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Keowee courier. (Pickens Court House, S.C.) 1849-current, October 30, 1890, Image 1

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? li R M S:
PubltsUod ovory Thursday morning.
For subscription, $1.00 por annum,
strlotly in advance; for ?U mouthe, 76
cont?; for four month*, 60 cont*.
Advertisements Inserted at on? dollar
por square of ono inch or IOBS for tho first
insertion and fifty couts for each sub
sequent infcortioii.
Obituary Notlooo oxoeoding five linos,'
Tributes of Kespeot, Communications of
~a personal oharaeter,1 'when, adlnlssablo.
aud. Announopmonts of Candidates will
bo ?hurgod l'or ns advertisements.
JOb Fil?tl?g neatly and cheaply execu
ted,
Necessity compels us to adhere strlotly
to tho requirements of Cash Payments.
?o i liloo Own Heit ai? -XVMO ?uti JU Mum ?ol(?w M |&f IVl?h? the ?Af, Vk*U Cnnn't No? .JTkew M4> WI? *f> *** S?-R ,
y.n.iUi . ,t..m,ll,UV? I iA?H>m\ii"?\-i j m..i.im i ' ii i
BY THOMPSON, BMITI? ? JATTNES.
'?HA, OOTOBKB 30, 1
VOi>tjMti Xiii.--:%.4?
>Vi'yi*?lH I jj
PMMMM ?
Whole Rice
I? One D?
OS
- g3>
The Gem of the Mountains.
Tino highest town East of tho Hookey
vMountatns, ls .H?CUU.ANOE,.N. C.;
altltudoj Main Stroot, 3,817 foot. Finost
all round dlimato: summer hoat raroly
above 80?; leo-t?bld springs; grandest wa
tor-falls and mountain scenery; ll nest
timber and almost all known minorais.
Groat summer and winter rosort. The
JIli/Mdnds Star, $1 por yoari Bo. por oopy ;
full of information. COE BROS., Pub
lishers, Highlands, Macon county, N. C.
In the Land of the Sky.
Merchant Tailor.
FREDERICK THEILKUHL, lato of
Germany, a professional tailor, is
prepared to do any kind of work In his
lino on reasonable terms, GivO him' a
call at his ( i nice on Main stroot, next door
to Bank, Walhalla, 8. 0.
October 81, 1889. 4-1-tf
NOMINATIONS.
Regulate The Bowels.
Cofltlvonotm deranges tho whole eye*
(em ?aa begote disease*, eueh oe
Dyspepsia! Fever*, Kidney Diseases,
Bilious Collo, Malaria, eto.
'/nit'" l'llls produceregaler habit off
boily end good digestion? without
wttloh, no one ea? enjojr good health.
Sold Everywhere.
THE CRESCENT MINERAL
-W ATER=
fill Core Your Dyspepsia.
OP OP TIJiHJY OP
?mi fiIJD KIDIJBY
' DISBSSB (SUPD.
J. N. Smith, for twonty years an
FOR GOVERNOR :
BENJAMIN R. TILLMAN.
FOU LIEUTENANT OOVKUNOn :
EUGENE B. GARY.
FOU ATTORNRY QKNRRAI. :
Y. J. TOPE.
FOR SECRETARY OF 8TATK :
J. E. TINDALL.
FOR STATE TREASURER :
W. T. C. BATES.
FOR COMPTROLLER ORNKnAI.:
W. II. ELERBEE.
FOR SUPEIUNTRNDKNTOF EDUCATION.1
W. D. MAYFIELD.
FOR ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR ORNERAI.
HUGH L. FARLEY.
FOR OONORK88 i
GEORGE JOHNSTONE.
FOR THE LEGISLATURE :
A. ZIMMERMAN,
J. L. SHANKLIN.
FOR PIlOllATE JODOK :
RICHARD LEWIS.
Fon sonoor. COMMISSIONER :
N. W.-MACAULAY.
FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONERS :
J. M. HUNNIOUTT,
W. N. COX,
A. BEARDEN.
FOR TREASURER :
A. P. CRISP.
and I am bettor to-day than I havo boon
for ten years, all through tire uso of this
water, and my wifo. who for many years
has boon obliged to toko medicine for
hor I'vor, ha? .ifvd iio occasion .for any
medicine since usine; tho Crescent Water,
and now fools Uko a now porson."
Loading ci ti /.en s of 'Greenville add tho
following:
"Thq testimony of John N, Smith, re
garding'tho' wqniWful curativo oftoets of
tho OresWit'Mme??l' Water will bo of
f;roat valuo, for no man's word is stronger
ll Greenville than his."
0, ll? Judson, President Furmnn Uni
versity. .
A. H. Curot?n, Superintendent Cotton
Sood Mill.
Frank (lammond, President Pooplo's
H. C, MaiUley, Caniago Manufacturer.
T, C. Gowor, Proprietor Stroot Railway.
John H, Maxwoll, M, D.
J. W, Ilowoll, M. D.
G. T. Swaudalo, M. D. ,
J. W. Karlo, M. D.
John Ferguson. Grooor.
R. E. Allon A Bro., Grocors.
J. P. MUlor, Grocer.
ti. M. Snider & Co., Jowolors.
G. D. Barr, Stove Doalor.
?091) Hart, Contractor and Bulldor.
Sordl for book of testimonials,
A Ortso of Croscont Minoral Wator, con
taining 12 half-gallon liottlos, will bo sont
hy ?xprcss. pr?pftid, by UH OU receipt oi i
f LOO, and $1.50 a dozen will bo allowed
for bottles returned nt our ex pense.
MmHilf your Druggist, has not obtalnod a
Ql^Hpply, order direct of thc
HHnEst'EKT MINERAL WATER CO.,
?HP n7 5 Of??rtvillo, S. C.
July 8, 1800
FOB AUDITOR :
T. li. NORltlS.
HEALTH,
STRENGTH.
HAPPINESS.
T?rm
18 AN I NOT HU MK NT FOR THE PREVEN
TION AND CURE OP DISEASE! IT 13 NOT
A BATTERY, NOT DYNAMIC OR 8TATI0
ELEOTRIOITV; NOR 18 IT dALVANISM.
THERE 18 NO CURRENT AND N08HOOK.
ITO WORK 18 DONE 8ILENTLY AND IN
SENSIBLY, YET MOST EFFEOTIVELY.
THE EVI LO RESULTING FROM THE USE
OF ELEOTRIOITY IN THE TREATMENT
OF D18EA8E8, A8 HERETOFORE PRAC
TICED, ARE ENTIRELY AVOIDED DY THI8
8Y8TEM.
WU TAKE PLEASURE IN OI VI NO INFOR
MATION TO ALL INTERESTED. WE A8K
VOU TO TAKE NOTHING ON FAITH, BUT
PROVE OUR 0LAIM8. WE HAVE TESTI
MONIA! ? FROM PEOPLE YOU KNOW,
ruy!NO THEIR OWN EMPE??iEKCS. VVTdTE
TO un.
SOUTHER? ElEOTROPOISE Do*
222 KINO STREET,
CHARLESTON, 8. c.
p. . -Mvwi iNfoAMA?iO!< M?KT jtfyy.
"Tho Third Estate of tho South,"
Wo have ,before xis a most inter
esting addreBB delivered bof?ro the
American Sooiol Soionco Associa
tion at Saratoga, N. Y., by th? ftev.
A. 'JD. Mayo; Toe themo of the
addross, ?The Third Est?to of th,?
Southj" is op.? which touches a jrrayc
social qU?st?dn in tho very bosom bf
tho Southern society, ajpd the essayist
of this ocoasiou, . the Rev. A. I>.
Mayo, must bc permitted to speak
for himself as to the oppOvtunitio's
he ha? enjoyed for fol ming sound
Opinions on BO prave a subject ' ja*
well as tho wholesome spirit of hon
est inquiry into the ro?l fa?ts of tho
?nso Whioh ho Would; bi !ng to be?ir
On the solemn sooial problem he
undertakes to disoU88.
Tho great Noi?hein apostle in the
oauso of Southoin 'duo?tion Bays of
himself and hrs essay :
"The present os?ay--'Tho Third
?state of the South1- is an honest
attempt to give my own opiuioiia
conceni'ng this, one of tho most
important movements in tho history
of the Republic. The assumption
of infal'Uilo wisdom-:and tho ventila-,
tton of wholesale theories, Noith
j ?nd ooitth, in tho discussion of
Southoin off d'"s, is tho misery of Our
political Ho. A \iuu?l.residence of
?en years in th's region, inolud'ng all
?the sixteen Southoin States, M 1th
good oppoi lunities for observation,
has deoponed the impression--*JM&<&
an'so?mVOTi^ -o'?vic puzzles that con
front thc Amoi'.can social scientist
and statesman, no koot is so tnngled,
so d'fficult to be undone, so danger
ous to be out by the sword as this.
To-day thc South as a section has
passed into a peimaneht m:,ioi ity of
sixteen of the foity-four States,
But it is sti'l possible to ai ray these
States again in a con il ic t that would
indict a wound on tho Southern
members through which tho Repub
lic would bleed to doath. It is 'easy
as preaching' to embroil and exas
perate wholo coir mon wealths, gveat
classes and races in a permanent
misunderstanding that not oven
another Wash'ngton or Lincoln could
reconcile. Even as concerns tho
South the question is one of \ ital
interest. Tho spectaolo of five hun
dred thousand white people of South
Carolina split into hostile dans by a
politioal campaign now foaming on
the ragged reef of violence is inex
pressibly painful and discouraging.
I shall not try tc deal with this ques
tion by the ambitious methods' of
grand analysis, abstract theorizing
or inflated propheoy. If I cnn oast
a littlo side light upon this proces
sion, as it moves on its twilight path,
it may not bo in vain that I occupy
tho time of the reader."
We go back now to lot tho Bostc?u
educator stato his oaso, and hiing
forward on tho stage of aotion this
"Third Estate of the South, to which
our attention is invited. Wo shall
not stop boro to dispute the essay
ist's propositions-some of whioh
aro undoubtedly inaccurate-as our
purpose is to lot him tell his story as
ho soos it and fi om his own stand
point of an earnest, honest Boston
evangelist. And this for tho reason
that wo sometimes fear that our mis
take has boen at tho South to shut
off the free discussion of gravo sub
jcots which concern our Southoin
society ns something whioh is our
own mattor and not to bp intci med
dled with by outsiders.
But wo live' in an ago of free
thought and aro a part of a great
country from whioh we cannot shake
our destinies free, nor can it free
itself from our embarrassing pro
blems. What hurts us must hurt it,
and what hurts it must hurt us.
Uenoo it is idle to dismiss tho hon
estly ontertained vioWs of thought
ful mon of tho North as without con
trolling force and legitimate applica
tion to our affairs.
Mr. Mayo introduces tho subject
ho trouts thus :
"From tho beginning of the Euro
pean settlement ovon to thc present
yoar of our Lord io most promi
nent objeot of in' . ost and observa
tion in what wo used to oall tho
Southern Statos of this Republic has
been tho relation of tho upper and
under classes of Southern society
tho slavoholding Anglo-Saxon and
the lately emancipated negro.
"Not only abroad, but at homo, it
has scarcely entered into tho calcula
tions of statesmen and scientists
that a great chango in Southern
affairs was impending that wouid
tyring another dominant olosu to tho
front. It Was known that ovon in
1860 thoro were six millions of wbito
peoplo in those Southern States who
had no imrnodiato connection with
slaveholder^., v?t waa expected that
this middle ollss would"1 be felt in
arresting the rnbveiuont of soc?ssion
hi 1861. But |?th the oxooption of
West Virginia Ind the stubborn loy
alty of tho mountain populations of
the central So^th this oxpoothtiou
was disappointed. Wo mot th?s'o
po?plo on tho baalo'-litdd through.
four dismal yearn where they earned
a reputation forwood fighting whioh
has mad o thc nimo of an A morion n
soldier Bjusttlous. *"
"But now,lik^'a mighty apparition
across tho Southe? JI horV.on, has
risen tho hopo $or poi tont of the
South,-tho th i M estate-to cbal
len^?'tho authority of the old liil'ng
?%8 , and pla?tt- itself where tho
?plain people' o? every Noithcin
State was long -ago established, as a
deolstvo influenc? >n our polUloat
affairs. South -?arol'na, tho hoad
and front of th? old South, is now
swept by a political revolution ns
radical as the emancipation of tho
slaves in 1865. /
"The w?so.-observer of Southern
affairs wiM greatly mistake if ho
insists on the exclusivo observation
of the old conflict of raoes and the
politioal condition of the negro.
For tho coining decade the place to
watoh the South is in the movement
of tho r's'ng th'yd estate.' What
it demands, what it can achieve in
political, social and industrial affs'vs;
what chang?s can bo w;mv$A,'Vn
jft^^V>yYnJtf'g?,?at:?p,,ft,ng foroos of
Amorican ol vitiation-by eduoation,
inoluding tho influence of tho family,
tho church and tho sohool- m tbeso
things w'1! depond tho fate of this
important sootiOn of tho countiy for
years to como. In tho Eu ?.opean
sense there never was a Southern
niistooraoy. But in tho Amorioan
sense there was and has boon up to
tho prosent tmie a dominant class in
this poi lion of tho country moro
powoi ful for all tho, issues of publie
Ufo than any order of nobi':ty in
Europe s'neo the French Revolution. I
"This politioal nristo?rmy m a'l
vital affairs governed tho ltepublio
tiM it was moved to rise up sud
divide the nation in 1861. It nsti
gat 1 and brought on the condition
of war against tho Indians, Gr?at
Biltabi ?nd Mexico. It was thc
author of the tn ag. ii (iceni soheme of
tho expansion of tei/itoiy whioh
gave us the empire of Louisiana,
Florida, Toxos, tho Payfio coast -a'l
the additions of our ten i tory except
tho latest purchase, Alaska. It led
in the settlement of tho West, and
Tonhosseo and Kontucky woro in a
blazo of border war, while tho North
west slumbered almost undisturbed.
"The world has aoknowledg?d tho
prodigious ab! My and matchloss
devotion with whioh this dominant
elas8 wont through the dcsporUo
programme to the ter ri bio end of its
own destruction. Its statesmanship,
now disparaged, was probably as
competent as a causo so at odds with
tho trend of modern civilization
would admit. But we do not yot
recognize fairly the great services
rendered the South and tho nation
later on by this class of mon in tho
demora!5zed state in which it was left
by tho war, where not one in ton of
its families was found upon or has
since stood on a solid financial foot
ing. Its young mon scattered to the
South west, to the Northwest, to tho
growing cities, leaving the open
country in charge of a class that in
the old timo had little influenco in
affairs. Its womon gathored up tho
wreck of a groat destruction in true
American stylo; ' and to-day ' tho
young womon of the hotter sort of
Southern families are tho hopo of
tho country, rehabilitating the towi.f?,
tho soul of thc church, the host
school teachers, on thc lookout for
all industrial opportunities that oan
bo used.
"But it was inevitable that this
long lonso of power by tho Southern
dominant class should oomo to an
ond. In New England and Now
York, tho aristocratic St ?.tos of tho
old North, this change wk-j gradually
wrought-by tho educational influ
ences that propared the humbler
classes, nativo or foreign born, for
tho responsibilities of powor. Eighty
five per cent of tho mon worth a
hundred thousand dollars or moro, in
those States, bogan with nothing but
this outfit. -But in tho South tho
progress of tho Third Estnto has
boon slow; indeed, until tho past
twenty yoars, it had hardly bogun.
But all things hasten, ovon in the
piny woods or mountain realms of
our Southland; and now, under tho
simple name of ?, 'Farmers' Alli
ance,' this mighty avmy of tho oom
mon people has been rcvonled, like a
frowning mountain world uncovered
by a rising mist. Already it may bo
predicted that tho old order, so far
as it depended oh the European
qualities bf family and olass train
i ug, has gouo by. Hereafter .tho Soutb
follows tho North in tho rush to the
front of tho fittest who BUT vive.
And tho cohteftt for place will bo on
industrial linos there as hero."
?: ??; ?U tb,?8^ not food for honest
thought and ground for o^ouraspeot
aotlon Columbia Itegistir.'
rroservlng Husbands.
At a recent meeting of the Wo
man's Club at Marshalltown, Ia.,
Mrs. H. C. Young canned quite a
stjr by her responso to ,tbo toast :
"Oe Husbands.*' Quoting Burns,
Mrs. Young bogan :
"ir?isb?nd, husband, cease your st rim,
No longer Idly rovo, sir;
Though I am your wedded wife,
Vet.Ivm' not your slavo, slr."
"How shali wo preservo our hus
bands?" continued Mrs. Young. "In
selecting your husband you should
hot be guided by the silvery appear
ance, as in maokerol. Nor by the
golden tnit as found lu salmon. Bo
sure to seleot him yourself, as tastes
diffor. Dc r;ot go to marget for ulm,
ns the best are always brought to
your door. It is far bolter to have
pbno, unless you know how to pro
servo thom: Some women do this
by keeping bim in hot water. Othor?
lot them freeze by fotfo'r^^??ffl* \
and indifference. Son?o^*,^^o?|?U\
iii a stow by irritating w^j?-Wui
moods. Others roast thom or keep
thom in pickle all their lives.
"It cannot be oxpeoted that any
husband w)H bo tender and good
managed in this way. Tho only true
way to do with him is to preserv?
h* m. To do th's you must havo a
preserving kettle of tho finest por
cei;an; or, if that is unattainable, an
earthenware pipkin will do with oaro.
See that the linen in which he is to
be preserved is nicely prepared.
Tio h'm in tho kettle with a strong
si'k cord oallcd ?oomfort,' as tho ono
oalled ?duty' is apt to be weak, and
ho might fly out of tho kettle and bo
buinrd. (You must remember thal
husbands aro I'ke crabs and lobsters, I
they havo to bo prepared while alive.)
Make a oloar, steady fire out of love,
neatness and cheerf illness. Set him
as near the fire as seems to agrco
with him. If he sputters and fizzles,
do not bo anxious. Some husbands
w<H do this until they aro quito done.
Add a 1'ttlo sugar occasionally in tho
form of what confectioners oall
?kisses,' but bo earoful to avoid pop
per or vinegar, as these things spoil
%ho flavor. A little spice' improves
thom, but it must bo used with good
judgment. Do not stiok any sharp
instiument into him to ooo if ho is
becoming tender. But stir him
gently, watching tho while lest ho
He too flat and close in tho kettle,
for then ho soon becomes spo'led
and useless. Watoll him oarefully
and you cannot fa?l to know when he
is done.
"If thus troatod, you wiU find you
have a well-preserved husband that
will provo.a joy lo you and tho
children, and ho will keep as long as
yon need him, unless you becoi.io
careless and sot him in too cold a
place.
'A king for tho beautiful realm ca^cd
homo,
And a m?n that the Maker, God,
Shall look upon as ho did tho first,
And say-lt is vory good.' "
Mr. James M. Sullivan, President
of the Anderson Shoo and Leather
Company, returned last Monday
from an extonded trip up North in
tho interest of tho company. While
gone he purchased all tho machinery
necessary, of tho vory best grade
and latest improvements. The ca
paoity of tho machinery purchased
is 800 pairs a day or moro. This
oapaoity oaii bo increased at a very
little expense to a thousand pair a
day. Mr. Sullivan was very muoh
encouraged by those engaged in thc
same business up North, whoro they
have, disadvantages that wo down
hore would not have. Ho also
bought a stock of leathor, <fcc. Mr.
Josoph LaChancc, of Camdon, N, J.,
Was engaged ns Superintendent, and
carno baok with Mr. Sullivan. Mr,
LaChanee is a man of fifteen years'
experience in tho manufacturing of
shoes. Ho expresses himself as
pleased with Anderson and tho pros
pects of tho company. Just as soon
as tho machinery arrives and ls
??laced in position, tho work of manu -
act ?ring il ces witt V;ogivi. This will
take about a mouth. As soon as possi
I hie tho company desires to employ
sovoral operatives, mon, women, boys
and girls. Now would bo a good
timo for sorao ono to begin, an hono
rable and profitable oalling.-Ander
eon Intelhaen??r.
Is the Tariff Law Law!
WASHINGTON, D. C., Ctotdber 28.
-A' number of newspapers this
morning publish articles foreshadow
ing attempts to contest the legality
Of the McKinley tariff bill upon va
rious g:'oundH, one being olorloai er
rors and omissions in the enrollment
of tho bill with the conference com
mittee changes. Concerning those
publications, Secretary Windon, said
this morning that he know nothing
official about tho legality of the ta
riff biH. "I do not," ho said, "re
gard it as the province of an execu
tive officer to question tho constitu
tionality of acts of Cong-ess. It i?
for him to enfovco the iw as he
finds it, and not to determine a ques
tion affecting its legality. I am,
thorefore, executing tho1 MoKinloy
tariff aot as I find it ?pproved by
tho President, of tho Sonata and
Speaker of tho Houso of Representa
tives, and I shall continuo tO do so
unless ? competent tribunal, such as
the Supremo Court, decides; that the
law is unconstitutional. It is not
for me to question the validity of
the signatures to tho bill as enrolled;
neither is it for rae to determino
whether tho bill signed by tho Presi
dent did or did not in fact pass the
lower Houso. Much less is it for
mo to doteimino whether tho omis
sion of the tobacco drawback section
or any other provision of the bill in
jn^.Vww'^th^Vwv. as a whole. Asl
understand it, tho aot of ??tober^Mtv
1890 is the law of tho land. My1
duty, then, is plaiu, and 1 will oxe
outo it to the host of my ability.
Its constitutionality is ;i question foi"
tho courts, and until th?y decide
against it, I shall bo gbv?rned by it
as it stands." Attorney GonOrol
Miller positively doc) i ned to discuss
tho question in any of its bearings,
saying that it would* bo manifestly
improper for him to do so uhloss it
carno to him in an official way.
Commissioner of Internal Revenue
Mason, who is especially charged
with tho exeoution of tho tobacco
provisions of tho law, confined his
remarks in regard to the alleged ille
gality of tho law to tho following
statement : "I will obey tho law^ as
coitificdby the Seoretary of Statb.
I It is not for us to say whether or not
tho omission of tho tobacoo rebato
provisions violates tho law."
Candidates for Congress.
There aro opposing candidates in
oyery Congressional Distriot in tho
State-something that has not hap
pened in years bofore. Tho nomi
nees are :
1st Distriot: W. H. Braw?oy,
Charleston, Democrat; Dr. W. ?)',
Ci um, Cha. lenton, colored Republi
can.
Cid District: Geo. D. Tillman,
Edgefiold, Demoorat; S. ?. Smith,
Aiken, colored Republican.
dd Distliot: Gcorgo Johnstone,
Nowbony, Domoorat; Jno. R. Tol
bert, Abbeville, Republican.
4th Distriot: G. W. Sholl, Laurens,
Demoorat; Dr. J. F. Ensor, Cohim
bia, Repubhoan.
6th Distriot : E. T. Staokhoufto,
Marion, Demoorat; E. H. Deas; DaV
lington, colored Republican.
8th Distriot: Jno. J. Ilomphill,
Chester, Domoorat; G. Q. Alexander,
Camdon, a so-called "Indopondent
Domoorat."
7th Distriot : Wm. Elliott, Beau
fort, Demoorat; T. E. Miller, Beau
fort, colorod Republican, and E. M.
Brayton, Columbia, Republican.
Sunday With the Vauaorbllts.
The Vanderbilts are religiously
inclined, and early on Sunday morn
ing tho children arc washed and
dressed and sont to Sunday School.
At church t'tno they go to their
father's pow and sit thoro with him
and their mother during tho sorvice.
In the aftornoon they go to Sunday
School again. They are never
allowed to use horses or oarriages,
nor to go out, excopt for a short Walk
as a matter of exorcise Tho day is
spent vory quietly. Thoy hayo an
early toa, and in tho twilight the
children gather in tho music-room
while ono of tho ladles play tho piano
or organ. Cornelius Vanderbilt!,.
William IC, Elliott F. Shepard and
tho ladies of tho families join for an
hour or two in song. Tho'boys some
times bring out their violins, tho
young girls play their harps, and
thoro is an hour or two of tho most
delioious musio that one Could imag
ino. They sing hymn after hymn,
and when tho twilight fades away
the little ones aro put to bo.?, to got
up thc next morning with the giow
of health upon their cheeks and
begin their week of study and play,
that flt them to become strong mon
and womon, to administer wisely
upon the vast fortunes that will soon
bo thoirs.-Zitdict? Ihme Journal.
II li ? II MinmwwiNu II 11 ) j ? * m i.uiil*'??jiiM ,t*>*M*e*mt.~rr~
KE?WEE COURIA
[WKB<?,y,]
-KSTA jJI.?flli?il) AT
Walhalla in 1868.
Destroyed by f?t? Jurw
Re-Establl8hed August
"Out of H?i Owa Xoiath."
Tho newspapers need not hunt up
words of condemnation for Haskell
and bia bolter*. Ho himself has der*
scribed tb0 man who turns his baok'
on bis friends and oomrad'?s in tho
hour of need. Ho has pronounced,
sentence ov? ?????GOI? and lue feckless
men associated with him in his fight
again Ht the Democrat io party and the
white mon of tho State. In 1887
Aiurphy and a??t?ori.bo\tod\t^e.pj^.,;:
moorotio nomination for city council
of Charleston. Among others, Alex
ander C. Haskell was interviewed
about tho mattor. What ho MA
was published in tho News and Cou
rier, of Decomber 8d, 1887. Hero is ****
what he said :
"I am shOokod to seo this thing.
An Independent movement in Char
leston is not only troaohory to thfct
city, but'to th'e ?t?Vo, and if sudeces*.
ful would be repudiated by tho State
If, for tho sake of PBRSONAL WS?
LUCK TO LRADBRB, tho Independents
ruin the party M'hioh is tho whito
man's party, and tho party of con
servative and Intelligent colored peo
pi? of tho State, they will be coftv
demned by all the people of South
Carolina as TB AH ORS, not, only to
their own interest, but to tho inter- .
est of the entire Stato.
"This movement is leading back to
tho condition of affairs from whioh
they wore rescued in 1876, and if
they get baok to it tho people of tho
Stato will not holp thorn out bf it.
[Ifi^jjlth Carolina it ls not a matter
of locaT^reawi.^pr TBK ^ONAI. prefer
enccs; IT IS A ?bi^Sfiii OF LIFB AND
OH ATM I
"Thoro is ohly one way by whlbV s>v
wo can hopo to maintain ah honest
government, and ovory,truo citizen
is bound to adhore to that, whatovor
his opinions of persons or local quos
tiens, tho way is to OBRY TH? VO?OK
OF TUB MAJORITY of tho DomOoratio
porty. If, ho doos not he is a DB
SBRTBR, and should be so treated."
Murphy was an obsouro mah. If ' <
successful he could only have inS"*^^
jared Charleston for a short timo.
If ho was a deserter and a traitor,
what should be said of Haskell and
the wicked mon with him? Ho has
boon honored by his people. Ho is a
mau of more prom i uenoo and intelli
gence. Ho knows his duty and tho
consequence of bis aots and stand?
without oxouso. Thoro is no pallia
tion for his wrong-doittg. Ho sins ^;
with knowledge and has condemned
himself. His movement will affect, --^
tho whole Stato and imperil tho ?f?- *
tiona!'Democratic party iii ?8&2. It 1
is against tho good order of society.
It is against tho businoas iiitorost of
tho State. It is against the women
arid children of his old. oomradeo.
Out of his own mouth lot him bo
condemned.-Abbeville Medium.
Three Parties in Georgia.
Tho following is clipped from tho
National J?cohowto?, oflioinl organ of
tjio National Alliance, of tho 18th
in ?tant':
"Has any of the subsidized press
heard of tho recont olcctioris in
Georgia ? So far a's giving out any
information regarding that subject is
concerned, ono would think tho nows
bad not yot boon furnished. Had it
gone tho other way tho'entire poultry
yards of tho Republican and Demo*
oratio parties would have been
brought out to decorate tho outside
p?ges of thoso papers. As it is,
silence is golden, and tho loss ' said
about tho matter is considered tho
bettor for both. A desperate b&ttlo
has been fought and the Afiance has
gained a groat victory, as tho saying
is, with hands down."
Tho new town company just bo
ginning operations at Bridgeport,
Ala., on the Tennessee River, has
sold ou.? io a syndicate headed hy
Robert Bonner, the nowspap?r man,
associated with H. B, Clafllln and
Connell and Dominator, tho iron
kings. They have organized a now
company undor the nanto of tho
Bridgeport Land and Improvomoht
Company, with a oapital of $5,000,
OOO. Tho mornbers of tho now com
pany went to Qhftttonooga yeeterdft
and proceeded w Bridgeport, whore
thoy will toko formal , possession of
tho proporty to-day.
---?*??.~~
Tho demand for fteight oars is s?
gre?t throughout tho country that
tho oarshops cannot build them fast
onOugh. Every car building "
in tho country m rushing n?g
day. still tho *v>.mbe* of ne.,
turned out docs not appear tb fill up
tho great gap. Tho different rail
roads bavo to take part of their or
dors in tum, as tho shops oonnot fill
any ono order ontiro, but divido tho
number up among tho different roads
in proportion to tho pisso of the order.

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