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Keowee courier. (Pickens Court House, S.C.) 1849-current, November 27, 1918, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026912/1918-11-27/ed-1/seq-1/

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?iura.
Ry Kt?M% Kholor Hughs At Sholor.
"TO THINE OWN SELF BE TRUE, AND IT MUST FOLLOW AS THE NIGHT THE DAV: THTUT^ST ^^^^^^^^^^^^
_WALHALLA, SOUTH CAROLINA, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 27th, Wi H.
New Series No. 711.-Volume LXI.Y_No. 18.
ALLGOO
We will unload two ca
thc last of this week. Plei
blocky Mare Mule-the kin
We have in our barns i
heavy-boned Mare Mules,
J,200 pounds-just the thii
Also, a few good work
C. W. ?? J. E. ]
WALHAL
IT PAYS TO BU
Government R
the Shoe
Why Government
Keg ulntion
Tho War Industries Hoard has
asked the shoe trade to curtail the
number of styles in order that capi
tal, labor, materials and transporta
tion may be released. Tho Govern
ment has asked us in turn to seek the
public's co-operation in making theso
regulations effective.
Damaging
Fatso Kinnora
Unfortunately false rumors, detri
mental to the weavers of shoes, have
appeared in tho newspapers, and we
fool it our duty to state the facts as
they are.
The Question
of Profits
Shoo manufacturers have been
aeked by tho Government to limit the
class of materials and amount of la
bor expended in tho making of shoes
lu order that shoes of good value and
assuring a fair profit to maker and
retailer may continue to bo sold. Of
necessity, however, this will elimi
nate, after present stocks uro sohl,
all shoes of the very highest grades,
which necessarily must retail at
prices higher than will be charged
for shoes restricted in style, but
which will not be on sale until some
timo in thc future.
Classification and
Values
Footwear purchased by us from
now on, but which will not bo on sale
until late winter or spring, will bo
classed A, H and C, according to its
type and quality, to be retailed from
$3 to $12. These shoes will not be
of aa good values as shoes now sell
ing at these prices, owing to the
groatly increased cost of manufac
turing, but they will be the host val
u?.-; obtainable at these prices.
C. W. Pi
Walhall
? YOUNG LADII
? TO ENTER TRAINING. SPLENDI?
? SURROUNDINGS. CLAJ
? . APPLY Al
SUPERINl
S ST. MARY'S '.)
? ANDERSOr
UNION THANKSGIVING SERVICE
Will he Held thia Year in thc Wal
halla) Presbyterian Church.
Tho usual union Thanksgiving ser
vice will be hold this year in the Wal
halla Presbyterian church. Kev. E.
P. Taylor, of the Methodist church,
will preach tho sermon. Tho ser
vico will begin nt 10 o'clock a. m.
lt is hoped that, there will be some
special Thanksgiving music .for the
occoasion.
At this time the usual collection
for tho various orphanages will 1??
taken. If you have any preference,
designate which orphanage you dc- St
D BROKE
rloads of fine young Mules
ity of good broke, thick,
d that are easily kept fat.
now one load of good, big,
In pairs, weight around
ig for Disc Plow Mules,
second -hand Horses cheap.
BAUKNIGHT,
LA. S. C.
IY FOR CASH.
emulation and
Business
All Shoos uro
"Patriotic"
We have been asked by patrons If
lt is not "unpatriotic" to wear cer
tain types of shoes. We answer that
?ill shoes are patriotic shoes, for the
Government expressly desires us and
ali shoe retailers to sell all shoes on
hand at prices now prevailing; and
which aro not affected by Classifica
tions A, ? and C.
Buy these Shoes
Willie You Can
Alter 'resent stocks are exhausted
certain beautiful and daintily colored
ihoes, HOW extremely popular, will
not be obtainable. These were made
in exact conformity with Government
cstrutions. When they are gone you
.annot obtain them, however, at any
price. included in these numbers
iro the beautiful gray kid. two-tone
md medium brown boots with French
leels and turned sole boots of the
vell-known moke of Uta & Dunn Co.,
Rochester. If you prefer these shoes
>f distinctive character, and at pres
s?t moderate prices, you should take
advantage of this opportunity.
All Shoes
Affected
Price and style restriction will af
en all shoes-men's, women's and
nieges' and children's alike. And the
>rlces will be higher, quality consid
ered, after present stocks aro ex
) au st ed.
Our Pledge to
Uncle Sam
We have pledged ourselves to the
?overnment to patriotically conform
vith the shoe restrictions, and have
pplied for a PLRIH?K CAK1>, which
vc will show in our window upon its
rrlval from Washington.
All shoe stores-wherever shoes
ire sold-havo been asked to co-op
irate and to seek your co-operation,
is we aro doing.
itchford,
S. O.
? ? ? ?? ? ? ? @
ES WANTED I
) OPPORTUNITY. PLEASANT ?
3S FORMING NOW. ?
r ON CF.
?
ft
'ENDENT g
[IOSITFAL, S
i. S. C. ?
Nt?<?H?> ? ? ? ?$?
Iro your offering to go to. Funds
ot designated will be equally divided
mong tho various institutions.
Lot s nil the Presbyterian church
) overflowing next Thursday niorn
ig, and let's make such a donation
> the orphanages as will make this
i be romombered as tho year of
iblleo in our midst.
On account of this service Thurs
ny morninlg there will be no prayer
looting at tho Presbyterian church
.'odnoxdoy night.
- Fine candies: "rho famous "Ja
>bs-.Made-Last-Night" package can
les; also Hoadly'a and Block's
esh every week. Norman's Drug
toro, Walhalla.--adv.
LIEUT. LAITE A DESERTER.
Inf orina tiun that Will Prove of Inter
est to Many in Carolina'.
The following item, taken from tiie
Now Orleans Picayune of November
15th, will be of Interest to many in
the upper section of South Carolina,
where "Liout." Laite played an im
portant role as lecturer and general
entertainer during several months of
active war work. Ho claimed to bo
ii wounded British soldier in this
country to recueprato from wounds
received in activo service with the
British forces. Wo puoto the article
in full:
"Alter enjoying the hospitality of
prominent citizens of New Orleans
and other large comunitios. and mar
rying one of the popular actresses of
the Loew Circuit. Harry Whitfield
Laite will leave for New York Friday
in the custody of Special Agent Whea
ton C. Stillson, of the Department ol'
Justice, to be turned over to the
British military authorities for trial
by court-martial on the charge of de
sertion from tho Canadian army.
"Since his sensational marriage to
Miss Isabel Violet Lilly, on October
81, and his subsequent arrest through
tho local British consulate, the young
soldier has been kept in solitary con
finement in the parish prison. It is
alleged that he has made a full con
fession to Special Agent Stillson, ad
mitting his desertion from tho Six
tieth Battalion, Sixth Middlesex Reg
iment of the Canadian army.
"Laite said ho waB born In Trinity.
Now Foundland. 2 2 years ago, and
that his father and mother lived at 30
Hancock street, Everett, Mass. Ac
cording to Department of Justice offi
cials he said he enlisted from Canada
in Juno, 1915, and after having serv
ed as private in the Middlesex, Regi
ment, deserted at Hramshett, long
land, In February ol' the following
year. After working his way to Lon
don and Liverpool he stowed on
board the merchant ship Quenimore
and landed in Baltimoro, where he
managed to evade the vigilance of
immigration authorities. He said ho
then obtained the uniform of a Cana
dian lieutenant and enlisted his ser
vices in the cause of the Fourth Lib
erty loan and solicited funds during
the Ked Cross drives. Hts credentials,
he said, wore givon through the olllce
of the British-Canadiancu remitting
commission.
"Garbed in tho uniform of a* lieu
tenant, ho was received by prominent
citizens of Denver. Indianapolis and
Chicago, and arrived in New Orleans
in the early part of September. Ho
said he had borrowed in the neigh
borhood of $1.00 0. and while he
spent, his money freely, he said his
stay in New Orleans has cost him lit
tle or nothing. He met Miss Lilly in
one of the leading hotels, and that
night they were marled in Gretna In
the presence of Lleuts. Briggs and
Taylor, of the Medical Corns of the
United States Navy.
"Lalto said he had deserted the
British army on account of the poor
treatment, received in a hospital, ac
cording to Special Agent Stillson."
"Lieut." Laite became quite promi
nent in various activities connected
with Liberty Loans and other war
work .and in tho Hold of Red Cross ac
tivities in this section. At the time
he was in such demand in this terri
tory he was making Anderson his
headquarters. The Courier never
had any faith in or respect for the
man after he failed to keep an en
gagement to speak In Walhalla, for
we were Informed, though not offi
cially or In such manner as to be able
lo make public any statement with
reference to our information, that tho
man was so miserably drunk at the
time he was to hove left Anderson to
come to Walhalla that ho could not
make the trip, lt was our private
opinion, freely oxpresed among Inti
mates here In Walhalla, that "Lieut."
Laite was a fake of some kind, or
that there was something crooked
Ilbout him. Wo lind, however, taken
no further notice of him until tho
Now Orleans publication recalled him
most, unpleasantly to our mind.
GENERAL ELECTION RESULTS.
Senator-Elect Pollock will Take Sent
on December 2d.
(The State. ;
Results of the general election ol'
November ? were declared last Fri
lay *by the State and Federal elec
tion canvassing board, thereby ter
nlnating a series of delays, which
.aused some apprehension as to tho
line when W. 'P. Pollock, elected to
.ho United States Senate for the
thort term, would be qualified to take
Us seat in that body. Senator Pol
ock will tako the oath of office on
december 2, at tho opening of the last
lesslon of the Sixty-fifth Congress.
The total vote cast tn the general
dectlon was slightly in excess of 2.r>,
100. R. A. Cooper and other State
?ffteers received 25,267 votes. Tho
.oto received by Nf. B. Dial for tho
ong term lu the United States Sen
tie was 2?,79 2. W. P. Pollock, for
he short term, received 2,r>,733.
ft, H. Richardson, tho negro op
lonent of Congressman A. F. Lever,
ecelved 176 votes against 1,761 for
ilr. Lever.
The vote for other Congreslonal
andidntes was: Whaloy, 2.32.S;
lymes, 3,lf>.*i; Dominick. 8, (108;
Nicholls, 1,069; Stevenson, 3.G10;
tagsdalo, ?5.626.
CAROLINIANS ON CASTA LT Y LIST
Ninnes of Quite a Kow Appear Dur*
lng tho. Rust Week.
From the reports of casualties in
the American Expeditionary Fortes
In Europe, as published in the daily
papors of the past week, we make
the following brief summary:
Killed in action - Sorgte, il. tl,
Muller, Sumter; MtllcdgO A. (jordon,
Clemson College; Lieut. Georgo E.
McCord, Greenville; Corpls. Carey L.
Farris, Fort Mill; William T. Sun
ders, Laurens; Ernest L. Wilkinson.
Taylors; Privates .las. T. Myers, Ef
fingham; William Thompson, Jeffer
son; Frank B. Collier, Dawesville;
Bassiel Suggs, Columbia; Dossle
Flowers, Darlington; Frank F. Cox,
Gray Court; Marion H. Thompson.
Jordan.
Wounded severely - Lieut. John
D. Colson, St. Stephens; Privates W.
A. Smith. Dishopville; Neville T.
McTeer, Snlkahatchle; Joseph Huff,
Clinton; Fumina Sweet, Floydale;
Mahen K. Jones, Silver Street.
Died of wounds - Sergts. Fritz
Williams, Neeces; Robt. Gadsden,
Dale; Corpl. Marclnd C. Christopher.
Greenville; Privates Louis G. Proc
tor, Union; Edwin H. Large, Flor
ence; Clinton S5. Dennis, Lake City;
Robt. H. Hancock, Columbia; Claude
S. Bagwell, Helton; Edmund Deke
tlaer, Columbia; Adam Mitchell,
Sumter; Cook Lewis K. BlatitilCtt,
Wallinna.
Missing In action-Private Miles
C. Hudson, York.
Dlod from accident and other
causes-Privates Wlllbert Lime
house, Yemassee; John Thomas, of
Bishopvllle.
Died of disease-Sergts. John P.
Parnell, Lamar; Tjios. R. Hughes,
Duncan; Theodore Thomas, Black
ville; Alfred J. Bradford, Sumter;
Wm. G. Williams, York; Lieut. Ed
ward S. Pickling, Columbia; Corpls.
John Fogel, New-Brookland; Joseph
Higgins, Charleston; Privates David
Barr, Turbeville; Harry Stepbney,
Columbia; John Green, Sumter; H.
H. Scott. Ridgeville; Hen Singleton.
Dale; Ben Collins, Newberry; Jud
son Cordon, Salley; Julius Holman,
Denmark; Ernest, M. Voght, Holly
Hill; Nathaniel Cunningham, Lan
caster; Henry G. Carter, Jordan
ville; Jos. Edward (Jailbird, Liber
ty; Louis L. Monck, Elloree; Alfred
Snads, Hawley Mills; Cleveland Out
law, Bethune; Monroe W. Burk hal
ter, Dunbarton; Charles Kimson, St.
Matthews; Edward Barker, Colum
bia; Andrew Lowinan, Aiken; Oli
ver Rallford, Beach Island; Clarence
Williams. Charleston; Richard An
derson, Cross; Chester Brown, Ran
tow; Mamie Edwards, Lone Star;
Eugene Maxey, Williamston ; Joe L.
Bowers, Fairfax; Foster Jones, El
lenton; Willi? V. King, Townvlllo;
Walter Pegues, Cheraw; Otto Wil
son, Bookman; Earle A. Davidson,
Clinton; Robt. A. Fowler, Sumter;
James Hall, Anderson; Robt. Heath
ley, Orangeburg; Shollio Jamison,
Jamison; Jesse L. Kirk, Liberty Hill;
James Dyar, Calhoun; I^ee JoneB,
Bonneau; Samuel Joseph,- Hatties
ville; Moses Scott, Bellinger; Leon
ard Steen, McBee; Jos. Anderson,
Aiken; Isaac Chisholm, Hardeeville;
Hardy Clemons, Bluff ton; Barth, j
Vaughn, Lockhart; Harry Stepbney,
Columbia; Walter E. Webb, Olym
pia; Corpl. Robt. Baskiiis, Lancas
ter; Wagoner Solomon Bailey, East
ovor; Cook-Waymon Proctor, Char
leston.
Wounded, degree undetermined
Corpl. Samuel L. Casque, Florence;
Privates Luther Moffett, Helena;
Prue E. Compton, Town ville; Clif
ton Morgan, Wllllamston; Phillp F.
Tooloy, Pringle; Mechanic Foist W.
Fant, Belton.
Slightly wounded in action-Lieut.
Elliott H. Kelley, Camden; Privates
Grover L. Glassgo, Anderson; Jos.
A. Billiard, Outland; William B. An
drews, Dacusville; Manton Perrott,
Lake City; Sol. Wilson. Ellaville;
Cunio W. Harley, Millettville: Cook
Sam. D. Wright, Union; Mechanic
Wm. J. Fowler, Loris.
Total Casualties, 8t,;ti:t.
The following shows the number of
casualties that have been reported up
to and including last Monday. The
lists are still far behind, and will
continue to ho reported by tho Ameri
can officers in Eurolie:
Killed in action ( including 396
at sea .I (5,1 50
Died of wounds . 6,448
Died of disease . 7,:?G7
Died of accident and other
'j^uses . 1.683
Wounded in action .44,4 97
Missing in action (including
prisoners) . 8,318
Total casualties reported . .84,343
Many May Leave Army.
Washington, Nov. 22.- All army
.onunanders were authorized to-day
to discharge, upon their own appli
cation, men in whose families there
s sickness or other distress, and all
mon whoso services can ho spared
ind who are urgently needed to re
mine some Industry or occupation.
In announcing the order, tho War
Department explained thai, it was
mended to meet exceptional cases,
md not to release men in largo
troups. Men who onlisted voluntari
ly boforo the war will not he dls
;harged.
CAN X()\V SELL EXPLOS1YKS.
Kulcs that Obtained During tho War
llitvo Now Hoon Rescinded.
On account of the omi of hostili
ties- which no doubt moans the end
of the war-publie safety no longer
requires certain regulations which
were put into force more than a year
ago. William Hanks, the explosives
Inspector for South Carolina, has re
ceived instructions from the Depart
ment of tho Interior, Bureau of
Mines, to the effect that nil regula
tions relating to fireworks aro re
voked, und that no further licensing
of llroworks will be required. Also,
the recent regulations relating to
platinum, irrldium and palladium
havo been revoked and no license of
theso commodities will be required.
The most far-reaching rule, how
over, is with regard to ingredients
which entor into the making ol* ox
plosives. The ruling declares that no
further llcnnso of such Ingredients
will bo required.
Theso rulings in no way affect the
licensing of the main explosives and
tho government oversight of maga
zines. Until further notice, all per
sons who have In their possession
blasting powder, dynamite and deton
ating caps will bo required to have
license ns usual, and all persons In
tending to purchase must have li
censes.
The Clerk of Court of each county
in the Stato ls ti licensing agent, and
In somo counties there aro other
agents, so that there will bo no hard
ship on farmers who wish to secure
dynamite for agricultural purposes.
There aro a number of dealors In
South Carolina who have been Inter
ested in thc fireworks regulations,
and they will doubtless be glad to
know that all restrictions on pur
chases and sales have been removed.
KED CROSS OFFICERS CHOSEN.
Annual .Meeting of the Oconeo County
Chapter Meld ut. Seneca.
The annual meeting of the Oconee
County Chapter, American Ked ('ross
Society, was held at the Seneca Ked
Cross rooms on Wednesday evening
last at 8 o'clock. The purpose of the
meeting was the election ol* officers
for the county chapter. Tuc follow
ing were elected :
Chairman-Dr. W. lt. Craig. Wal
halla.
Vice Chairman-Dr. J. S. Stab
ling, Seneca.
Secretary-Miss Eunice Macaulay,
Walhalla.
Treasurer-T. Hedem Anderson,
West minster.
Director of Woman's Work- Mrs.
W. J. Lunney, Seneca.
Chairman of Committee on Educa
tion- Mrs. S. P. Heeder, Westmin
ster.
Chairman of Junior Membership
Committee-Miss Tabitha St rib) lng,
Walhalla.
Chairman of Committee on Exten
sion and Membership-Rev. W. H.
Mills, Clemson Colloge.
Chairman Committee on Publicity
-lt. T. Jnynes, Walhalla.
Chairman Committee on Finance
P. S. Holleman, Seneca.
Chairman Committee on Civilian
Relief-W. C. Hughs, Walhalla.
Chairman Canteen Service - Mrs.
Leslie Strlbllng, Seneca.
Those officers compose tho execu
tive committee of tho chapter and
meet once a month to discuss tho
various activities of tho different
branches of the chapter.
Rainfall and Temperature.
Below ls a record of meteorological
observations taken by H. W. Brandt,
co-operativo obsorver of the Weather
Bureau of tho U. S. Department of
Agriculture, during the week ending
November 24, 1918, at 7 p. m. (The
instrumental readings aro from gov
ernment standard instruments ex
posed in tho manner recommended
by the chief of tho Weather Bureau):
Character of
Day.
Dato
Nov. 18-Cloudy..
Nov. 19-Ptly cldy
Nov. 20-Clear . .
Nov. 21-Cloudy..
Nov. 22-Cloudy..
Nov. 23-Cloudy...
Nov. 24-Ptly cldy.
Total rainfall . . .
Death of Joseph Kelley.
Tama8see, Nov. 2f>.- Special: Tho
death ol" .loo Kelley saddened tho
hearts of this community, whore ho
was known to bo an honest, upright
Christian man. Pneumonia, follow
ing influenza, was tho cause of his
death. Ho leavos a wlfo and sevon
children, his aged parents and ia
number of brothers and stators to
mourn his untimely passing at the
age of 3 4 years. Ho was a farmer,
but also found time to lend his in
fiuenco and himself to further tho
causo of tho Master. Cherry Hill
Raptlst church will miss his pastoral
work, aa will also the Sunday
schools. Tho community deeply sym
pathizes with his bereaved family.
FOSTER
IS CHOICE
Of People of Oconcc County
to Fill the Office of Super
visor.
ABBOTT
CHOSEN
To Hold the Office of Coronctv
These Two will Stand ai
the Nominees.
ELECTION RESULTS.
With twenty boxea out of thirty
seven heard from, it sueins as if M.
N. Foster is elected County Super
visor, and .1. M. Abbott, Coroner.
For Supervisor:
Foster. 64 4
Shockley. 33 4
Brown. 332
Owens. 4e
Total -.
1360
For Coroner:
Bischoff. 210
Ta Hoy. 191
Hay. 2558
Abbott., 39 C.
Loo.* 126
Toay. 13?
Total 129?
New Blue Ki ?ige Agent.
H. A. Harris, of Kelton, basc?me te
Walhalla to take up tho agency work
for the Blue Ridge Railway. Mr.
Harris ls also an operator, and will
have charge of the telegraphing n?
well as tho responsibilities of the
agency. Ho BUCOOds lohn Oainbroll.
who held the agency here for a time,
tcsigning here to take tho agency foi
the Blue Ridge at Pendleton.
The only thing we know of still
chea|)-- The Courier, $1,00 a year.
.J CST A F KW
WORHS, PLKASK!
TUB GOVERNMENT RULING
AS TO PA I ll-IN-A OVA Nt Hi
SUBSCRIPTIONS MILL GO
INTO KFFKOT JAN. 1, 101?,
WK ll AVK QUITE A NUMBER
OF SUBSCRIBERS WHOSE
SUBSCRIPTIONS WILL EX
PIRE BETWEEN NOW ANO
THE FIRST OF THE COMINO
YEAR, ANO NOT A FEW WHO
HAVE AMXIWHI) THEIR.
SUBSORIITIONS TO ?ET
CONSIDERABLY IN Aft
lt KA HS. WE ARK BADLY
BEHIND WITH OUR HOOKS,
OW I NO TO SHORTNESS OF
OUR FORCE, AND THE ONE
METHOD AT OUR COMMAND
IS TO DISCONTINUE ALL
SUBSCRIBIONS AS THEY
EXPIRE. THIS METHOD
WILL HE PUT INTO FORCE
DECEMBER 1 NEXT IN OR
DER THAT WE MAY HE IN
POSITION AT THE FIRST OF
THE MOW YEAR TO COMPLY
WITH THE GOVERNMENT
RULING. WON'T YOU DO
US Tl IK KA VOR TO LOOK AT
THE LA BIOL ON YOUR PA
PER THIS 'WEEK, THEN
MAKE PAYMENT IN SUFFI
CIENT AMOUNT TO CARRY
YOUR SUBSCRIPTION WELL
PAST JANUARY 1, 1010? BY
DOING THIS YOU WILL SAVE
US A LOT OF UNNECESSARY
WORK ON OUR BOOKS, AND
AT THE SAME TIME AVOID
THE UNPLEASANTNESS OF
HAVING YOUR PAPER STOP
COMING TO YOU AT TUM
FIRST OF THE NEW YEAR
RESIDES, WE NEED THE
MONEY, AND WE WILL RE
LITERALLY SWAMPED
WITH WORK IF ALL THIS
ACCUMULATION IS PILED
ON US AT THE FIRST OF
THE YEAH. I/OOK AT TH?
LABEL ON YOUR PAPER TO
DAY, THEN PUT YOURSELF
RIGHT WITH THE NEW
POSTAIi REGULATION. DO
IT NOW!

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