OCR Interpretation


Keowee courier. (Pickens Court House, S.C.) 1849-current, November 13, 1918, Image 5

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026912/1918-11-13/ed-1/seq-5/

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SUITS AND COATS
Two Stores in One,
Old Coleman Corner
AT MODERATE, PRICES AT
THE BEE HEVE
SENECA, S. C.
9
Sells for Cash;
"Sells 'Em for Less"
Most every week the express brings us new Coats and Suits fresh from the makers in New York. Our racks
are now hanging full of the newest in both style and fabric. Be your choice Long Coat or Suit, we can please
you- COATS, $15.00 to $40.00 ~- SUITS, $15.00 to $37.50
Men's and Young Men's Overcoats
New models and fabrics for young men and staple black
and gray longer Coats for older men. Extra good values at
$12.50 to $25.00.
Boys,' Men's and Young Men's Suits
Yotmg Men's New English Models in Green and
rreen and Brown Mixtures; Men's regular 3-button Sack
Suits? 34 to 46, and Men's Box-Beck Suits.
Good All-Wool Men's Suits at $20; other Suits, $12.50
o $30.00.
Boys' Suits, 9 to 20 years, $4.50 to $15.00.
Little Boys' Serges, Cassimers and Corduroy Suits, 3 to
8 years, $4.00 to $5.00,
SHOE SPECIAL!
36 Pairs Boys', 3 1-2 to 5, from Hunter's Stock, worth
$2.50 to $3.50, at (pair) $1.95.
Big stock of Cotton and Woolen Goods, Underwear,
Blankets and Notions.
SAVE ON SHOES
by buying at The I)ee Hive.
We are in position to save you money on Shoes, both in
regular stock and some specials we are closing out:
Brown Engligh, for Ladies, $5 to $8.
Black English, for Ladies, $5 to $7.50.
Men's Fine Shoes, $5 to $8.
$5.00 Value, Ladies', Special to close out, $3.95.
$5.00 Value, small sizes, to close out, $3.35.
$4,00 Value, small sizes, to close out, $2.15.
$3.00 Value, small sizes, to close out, $1.85.
Unusually strong line of Men's and Women's Heavy
Shoes,
THE BEE HIVE, Seneca, S. C.
J. E. HARPER? Rirop,
French Serge Dresses
Only two very pretty styles in these Fine Serge Dresses
-mostly Navy Blue, elegantly tailored-Sizes J 6 to 38. One
price-$22.50. '
Separate Skirts
More than one hundred separate Skirts, some in fine
Serges and Poplins, other staple All-Wool Serge. Regular
and extra sizes. The price range is $4.50 to $ J 0.00,
Staple and Fancy Silks
Yard-wide Silk Poplin, per yard, $1.00.
Yard-wide Taffettes, per yard, $1.35 to $2.00.
Yard-wide Messaline, per yard, $1.50. ..
Crepe DeChine, per yard, 50c to $1.75.
Georgette, per yard, $1.75.
Silk Dresses
Big variety of One-piece Silk Dresses, Satins, Taffettcs,
Poplins, etc. These are exceptionally good styles" and
values at $7,50 to $16,50.
ars are won with
metal-save it.
Iron and steel are needed for
tanks, guns, ammunition,
ships, railroads, etc. Folks at
home must save iron and steel
to help win the war.
Use) the old lange
until after the war.
Make your old range do a little longer
by having it repaired. If it's patt
repairing, then the next best step is
to buy the range that saves fuel, food
and repairs. The Majestic's heat?
tight riveting prevents fuel waste;
its perfect baking prevents food
(vaste,and its unbreakable malleable
iron and rust-resisting charcoal iron
make repairs a rare need.
Caution t If your Majestic nsade new
parts? ?ol them from US, We will supply
you with genuine Majealie matarlala-not
light, Inferior parla, made by scalperi.
BALLENGER BARDWARE AND FURNITURE CO., Seneca.
GEOKGE W. MAULDIN WOUNDED.
In (vondon Ilo.siiitnl as KOSH lt of a
Shnrpncl Shell Injury.
W. II. Mauldln, of Wost Union, ll.
F. D. No. 1, last week received the
following lcttor from London, an
nouncing tho Injury of his sou. Geo.
W. Mauldln, In active servlco In tho
war area of Europo, recently:
Henry W. Mauldln, West Union, S.
C.-Dear Mr. 'Mauldln: On the ?th
of October 1 jmid a visit to the Kitch
ener Hospital at Brighton, and there
saw your son George. He was wound
ed on the 30th of Soptember by
shrapnel In the left shoulder-not a
serious wound-and is getting along
well*. He seemed quite cheerful when
I saw Iii m.
About (>0 of our wounded boys
came ovor on the same convoy which
arrived at Brighton late Saturday af
ternoon. After leaving tho front, line
clearing station they were sent to
an Australian hospital at the base In
France, where their wounds were
dressed, and they then came by way
of steamer across tho Channel to a
port near Brighton, and on to the
Kitchener Hospital by a short rail
road journey.
You can rest assured that George
ls having the best of care and atten
tion. Tho nurses are Canadian, and
the hospital ls situated on top of a
breezy spot overlooking tho sea.
Brighton, as perhaps you know, is
quito a popular resort, and when the
boys are convalescent they will enjoy
aoelng the place.
We Americans over here all feel
proud of tho splendid showing our
boys have made, and lt ls a satisfac
tion to know that in this particular
fight they obtained the objective they
were sent after.
The British people aro very grate
ful for our help after their four years
of bearing the burdon of the war,
and do not hesitate to express their
appreciation of all we have done and
are doing. I have lived among the?
for 16 years, and can, I think, recog
nize genuine sentiments.
Letters should bo addressed to
your son (with his rank and number)
to American Convoy, Kitchener Hos
pital, Brighton, Sussex, England.
Very truly yours,
Francis E. Powell,
.President Y. M. CA. Advlsry. Com.
London, Eng., Oct. HKh, 1918.
Subscribe for The Courier now.
$1.00 a year-In advance.
RaUifuli and Tom|>oraturc.
Below lt a record of meteorological
observations taken by H. W. Brandt,
corporative observer of the Weather
Bureau pf tho U. S. Department of
Agriculture^ during the week ending
NOvoi?hQV IO, 1918, at 7 i). m. (The
instrument)tal readings aro from gov
ern m on I standard instruments ex
pos id In, 'he manner recommended
by the oljlc: of the Weather Bureau) :
Oiikvffl^er ot
?
Date- -
Tempera
ture.
bo
.r-l
w
Nov.
Nov
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
?1 - (Hear
5 - (?lear
6- Clear
7- C lear
S Clear
l'fcly clddy
.Clear . . .
9.
10
7B
07
GI
r.n
7 3
72
71
34
39
38
35
38
4G
44
Resolutions of Commendation.
The f. |owing resolutions of com
I mendal)'-) and appreciation were re
ce?? 1> pi tod by the stewards of the
Walhalla Methodist church:
Whereas, the call of our country
to all patriotic citizens to support
our government in its various war
activities has been great and press
ing; and
Whereas, our pastor, Rev. E. P.
Taylor, ha? constantly responded to
these calls and given much of his
time- and labor as well as contrib
uted liberally of his means; and
Whereas, we note with pleasure
his effective work as a patriotic cit
izen in addition to the faithful dis
charge of (tis/ ministerial duties:
Now, therefore, be it resolved
1. That We hereby express our ap
preciation ^f.these labors, and deem
thom worthy of permanent record
upon our quarterly conference Jour
nal.
2. That jit is the sense of our
membership that the pastoral rela
tion continue, and that Bro. Taylor
and his excellent family romain and
set ve during the ensuing year.
?t. T. 'Jaynes,
5. L. Herndon,
. A. Smith,
A. P. Crisp,
Ino. E. Eauknight,
For. Board of Steward'
Methodist Episcopal Church, South,
Walhalla, S. C., Nov. 3d, 1918.
Wc have one carload ROOFING, bought
before the last advances to apply on his
commodity, and can make you prices jn
Roofing that prevailed years ago. We have
this in the J, 2 and 3-ply grades, and it will
pay you to get our prices before covering.
We have everything in the
BUILDING MATERIAL LINE
and will be glad to sell you this for essential
use at a price that you cannot well afford
to let slip by, j
?gi
-GRAIN DRILLS,
Genuine Oliver Plows and all Repairs,
Farm Tools, Blacksmith Tools
and Machinery Supplies.
Matheson Hardware Co?,
WESTMINSTER, S. C.
AA
fini ll W?li Examine Eyes for Glasses
Upii PM and Fit Artificial Eyes
At Dr. Barton's Drug Store,
Walhalla, S. C., Thursday, Nov. 21
AND
At Gilreath's Hotel,
Westminster, S. C., Friday, Nov. 22
One Day Only at Each Place.
SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO SCHOOL
CHILDREN'S EYES.
TS*

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