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Keowee courier. (Pickens Court House, S.C.) 1849-current, November 06, 1912, Image 1

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"TO THINK OWN SBLI'1 BK TRUE, AND IT MUST FOLLOW AS THE NIORT THE DAY: THOU CANST NOT THEN RE FALSE TO ANY MAN."
By STECK, BHBLOR & SCHRODER. WALHALLA, SOUTH CAROLINA, WEDNESDAY, NOV. ?, 1012. New Series No. 05ft.-Vol unie LXIW-No. tr>.
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Better Shoes
for Your Money
You know that price doesn't always determine the quality
of an article; it matters not what you buy.
The best evidence is tho number of satisfied customers and
the continual repeat sales. Ask any wearer what he thinks of
"Star Brand" Shoes. You'll lind them all to be well satisiied.
And why should they not? Every "Star Brand" Shoo is mado
of the best tanned leather. No substitutes aro ever used. Each
pair is mado over comfort-giving lasts, with just enough stylo
to mark their individuality. You can get them in any of the pop
ular leathers.
Some of Our Popular Sellers:
Tho "Patriot"--"A fine shoo for men."
The "Pilgrim"-"The business man's shoe."
"Stronger-Thnn-The-La-w" -"Tho strongest and longest
wearing work shoes."
Th0 "Soft & Good"-"A work shoo true to name."
Tho "Our Family"-"For every member of the family."
"Tess and Ted"-School shoes for girls and boys. Look bet
ter, flt better-wear longer.
Try a pair.
Walhalla, S. C.
jsr IT PAYS TO BUY FOR CASH, jet
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Money is Power I
Labor is Power !
You work a week for $ J 0.00.
That ten dollars repr?seme a week of your life
work? You are a week older, and as the weeks,
months and years go by your strength is gradually
exhausted; you have put your strength into dollars.
What nave you done with these dollars? Have
you spent them as fast as you earned them? If you
nave, you are poor indeed; but if you have spent only
a part of the dollars and kept some of them, you have
in these dollars stored irfp'etfergy and stt'engtrPto*
provide for you in your old age?
How much better still is your position if you have
put these saved dollars to work for you !
A good way to do this is to deposit them in some
good, strong bank?
The Westminster Bank,
Westminster, O.*
is a good place to put these dollars.
W. P. ANDERSON, P. P. SULLIVAN.
President. Cashier.
J. M. NORRIS, Assistant Cashier.
Triplets Named for Candidates,
Washington, Nov. 4.- Mr. and
Mrs. .1. II. Kyler, of Denison, Texas,
sent a telegram to President Taft,
received to-day at the White House,
announcing tho hirth of three sons,
William Howard Taft Kyler, Theo
dore Roosevelt Kyler and Woodrow
Wilson Kyler. In the President's
name Assistant Secretary Brahany
to-day sent a telegram to the par
ents expressing tho wish that thc
triplets would live long and prosper.
THURK Y CALLS TO TH IC POWERS.
Porto linn Formally Applied for Me
diation-Fear Great Massacre.
Constantinople, Nov. 3-The Porte
has applied to the powers for media
tion with a view to the cessation of
hostilities and for tho negotiation of
peace. Application has boen made to
the embassies here and by circular
to the Ottoman repr?sentatives in the
European capitals.
The Turkish army ls retreating to
the last lino of fortifications outside
the capital. This was announced in
the first bulletin admitting defeat in
the great battle, which the govern
ment issued to-night.
Constantinople is in a fever of ex
citement over the alarming reports
from the field of battle. Foreigners
and natives alike are suffering from
tho tension caused by the series of
military disasters, and, although the
city is In a state of siege, crime in
some quarters ls unchecked. Many
families are leaving the city.
The people fear, first, an outbreak
of moslem fanaticism by the turbu
lent elements, the lower classes, and,
second, a rising of hordes of madden
ed soldiers, who aro being driven by
Hie Bulgarians to make their last
stand a few miles outside of Con
stantinople, and then perhaps to fall
back on tho capital.
Massacre and Pillage Feared.
There is a large and unruly ele
ment of the population which would
be glad of any pretext for massacre
and pillage. The presence of more
than 10,000 refugees from the war
zone, who have lost all their posses
sions, adds to the danger of the sit
uation. Rumors aro current that the
Young Turks Committee may rtart
rioting with the object of overthrow
ing the government, but there have
been no tangible proofs of such a
plan. It is doubtful .whether a ris
ing would be directed agaist foreign
ers as much as native Christians, but
the danger to foreigners is very real.
If tho Turkish army sustains com
plete defeat the lives and property of
thousands of foreigners, as well as
native Christians, will be in Immi
nent peril.
Turkey Awaits Powers' Reply.
London, Nov. 4.-The prospect
that a considerable portion of the de
feated, Turkish, army will ho ohio .to
form behind the lines of Tchatalja,'
the last fortifications before Constan
tinople, is not altogether excluded,
but it is doubted whether the Turks
will be able to maintain there any
serious resistance to the Bulgarian
advance.
In the struggle with the allies the
Turks lost, more than half their artil
lery. In fact, the Servians alone
claim to have captured no loss than
300 guns. This will certainly mili
tate against any prolonged stand at
Tchatalja.
Nothing from Powers.
Up to tho present hour there is no
sign that anything bas come of the
Porte's appeal to the Powers for me
diation. No replies have been receiv
ed at Constantinople and there is lit
tle doubt that when they are receiv
ed they will embody a declination to
consider the idea of proposing an
armistice. Apparently Bulgaria ls
in no mood to negotiate peace now.
MEXICAN TOWN WIPED OUT.
Severe Hurricane Sweeps AcuIi>oco,
on the Pacific, ('oust.
San Juan Del Sur, Nicaragua, Nov.
ll.-The seaport of Aculpeeo, on the
Pacific coast of Mexico, was virtually
destroyed by a severe hurricane on
Wednesday night, according to wire
less dispatches received here. Four
fifths of the town was shattered and
the American consulato was unroof
ed. No lives were lost, but a num
ber of natives were Injured.
Several small ernfts In the harbor
were wrecked, but the United States
cruiser Maryland, which was lying
there, wns not Injured. Tho United
States cruiser Cleveland, which was
cruising in the vicinity, did not suf
fer. Telegraph communication with
Acapulco is Interrupted.
Acapulco is the chief port of call
for steamers plying between San
Francisco and South American ports.
The outer bay is unprotected, and ls
occasionally swept by fierce cyclones.
THINKS IT IS UP TO ROOSEVELT,
Schrank Bel loves His Victilm Hears
No Malice-Light Sentence.
Milwaukee, Nov. 1--Believing that
Theodore Roosevelt does not. boar
malice towards him, John Schrank,
would-be slayer of tin; Colonel, ex
pects to escape with a light sentence.
Schrank confided these expecta
tions to Bernard H. Gottsohalk, who
occupies a cell near that of the noto
rious prisoner. Gottschalk is a for
mer resident of New York.
"Theodore Roosevelt, is only hu
man, after all," Schrank said, accord
ing to Gottschalk. "Ho was shot and
has recovered. Now that it is all
over and ho has had timo for reflec
tion, his bettor self surely has con
cluded that I should bo pitied and
npt condemned. When McKinley
was shot he showed forgiveness.
"The entire case rests with Roose
velt. I know If he will como hore
and speak for mo and adopt a broad
view of the matter I will get a light
Ben tonco. Hi? word will settle tho
whole matter. 1 should think ho
would como hero when the case is
tried."
FOR W
Indications this mornin(
tt?js United Democracy
vfetory in the history o?
The following informatio:
patches from New York
New York, Nov. 6-Tho a weep
in*, victory bf Woodrow Wilson
haft exceeded the most sanguine
Dauiocratic expectations. He
not only polled the solid normal
D?mocratie strength and carried
practically all doubtful States by
heavy pluralities, but Invaded
many or the old-time Republican
strongholds as well.
T?ew York State, which gave
blip the biggest Democratic vote
in iher history, was followed by
Maibe, Connecticut, Massachu
setts, New Jersey and Delaware.
Maryland was conceded early In
the night.
iThe solid Southern Democrat
1c,fita tes, including Virginia, the
Carolinas, Georgia, Florida, Al
abama, Mississippi, Louisiana,
Arkansas and Texas, all piled up
heavy Wilson majorities. Incom
plete returns gave the Demo
crat Oklahoma, Arkansas, Mis
souri, Kentucky and Tennessee
also.
. Ajnong the Western States
which Wilson leaders claim are
Minnesota, North Dakota, Indi
an i, Nebraska, Arizona, New
ixico and Wisconsin.
{The only States in the whole
n which Pr?sident Taft
ed sure of carrying at a late
uweve Vermont and probably
;\sylv^la,. ??Lu?
Taft anti Tedd)
Now York, Nov. 6.-I
Roosevelt concede the <
and at midnight last nig
tory messages.
IN RA TLB WITH PLKM10NTS |
Lone Survivor (Tings to Rigging of
Wrecked Craft.
New Inlet Saving Station, N. C., '
Nov. 2.-A lono survivor of the crew I
of the Now York schooner John Max
well, driven on the treacherous Hat
teras Shoals during the night, while
bound from Norfolk to Savannah, and
broken In two by a raging sea, clung
tenaciously in the rigging of the
wreck when darkness fell to-night
whllo life-savers from this and near
by stations watched helplessly for an
opportunity to rescue him. A Uni
ted States battleship from the South
ern drill grounds and a revenue cut
ter to-night are steaming full speed
to reach tho spot in an attempt to
savo him.
Six lives had already been lost in
the wreck, five of the men having
disappeared in the huge waves before
dawn to-day. The sixth sailor hung
onto tho rigging until late this after
noon, when, benumbed by cold and
exhausted by the lashing of the
waves, ho was forced to release his
hold and was swept to death in the
seas. The lone survivor, through
glasses, appeared to he an aged man.
An all-day battle was waged by the
life-savers, but tho tremendous sea
and forty-mile gale made it impossi
ble for them to launch their boats.
Repeatedly during the day the life
savers shot a line over tho Maxwell,
but the man in the rigging appar
ently was too numbed hy cold, or too
exhausted, to attach lt to tho rigging.
Failure to get the line fastened so
the breeches buoy might be sent out
prevented a rescue in this way. The
coast guardians again and again
tried to put their ll fe-boa ts to sea,
but each time were repulsed by thc
relentless waves.
It was not until afternoon that the
idcntly of the vessel became known.
A pleeo of wreckage hearing the
nanto was washed ashore. Pinier the
force of the terrific waves the craft
broke in two and is fast going to
pieces. She will be a total wreck
with her cargo of coal.
Capt. Fred Godfrey Saved.
Norfolk, Va., Nov. 3.--The sole
survivor of tho three-masted schoon
er, John Maxwell, wrecked on tho
shoals off New Inlet, N. C., is Capt.
Predorlck Godfrey. The other men
on tho Ill-fated vessel, seven In num
ber, are known to have perished.
---^ .-.
Chamberlain's j??r%o??0Rm?%r.
[ Never falls, Jttiy lt now. lt nuiy save life.
i
y are that Wilson has lead
to the most sweeping
' the party and nation,
ri is conveyed in late dis
headquarters :
The only States of which the
Roosevelt party seemed sure
were. Illinois, Iowa, Michigan
and South Dakota.
It is believed that the com
. pite returns will give Wilson the
greatest popular majority any
Democrat has received in the
history of tho nation.
The New York Sun estimates
that the Electoral College vote
Will stand:
WILSON . . ..309
TAFT.110
ROOSEVELT. 82
i
With the returns of the South
ern and Eastern States practi
cally all in, and with Woodrow
Wilson's election certain beyond
a doubt, it appears that the Dem
ocrats have made a clean sweep,
with the possible exception of
Vermont and Pennsylvania.
There is a trille doubt about New
Hampshire, hut lt makes no dif
ference. The Middle Western
and far Western States have not
begun to report, but private ad
vices indicate that they have fal
len In line for Wilson.
However, the result In them
will have no bearing on the re
sult, as Wilson ls already assur
ed of moro than enough electo
.raJLyot.es t<> oject, hlm.^^^ - s
i Admit Defeat.
3oth Mr. Taft and Mr.
slection of Mr. Wilson,
ht sent him congratula- |
i
STATE SENATOR J. IL (?KEEN.
Noted Confederate S< Idier Called to
Reward-Loss to State.
Bennettsvllle, Nov. 3.--Senator
.lohn B, Oreen died o? his home here
this morning at 1 1 o', lock. Por sev
eral days his death bed been expected
and life had been sustained largely
by stimulants. The cause of death
was myocarditis. Por many years
Senator Green had been ono of the
county's most useful citizens and he
held a place in the hearts of every
one who knew him that is seldom
won hy any man. His death ls a gre. t
loss to the county and State.
As a Confederate soldier, in the
summer of '61, John B. Green re
sponded to the call of the State and
became a member of Company B,
24th South Carolina Infantry, and
with his company was mustered into
service in December of that year and
assigned to duty at Charleston. In
J>ine, 1S(?2, this company became a
part of Hie Confederate forces and
WSi assigned to service with the
a rui., of Tennessee. Private! John D.
tireen became captain of his com
pany, and at Hu? time of his death
liad in his keeping the captain's
sword carried by the first captain of
his company and hy the several offi
cers succeeding him, until il. was re
ceived by him He was in service at
Franklin, Chickamauga, Kennesaw
Mountain, Peachtree Creek and on
many other hard fought fields, prov
I himself every Inch a soldier.
Capt. Green was elected sheriff in
1892 and assumed tho duties of his
Office on December 13 of that year.
On more than one occasion presiding
Judges declared Sheriff (Deon to be
ono of tho most ellicient sheriffs in
tho State.
Two years ago. by an almost unan
imous call, Sheriff (?reen tendered
his resignation as sheriff and an
nounced his candidacy as State Sen
ator. No one thought, of opposing
him, and for two years he served the
county as Its Senator. His record
there was that of a broad and fair
minded patriot, desiring and striving
lo do that which looked for the bet
terment of his county and State.
-
No Retreat Service Next Sunday.
Westminster, Nov. 5.-Editor Kco
woe Courier: Kindly give space to
the follow lug notice:'
On account of absence from home,
I will not fill my regular appointment
at Retreat next Sunday, tho 10th In
stant. Congregation please take no
tice. R. L. Grier.
COURT OF GENERAL SESSIONS.
November Tenn Convened in Wal
halla, Loot Monday Morning.
The November term of the Court
of General Sessions for Oconoe con
vened here Monday morning, Judge
J. VV. Devore presiding, Solicitor P.
A. Bonham wno on hand, ready for
tho discharge of his duties, as was
also Circuit Stenographer Clyde
Smith.
There was a large crowd in at
tendance at the oponing of tho ses
sion, the Court room itself hoing
well lilied, and on the grounds
around the building littlo groups ot
people engaged In conversation were
to be seen as usual in spite of tho
rather cold, raw day.
The Proceeding.
Court was called promptly at 10
o'clock, the jurors polled and every
thing was ready for business. Tho
first case disposed of was
The State vs. Sam Blassengamo
bastardy. Nol pressed.
The ^ vs. R. W. Powell-vio
lating dlspei <ary law. Pleaded guil
ty. Sentenced to pay fine of $300 or
serve six months on public works.
Permitted to pay $75 and balance of
sentence suspended during good be
havior.
The State vs. Will Evatt (colored)
-larceny of live stock. Pleaded
guilty. Sentenced to servo three
years on public works of county at
hard labor, or like period in State
penitentiary.
The State vs. Bennie Watson (col
ored)- larceny. Found guilty. Sen
tenced to serve three years on county
works at hard labor, or like period
in State penitentiary.
The State vs. Harrison Woods
violating dispensary law. Tried In
absence. Found guilty on first and
seventh counts. Sealed Sentence left.
The State vs. J. Robt. Mahoney
malicious mischief. Verdict of not
guilty instructed by court.'
Tho State vs. J. M. Patton-assault
and battery with intent to kill. Not
guilty.
The State vs. Ben Whittier?-as
sault and battery with lntout to kill.
Not guilty.
The State vs. James Greer-mur
der. Continued.
Tho State \s. Arthur WiUtds
forgery. Prosecution withdrawn ,.*nd
ettgff^? tteff.*1^'CTw ir. yw^ofaM* i
The State vs. Sam Blasscngame
and Sam Parks-attempt to produce
abortion. Nol prosscd.
Thc State vs. Lee Siegel-viola
tion dispensary law. Nol prossed.
The State vs. Jos. Childs and J. B.
Nixon-disposing of property under
lien. Nol prossed.
Tho State vs. Will Tiner-assault
mid battery with Intent to kill. Found
gftilty of assault and battery. De
fendant's attorneys gave notice of
motion for new trial. Sentence with
held pending termination of motion.
The case of the State vs. Riley
Moore, indicted for rape, is being
prepared for trial this morning.
True Hills Returned.
During the session so far, besides
the cases acted upon and reported
above, the grand jury has handed in
true hills In the following cases:
Robert Norris and Catherine Han
cock--adultery.
Jacob Rothell, Karie Long and Ab
Long-forgery.
J. H. Johnson-disposing of prop
erty under lien.
Frank Blakeley-- bastardy.
W. M. Turner, Mrs. W. M. Turnor
and Jolly Turner-violation of dis
pensary law.
No Hill
was returned in the case of T. F.
Ramey on the charge of disposing of
property under lien.
FIRST DEPORTED PROM SOUTH.
Frenchman Sent from AtAantn Never
to Return.
Atlanta, Ga., Nov. 1.-Armand Lu
jarries, a French white slave trader,
who was arrested and put In tho Ful
ton county Jail the same day he was
released from the Federal prison
here, will enjoy the ignominious dis
tinction of being the only white man
ever deported out of the United States
from the South.
He was rearrested for the special
purpose of having him deported, and
has been sent to Now York under a
guard to be put on ship board, and
will never be permitted to return to
this country.
His crime was the Importation of
young Fr?nch girls under tho false
pretense that, he would provide them
positions as waitresses. He operated
with Offices both In New York and
Chicago.
The only signs of his former pros
perity was a gold-headed cane and a
Jeweled Ci ga rotte case, which he has
kept through all his jail experiences.
Mule's Fool Torn Off.
Sumter, Nov 3.'- Friday evening
li. 1). Jennings, mayor of Ibis city,
and a large farmer, lost a mule un
der most peculiar circumstances, Tho
mule was one of a four-mulo team
which was bringing a wagon load or
cotton pickers in from tho field. His
foot caught In a railroad switch frog,
and before the team could be stopped
tho other mules had pulled tho mule,
on and tho foot was pulled off from
tho ankle and left in tho switch. As
the mule was In such a painful and
fearful condition Mr. Jennings at
once had a veterinary surgeon to
chloroform lt.

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