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The Newberry herald. (Newberry, S.C.) 1865-1884, May 08, 1884, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026909/1884-05-08/ed-1/seq-4/

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PLANTING PEANUTS
Peanut planting is done any time
in May. The ground should be
ridged and otherwise broken by
plowing several weeks beforehand.
Soil suitable for the peanut does
not harden or pack much under
rain and snn.-The best soil for this
crop is a white or chocolate-color
ed sand. Some prefer a reddish
sand, but that is more likely to color
the peas and make them less salable.
Any dry, open soil, having plenty
of lime in its composition, will
produce good peanuts. It should
.be clear of weeds and other coarse
rubbish; hence ground in corn, pota
toes, or some cultivated crop last
year, is preferred. In plantlng the
ground is marked in rows about
three and a half feet apart, and if
any fertilizer is used it is applied
in the drill before ridging. The
ridge is formed by rnnning a light
furrow on each side of the drill, lap
ping the -dirt in the middle. The
ridges are afterwards knocked down
nearly flat, by drawing over them
from end to end a tolerably heavy
pole or board, or piece of scantling,
attached to shafts or small poles for
the horse. This is long enough
to reach across two, three, some
times ever four ridges, and they
are flattened so as to leave only a
little elevation to keep the seed
out of the water in case of a heavy
rainfall before it comes up. Some
dispense with ridges, and lay the
seeds flat on the surface, only press
ing them slightly with the foot.
This saves labor, but as a rule the
ridging is best. For this the same
plow is used for the furrows as for
corn or other crops.-The distance
apart varies considerably, ranging
from ten to twenty inches. Sixteen
inches is fair distance for the hoe
in weeding, and for spread of vines
on land of medium quality. An im
plement with:a wheel is pushed along
tbe ridge, points or pins at given
distances marking the place on top
of the ridge for thie peas. Care is
taken not to have the holes more
than two inches deep. The pea, a
single kernel in a place, is then
dropped by hand and covered by
carefully pressing a little soil upon
it. The land is left in a smooth
state for the first plowing. Being
a tropical plant, the peanut r-e
quires warm sun all the time. We
have known it planted all through
the month of June, but it should
generally be up and growing by the
first of that month here. Cold
rainy weather about the time of
planting is very detrimental. The
crop can he and is already grown
successfully much farther North
tban Virginia.-B. W. Jones, lat
.Aamricant yricult"rist for Ma~y.
SEEDING, PROPAGATION. COVERING.
-The most carefully seeded mea
dow is the most productive. Grass
seed should be sown with winter
grains, because they grow thinner
on the ground than spring grain;
th young plants are less shaded
and the growth fowms with stronger
roots, and is better able to with
stand the hot sun and dry weather.
After harvesting the n-rain, the
seeding is often destroyed, because
the roots of clover and timothy are
so near the surface that they dry
up. The ground is crusty for want
of cultivation and weight of snow
after tbe grain is sown. The reme
dy is simple, but rarely used. The
grain should be harrowed into the
ground after it has settled, and is
dry enough to mellow under the
hariow. Winter grain is improved
by barrowing, affording a lighter
soil for the spread and growth of!
the roots' covering the field with
stronger growth, consequently in-'
creasing the yield. This process
insures the certainty of grass seed
ing; as seed is expensive, farmers
cannot afford its loss, or "trust to
luck." Two crops cannot grow in
the same place simultaneously.
Filling the ground with all it can
support of spring gramn, and sowing!
grass-seed at the same time, expect
ing to produce a fine meadow after
the grain, results in a feeble product
and after harvesting the grain, the
weak plants shrivel and die. Spring
grain must be sown thinner when
sown with grass-then what is lost!
in grain, is gained in thickness of
the clover or grass crop. Thinly
sown grain generally produces
heavier, larger heads and more
stems, consequently the crops is
not lessened. Grass is as impor
taut to farmers as grain, and should
not be sacrificed for the chances on
the latter. It should not be made
the primary cr-op, for the so'l is re
newed by it while it is exhausted;
by grain.-F. D). Curtis, in Ameri
THE ART OF THINKING.
The object of the teacher is to
teach to think. The pupil thinks
enough, but he thinks loosely, in
coherently, indefinitely, and valgue
ly. He expends power enough on
his mental work, but it is poorly
applied. The teacher points out to
him these indefinite or incoherent
results, and demands logical
statements of him. Here is the
positive advantage the teacher is to
the pupil.
Lot us suppose two pupils are
studying the same lesson in geogra
pby or history. One reads to get
the facts; he fastens his eye on the
page and his mind to the subject
before him; he makes the book a
study and acquires information
from it; his object is to acquire
knowledge. He attains this end.
The other also stud.es the book,
but while reading he is obtaining
lessons in thinking. Ile does not
merely commit to memory; he stops
to see if the argument is sound, he
analyzes it to see if the conclusion
is warranted by the premises.
The one who thinks as he reads
is quite different, it will be seen,
from him who simply learns as he
reads. To read and think, or to
think as one reads, is the end to
seek. To teach to think is then the
art of the teacher. The reader for
facts gets facts ; he comes to the
recitation seat and reels off those
facts. His mind, like Edison's
phonograph, gives back just what it
received. While this power is val
uable, it is not the power the world
wants.
The teacher will find his pupils
come to the recitation to transmit
the facts they have gained. He
must put them in quite another frame
of mind. The value of the teacher is
measured by his power to teach the
art of thinking.-Teacher's Institute
A SAFE PLCE.-Country Editor
-"Well, sir. what can I do for
ycu?"
Stranger-"I want to find a place
for my boy. He is a fine accoun
tant, and I hear you need a book.
keeper."
Editor-"Yes, I want some one
t a small salary to keep my books
ollect bills, and look after the
afe when I am out."
Stranger-"Hie can do all that.
e is the best bookkeeper in the
State."
Editor-"Is he thoroughly reli
Stranger-"Well, the fact is, he
s a kleptomaniac. He has been in
he penitentiary a great many times
for taking money out of safes, but
>eyond that he is all right, and that
s why I want to get him a place
with you."
Editor-"With me, eh?"
Stranger-"Yes, where he will be
ut of temptation."
A SUTA: N1erKs.M.-"Isn't
Collar Button' rather an odd nick
ame to give your boy?' asked a
entleman of a friend, who had
ust addressed his son by that ti
tIe.
"Well. I don't know," replied the
ather, laughingly. "It may sound
lit.le curious, but it suits the boy
irst rate."
"WVhy do you think the nick
ame 'Collar Button' rits the
boy"
iBecause," was the reply, "when
e slips out in the evening I am
ever able to find him."
As ArT Pvpmi.-Plumber-"So
you would like to learn our trade?"
Boy-"Yes, sir."
Plumber -"Are you good in arith
neicT '
Boy-"I never had much school
Plumber-"How much are 2 and
Bov-"16.''
Plumber-"If I work at a pipe
three hours at five dollars an hour,
ow much will that make?"
Boy-"S$125."
Plumber-"You'll do."
In theatres in Japan, holding all
day, food and drink are brought the
spectators. The use of a cloth, wet
n hot water, with which to wash
the face and hands after eating,
s also sold. One cloth generally
serves to scrub a hundred or more
faces and hands.
W hen a man declares his love in
deeply-drawn breathing, young la
y. put it down as only a sighed
show.
The singer who understands the
nanagement of his breath is con
sidered a great artist. It ought to
e the same way with a barber.
Prinirple in a pafin fortruith
Climbing the Spiral Stair.
INVISIBLE ARCHITECTURE IN A NEW
ENGLAND PARISONAGE.
"Yes," she said, "our chi1dren are married
and gone, :.Ud my husband:and I sit by our
winter fire much as we did before the little
ones came to widen the circle. Life is some
thing like a spiral staircase: we are all the
time coming aroond over the spot we started
from, only one degree further up the stairs."
"That is a pretty illustration," remarked
her friend, musingly, gazing into the glow
ing coa!s which radiated a plea5ant heat
from the many windowed stove. "You know
we cannot stop toiling up the bill, though."
"Surce we cannot, and for myself I don't
find fault with that ne, .ity provid-2d the
advance in life is not atienled with calamity
or suffering, for I have had my slare of that.
Not long since my health utterly brolze
down. My systen was full of malaria. My
digestio ):came thoroughly disordered and
my nerves were in a wretched state. I was
languid, ate a little and that without enjoy.
ing i:, and had no strength or ambition to
perform even my light household duties
Medic,l treatment failed to rench the seat of
the trouble. The diseasc-nthch secemcd to
be weakness ofali the vital organs-progress
ed until I had several attjc%s wli:ch my
physicians p:-onottncel to Ue ncttte Contges
tion of the stomach. The last of thtee was a
desperate struggle and I was given up to dic.
As the crisis ha(l partially passed, my hus
band heard of the merits of PAl'KE!t'S
TONIC as an invigorant in just tuch cases as
mine. I took it and felt its good effects at
once. It appCared to porv.dc my bo)-)dy, as
though the blessing of new lfHe ha.i come to
tue. Taking no other medici.e I eonttinued
to anprove, and ant Iow in tter health
than I lave heen for a ! mn .
Extract from an i:eiv;ew wihi the wife of
Rev. P. Perry Pastor of Baptist Chureb,
Coldbrook, Mass.
TUTT'
TORPiD BOWELS,
DISORDERED LIVER,
and MALARIA.
From these sources ar three-fourths of
tho disa.ses of tho LunuM rItec. These
symptoms indicate their emistence: Loss of
Appetite, Bowels costive, Sick I1cad
acLe, falluess after cating, aversion to
e xertio,n of body or mind, Eructationh
of food, Irritability of temper, Lowv
sp!rit3, A feeling ofr having neglcctvd
some duty, DIzzinzss, Flutte ring at the
IIeart,Dois before the eyes, hciy col
ored Ur:- , CONSTIPATUOX, and de
mand tho use ofaremedythat atts directly
ontheliver. AsaLivcrnedcnefl- TUT'"S
Pf LLS1 1a,v no equal. Their action on the
Kidneys and Skin is also prompt; renovi.g
all imparities throzgh these thtree " Pcav
engers of the system," prot:in apt:e
tite, soand digcrt.n, reglar stools, a ciev.r
skinand a vigorous body. TVTT'S PILLS
cause no nausea or griping nor interfere
with daily work and are a perfect
ANTIDOTE TO MALARIA,
HE FEELS LIKE A NEW MArN.
"I have had Dyspepsia, with Constipa
tion,two years, and have triod ten difTerent
kids of pius, and 'UTT'S are the -t-,
that h.yc done me any good. They have
cleancd mno out nicely. My appetite is
lndidut~, food digests readily, and I now
ha~e natural passages. I fe!l like a new
mn." W. D. EDWARDS, Palmayra, 0.
'ol eivrhere,25c. Ofilee4 tMraySt t.Y.
GiLix HMn oR WHisKERs changed in.
stanttly to a CLossY BLACK by a single at'.
plicanon of this DTE. Sold oy Druggi.-ts.
or sen t by express on receipt of 5 1.
Oliee, 44 Murray Strcet, New York.
Tt;TTS O.EUE OF USEF!L PEE'PTS FREL
July 19, 29-1y.
as low
ITTERS
Begeneration for Enieebled Systems,
Suffrr iono a general want of tone, attd
its usual concomitants, dvspepsia att
nervousness, is seldom derivable from the
use of a nourishting diet and stimuli o1
appetite, unaided. A medicine that will
efet aremoval of the specitic obstacle to
renewed health and vigor, that is a genuine
corrective, is the real need. It is the pos
session of this grand requtirement which
makes Hostetter's Stomach flitters so
effective as an invigoratnt. For sale by all
D.ruggists and Dealeis generally.
WAXNTED.
COTTON SEED!
COTTON~SEED!
I will pa.y (i.) Iio e n
DRY C OTTON S :;I)D, dlivered( to
Novemberie. Will cX':batug '. Coott
Sed ineal for- C tton Seed.
W. F-. HOILLOWAY & (0.,
Oct. 8-Utm. l ~amaria, S. C,
Livr, h(ita Or M0madh Troule .
Svmptoms: Inmpure blood, cost ive bo wels.
irregttar apetite,~ soutr belehmig, pains it:
sde, b)ack amdl heart, yelow; urmne. burtnmig
when urinating, elay-color'd stools, badl
breath, no desire for work, chills, fevers,
iritability, whit ishi tongue, t-y cougth,
dizzy head,. with dlull pain mn back pat, loss
of memory. forgy sight. For these troublles
"SWAYNE'S PIL LS" tare a sure cure. Box.
(30 Pills). by mail, 25 ets., 5 tot- $1.00. Ad
dress, Dit. SWAYNE & tSON, Philada.. Pa.
Sold by Druggists. Jas. si-ly.
A FULL LINE OF
Hats.
Boots.
Shoes,
Trunks,
Clothing, &c. &c.,
Can be found
At tile LOWEST PRICES,
At the OLD ESTABLISHMENT
-OF
M. FOOTs
42-t f
0for the w orkingz class. Send 10
cens for postage. atnd wewi
mait y on free. a royal, valuable
box~ ot aim pte goods that will put
-o in the way oS moakinr more money in a
few danys than you thought p)osibleO at any
business- Capital not req;uired- We will
start you. You can work all the spare
time only. The work is universally adapted
to both exes, young and old. You can e.isily
earn 5>u cents to $5 every- evening., That all
who want work mxay test the business, wo
make this unpara'ieled ciTer ;to all who
are not will sxtistied we wilt send $1 to pay
for the trouhle of writing us. Full particu
lars. directions. te.. senut free. Fortunes
will b.- mc de by those who give their whole
time to the work. Great success absolutelyI
sure. Don't delay. Start now- Address
Stilson & Co,, Portland, Main.
C. BART & CO.,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
The largest Impo.ters of Foreign Fruit in the South. of-er for sale a well
selected ,tock of
Apples, Oranges, Bananas,
Cocoanuts, Lemons, Nuts.,
Dried Figs, Raisins, Potatoes,
Cabbage, Onions, Peanuts,
And everything else that a First Class Wholesale Fruit
Store should have.
COUNTRY ORDERS FILLED
WITH DISPATCH.
Oet. 2-Gii.
HEADQUARTERS FOR
A&RICDIT91AL IMPLIMINTS AND MACHINERY.
F. A. SCHUMPERT & C00.,
are Agcit and iave for sale t Ie fl Iowing improve<1 Agrivilt Iural- fim p]vineIIt:
Threshers,
Steam Engines,
Saw Mills,
Grist Mills,
Cotton Gins,
Cotton Presses,
Cider Presses.
McCORMICK'S MACMINESI
Harvester and Binder,
Table Rake,
Dropper and Mower,
Horse Rakes,
Harrows,
G-lobe Cotton Planter,
SULKY AND WALKING PLOWS,
CULTIVATOIRS,
CHICAGO SCREW PULVERIZER, CANE MILLS AND EVAPORATORS
AND OTHER IMPROVED AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS.
If voti want anything of this kind give uii a call before purci nesehere
Warehouse for .1achinery in the new building on corner Caldwell and Hiar
rington streets, below Christian & Smith's Livery Stables.
Mar. 5, 10-tf.
Out of Jaws of Death.
This gentleman who outlines his case be- SED'RPICLST
low his is ai man c,lnsiderably advanced in
life; and is noted for his sterling integrity, ~ c LtE.
lis post-office is Yatesvilie,Upson county,Je lr
Ga. [he following is
Mr. John Pearson's State-PALC
ment. 2 IN T
In the Spring of 18S2 I was attatcked with CALSO,SC
a very bad cotugh, which continued to growILAGSSTC
orse until fall, when I got so weak thtat ILO ETPI S
ould not get about. I tried a great many I ~ TESUH
kinds of medicines but continued to grow
orse. I was notified that I had consump- RPIIGASEILY
tionl and wouild probably dliC. Dir. IlohlowayLDMEYU W THS
finally to!d ine to try Brewver's Lung Re
storer. They sent to Ward's Store and got No.1- .
bottle and I commenced taking it right
away. After taking two or thice dloses, I tbe
aun to imnprove, and by the tme I had usedl -
p one bottle I was able to get on my feet o
again. I am now in excellent health. I am' o d l
ofident that the Lung Restorer saved myj
ife and my neigh oots are of the same opinion.- t~k-tiii
t is thec hest Lung Rtemedy ever made in my
opnion. D)r. ii. promised mec that he woulIdI tv~i~rr ~aa
write to the manufacturers anid tell them of1;iutLIIA' ,IUR
te wonderful cure it made in my case.
Statement of Benj. F. Hlearn THS AR OFE D
doll. A~~ Ve welryrfis
Eat v i Noen2r. TSl,1PALACgEo
the iae:;ne. v xmor vns ikcn i:hta224 KIN S.4D S
severepun inher sde,CHARLESTwaON, Sl fo
lowed y hemontta~s fromARGEST.gsSTndCa.
otme ofGoeds ofelAllone.dsh
such a keptinna
de n trsomah Ite ge Lt 1) . ey1hotPrfis
Elflary in Noember,t 1tt8t, wht de go
fina meanatio of ie w:astaenw at! ~SADIWL
nvr ough e omnced,tecs oees she could
was al reducedt, a eivtt. f:eor. The at-v
:erd osg phsiinn that me t h et ithoght
meon her stoach, n fte agrele ithiDrd
IHell a n to nout:iti om.Tey mp aet a .v o n lmdalreadClgn
fi ala intion o ti c the entsso! ;.rO
nouni:vc d the t shes Ito -ihit:d
bas, a-tr srt bl setfor al botmle gaveC O , JE EL Y
her' aljc dose I fondtat she rould reain Siitan lte ae
tnher unstorch ad er lbout the third
hae, a beato not ichie some provemnt I NDGIA SRN S
inpher co:tlition . Ie ninued theroedicinee
re:.:Allior:mrsbyytheilimeomhely:attenken two
botties,~'Watwas abengoawnlkReboutinh
house. She isCnow inyetnerwhiththishanchh
have aafamany examineemyldren, andepricehe
HOSE
Nov 2,.7- F OT
7~j~ .42 -
assor:m . o
Feb. S-1m. o
Toc
and the courts Rsonable terms. Opn ion as to _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
__All- Sre by mailro pt ly ttenddgo.
t~..e ou piceTh fatetWate'gaoomak ~igJ?' and. Reirn
Don Chal n itDispatch.
I Caeriaandmeesaprneitmyo atock an ri.
Halhett ook CoNov.it21,i47-aIf.
caweo e a ntced for get T eh re I. e ofal i'.taa ny~u .-amt -
Preidnt o the U.S The B ND
Rail Roads.
Columbia & Greenville Railroad.
PASSENGER DEPARTMENT,
CVLUMIfIA. 8. C., Feb. Itl. 1881.
On and after Monday, Feb. 4, 1K-4. the
PASSENG ER TRAINS n ill run as herewith in
dicated upon this road and its branches
Daily, except Sundays.
No. 53. UP "ASSENGIR.
Leave W., C. & A. .Jui:ction - - - - 11.22 a in
Leave Columbia,A - - 11.50 a In
Aliston. - - - - 12.55 P m
Newberry, - - -- 212 ! in
Ninety-Six, - - - 37 pm
" Hodges, - - - 4 22 p m
" eit%n, - - - 5.24 p m
Arrive Greenville,- ---- 650 p in
No. 52. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Greenviile, - - - 9.55 a in
" Belton, - - - 11.25 p i
" Hlodges. - - 12 36 p m
Ninety-Six, - - - - 1.43 p m
" Newberry, - 3.14 p in
Alhton, - 4.19 p in
Arrive Columbia,F - 6-5.2 p in
Arrive W., C. & A. Junction. - - - - - 5 3 p m
S'ARTANBURo. UNION & COLUMBIA RAILFOAD.
No. .3. UP PASSE GER.
Leave A!ston. - - - - . in
Strotlh-r, - - m
" Shelton, -4 p in
S Santuc, -- in
Union, - - -in
Jonesville, 4 P in
Arrive Spartauburg, .10 p m
No. 5'-. DOWN PASSENGl..
Lenave Sp:irtan burg, I..& U. Depot, 11 l1b(1-pri
Spartanbur-, S. U.& C. I)cl.ot,; 11.l.31) in
Jonesville, -2- 25 p m
Union. t- .5 p in
santilc, 7- 4p m
- 4 p in
Stro-her, J.14 p in
Arrive atrabr, - Ao- 4 071 p in
LAUUENS RtAILWAY.
Leave Newberry, - - - 3.20 p in
Arrive Launrens C. H. - - 7.10 p in
Leav" Laurens C. ., - - 1.47 p m
Arrive Newberry, - - 1240 p m
'%BBLVILLE DIZZANCII.
Leave tothe - - - 43. p m
Arrive at Abbeville, - . - 1 7 m
Leave Abbeville, - - - n3pm
Arrive at erry, Il- - 12.30 p m
BLUE RIDGE RAILROAl) AND ANDERSON
1.R4ANCIL.
Leave Delton 5.25 p in
" Anderson 6.0 p M
" Pendleton (; 35 p m
Leave Seneca C, 7.30 p m
Arrive Walhalla 7.57 p in
Leave Walhalla, - - 8.45 a in
Leave Seneca C, 9.15 a in
" Pendleton, - - 10.02 a m
" Anderson, - - 10.47 p mn
Arrive at Belton, - - 11.21 p mn
FEIGHT, PASSENGER COACH ATTACIIED.
Leave Belton 6. 15 a in
Williamston 7.10 a m
Pelzer 7.37 a in
Piedmont ,8:15 a In
Arrive Greenville 9.2.5 p i
Leave Greenville 3.45 p in
Peidmont 4 52 p m
Pelzer (;.00 p in
" Williamston 1.25 p m
Arrive Belton 7.10 p in
CONNECIONS.
A. With South Carolina Railroad from Char
- leston.
With Wilmington, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad from Wilmington and all
points North thereof.
With Charlotte. Columbia and Augusta
Railroad from Charlotte and all points
North~thereof.
B. With A6heville & Spartanburg Rail Road
fo(r points in Western North Carolina.
C. With A. & C. Div. R. & D. R. I., from all
points South and West.
D. With A. & C. Div., R0. & D. R. R., from At
lanta and beyond.
E. With A. & C. Div., R. & D. R. R., from all
points South and West.
F. With South Carolina Railroad for Charles
ton.
With Wilminaton, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad for Wilmington and the 2orth.
With Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad for Charlette and the North.
G. With Asheville & SpartanbUrg Railroad
from Hendersouville.
I. With A. & C. Div., It. & D. R. R., from
Charlotte and beyond.
Through Coach for Hendersonville k ill
be run from Columbia daily.
Standard Time used is Washington, D. C.,
which is lifteen minutes faster than Columbia.
J. W. FRY. Superintendent.
31 S.A Uc.n TER, General Passenger Agent.
D C AXRD wEL.t, A s't G enerali Passenger gi.,
Columbia. S. C.
South Carolina Rallway, .Company,
CHANGE OF SCHIEDULE.
On and after Jan. 20th, 1554, Passenger
Trains on this road will run as follows un
til further notice:
tO AND FRO31 CIA RLESTON.
GOING EAST,
Leave Coluimbia *".40 a mn f5.SI p mn
Arrive Charleston 11 2:l p im 10.10 p
GoING WEST,
Leave Chiar;eston 17.00J a in *4.00 p mn
Arrive Columubia 11.1- a mn 10.35 p in
tDaily. 'Daily except Sunday.
TO AND FRt' CA3MDEN.
GOING EAST,
Leave Columbia *t; 40 a m *53 P mn
Ar; ive Camdeni 1.55a mn 8.35 p' m
GOING WEST
Leave Camden *7.15 a mn *4 15 P mn
Arrive Coluiati' 11.4o a mn 1t0.5 p~ m
*l)aily except Sundays.
To AND FROM1 AUGUSTA.
GOING EAST,
Leave Couumbia M.4 a mi *5.31 p in
Arrive Augusta 12.0(5 P m1 7.10 a in
GOING WEsT.
Lave Augusta *;.08 a im *5.00 p mn
Arrive Columbia 11.40 p mf 10 35 p ms
*Daily except Sundays.
CONNECTIONS.
C;onnect ion miadle at Colunmbiat with the
Columiaih andl Greenville liail Road by train
arriving~ at 11l.2s P. M.. and departing at 6.58
P. M. Contnetion made at Columbia .Jun
tion wvith Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
1:ail to:vd by same train to and from all
poinits on1 bsothi roads with through Pullman
sleeper bet ween Charleston and Washing
ton, via Virginia Midland route. withotut
change. Connect ion made at Charleston
with Steamers for New York on Wednesdays
andl Saturdavs; also, with Savannah and
Charleston Ra~ilroad to all points South.
Connections are made at Augusta with
Georgia Railroad and Central Railroad to
and from all points Sonth and West.
Through 1lickets can be purchased to all
points South and West, by applying to
D. McQ~UEEN, Agent, Columbia.
U. C. ALL EN, G. P. & F. A.
Jolts .. Pr:cK. Gene:al Manager.
Asheville andi Spartanburg Railroad.
SPARtTANURG. S. C., September 1, 1881.
On and altcr Monday. October 1st,18S%3
passenger trains will be run daily (Sundays
excepted) between Spartanburg and Hien
dersonville, as follows:
UP' TRAIN.
Leave R. & D. D)epot at Spartanburg.1.3 p mn
Arrive at Hiendersonville..........'.30 p mn
DOWN TRAIN.
Leave IIendersonville.............. 8.00 a mn
A rrive IR. & D. Depot, Spartanbur.1.30 p mn
Rtoth trains make connections for (Colum-~
biat ant Charleston via Spartanburg. Union
and Columbia and Atlanta and Charlotte by
Air Line. .JAMES AND)ERS.ON,
Su periniten dent.
WANTED!
SIBOA RDERS !
I ain now prepared to) fuIrnishI First
Ca-s Board, withouIt lodgingo, to
oting meni andt old men. Fare good,
andlf cha'rges low. Dinner furishe-ld to
counItrV tmen at i25 cent- ech.C
FIRST DOOR ABOVE
TODD'S GROCERY STORE.
L. WV. P. RISER.
4-tf
PATENTS
Obtained, and all other buasiness in the U. S.
Patent O11cc attended to for MODERATE
FEES.
Our ofIeo is opposite U S. Patent Omeie,
and we ca obtin P'atents in less time than
those renmote from W AbIINGTON.
Send MODE L or DRAWING. We advise
as to pate itability freeh of chiarge ;and we
make NO CHIARGE g'ESS WE OBTAIN
PATENT.
We refer, here. tt m~zaster, the
Supt. of Money Orde. to the off
cials of the U. S. Pater. circular.
advice. terms, and rt actual
clients in your own Stat write
to C.. - .o-,
OppoePatentOfflee,W ..J.C.
Sa week at home. $5 00 outtit free. Pay
absolutely sure. No risk. Capital not
required. Reader, if you want busi
ness at which persons of eithem sex,
young or old, can make kreat pay all the
time they work, with a buoluite certainty,
...s rm n atUIM tO H ia11tt .&Co..
1884 THE 1884
CONS TITUTION
THE DAILY CONSTITUTION has come to
be a necessity to every intelligent man in
the range of its circulation.
For the next year it will be better than
ever. Nearly $lf0,000 Is now being invested
by its proprietors in a new building, pres
ses and outfit, in which and with which it
can be enlarged to meet its increasing busi
ness, and improved to meet the demands of
its growing constituency.
TlE DAILY AND SUNDAY CONSTITUTION for
188.4 will be better and tuller than ever, and
in every scase the best paper in the reach
of the people of the Southeast.
One Year a10, 6 Months .5. 3 Months $2.50.
1 Month $1.00
THE WEEKLY ON9TITUTION
starts the new year with 13.00 subscribers
who pronounce it the largest, best and
cheapest paper within their reach.
It consists of 8, 10 or 12 pages (as the de
mand of its business or the news may di
rect) filled with matter of the greatest inter
est to the farmer.
AT LESS THAN 3 CENTS A WEEK
this great budget of news and gossip will be
sent. to y our fireside to entertain every
member of your household,
One Year..........................$1 50
Six M onths.............................. 1 00
In Clubs of Ten, each.........1 25
In Clubs of Twenty, each......... 1 00
With an extra paper to the getter up of
the Club.
THE YE.AR OF 1S81.
will be one of the most important in our
history. A President. Congressmen. Sena
tors. Governor, Legislature-are all -to be
elected.
Very important issues are to be tried In
the National and State elections. The Con
stittition in its daily or weekly edition will
carry the fullest aid freshest news in best
shape to the public. and will stand as an
earnest champion of Democratic principles.
Address, THE CONSTTUTION.
THE
Chronicle & Constitutionalist,
AUGUSTA, GA.,
-ASI) TIE
NEWBERRY HERALD
for one year at $3.50.
The Augusta CHIRONICLF AND CoNSTITU
TIONALIST is the largest weekly newspaper
in the State. It is a ten page seventy column
pnper. It contains all the Important news
of the week, and is filled with interesting
and instructive readinsr to the farmer, me
chanic. businessand professional man. Its
Washington. Atlanta and Columbia letters
with its ful- telegraphic service, market re
I orts, editorials and general news make it
one of the most readable and one of the
best newspaper in the South.
The CHRONICLE AND CONSTITUTIONAUST
can be read in any household. It is free
ftom sensationalism.
THE IMERICIiN_ FIRMER
Established 1819, and for more than a Third
of a Century under the same
Management.
Devoted to FARMING, STOCK-RAISING,
FRUIT GROWING, MAIRET GARDENING,
the DAIRY, the POULTRY YARD, et., etc.
Special attention is paid to Fertilizers and
Manures, including those of commerce and
the farm. L
Reports of Representative Farmers' C1
are a notable feature of its issues.
There Is a Home Department, with el'
ing reading and practical suggesti ..arm
the ladles of the farm household. s for
The most competent, succeisi
perienced men and women ha and ex
the several departments. charge of
No Farmer in the Atla
Delaware to Georgia. ic States, from
without" this old an can afford to be
Guide on farm wor * reliable adviser and
The American
every month armer is published twice
beautifully -. (on the 1st and 15th). It is
clear ty rinted on ine white paper in
oer t .$1.0 a year. To clubs of live
O, $1C each.
me, Valuable and Useful Premiums
o given to all those who will take time
anid trouble to collect subscribers.
SAM'S SA NDS & SON, Publishers,
12$ Baltimore St., Baltimore, BId.
The HERALD and the American Farnner
will be clubbed together andl sent to any
add(ress for $31.00 ior one year.
TIHE EVENING
Chronicle and [Costitthalst
Augusta, Ga.,
-AND THE
NEWBERRY HERALD
will be furn ishedl for 1881 at 67 00
The EVENING (CRONiCLr. AND CoNsTITU
TIONA LIST is the largest andl cheapest Daily
newspaper in the South. It contains eight
thouusan2d words of telegraph per day fromi the
New Yo:k Associated Press. This service Is
supiplemented by full special from Atlanta,
Columbia and Washington. As a newspaper.
the CunoNicr.E is one of tire best in the
South. It Is newvsy, progressive, reliable and
liree fromi the denioralizing details of crime.
THIS PAPER
IN CLUB WITH
ODE Y'S
LADY'S BOOK
will be sent for one year to any
address on receipt of $3.50 which should.be
sent to the publisher of the HERLALD.
GOOEY'S LADY'S BOOK
Is recognized as the leading Fashion and
Home Magazine In America. The leading
attractions for 1884 are the following :
-Beautiful Colored Fashion Plates exe
'I eLuted by the French p)rocss, represen
ting the prcvailing fashions in both
styics and color, produced especially for
and1 published exclusively in GODEY'S
LADY'S DOOK.
liEng~lish Plates of Fashions in black and
'white, illustrating leading styles.
1 9Finelv Executed Steel Engravinirs by
-the biest artists, made for GODEY'S
LADY'S BOOK.
1 'Erngraved Portraits of Ex-presidents of
"the U. S., which form a part of what is
known in GODEY'S LADY'S BOOK as the :
PRESIDEITIAL Portralt Gallery,i
each being accompanied by a short biogra
phical sketch.
1. ae.Illustrating Fashions and fancy
Sneedle work
19P'agesofA rchitectural Designs. showing
'"plans and perspective of Houses and
Cottages of all descriptions.
9Full Size Cut Psper Patterns with full
anud explicit Instructions for use.
200 CODEY'S Wi
Celebrated household cooking receipts,.each
having been tested by practical housekeep
ers before publishing.
24 PAGES OF SELECT MUSIC.
EBESIDE embr icing a rich array ofltera
andI Poems, by eminent writers, among
whom arc.
MARION HIARLAND, AUGUSTA de BUBNA,
CHIRISTIANREiD, Mrs. SHEFFEY PETERS,
ELLA RODMAN CHURCH, HELEN MATH
ERIS, Author of "Cherry Ripe."
The Art Department-will be under the di
rection of Win. Mac Leod, Curate of Corcoran
Gallery of Art, Washington, D. C. All other
departments under equally competent di
rection.
SUBDSCRIPTION Price $2.00 per Year.
For further Information send for circular
Samp)le copy of GODEY'S LADY'S BOOK
I5c. Stamps taken. To avoid errors write
plainly your address, giving County and
State.
GO9EY'S LADY'S BOOK.
1006 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa
a .4iy
J. Z. SALTER
Newberry, S. C.
Call at his Gallery over
Leavell's Furniture Store,
Examine his work, and procure some
nice Photographs. IIe uses the In
stantaneous Process making a Picture
in o.ie second. Hesitate no longer to
carry the sweet babe for its .Picttre.
Cop'inig and enlarging from Old Pie
tures done with Artistic Finish.
ORDERS SOLICITED,
Feb. 9--St.
HENRY STEITZ,
Importer and Wholesale Dealer in
Foreign & Domestic
FRUIT,
APPLES, ORANGES,
BANANAS, COCOANUTS,
LEMONS, PINEAPPLES, POTA
TOES, ONIONS, PEANUTS,
CABBAGES, &C.
S. E. CORNER MEETINC
& MARKET STREETS,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
Nov. 8, 45-6m.
MONEY TO LEND!I
BY THE CAROLINA
BANKING COMPANY
OF
NEW YORK AND BOTON.
Farm Mortgage L
Negotiate
Im
ved
f - & Plantations.
FOR NEWBERRY COUNTY.
Apply to
0. L. SCHUMPERT,
Attorney and Counsellor,
48-3m. Newberry. S. C.
THE ONLY TRUE
IRON
TONIC
FACTS RECARB1NG
the IVR and KIDNES a ToRIst
dsaereurin e rtain and emcie STON
oS)CIIVI s sa.Wantot Appetite.1ndlg
it u tnc ilate a:~ voderful results. ot
the wind and supplies Brain Power.
DR. HAR -RSI ICa tdSO
cure. it esa cetar and heal a u
Te trnet enoY h p
do o ,exer nault th OItIA AD Br.t
Funt .trr.ne and ueeful informiat1ionte.
On. IAESIRN' TOC IS OR SA AL.
NORisA'S
UT[RAIN
CbR2DIA
AERlKS CFIEF SIOMACIJ
SURulai ad oder ofthesti seand Bw
e ther u,G~ ing chdrn. Faduety aue,iiy
t~ Stmach etbr.siad Ztr'osHade s
MDYSPEPSIA.
N EUT RALIIZINC CORDIAL
Wi ns-oDtlltl OpIum ad wil not eoli
,aw Specially rocomm:ended for Seasickasu
adTeething Childrens.
German and English Dhrectionsaon each Bottl.
Price z5c. and Sz.oo.
allPrr .taand [tnlr In Keiclas,
TEEIDELSIOE CHEMIOAL 00., BolePhopbu,
ar~.s.:"c. S?L oE"ITE BOOK.
New York Offlee 70 M-!iden Lane.
PAYNE'S 10O Horse Spark-Arresting
Potble LuiE ha cut 10.000 ft. of3Ichna Pan
eight foot lengths.
Oaw 1Ilr#ie 'a rE t inIIS pw,S
iSBorsewil tc -t~~ ;f n ime timr.
a *are-oc o*)
nei t attrel wit an uoatsie
eIhrc tr Meddst Plt
ilntra t catalogue No. I2 for
JWPNE&SON8
May 17, 20-ly.
Cough8, Celd8, Carh CenSuBpile.
cured byth hldeste SWAYE'
le. and acur sped fows, ecta ,or
e1.10. at Drtatgista. Jan.s88-15.
Send Si Cafr poag, -
zot goo which wilhelp
awrhg leI this wrldee)

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