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The Newberry herald. (Newberry, S.C.) 1865-1884, July 03, 1884, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026909/1884-07-03/ed-1/seq-4/

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farm, aru g ousn4 I1D.
JULY.
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TAKE CARE OF YOUR LIVE
STOCK.
GOOD SHELTER.-It is absolute
economy to provide warm and com
fortable winter quarters for all live
stock, with an ample supply of pure
fresh air. When animals are
housed in well-made barns and
stables, they require much less food
to keep them in a good condition.
Lumber, in this form, is cheaper
than hay grain and for wintering
farm stock. Pure water in abun
dance is very needful for the health
of the animals. It should be drank
fresh from the well. If left in the
trough to freeze, it soon becomes
as cold as ice water, and when ta
ken into the animal system, it re
quires much heat of the body to
bring it up to the required ten?per
ature. Avoid as far as possible
having the watering troughs partly
filled wita ice and snow. They
may be made so as to turn over
when not in use, and this keeps
them clean and free from the chill
ng ice.
Live stock should be fed regu
larly. Even if not generously fed,
this regularity is better that an ex
cess for a few days, and then a lack
of food for a time. Animals are
never contented when hungry, and
they should not be permitted to
thus become uneasy. The damage
done by one omitted feeding cannot
be made good by a double ration
afterwards. This slip-shod method
of feeding is quite sure to bring
disorder into the flock or stable.
Horses.-An idle team may be
wintered upon good hay alone, but
when lightly worked, a little grain
at noon may be needed. They are
to be kept in good health and flesh,
and the amount of grain should be
governed accordingly. Horses do
ing heavy work will need a few
quarts of ground oats and corn
daily, in addition to an abundance
of the best hay. Young colts should
have excellent care, for their future
usefulness depends largely upon
the growth they make the first
winter. Linseed oil cake in small
doses is one of the best remedies for
costiveness in the young farm ani
mals.
Cows-As the weather begins to
grow cold, the cows will fall off in
milk unless and abundance of nu
tritious food is provided in the
stalls. Beets cut or pulped, and
mixed with cut hay, to which corn
meal is added, makes an exellent
ration for milch cows. It is of the
greatest importance to keep up the
flow of milk at the beginning of
winter. Calves and yearlings may
be kept in roomy sheds where, with
good feed and abundant litter, they
will make a large amount of ex
cellent manure before spring.
([Americant Agriculturist.
REASONING POWERS IN THE
IhORSE.
Not long since a fine blooded
mare was brought here from Ken
tacky and placed in pasture, and
the owner, not expecting her to
foal, took no particular care of her.
A couple of days ago she foaled
while in the pasture and surround
ed by many other horses, which
made so much over her difficulty
that she, being frightened, ran, with
her weakling following after as best
she could, in hopes to shelter her
self and offspring from the torments
of the herd. In her excitement
she made for the Floyd, a stream
running through the pasture, some
30 yards in width, which she plung
ed into and swam to the opposite
shore; the colt following, but lack
ing strength, did not succeed in
leaving the stream, bu~t with great
tenacity of life clambered into son
willows which grew on shore, and
there remained, apparently "hang.
ing on for dear life." The mother,
having discovered her error in get
ting the colt into 'such a position,
either by "instinet" or a conclusion
of mind, at once started for help,
by swimming across the stream, and
at full speed ran to the barnyard
some distance away *re some
men were at labor, and with furious
neighings and other actions, like
mad, attracted the attention of the
workmen who, when they noticed
her particular desire that they
should follow her-by her showing
great joy when they did-went to
the stream and rescued the colt
The mare showed them great kind.
ness until she had recovered her
offspring, when she became instant.
ly very vicious, and would not al
low one of the rescuers to approach
her
fmoDrous.
HI8-COLLAR BEGAN TO
SMOKE.
In Evansburg, Indiana, there is
a young attorney-or at least an
alleged attorney-who was never
known to have won a case and
some say that though he had been
a full fledged 'awyer for several
years, he had been a full fledged
he never had a case.
His appearance is somewhat
against him. IIe don't look like a
man who could get up before jury
and "sway' them as he chose. He,
is a mild-mannered man, who would
look more at home behind the rib
bon department of a dry goods
store than sawing the air and hurl
ing Latin quotations at the heads
of twelve eulighteded jurymen.
He is always at court, however
and chews as much tobacco as any
body, and looks as wise as the
wisest when a knotty point comes
up and some brother attorney re
fers learnedly to Ilolson v. Bobson,
1st Ind,, sec. 7, page 84.
The other day the court was
hard at work, and Brown-we call
him Brown because it's so easy to
write-was there. A poor devil
was brought up on some charge and
the Judge said, "Who's your at
torney ?"
"Haven't got none."
"Well, what are you going to do ?
You must have somebody to defend
you, even if it's a matter of form."
"Can't help it, Judge. I havn't
got no lawyer and I ain't got no
money to hire one."
"Well, in that case," said the
Judge, I'll appoint an attorney to
defend you. Mr. Brown, you may
take the prisoner's case, and do the
best you can for him."
The prisoner looked at Brown a
moment, then at the Judge, and
then at Brown again. Then he
said slowly.
"Judge is this the man you ap
point to defend me ?"
"Yes, sir; Mr. Brown w:il take
your case."
'Then said he slowly, "I'll jist
plead guilty and then be done with
it."
And they say Brown turned so
red that his paper collar began to
smoke.
A MIOUNTAIN 8IDE FARN.
Chicago Herald.
"1 farmed it up in the mountains
f Pennsylwany for fifteen years,"
said a commrenicative West bound
assenger, "and useter think nothin'
ould ever git me to leave the old
lace. It seemed ez 'twas the only
lace I could ever live and be really
satisfied. Though I'm a rough man
n my speech an' my close ain't o'
he finest, stranger, I try to be a
hrnstian, an' wanter live and die
ne. But t'other day somethin' hap
pened which caused me to make up
my mind thet no man can be a Chris
ian on a mountain farm. Ye see,
a neighbor o' mine-Jenkius was
his name-Josh Jenkins- what I
wsted onet in a hoss trade, he
flared up an' tried to hey me turnedi
out o' church, an' behaved so dot
rotten mean thet we had a reg'lar
ole Pennsylwany quarrel of it.
Onct he 'cused me of trespassin' on
his farm right afore all the church
members, when I rose an' made my
solemn decelration that ef I waz
ever after seen on his laud they
could turn mec out of church ez a
liar an' wicked man. Well, 'bout
three weeks ago what would happen
but one day when I waz a-walkin'
on my own farm, attendin' strickly
ter my own affairs an' thlnkin' how
sinful Brother Jenkins wuz to bear
me so much ill-will, I stubbed my
toe on a dodrotten stun an' fell
cleai off my farm onto ole Jenkin
ses. knockin' down 'bout a rod of
his fence. An' the worst on it wuz
that red headed scarecrow saw me
and had me rested for trespass an
m'licious 'struction of prop)erty, an'
fined $5 an' costs. I then con
cluded no true Christian could live
on a Pennsylwany mountain side
farm, and here's me an' my hull
family bound for Dakoty. Got any
fine-cut, stranger ?"
"Why dont you get up as early
as you used to a few months ago ?'
angrily asked a wife of her lazy
husband. "Because, my dear, it's
sleep year;" he grinned as he turn
ed over for another snooze.
The sermon of the best preacher
in the world will not make as much
impression upon a congregation as
the sudden pattering of rain on the
window panes of a church con
taining two hundred new bonnets.
Forty cents a week is all it costs
John WV. Nissley, of Mount Car
mel, Pa., who is sixty-five years old1
and weighs 175 pounds to live. His
diet is dIry bread and hot wfiter,
and has been so for the last seven
SWEPT INTO TilE STIEAMS
One Thousand Acres of Land an<d
'Right Smart of Bears.'
On the deck of a big Mississippi steamboat
stood an aged Southern planter. Indicating
by a sweep of his arm the waters the boal
%as passing over, he said to a passenger
from the North : "When I was twelve years
old I killed my first bear on a new plantation
my father was then cutting out of a forest
thatt grew directly over the waters of this
bend. That was a mighty good plantation
and there was right smart of bears there, too
But that one thousand acres of land went into
the Mississippi years ago."
It is putting no strain upon the figure to
say that great forests of youthful hope, wo
manly beauty and manly strength are swep1
in the same way every year into the areat
turbid torrent of disease and death. Yet it
should not be so. That it is so is a disgrace
as well as a loss. People are largely too
careless or two stupid to defend their own in
terests-the most prccious of which is healtt
That gone, ail is gone. Disease is simple
but to recklessness or ignorance the simplest
things might as well be complex as a propo
sition in Conic Secions. As the huge Wes
tern rivers, which so often flood the cities
along their shores, arise in a few mountait
springs, so all our ailments can be traced to
impai blood and a sniall group of disorder
ed organs.
The most effective and ine!usive remedy
for disease is I'ARKER'S TONIC. It goes tc
the sources of pain and weakness. In res
ponse to its action. the liver, kidneys, stom
ach and heart begin their work afresh, and
disease is driven out. The Tonic is nut, how
ever, an intoxicant, but eues a desire for
s1rong drink. Have you dyspepsia, rheuma
tism, or troubles which have reftsed t<
yield to other agents? Here is your help.
TUTeT'S
PILLS
TORPID BOWELS,
DISORDERED LIVER,
and MALARIA.
From these sources arise three-fourths of
the diseases of the human raee. These
symptoms indicate their existence: Loss of
Appetite. Bowels costive, Sick iead
aohe, allness after eating, aversion to
exertion of body or , Ernetation
of food, Irritability of temper, Low
spirits, A feeling of having neglected
some duty, Dizz nes, Fluttering at the
Heart, Dots before t he eyes, highly col
ored Urine, CONS'r'IPATION, and de
mand the use of a ren iedy that acts directl
onthe Liver. -AsaLi 'er medicine TUTT'4
PILLS have no equ; . Their action on the
Kidneys andSkin isalso prompt; removing
all impurities through these three " scav
engers of the system," producing appe
tite, sound digestion, regular stools, a clear
skinand a vigorous body. TUTT'S PILLS
cause no nausea or griping nor interfere
with daily work and are a perfect
ANTIDOTE TO MALARIA.
HE FEELS LIKE A NEW l1AN.
"I have had Dyspepsia, with Constipa
tion two years, and have tried ten different
kinds of pills, and TUTT'S are the first
that have done me any good. They have
cleaned me out nicely. My appetite is
splendid, food digests readily, and I now
have natural passages. I feel like a new
man." W. D. EDWARDS, Palmyra, O.
Soldeverywhere,25c. Offiec,44MurraySt.,N.Y.
TUTT'S HAiR DYE.
GRAY on WhsxRS changed in.
stantly to a bLossy BLAcK by a single ap.
plication of this DYE. Sold by Druggists
or sent by express on receipt of s 1.
Office, 44 Murray Street, New York.
TUTT'S MANUAL UF USEFUL RECEIPTS FRE.
July 19, 29-1y.
_ TETI E
STOXACH
EITTEg5S
Fortify the System.
All who have experienced and witnessed
the effect of Hostetter's Stomach Bitters
upon the weak, broken down, desponding
victims of dyspepsia, liver complaint,
fever and ague, rheumatism, nervous de
bility, or premature decay, know that in
this supreme tonic and alterative there
exists a specific principle which reaches the
very source of the trouble. and effects ai
absolute and permanent cure.
For sale b'y all Dru ists and Dealers.
Samson's Legs and Locks.
When Delilah clipped off Sameon's
locks that mighty athlete at onace bc
camne "'as 01ote mena.' If it could lte
p)roved that the p)ossessiona of luxurriant
hair would (eiable men to tear open
lion's jalws. Iliscox & Co., wotuld be
driveni wild in the eFort to supply
enough of Parker's H[aiir Balsams to
meet the the dlemanid. As it is the
Basanm p)revets yourin hair' from fall
ing out, and restores the origial color
if faded or gray. Besidles it is at great
addition to the toilet table as a dress
in... June 1-lmn.
From Macon. -
In August, 1%1l. it was discovered
that my son's wife was itn the last
stages -of consuttlJtion. She wa
coughing inceessantly and( at t ime(s
woulid dischtarg~e quanitities of pus1 from
her lungs, (could not sleepl or retain)
anythinag on.' h'ir stomach. and we
thought it only a qutest ion of time when
life wouldl hC complled( to give way
to the fell destroyer'. After- all other
remedies lad failed, we got Bre wer's
Lung Restorer and began it in very
small doses, a.s shte was veryV weak'
She soon1 began to improve; (contintued
the remedy andu wats resttred to life
and health and is to-day better thain
she has ever been before. I regard
her restoration as ntear'ly a mtiracle, for
wvhich she is inidebted to Brewer's
Lung Restorer.
R. W. BONNER.
Maeotn Ga.
Brewer's Lun g R e-torer is a purely
vegetable prepar'ation,. contains tno
opium, morphine bromide or any p)oi
sonous substance. Send for eircular
of 1o ig list of wonderful cures.
LAMAR, RANKIN & LAMAR.
Macon Ga.
~O
W. J. POLLAED. JAS. L. ROBERTSON.
POLLARD & ROBERTSON,
Cotton Factors and Commission Merchants,
No. 731 Reynolds Street, AUGUSTA, CEORCIA.
Manufacturers and General Agents for the Following Machinery, Con
sisting in Part,
100 Fairbanks Standard Scales,
100 Thomas Smoothing Harrows,
100 Acme Pulverizers and Clod Crushers,
100 Reapers, Different Makes and Styles, (single or combined.)
25 Hubbard Gleaners and Binders, (Independent.)
25 Threshers and Separators, (various sizes and styles)
25 Watertown Steam Engines, (all sizes all styles)
20 C. & G. Cooper & Co. Steam Engines, (all sizes and styles)
10 Oneida Steam Engines, (all sizes and styles)
75 Smith's Hand-Power Cotton and Hay Presser,
50 Pollard Champion Gins, Feeders and Condenseis,
25 Neblett & Goodrich IXL Cotton Gins at $2.00 per saw,
10 Neblett & Goodrich second-hand IXL Cotton Gins at $1.50 per saw, in good order,
5 Kreible Engines.
WOOD WORKING MACHINERY (all kinds) FLOUR & CORN
-MILLS, & MILL MACHINERY.
Otto Silent Gas Engines, Hancock Inspirators, Dean Steam Pumps,
Milburn Roller Breas. Gins, Feeders and Condensers, Carver Seed Cotton
Cleansers, Newell Cotton Seed Hluliers and Separators, Colt's Power
Cotton Presses, Shafting, Pulleys and Hangers, Steam and Water Pipes,
Fittings. etc. Belting, Lacing, Hoes, etc.
COTTON^ MILL SUPPLIES A SPECIALTY.
A full line of Machinery of all kinds in estock and for sale low. Call and
examine before l)urchasir.g, and save money.
Send for catalogues. Correspondence solicited and promptly attended to.
Pollard & Robertson, 731 Reynolds st., Augusta Ga.
W. T. GAILLIAnD, Agt. Ne wberry, S. C.
Mar 19-ly
OLUMBIA CASH DRY GOODS STOR?,
. F. JACKSON, Manager,
120 Main Street, - Columbia, S. C.,
ALWAYS ON HAND A FULL
-STOCK OF
NOTIONS, CLOTHING, HATS,
Ladies and Gents Under Garments,
HOSIERY, CARPET
JI TERMS SRICTLY C H. I
TH BLATCHLEYPU I
Cancer.
The development of the treatment of Cancer B
with Swift's Specific seem so wonderful, that all BLATCHLEY S
so afflicted should write tis.TRPENA L
CANCER for 14 YEARS.PO ELILNE
Spartanburg, S. C . March 14, 1884. o
I have for la years been a suffercr from a run-SEM SSTB
ning sore on my face that everybody called a
CAMCEtR. I have used over S3d0 worth of medi- CPE-IE
cine and fcunid no relief. About four months E
ago I bought one bottle or Swifts Speific from
Dr H E Hleinitsh, and since have bought live
others, have taken it. and they have cured ine
sound and welt! My face is Dosnoteeefromuedsore
ass nbody's, and my health is perfectly restored ba
I feel like forty years had been hined off my hue nteTae
head. Yours thankfully, ELIZA TINSLEY. ~ .LTHE,aUr
Mr. B F Burns, Hfope, Ark., says, uder date 30MAKTS.Phlda
of Jan 22, 1884: "I have taken five bottles of I Wiet efrnm fnactAet
SwIft's Specific forea sore on my temple-said to aL-On
be a caricer. I have been wonderfully benefitted
and will soon be a well man."
Mr W RI Robinson. D)avideboro, Ga., writes, Lr inyo t~'ahTobe
under date ,Jnn 3, 1884: "'I am getting on finely,
the ulcer -is gradually healing. 1 feel that SvfpiilIfpueodcotebwls
Switt's Specitic will cure the horrible cancer irgiiiIieie oiieeig ~isi
which has been feeding on ine for over 20 years. sie akadhat elwtrle inn
Mr. W It Gilbert, Albany. (;a, says: brah neiefrwo,cil,fers
"A gentleman iiamed 'Moore near this city Irttiie vIlhtnu,dycuh
had an eating cancer on his face, which haddiz i'.,it(ll )i ihckpr.ls
eaten away his nose and his under lip, and had o eoy og ih.Frteetobe
extended up until it lhad nearly reached his eye. "WY .. 'LS r ueer.Bx
The cancer waseatina his gums and had render- (13Pls,b al . t. r~.O d
ed his teeth so loose that lie thought they mightdrs.P..AYE&S, liad,P.
at any time drop out. lie hams been takio odb I git. a.g-y
Swift's Specific about three months, and its et -_____ __________
feet has been wonderful. It has driven thec
poison fr'm h is sy stem, the cancer has already
healed greatly, is teeth have become strong Goso l id
again, itid lie thinks he has been rescued from
ani awful death. He is the most er:thusiastic man t'askpiia
l ever saw." __ ILA E 1 TIK
Treatise on plood and Skin Diseases mailed free.
TIIE SWIFt' SPECIFIC CO., H S R FE E
Drawer, 3, Atlanta, Ga.Vey Pois
____ ____ ___ _ BY TIL OLD EST.
PLATHLE'SE
224 PIORST. .AIN-E
(~LNNSAMLESS TUB
LOWET P1 S 'ATAN U CO SPC
that t wilbe oe nthi easoned
Nov lo13.th 1s ofMa tiderth sambyte best
:~ghouset as laetTyear.
TERMSOFLACH LE,ManAf'r,
308 ARKeEnT ST., Phlad'a.rth
transportationam of caest eSng
frommptan:bmpr.lo,cstv oes
~VAtJIE 111JEVrregular . atitenior hen,o asin
At hesewdtor,obHotlkLtndMheart yelo SIPSNb:nn
breath. nowdesnreaforwork,gchiand,elevers
WACESiLOK,zEELY he -A,wt-lpi nhakpr,s
Si"vW aAd latedWare,IPIIL BOOK reasTre cueox
SPETALE ANSECACL CSE rer's , aEr&sON iada. al.
Cldren's Scrgiptus. Js iony
Watcmakig an Repiri GScoods Boofsall kinds
Cal and examice.0 W m23 sthtok an pthiAes. AVery hoarfrt quality.
EDU RD CHO TZ. Botn PapEr-ALDiES
L EN D AIR PET~ RIC-6EA ENSISTeos-l.kns
ToltAtMe esoR Es Ert'. -lr oeb' ih udyohratce
gl~s adSOLnSJ emoenrf,lrsap-yasoev
Arlocatc AlsorAtE iia n
dor~eit Eegan dring. FrgatlT. C.~PFO A
pef Cd heAREN of fao. A
LAEGESTfo STlj,oCK.M ..To.F.B E E E
1884 THE 1884
CONSTITUTION
THE DAILY CONSTITUTION has come to
be a necessity to every intelligent man in
the range of itQ circulation.
For the next year it will be better than
ever. Nearly $100,000 Is now being invested
by its proprietors in a new building, pres
ses and outfit, in which and with which it
can be enlarged to meet its increasing busi
ness, and improved to meet the demands of
its growing constituency.
THE DAILV AND SUNDAY CONSTITUTION for
1884 will be bt.ter and fuller than ever, and
in every sense the best paper in the reach
of the people of the Southeast.
One Year $10, 6 Months $5, . Months $2.50.
1 Month $1.00
THE WEEKLY ONTITUTION
starts the new year with 13,0(0 subscribers
who pronounce it the largest, best and
cheapest paper within their reach.
It consists of 8, 10 or 12 pages tas the de
nmnd of its business or the news may di
rect) tilled with matter of the greatest inter
est to the farmer.
AT LESS TITAN CENTS A WEEK
this great budget of news and gossip will be
sent to your fireside to entertain every
member of your household,
One Year......................... $1:50
Six Months............................ I u0
In Clubs of Ten, each......... 1 25
In Clubs of Twenty, each......... I 00
With an extra paper to the getter up of
the Club.
THE YEAlR OF 1S1.
will be one of the most important in our
history. A President. Congressnien. Sena.
tors. Governor, Legislature-are all to be
elected.
Very important issues are to be tried In
the Na:ional and State elections. The Con
stitutinui in its daily or weekly edition will
carry the fullest and freshest news in best
shape to the public, and will stand as an
earnest champion of Democratic principles.
Address, TIUE CONSTITUTION.
THE
Chroolcl & CoAsti!utioaIist,
AUGUSTA, GA.,
AND THE
NEWBERRY HERALD
for one year at $3.50.
The Augusta CHRONICLE AND CONSTITC
TIONALIST is the largest we-ekly newspaper
in the State. It is a ten page seventy column
pnaper. It contains ll the important news
of the week, and is filled with interesting
and instructive reulintr to the farmer, me
chanic, business and professional man. Its
Washington. Atlanta and Columbia letters
with its full telegraphic ser':ice, market re
r.orts, editorials and general news make It
one of the most readable and one of the
best newspaper in the South.
The CHRONICLE AND CONs7lUTIONALIST
can be read in any household. It i, free
fiom sensationalism.
TilE AMERICAIN FI1ER
Established 1819, and for more than a Third
of a Century under the same
Management
Devoted to FARMING, STOCK-RAISING,
FRUIT GROWING, MARKET GARDENING,
the DAIRY, the POULTRY YARD, ete, etc.
Special attention Is paid to Fertilizers and
Manures, including those of comnlerce and
the farm.
Reports of Representative Farmers' Clubs
are a notable feature of its issues. I
There Is a Home Department, with charm
ing reading and practical Suggestions for
the ladies of the farm household.
The most competent, successful and ex
perienced men and women have charge of
the several departments.
No Farmer in the Atlantic States. from
Delaware to Georgia. "can alrord to be
without" this old and reliable adviser and
Guide on farm work.
The American Farmer Is published twice
every month, ;o- the 1st and 15th). It is
beautifully printed on line white paper in
clear type. $l.' 0 a year. To clubs of five
or over $ . 0 aeh.
Handsome, Valuable and Useful Premiums
are given to all those who will take time
amnd trouble to collect subscribers.
SA M'S .ANDS & SON, Publishers,
128 Baltimore St., Baltimore, lId.
The IIERALD and thme AmeriCan Farmer
will be clubbcd together and sent to anay
address for $3.00 for or,c year-.
THlE E~VENING
Augusta, Ga.,
--AND THE
NEWBERRY HERALD
w:ll tbe furnished for 1I81 at $7 00
The EVENING CHuoNICL.E AM) CONSTmrL
TiONA LzsT is thme largest anid cheapest D)aily
newspaper in the South. It contains eight
thi maanud words cf telegr-aphi per day fronm the
N?w Yo:k Aesciated P'ress. This service Is
supplemented by full special fr-om Atlanta,
Colunibia and: Washington. As a newspaper,
thme CunxiNCI. is onie of the best in thme
Sout h It is neCwsy, prmogressive. refia le and
free froam the demorializing details of crime.
THIS PAPER
IN CLUB WITH
ODE Y'S
LADY'S BOOK
will be sent for one y-ear to any
address on receipt of $'L50 whichi shculd be
sen t to the publish er of the lIERALD.
GODEY'S LADY'S POOK
Is recognizted as thme leatding 1 'ashion and
Hlome Magazine in Amnerica. The leadihng
attrauctions Ior 1&s4 are .the follow ing
Beautiful Colored Fashion Plates exe
1 .cuted by time French process, represen
ting the prevailing fashions in both
styles and color. produced especially for
and published exclusively in GODEY'S
L AD3 'S 1U0OK.
EgshPlates of Fashions in black 'd
"Whie, llutraingleading styles.
9Finely Executed Steel Engravinas by
? the best artists, made for GODEY'S
LADY'S 11OOK.
)Engraved P'ortraits of Ex-presidents of
"Lthie U. S., which form a part of what Is
known In GODEY'S L ADY'S BOOK as the
PRESIDENTIAL Portrait Gallery,
each being accompanied by a short biogra
ph ical sketch.
S0Pages. Illustrating Fashions and fancy
needle work
1 Pages of Architectural Designs. showing
~planus and perspective of Houses and
Cott-ages of all 'tesciptions.
Full size Cut Paper Patte.rns with full
200 CODEY'S WP
Celebrtated. householud cooking receipts,.each
having beein tested by practical hiousekeep)
ers before publishing.
21 PAGES OF SELECT MUSIC.
BESIDES emnbr icingrt ri,h array of litera
andl koems, by eminent writers, among
whom are.
MARION HTARLAND, AUGUSTA de BUBNA,
ClhRISTIA N REID, Mrs. SHEFFEY PETERS,
ELLA RIODMAN CHURCH, HELEN MATH
RS, Author of "Cherry Ripe."
The Art Department will be under tIhe di
rection of Win. MacLeod, Curate of Corcoran
Gallery of Art, Washington, 1). C. All other
departments under equally competent di
rection.
SUBSCRIPTION Price $2.00 per Year.
For fur ther informiation send for circular
Sample copy of GODEY'S LADY'S EOOK
15c. Stamps taken. To avoid errors write
plainly your address, giving County and
State.
GODEI'S LADY'S BOOK.
iC2)6(i',nut Street Phile-lphia, Pa
-4 pC
g 1 fH,dO
Out of Jaws of Death.
This genltlcnan who outlines his case be
low his is a man corsiderably advanced in
life; and is noted for his sterling integrity,
His post-c.flice is Yatesville, Upson county,
G::. fhe fouowing is
Mr. John Pearson's State
ment.
In the Spring of 18S2 I was attacked wit
a very had cough, which continued to grow
worse until fall, when I got so weak that I
could not get about. I tried a great many
kinds of tnedicines but continued to grow
worse. I was notified that I had consump
tion and would probably die. Dr. Holloway
finally told me to try Brewer's Lung Re
storer. They sent to Wat d's Store and got
a bottle and I commenced taking it right
away. After taking two or three doses, I be
gan to improve, and by the time I had used
up one bottle I was able to get on my feet
again. I am now in excellent health. I antm
confident that the Lung Restorer saved my
life and moy neighbots arc of the same opinion.
It is the best Lung Remedy ever made in my
opinion. Dr. II. promised me that he would
write to the manufacturers and tell them of
the wonderful cure it made in my case.
Statement of Benj. F. Hear
don.
Early in November, 1581, while sewing of
the machine, my wife was taken with
severe pain in her side, which was soon fo.
lowed by hemorrhages from her lungs and
severe cough. Fever commenced, she co
neither eat or sleep, and in a few week
was reduced to a living skeleton. T
tending physician told me that he tho
one ot her lungs wr- entirely gone.
could not retain tltt, most delicate arts
ment on her stomach, I then agree -ith Dr.
Su!van, my family physician, t call Dr.
I0o:0way in consultation. The made a
fital exandttation of the patien and pro
nounced the case hopeless. r. Holland
then suggested the Brewer's ng Restorer
as a last resort, I sent for a bttie and gave
her a dose. I found that she could retain it
on her stomach and after about the third
dose, I began to notice some improvement
in her condition. I continued the medicine
regularly and by the time she had taken two
bottles, she was able to walk about the
house. She is now in better health than she
has enjoyed for several years. I believe
the Lung Restorer saved her life. We have
have a family of six children, some of them
grown."
Mr. Ilcarudon's post-office is Yatesville,
Up-on county, Ga. Ile is a thoroughly re
liable man in every particular.
Feb. 28-1m.
oo"
RONO
TON C
OFACTS RECARDING
m. - r
O hW:ha' ir.
the Liv R - a + KIDNEY,anRETETH
wt . oru e
Dec. t4o tf.
4 THE ONLY TRUE
D.ARESTONICsfeads
erIt gives apct:r and etheaLhy, remple
te stVrnds eimny, t te valueE U
d.at e tn tertig ,avce r.y addd (toi ethe M
lveren t)h - o-p:in:l.Wat or, cArnetl I
totw, L . e , p:- r:- i t::en t- et. t use: AL mA r
f 'llttCt Littiran:'. usete flenforc ati
D1n. HCARTE<'s ION TONC 3 Fe S
cure. It 5 Ai' o Dttr.Es :nhElvEcmpe
-l"r sr,Cstetnit"I)thA E lu
tt E'i d l f to i I R: c yfo tr:. and -.ari,tv de
do r. r~ e il rt te adul:I nL A r
tum. lu, riln tris. Ftuncy, Naute, cii
the o tar ourSc adevous Hedah
DYSEPIA.
Ma b und i r.!ranme of te Stamch sanIlw
I" t i axation o then Intestlaus or a cag
NEUTRALIZINC CORDIALS
Is as pleasant and harmless as Blackber
Win-<onrtnsno Opium and wil not coon i
patr>. fyciatly recommnended for Seasickns
and Teething Children.
Gevr:nr and Ezr4ish Directions on cachi Bota,
Prica zSc. and $r.co.
Irgo dize enMain,"tx timerct i.s mlach nusmal. SoIdi
alt I:..ud st ar- ldDaers in Medicines.
TE EXCELSIOR CHEMICAL 00., Soie Propr'tarr
SED A :'e. a TAMPk FoR ULL: nOOK,
New York Office 70 Maiden Lane.
PAYNE'S 10O Horse Spark-Arrosting
Portable Engine has cut 10.000 ft. of M icihigan Pina.
Boards in 10 hours, b:ruuing siahs lrom, the saw in
eght foot lengths.
-Oltr 10 flor*' we G:eranfr'e to farntsh powets to
aw 8.000 fe:-t of l1mk zr-Io,td, t i hours. Our
25 Horse wdi c't' 1'.s- feet in iw.me ttime
Sr _!::i'jines a.: (.,ARtANTEED to
h:rm2-hI ai hor'e-pc w'r on '. loee
f at s:.l wrater thant ..ny oth.er En
:rn: tot f.i ted v: it'h an ~IOmatic
Cat Off. If youz wan' a S L. ur
or Portable Et-. te. Boile \reu
lar Saw-iIil!, Lshnifrmg or I .lley.,
either c.-t 'r Medodart' CI."tent
Wrourrhtrotn Pl'ley, sen-d fo,r 'our
illm-trated catalogue, No. 12, a'or
information nna prices.
B3. W. PAYNE & SONS.
Corning, N. Y. Box 1427.
May 17, 20-ly.
Co1ugh5, Cold, Catarrll, CDsuion.
All Throat, Breast and Lutng Affections
ured by the old-estabtished "SWAYNE'S
WILD-CITERRtY." The first dose gives re
lif anid a cure eedily follows, 25 eta., or
iLO at Drug~gista. Jan. Si-Ky.
Pl Snd six cents for po.stag
Aam1IL; receive fr. a coty
hrox or goods which will help
sway ti.an an'.t ing eise in t his world. Alt,
of either s'-x, succeed Irom first hour. The
Rail Roads.
Columbia & Greenville Railroad.
PASSENGER DEPARTMENT.
COLUXBIA. S. C., June 8th, 1884.
WOn and after Sunday, June 8, 1881, thi
PASSENG ER TRAINS will run as herewith in
dicated upon this road and its branehea
Daily, except Sundays.
No. 53. UP PASSENGER.
Leave W., C. & A. Jur.ction - - - - 12.35 a in
Leave Columbia,A - - " 12.40 a in
" Alston, - - - - 1.54 p in
Newberry, - - - - 2.56 p i
" Ninety-Six, - - - - 4.13 p m
" Hodges, - - 518 p m
" Belton, -. - - - 6.23 p in
Arrive Greenville, - - - - 7.50 p in
No. 52. DOWN PASSENGER.
Let.ve Greenville, - - - - 9.54 a in
" Belton, - - - 11.22 p in
Hodges, - - 12.3~ p in
Ninety-Six, - - - - 1.21 p in
" Newberry, - - - 3.12 p in
" Alston, - - - 4.13 p in
Arrive Columbia,F - - 5.15 p in
Arrive W., C. & A. Junction.- 5 3 p in
sPAILTANBU2o. UNION a COLUMBIA RAILROAD.
No. 53. UP PASSENGER.
Leave Alston, --------p in
4 Strother, -- --- - p in
" Shelton, - - - :;. p m
" Santuc,- ---- 3.3t; p m
Union, - -- 4.2 p in
Jonesville, -4.41 p i
Arrivc Spartanburg, - .27 p in
No.52. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Spartanburg, RI. & D). Depot, li 11 5v p in
Spartanburg, S. U.& C. Lepo!,G 12.]Op in
Jonesville, - - - l.'2 p in
Union. - - 1.35 p in
Santc, - - - 2.21 p it
Shelton, 1 p m
Strother. - - - 3.:1 l) in
Arrive at Aton. - - 4.07 p in
LAURENS AILSA .
Leave Newberry, - - - 3.30 p it
Arrive Lauregs C. i., - - 6.15 p in
Leave Laurein. C. H., - - 9 135 p in
Arrive Newberry, - - 12. p it
ABBEVILLE I:ASCII.
Leave Hodhes. - - - 5.31 p it
Arrive at Abbeville, - - - 4.3 p m
Leave Abbeville, - - - - 11.30 p it
Arrive atlioges, - . - - 12.30 pm
BLUE P.IDGE RAILROAD AN!) ANLEIISO:I
Leave BLelton 6.5 p m
Anderson 7.12 p m
" Pendleton 0.59) p in
Leave Seneca C, 8.52 p in
Arrive Walhalila 9.1 p in
Leave Wahalla, - - 8.40 a i
Leave Seneca C, 9.--7 a in
La Pendleton, - - 952 a in
" Anderson, - - 10.42 p in
Arrive at Belton, - - 11.15 p m
FIEIGHT, I'ASSEN-ER COACH ATTACED.
Leave Selton ,r.15 a in
" lnliauston 7.10 a in
' leIzer 7.37 :L In
" iedmont 8.25 a in
Arrive aBeenvill 9.2.5 p i
Leave Greenville 4.15 p in
" Peiiamtont 5 30 a in
"'elzer 6.15 p m
" Wllianston 7.00 ai
Arrive Ielton 7.10 p in
CONNECTIONS.
A. With South Carolina Railroad from Char
leston.
With Wilmington, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad from Wilmington and all
points North thereof.
With Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad from Charlotte and all points
North thereof.
B. With Asheville & Spartanburg Rail Road
for points in Western North Carolina.
C. With A. & C. Div. R. & D. R. R., from all
points South and West.
D. With A. & C. Div., R. & D. R. R., from At,
lanta and beyond.
E. With A. & C. Div., R. & D. R. R., from all
points South and West.
F. With South Carolina Railroad for Charles
ton.
With Wilmin"ton, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad for Wilmington and the North.
With Charlotte, Colnmbia and Augusta
Railroad for Charlotte and the North.
G. With Asheville & Spartanburg Railroad
from Hendersonville.
1I. With A. & C. Div., R. & D. R. R., from
Charlotte and beyond.
J. W. FRY, Superintendent.
31. SLAUGHITER, General Passenger Agent.
D CARDWELL, As't General Passenger Agt.,
Columbia, S. C.
South Carolina Railway Company,
CHANGE OF SCHEDULE.
On and after May 11th, le4. Passenger
Trains on this road will run as follows un
til further notice:
'10 AND FRO31 CHARLESTON.
GOING EAST,
Leave Columbia *7.50 at mn 5.25 p mt
Arrive Charleston 12 20 p mt 655 p mn
GOING WEST,
Leave Charleston t8.l8 a mn *4.30 p m
A rrive Columbia 12.'38 a mn 9.22 p in
ti-aily. *Daily except Sunday.
TO AND FROM CAMDEN.
GOING EAST,
Leave Columbia *i 50 a mn *5.25 p mn
Ar: ive Camden 2.25 at mn 8.25 p mn
GOING WEST
Leave Camden *.0.00 a In +4 t0 p mn
Arrive Columbia 12.38 a mn '..22 p mn
*Daily exeept Snnays.
TO AND FnOM AUGUSTA.
GOING EAST,
Leave Columbia *7.50 a mn *5.25 p mn
Arrive Augusta 1.20 p mn 8.101 a mn
GOING WEST,
Leave Augusta *7.15 a mn
A rrive Columbia 12.38 p mn
-Daily except Sundays.
CONNECTIONS.
Connection made at ColumbIa with the
Columbia and G reenville Itail Rtoadl by train
airriviIi atL 12.38 P. M., ad dleparting at 5.50
P'. M1. Connection mal:de at Columbia June.
tion with Charlotte. Columbia and Augusta
1:ail Rioad by same train to and from all
points on both roads with through P'ullman
sleeper between Charleston andl Washing
ton, via Virginia Midland route, without
change. Connection made at Charleston
with Steamers for Ne w York on Wednesdays
and Saturdays; also, with Savannah and
Charleston Railroad to all points South.
Connections are mnade at Augusta with
Georgia Railroad and Central Railroad to
and from all points South and WVest.
Through tickets can be purchased to all
points South and WVest, by applying to
D. MCQUE EN, Agent, C'olumnbia.
D. C. ALL EN, G. P. & F. A.
JOHN B. PECK. General Manager.
Asheville and Spartanburg Railroad.
SP'ARTANBURG, S. C.. May 12,188SI.
On andl after Monday, May ]2st, 1844,
passenger I rains will be run daily (Sundays
exceptedl) between Spartanburg and Hen
dersonville, as follows:
UP TRAIN.
Leave R. & D. Depot at Spartanburg.6.00 p mn
Arrive at IIcndlersonville.........9.0 p mn
DOWN TRAIN.
Leave Hendersonvillo............. 8.00 a in
Arrive R. & D. Depot, Spartanburg.1.30 p mn
Both trains make connections for Colum-.
bia and Charleston via Spartanburg. Union
und Columbia and A tlanta and Charlotte by
AIr Line. .JAMES ANDERISON,
Supe.rints nelent.
PAT NT
Oband.adal te busieith U.
Sen MODL DRAING We as
ast paetbliyfe -fcag andw
We efr, er. t te8Poatr the
toCoA NO C.
Dc.~ 6.8-1
tiete ok wt c t ,.2
Patent Ome etnaa atteneato OERTE

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