFEE
Sulva,myhnidohyin, AtoVrychoriPrDts
Eolloly in onsultation.1 hey scwig on
noued ahe. eas hoelwas Dake withlad BY THE 111 O111iLDEST
thed byherhgesmc h Brw er LungRstandea
sever cogh evefr ottlcd,e nd e-I h Oe Sto E,oelLt
lneihrtor s lad siecdrtin aiewwek she
was reu .tol a lnd sktelehoton tb t-/dB B
tening hysian to d sme ihatvh e nt ht v o nhn lreadeeat
ineo her ngditioni.l gne IiS Mtm~ FOO
couldrl n bya th tost sheataen oh**
Sulliva, myw failyehsin to kati the
Htolloway s o in besu tte lhtatio.T y madea -
l njo ed for csevhopelers. Ir levae I iv radWltd
then Longester th ed re er lfn. Westorerare
hae a fayoe si undlrhat sme ofl rem i
on. h e tdo'pst -ofan fier i abo teihe , irdE ADSPCACECAE
inpher conty,on. Ie ninued theooa re-ie asrm to
botesjewsablcmniteer patica. abutteDDA AN BIRTDA ESIENTSV
houe. 2Sei-ol nbetrhat ta h -t'UU L eLi
ha noe o eea yer.llhciv Silverb ai Prlyat ned re
th on esoersveVe Waife.aingand havein
r Hardo' potofc isontsvie SPCAly And wiETAL DpacASE
I.END.88V REY
- Cal an exmn ysoc n rcs
- EDURDSCOLZ
Dc S4, tf. -
Specalty.-Patent causes before the Patent Offic __ ~ ~
ad the Courts Resasonable terms. Opinion ato
patentability, free of charge. Send for circular _____________________
Nov.3,Ss3-l. ___ .kLYON&HEAL.Y
Stato & Monroe Sts., Chicago~
Swanted for The Lives of all wm,en prepaitoany.4.Mreathert
Presidents of the U. S. The BAND CA TALOCUE,
ThUiJ~Ilargest. handsomest best . "i'. c t5C * DeU '
boo0k e-ver sold for less t han n..aa Epanicia, td
tw.,ce our price. The fastest selling book . a.a.~0 De t ajor'. sbf. a.
in Amerea. Immense profits to agents. | M a ss
All intelligent people want it. Any one"'f
ca nacom e acsful aet. Terms free.- afuie aa Sada.
Rail Roads.
Columbia & Greenville Railroad.
PASSENGER DEPARTMENT,
COLUMBIA. S. C., Feb. ith, ISSi.
On and after Monday, Feb. 4, 18S4, the
PASSENG ER TRAINS will run as herewith in
dicated upon this road and its brancbeq
Daily, except Sundays.
No. 53. UP PASSENGER.
Leave W., C. & A. Junction - --- 11.22 a m
Leave Columbia,A - 11.50 a In
Alston,- --- - 12-55 p m
Newberry, - - - 202pm
Ninety-Six, - - 3.37 p m
Hodges, - - - 422 p m
Belton, - - - 5.24 p In
&rrive Greenville,- ---- 6-50 p m
No. 52. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Greenville, - - - 9.55 a m
Belton, - - - 11.25 p In
Hodges, - 1236 p m
Ninety-Six, - - - - 1.43 p In
Newberry, - - - 3.14 p m
" Ahton, - - 4.19 p In
Arrive Columbia,F - - 6.21 p In
Arrive W., C. & A. Junction.- 5 38 p m
SPAnTANBURG. UNION k COLUMDIA EAILROAD.
No. 53. UP PASSENGER.
Leave A!ston, - - - - 1.10 p In
" Strother, - - - - 2+5 p In
" Shelton, - - - - 245pm
Sautuc, -- -----332pm
" Union, - - - 4.15 p In
Jonesville, - - - 4.57 p In
Arrive Spartanburg, * - 6.15 p In
No. 52. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave SpartanLurg., R. & 1). Depot, H 11 5 p m
Spartanburg, S. U.& C. Depot.G 11.15p In
Jonesville, - - - 12.25 p In
" Union. - - - 1.10 p m
" Santuc, - - - 1 47 p In
" Shelton, - - - 2 40 p m
" Strother, - - - 3.14 p In
Arrive at Alston, - . - 4 07 p In
LAURENS RAILWAY.
Leave Newberry, - - - 3.20 p In
Arrive Laurens C. 11., - - 7.10 p m
Leave Laurens C. H., - - 9.ro p In
Arrive Newberry, - - 12 40 p m
ABBEVILLE BRANCH.
Leave Hodges, . - - 4.30 p In
Arrive at A bbeville, - - - 5.3j n In
Leave Abbeville, - - - - 11.31 m
Arrive at Hoges, - - - - 12.30 p m
BLUE RIDGE nAILROAD AND ANDERsON
nRANCII.
Leave Belton 5.25 p In
"4 Anderson 6.00 p m
" Pendleton 685 p M
Leave Seneca C, 7.30 p In
Arrive Walhalla 7.57 p In
Leave Walhalla, - - 8.45 a In
Leave Seneca C, 9.15 a a
" Pendleton, - - 10.02 a In
" Anderson, - - 10.47 p In
Arrive at Belton, - - 11.21 p m
FREIGHT, PASSENGER COACH ATTACHED.
Leave Belton 6.15 a m
Williainston 7.10 a In
Pelzer 7.37 a m
Piedmont 8.25 a In
Arrive Greenville 9.25 p In
Leave Greenville 3.45 p In
Peidinont 4.52 p Im
Pelzer 6.00 p M
Williainston 6.25 p II
Arrive Belton 7.10 p M
CONNECTIONS.
A. With South Carolina Railroad from Char
leston.
With Wilmington, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad from Wilmington and all
paoiuts North thereof.
Wit Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad from Charlotte and all points
North thereof.
B. With Asheville & Spartanburg Rail Road
for points in Western North Carolina.
C. With A. & C. Div. R. & D. R. R., from all
points South and West.
D. With A. & C. Div., R. & D. E, R., from At
lanta and beyond.
E. With A. & C. Div., R. & D. R. R., from all
points South and West.
F. With South Carolina RaiLroad for Charles
ton.
With Wilmington, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad for Wilmington and the North.
With Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad for Charlotte and the North.
G. W.ith Asheville & Spartanburg Railroad
from liendersouville.
H. With A. & C. Div., R. & D. R. R., from
Charlotte and beyond.
Through Coach for Hendersonville 9I
be run from Columbia daily.
Standard Time used is Washington, D. C.,
which is tifteen minutes faster than Columbia.
J. W. FRY. Superintendent.
M1 SLA UGH TER, General Passenger Agent.
D Ca R saL L, Ass't GeI.eral Passenger Agt.,
Columbia, S. C.
South Carolina RailWay Company.
CHANGE OF SCH1EDULII.
On and after Jan. 20th, 1884, Passenger
Trains on this road will run as follows un
til further notic:
TO AND FROM CIIARL.ESTON.
GOING EAST,
Leave Columbia *6.40 a mn f5.34 p mn
Arrive Charleston 11.23 p mn 10.10 p mn
GOING WEsT,
Leave Charleston ti.00j a mn *4.00 p in
Arrive Columnbia 11.40 a mn 10.35 p mn
f Daily. *Daily except Sunday.
TO AND FRO31 CAMDEN.
GOING EAsT,
Leave Columbia *u 40 a mn *5.31 p m
Ar: ive Camden 1.5.5a im 8.35 y mn
GOING WEST
Leave tCamden *7.15 a mn *4 15 p mf
Arrive Columbia 11.40 a in 10.35 p in
*l)aily except Sundays.
TO AND FROM AUGUSTA.
GOING EAST,
Leave Columbia *0.40 a mn *3.34 p mn
Arrive Augusta 12.05 p in 7.10 a in
GOING WEST,
Leave Augusta *0.OS a in *5.00 p mn
Arrive Coltunbia 11.40 p mn 10 35 p mn
*Daily except Sundays.
CONNECTIONS.
Connection made at Columbia with the
Columbia and' G reenville itail Road by train
arriving at 11.28 P. M1., and dleparting at 6.5$
P. M1. Connection made at Columbia Junc
tion with Charlotte. Columbia and Augusta
i:ail Road by same train to and from all
points on both roads with through P'ullmnan
sleeper between Charleston and Washing
ton, via Virginia Midland route, without
change. Connection made at Charleston
wit h Steamers for Ne w York 01n Wednesdays
and Saturdays; also, with Savannah and
Charleston Railroad to all points South.
Connections are made at Augusta with
Georgia Railroad and Central Railroad to
andl from all poInts South and West.
Through tickets canl he purchased to all
points South and West, by applying to
D. McQUE EN, A gent, Colombia.
D.. C. A LL EN, G. P. & F. A.
JOHN B. PECK. General Manager.
Ashev-ille and Spartanbnrg Railroad.
SP'ARTANI1URG. S. C.. September 1, 1881.
On and after Monday. October 1st, l863,
panssenger trains will be run daily (Sundlays
exceptedl) between Spartanburg and Hen
dersonville, as follows:
UP TRAIN.
Leave It. & D. D)epot at Spartanbmurg 1..d p mn
Arrive at Hlendersonville.........5.30 p~ n
DOWN TRAIN.
Leave Hlendersonville............ 8.00 a in
A rrive IR. & D. Depot, Spartanbur.1.30 p mn
Both trains make connections for Colum
bia and Charleston via Spartanburg. Union
and Columbia and Atlanta and Charlotte by
Air Line. JAMES ANDERSON,
Supe rintenedent.
SWANTED!
I an no0w preparetd to furnlish First
Class Boartd, Without lodlgings, to
young mecn anld old men. Fare good,
and charges low. Dinner fuirniShied to
country men at 25 cents each.
FIRST DOOR ABOVE
TODD'S GROCERY STORE.
L. W. P. RISE R.
4-ti
BATE NTS
Obtained, and all other business in the U. S.
Patent Offce attended to for MODERtATE
FEES.
Our offce is opposite U S. Patent Offce,
and we can obtainm Patents in less time than
those remote from W ASHINGTON.
Send MODEL or DRAW ING. We advise
as to patentability free of charge ; and we
make NO CHARGE UNLES3 WE OBTAIN
PA TENT.
We refer, here, to the Postmaster, the
Supt. of Money Order D)iv., and to the off
cials of the U. S. Patent Offce. For circular,
advice, terms, and references to actual
clients in your own State or country, write
to C. A. SNOW & Co.,
Oppos&te Patent Offce, Washington, D. C.
Dec. I;. 83-ly.
$a week at home. 15 00 outfit free. Pay
absolutely sure. No risk. Capital not
required. Reader, if you want bust
ness at which persons of elthe: sex,
onng or old, can make great pay all the
tie they work, with absolute certainty,
g51 SOa U, H. tLo
1884 THE 1884
CONSTITUTION
TnE DAILY CONSTITUTION has come to
be a necessity to every intelligent man in
the range of Its circulation.
For the next year it will be better than
ever. Nearly $lu0,000 is now being invested
by its proprietors in a new building, pres
ses and outfit, in which and with which it
can be enlarged to meet its increasing busi
ness, and improved to meet the demands of
its growing constituency.
TIE DAILY AND SUNDAY CONsTITUTION for
18S4 will be better and tuller than ever, and
in every sense the best paper in the reach
of the people of the Southep.st.
One Year $10, G Months $5, 3 Months $2.50,
1 Month $1.00
THE WEEKLY CONSTITUTION
starts the new year with 13,0(0 subscribers
who pronounce it the largest, best and
cheapest paper within their reach.
It consists of 8, 10 or 12 pages (as the de
trand of its business or the news may di
rect) filled with matter of the greatest inter
est to the farmer.
AT LESS THAN 3 CENTS A WEEK
this great budget of news and gossip will be
sent to your fireside to entertain every
member of your household,
One Year...........................$150
Six Months...... ..........1 00
In Clubs of Ten, each......... 125
In Clubs or Twenty, each......... 1 00
With an extra paper to the getter up of
the Club.
THE YEAR OF 1884.
will be one of the most important in our
history. A President. Congressmen. Sena
tors. Governor, Legislature-are all to be
elected.
Very important issues are to be tried in
the National and State elections. The Con
stitution in its daily or weekly edition will
carry the fullest and freshest news m best
shape to the public, and will stand as an
earnest champion of Democratic principles.
Address, THE CONSTITUTION.
THE
Chronicle & Constilltionalist,
AUGUSTA, GA.,
- AND TIHE
NEWBERRY HERALD
for one year at $3.50.
The Augusta CIIRONICLE AND CONSTITU
TIONALIST is the largest weekly newspaper
in the State. It is a ten page seventy column
paper. It contains all the important news
of the wesk, and is filled 'with interesting
and instractive readine to the farmer, me
chanic, bLsiness and professional man. Its
Washingten. Atlanta and Columbia letters
with its full telegraphic service, market re
I:orts, editorials and general news make it
one of the most readable and one of the
best newspaper in the South.
The CHRONICLE AND CONSTrUTIONA.ST
can be read In any household. It is free
fiom sensationalisin.
THE IBERIIN iRME
Established 1819, and for more than a Third
of a Century under the ame
Xanagement.
Devoted to FARMING, STOCK-RAlBING,
FEUIT GROWING, MARKET GARDENING,
the DAIRY, the POULTRY YARD, etc., etc.
Special attention is paid to Fertilizers and
Manures, including those of commerce and
the farm.
Reports of Representative Farmeri
are a notable feature of its issues.
There is a Home Department, with
ing reading ani practical sJ fo
the ladles of the farm househ
The most competent, su nd ex
perienced men and women arge o
the several departmenta.
No Farmer in the A States. fron
Delaware to Georgia. i afford to be
without" this old .ble adviserand
Guide on farm wo
The American .er is published twice
every mo Lhe 1st and 15th). It it
beautifully . -d on fine white paper in
clear . a year. To clubs of five
or over, eh.
, Valuable and Useful Premin
na en to all those who will take timE
rouble to collect subscribers.
SA M'S SA NDS & SON, Publishers,
128 Baltimore St., Baltimore, Md.
The UERALD and the American Farmet
will be clubbed together and sent to any
address for $3.00 Ior one year.
THEF EIVENING
Chronicle and COnstitutiOalist,
Augusta, Ga.,
--AND THlE
NEWBERRY HERALD
will be furnished for 1884 at $7 00
The EVENING (.HRONICL.E AND CONsTITU
TIONA LIST is the largest and cheapest Daily
newspaper in tile South. It contains eight
thtousaLnd words of telegraph per day from the
New Yo:k Associated Press. This service Is
supple~mented by full special from Atlanta,
Columbia and Washington. As a news_paper,
thle CHRIONICLE is one of tile beat in the
South it is newsy, progressive, reliable anId
tree from the demoralizing details of crime.
THIS PAPER
IN CLUB WITH
ODE Y'S
LADY'S BOOK
will be sent for one year to any
address on receipt of $3.50 which should be
sent to the publisher of the HEUALD.
GOOEY'S LADY'S BOOK
Is recognized as tile leading Fashion and
Home Magazine in America. The leading
attractions for 1884 are the following :
'4Beautiful Colored Fashion Plates exe
cII,uted by the French process, represen
ting tile prevailing fashions In both
styles and color, prod uced especially for
and pubiishled exclusively in GODEY'S
L AD'I'S BOOK.
iEnglish Plates of Fashions in black and
'wh ite, Illustrating leading styles.
lFinely Executed Steel Engravings by
th~le best artists, made for GODEY'S
LADY'S BOOK.
l')Engraved Portraits of Ex-presidentsa of
"L~the U. S., which form a p art of what is
known in GODEY'S L ADY 'S BOOK as the
PRESIDENiTIAL Portrait Gallery,
each being accompanied by a short biorra
phical sketch.
1.- Pages. Illustrating Fashions and fancy
needle work
9.Pages of Architectural Designs. showing
L"plans and perspective of Houses and
Cottages of all descriptions.
FulSize Cut Paper Patterns with full
adexplicit Instructions for L.e
200 CODEY'S WP'
Celebrated household cooking receipts,.each
having been tested by practical housekeep
ers before publishing.
21 PAGES OF SELECT MUSIC.
BESIDES emriigarc array ofliea
and Poems, by eminent writers, among
whom are.
MARION HIARLAND, AUGUSTA de BUBNA,
CHRiISTiAN REID. Mrs. SHEFFEY PETERS,
ELLA RODMAN CHURCH, H ELEN MATH
ERt., Author of "Cherry Ripe."
The Art Department will be under the di
rection of Win. MacLeod, Curate of Corcoran
Gallery of Art, Washington, D. C. All other
departments under equally competent di
rection.
SUBSCRIPTION Price $2.00 per Year.
For further information send for circular
Sample copy of GODEY'S LADY'S BOOK
15c. Stamps taken. To avoid errors write
plainly your address, giving County and
state.
GfBEY'S LADY'S BOOK.
1006 Chestnut Etreet, Phladliphia, Pa
J.Z. SALTER
Newberry, S. C.
Call at his Gallery over
Leavell's Furniture Store,
Examine his work, and procure'some
nice Photographs. He uses the In
stantaneous Process making a Picture
in one second. Hesitate no longer to
carry the sweet babe for it's Picture.
Copying and enlarging from Old Pic
tures done with Artistic Finish.
ORDERS SOLICITED.
Feb. 9-St.
HENRY STEITZ,
Importer and Wholesale Dealer in
Foreign & Domestic
FRU1T,
APPLES, ORANGES,
BANANAS, COCOANUTS,
LEMONS, PINEAPPLES, POTA
TOES, ONIONS, PEANUTS,
CABBAGES, &C.
S. E. CORNER MEEiINC
& MARKET STREETS,
OHARLESTON, S. C.
Nov. 8, 45-Cm.
MONEY TO LENDIII
Bf THE CAROLINA
BANKING COMPANY
OF
NEW YORK AND B
Farm Mortgag ans
Nego
d
lantations.
EWBERRY COUNTY.
Apply to
O. L. SCHUMPERT,
Attorney and Counsellor,
48-3m. Newberry. S. C.
THE ONLT TRUE
IRON
TONIC
FACTS RECARDINC
the LVRandnKidNEY nd zTt To
isse re frina certain and efliceutThC
esito oY esiant of ApttcsIndg
WIt im niliate and wonderul results. Boes
the mnind and supplies Brin ower.colit
DR. H3 ecW TiNTO a satea pa red
ue strongest testimony to he value of Da
d A Tt~ tp t eTh.C I N thtfeteiAtttnDB
Full ofr trange and useful information, fe.
DR. MATE' sn ToNi IS FoRSE By AL
U TRfADE
AM RICPS CHEF. STMCIIC
sU ~notir fo th tch Bof
th mc h, - c bunSekn ervous casdacheang
DYSla PEPSIA.
of foofd or waoor.
NOR.A.N'S
NEUTRALIZINC CORDIAL.
Isa easn iard harless asB1c~
Pete. Specially rcmmended for Seasioknegs
Gersnan and English Directions on tech Bottl.
Price s5c. and 81.00.
alDugis and Ieln hi Medcns
THE EIELSIOE fHETCAL 00., 8aePpqa'a
wiz.Hr.r., s.C. U.L A.
BEXD A 2c. STAMP FOR ILITTL.E BooK,
New York Office 70 Maiden Lane.
PAYNE'Sl o Horse Spark-Arresting
Porale Engine has ct1.0fLo ihanPin
cight-foot lengths.
as 8000 f ?Ten.k.nd i 1 0 hours our
?5Erswi.i * *" s * tie
f. h t t ca jta ro ) i s
inforIm a rt an an ric er
or Cornl g,EN. T Bo c17.'
enaT r S-eil abise SAo lue,s
WII.D-C Ei"The fst oe iedts re-sa
Wrougt-Irn ule, dfor o,
lihietrtttd catge or. 1Thfe
. **lsinfra'E" ice.

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