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Keowee courier. (Pickens Court House, S.C.) 1849-current, December 01, 1920, Image 5

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KEOWEE COURIER
(KS tal ?I Isl MM! I HIU.)
Published Every Wednesday Morning
sriisntiiTioN PRICK.
Ono Vear .$1.00
Hix Months .ri?
Three Month*.510
Advertising Ratos Reasonable.
Jim
Ry Steele, Sholor, Hughs *V Sholor.
Communications ot a personal
character charged for as advertise
ments.
Obituary notices, cards of thanks
and tributes of respect, either by
Individuals, lodges or churches, aro
charged for tis for advertisements nt
rate of ono cont a word. Cash must
accompany manuscript, and all such
notices will bo marked "Adv." In
conformity with Fodoral ruling on
such matters.
WAMIALIJA, S. O.
WI OD MOS DAV, I >i?:<\ I, 1020.
IM MO CROP unsri/rs.
We do not believe that any county
in South Carolina is capable of pro
ducing or does produce better
crops than Oconee. Ot* course lhere
ure inslaneos of special yields on "pol
pu telles" in other counties thal have
eclipsed Ocoiioo's reported yields, but
in general wo believe Oconee can lend
our Slate in line crops, your in and
year out, in every day- practical op
eration ol' tho farm.
Hr that as it may. wo recently had
presented ni The Courier olllce some
mighty lim! evidences of crop possi
bilities within our horders. After the
exhibition of products al tho recent
exhibition for Hie boys and girls of
I he valions county clubs, we saw tho
ten-ear exhibit of corn of Master
George Taylor, ll years old, of tho
Oconee Crook section. The ten ears
of corn weighed full ten pounds, and
they look the Drat prize in the corn
contest, which was Judged on tho
various points of {excellence. We
have often viewed, in the seed cata
logues, Hu pictures of large ears of
corn, oneil ear fully rounded out lo
the und with a grain of .corn in Hie I
center of tho tip of the ear. And
young Taylor's lon ears looked as
though Ibey mimili have been the
originals of one of tho most perfect
of these pictures, lt was practically
perfect corn, considered by points.
The grower of ibis corn, ns slated
above, is 1 I years of age. Ho did a
considerable pari of the work ou tho
. hut bis plowing done by
i. However, he has
ly sot In his mind
1 f sciunco as applied
1 corn and the ambl
o hotter crops and
'heroin lies the hope
of our country in an agricultural
way, we think- the fad that the
boys of to-day, who will bo tho men
of to-morrow, aro going to excel I heir
daddies in crop-making and in profit
making. Tho club boys are getting
what (hair daddies were unable to
gel in their young days scientific
instruction, hearty encouragement,
and the all-important incentive to
excel--to never bo satisfied with tho
accomplishments of ono day, but to
start each day with tho determination
to improve on the past.
There wore lots of fine exhibits at
tho county club show, and it was
stated by ono of tho judges from
without the bounds of our county
thal tlie exhibit would have done
credit to the State Fair.
II. A. Wood, ot Walhalla Route ;t,
was one of tho grown-ups who had
exhibits at thc club show. He had
an exhibit of 12 sweet potatoes, the
dozen weighing r>2 pounds. They
were1 beauties, and as sound as it
is possible for potatoes to be. Mr.
Wood set out 2.000 plants, and from
theso ho gathered live two-horse
loads of tine potatoes- 13fi bushels.
They were something of a curiosity
-twelve potatoes, some weighing in
excess of live pounds each, and tho
whole pulling the scales down to f>2
pounds.
Hut "thorn are others" young
ladies- in our county who are not
only practical farmers, but good
farmers of which fact wo had am
ple proof last Friday when two young
ladies. Misses Hannah and Hertha
Itrucke. of the lObenozor section,
stopped in The ("ourler olllce and we
had time to talk with (hem for a
short while about crops. There are
three of the Drucke sisters, but one
of our visitors disclaimed any special
credit for Ibo farm operations, as she
is giving her time largely lo teaching
school. This w;is Miss Hertha, who
gave all ibo real credil for crop-mak
ing lo her sisters. Misses Hannah
mu? '-'lizabeth. And if we may bo
counted us u Judgo in tho promises,
they are ,r,.;1i farmers
A. F. Itrucke. Ibo father of those
"farmerettes." is now past .)() years
nf age und is incapacitated for Hie
strontian labor of thc farm, hence
tho girls have taken over "tho refus
of government" ai Hie Itrucke place,
and iliey uro making good. Miss Han
nah WO judge thal she is the chief
in the Itrucke farm operations said
(hat up lo his year we hive never
made any .om. and it always wor
ried father, for ho used lo make such
fine com crops." So Ibis year the
Itrucke farm produced some corn
we say that advisedly, if wc may be
permitted to apply tho slangy term,
SOME COHN' and Miss Itrucke as
sured us thai it was worth all their
hard work, worry and trouble Just
to noto tho pleased and surprised
expression of their old father when
thoy led him to tho corn crib and
showed him a pilo of olght largo
ono-horse loads of (Ino corn-the ro
sult of two young women's labors on
two acres of land. They did evory blt
of the work from beginning to end
oxcopt to putting down of tho fertil
izer, which they hired dono. They
planted, hoed, plowed and worked
lite crop from the. beginning lo the
ond, and thou they gathered the corn
and hauled it up to the homo and
housed it. Six ears -line, big oars
sound, hard corn -wero left willi us
for a sampln of tho crop. And we are j
proud of tinsse six cars of corn, as
tho drucke girls have a right to be.
This your they produced two bales
ol' cotton in addition to their other
croiis. In this crop, loo, tho work
was practically all done by the young
women. Hut tho Umeko girls will
hereafter always make some corn.
Tills year's experience has taught
them that it is easier to make than
cotton, and that it is foolish to buy
corn with Hit! expectation of paying
for it with the hard-earned dollars
that come from Hie cotton crop. We
wish thal more of our mah! farmers
would come to a like rea li/.a I ion and
quit the ".slow suicide" policy of one
crop farming.
Bul we could go on indefinitely
and talk about better farming meth
ods, hotter and bigger crops, and wo j
tuny later tuko up this line of
thought. For the present, we point
to tho records made by three young
women of the Ebenezer section, and
ask that some of our men consider
what has been dono by them, and
profit by their exam plo. And, In
(dosing, we merely add
All honor ,to Ike Br?cke girls! We
wish there were more, of this kind in
our section-determined, ambitious
to succeed, willing to work - tu the
limit where circumstances call for
Hie exercise of the utmost in brain
and brawn.
"ONI?; TillN(? IllOr BACKEST."
At th.e tenn of F?deral Court in
Anderson last week tho Judge, in
speaking to the jury and in general
to Hie court ollicials and lo Hie peo
ple, assembled in tho court room,
took occasion lo say that "Oconeo
would he tho best county In South
Carolina if she could only rid her
self of the liquor-making und liquor
selling evil."
This is Interesting, what Oconeo
lacks to make her the best county
in South Carolina is lo rid herself o?
the incubus of the damning influence
and effects of liquor. We do no/,
have to rid ourselves of something
that Is of value to some citizens or
to some section of our county. Not
at all. lt is Just to rid ourselves of
a detrimental evil-an evil that all
of us see. few of us defend, and most
of us deplore.
We believe that tho overwhelming
majority of our people waul to he rid
of Hie liquor evil, and are ready lo
. lo alt in their power to clear tho fair
name ol* our county of this liquor
blot. Bul our citizens are helpless.
What we need is tho help of our
courts. We need judges with back
bones strong enough to permit them
to deal out sentences of .sufficient
severity to make liquor law violators
smart. When we get that assistance
wo will be well on tho way to "mak
ing Oconee county the host county in
South Carolina." For years the ses
sions of our courts here at Walhalla
have proven nothing more than farce
comedies- -comedy that suits both
defending attorneys and law viola
tors. Those farces, however, are any
thing bul amusing to the law-abid
ing citizens of the county, who see
tho sober side of tho acting and vlow
it as tragedy--the trifling with a vital
force for evil, and the setting at
naught of tho high moral principles
for which Oconeo citizens havo stood
and ballot ted for lo these many
years.
We call upon our juries and our
Judges to help us by doing their full
duty when dealing with law-viola
tors. Our citizens are discouraged,
because they know that nothing can
bo done until liquor law transgres
sors are adequately punished. Let
the courts help us to make Oconee
tho best county fn South Carolina!
CUT-HUT DON'T QUIT.
John T. Roddy, of Kock Hill, one
of tho best known and most pros
perous business men in South Caro
lina, is out In an article in the daily
papers advocating tho total abandon
ment of a colton crop for 1021. Wo
think Mr. Roddy entirely too radical
in his views, but he is certainly on
tho right line.
It is a good time for our farmers
to begin thinking of Hie 1921 cotton
situation think while tho 1020 dis
aster is not only frosh In your mind,
bul while the .sting is still thoro as
a thorn in tho flesh.
The colton farmer has "resolved"
and "(Iformed" so often and so loudly
in the past-and has broken good
resolutions as many times as made
until the general public is going to
have to be shown a reduction before
they Iud i eve thal such a thing is pos
sible in regard to the colton crop.
Think now what you are going to
do in regard lo your cotton acreage
next year. Il does,not make one par
tie of difference how many-or how
few resolutions you may pass, if
they are not kept they but hurt, and
ev(\'i if I hoy are kepi they amount to
bul little so far as any Influence on
tho price ol* your staple is concerned.
Stop "resolut ing" and do some
thing cul your acreage and say
nothing about it: nobody is going lo
believe it anyway, so why waste per
fectly good ink and paper and lime
in writing out resolutions'.' The pub
lic will believe that the colton acre
ag?? of the South has been cut when
the number of bales taken from the
rudds and ginned Indicate such a con
dition, and not until then.
This is somewhat of a broad state
ment lo make, but lt is truth never
theless. The cotton growers have lied
so many times about reducing acre
age that nobody holieves them when
they do it. They do not believe it
themselves, for, nlno out of ten of
them "go down from tho placo of
meeting" resolving mentally thaf
they will Individually Increase their
acreage In the vain hope that their
I follows will stand by the resolution.
It's up to the cotton growers to
PATTERSON'S
SENECA,
I SOUTH CAROLINA.
30*1 itch Sheeting.10c.
?{({.Inch Sheeting, good weight amt
a very good quality,
PRICE. VA ui),
10c.
;lO-inch Torca' ?.lile.
?iO-Inch Teicate, light and duri?
Dress Patterns, also Solid Colors,
TH IC ll, YA HI),
19c.
30-Inch Wenching.lae,
30-inch Hleaching, good quality,
no starch. Thia was selling for 33c
sixty days ago.
THICK, YARU,
15c.
SACRIFICE
Apron Ginghams.15c.
'JO pieces, assorted pattern:!, good
staple Apron Ginghams, 20c. value,
THICK, YA HU,
15c,
Dress Ginghams.10c.
35 c. Dress Ginghams, in Dight mal
Dark Tat terns, Tlaids, Stripes und
Solid Colors,
THICK, YA Ul),
19c.
\
SI-INCH SH METING .IKc.
Kl-Inell Not Bleached Sheeting,
very good weight, pretty and
smooth
THIGH, YAKI),
48c.
Cheviots.._?.-,<..
Riverside Cheviots, tho Heaviest
and Best Cheviots made. Thirty
days ago they were IO cents
THICK, YA HU,
25c.
We are taKing our losses with a smile
our Forty Thousand Dollars StocK of
Merchandise is being sold at sacrifice
prices. This is your opportunity to buy
Winter Goods in mid season at prices
no one even dreamed of thirty days ago.
LADIES' SUITS AT HALF PRICE.
Ladies' High Grade Suits, made of absolutely All
Wool Materials. Staple colors, new models,
teed Linings and the tailoring is perfect.
LADIES1 $45*00 SUITS
SACRIFICE TRICE.
LADIES' $40.00 SUITS
SACRIFICE TRICE
LADIES' $35.00 SUITS
SACRIFICE TRICE
LA DI KS' $30.00 SUITS
SACRIFICE TRICE . ,
LADIES' $25.00 SUITS
SACRIFICE TR ICE
A FEW ST ITS FROM LAST SEASON
WORTH MUCH MORE THAN OUR TRICE
Guaran
$22.50
$20.00
$17.50
$15.00
$12.50
$7.50
LADIES' $7.50 SILK UNDERSKIRTS,
AT HALF PRICE, $3.75.
LAMMS' SILK UXItKllSKIItTH, -Assorted Colors.
Meiling foi- $7.ftO-.
orl; HACIUPICK I'KK'K ls just huir.
Thcso have licen
$3.75
Danville Tlaids ..15c.
Everybody knows they are tito best
25c. Tlaids made. They have been
selling for 25 cents
TRICE
15c,
Vests und Tauts .48c.
Ladles* Knit Vests and Tauts, reg
ular 75c. garments,
TRICK
48c.
Dross Ginghams.15c.
Dress Ginghams, Assorted Pat?
terns, in Light Stripes, Checks und
Solid Colors,
TRICE, YARD,
15
Ul
LADIES' COTTON HOSE.
Ladies' 15c. Cotton Hose,.pair 10c.
Ladies' 20c. Cotton Hose, pair 15c.
Ladles' 25c. Cotton Hose, pair 10c.
Ladies' 35c. Cotton Hose, pair 25c.
Ladies' 50c. Cotton Hose, pair'{5c.
MEN'S SOCKS.
Men's 13c. Socks, price.I Oe.
Men's 2,"?e. Socks, price ..... .20c.
Men's 35e. Socks, price.25c.
Men's 50c. Socks, price.35c,
Men's 75c. Socks, price.50c.
MIDDY SUITS AT HALF PRICE.
BLUE SERGE MIDDY SUITS FOR LA DI KS AND MISSES-GOOD
MATERIALS, WELL MADE AND XFATLY TRIMMED.
$17.50 Mm SACRIFICK TRICE . . . . .$8.75
$12,50 SACRIFU ll TRICK ... .$8.25
$10.00 M,n SACHIFKi: TRICK . .$5.00
BOYS' SUIT? AT ONE-THIRD OFF.
ALL OUR ROYS' SUITS Gp IN THIS SACRIFICK SALK AT JUST
Ht)
. I ' - o?> ri * * .TS . .
Vv RH ICE TRlCrJ
HO
-.\? uiv ICI' I ll i
ROYS' .510.00 SUITS
SACRIFICE THICK . . .
BOYS' $7.50 SUITS
SACRIFICK TRICK . . .
$10.00
$9.00
$6.65
$5.00
MILLINERY AT HALF PRICE.
ALL OUR MILLI \ IO RY (?OKS IN THIS SACRIFICK SALK AT K.Y
ACTLY HALF TRICK!
LA DI KS'
LADI1
LADIK
s' $3.50 "** SACRIFICE TRICK . . .$1.75
SACRIFICK TRICK . . .$2.50
:s $8.00 ? SACRIFICK TRICK . . .$4.00
LADIES' SILK HOSE AT HALF PRICE.
LADIES' SILK $1.00 HOSE- CA
SACRIFICE TRICE.JUOt
LADIES' SILK $2.00 HOSE- QH nfl
SACRIFICE TRICK.$ I lUU
LADIES1 SILK $3.50 HOSE- Ol 7P
SACRIFICE TRICE.?pi.fU
BLANKETS AT HALF PRICE.
These have been sell
.$2.25
These have been selling
$3.00
One Lot of Cood-si/.o Dark Colored Blankets
ing at $1.50
SACRIFICE TRICE.
One Lot of Extra Heavy Mixed Blankets
for $0.00
SACRIFICE PRICE.
LADIES' SILK WAIST AT HALF PRICE.
LADIES' BEA UTI FUI. SILK WAISTS-GEORGETTE, CREPE DE
CHINE, ETC. These h ve been selling at ?O to <j?n i\E
$5.50 to $12.50. Sacrifice Trices Just (Half. .$?.1 J $U.??
SHOES
SHOES
Yes, (hero has been a break in tho Shoo Market. Some time ago
wo made, ninny reductions, and in order to do entire justice to tho
buying public, wo have now made prices based on next spring's mar
ket.
Men's W. I/. Douglas (best known ?hos in tho world), values
$8.00, $?.00 and $10.01)-Trice now.$0.50
Men's cheaper Shoe? at $3.25 to.$5.00
Ladies' $8.00, $0.00 and $10.00 Shoos, prico.$0,50
Ladies1 $0.00 Shoos, prleo.$-1.75
I indies1 $5.00 Shoos.$3.00
Ladies' Heavy Shoes at $2.05 to.$4.00
Roys', Girls1 and Children's Shoes at $1.00 to.$4.00
reduce acreage by practice; aa a
"bluff" it lias proved but a snaro and
a delusion, and has hurt no one half
so bad ns tho cotton grower himself.
Cut your acreage-and you don't
need to toll anybody anything about
it. If you do it you will know it, and
If you raise other things on the acre
age taken from yourN?otton crop, you
will be bettor off-and that is suffi
cient.
Rainfall and Temperature.
Below is a record of meteorological
observations taken by H. W. Brandt,
co-operative observer of tho weather
Bureau of the U. S. 1 inpart mont of
Agriculture, during the woek ending
Nov. 28th, 1920, at 7 p. m. (The
instrumental readings aro from gov
ernment standard instruments ex
posed in tho man nor recommended
by tho chief of tho Weather Bureau):
Cnaractor of
Day.
romper?
ture.
Dale
st
Nov. 22? i'd.y cldy. \ . 1 2
Nov. Clear.
Nov. 24-Clear.
Nov. 2?"> Clear.
Nov. 2?- IM ly cldy.
Nov. 27- Cloudy. .. . Hu
Nov. 28 - Ptly cldy. . O'.)
Total rainfall. . . , 45
ii.)
r?:t
5 I
I
(50
.A"
2:>
?i I
21?
Oil Mill Closes Down.
Tlmmonsvillo, Nov. 28. The Tim
rnonsvllle Oil Mill closed down yes
terday afternoon for an indefinite
period. This means that more than
thirty employees who have been
drawing daily wages of from three to
four dollars aro now without work.
Tho cotton situation ls being felt
boro in all lines of business, and all
tho cotton buyers oxcopt ono have
refused to purchase any more of tho
staplo for tho present.
lound Much Stolon Valuables.
Dunville, Va., Nov. 20.-A wooden
box containing $300,000 in Liberty
bonds, war savings Rta m pa and life
insurance policies, which were stolen
from the Hank of Halifax, at Hous
ton, Va., eight weeks ago. was found
to-day by tiny Lumpkln, a farmer,
at Midway, Va., according to advicos
Just received hero
The Tilga loo Singing Association.
Tho Tngaloo Township Singing As
sociation will be held at Retreat No.
2) school building, about two miles
south of Westminster, next Sunday.
Hoc. r>. at 2 p. m. All lovers of music
are invited. Oscar Driver.
.1. lt. Drown. Sec'y. President.
"California Syrup of Figs"
Child's Best Laxative
Accept "California" Syrup of I<Mgs
only - look for tlie name California
on the package, then you aro sure
your child is having tho best and
most harmless physic for Hie little
stomach, liver and bowels. Chlldron
love its fruity taste. Full directions
on each bottle. You must say "Cali
fornia."- adv.
MOTHER!
STATU OF SOUTH GAROMNA,
County of Oconeo.
In Court Common Pions.
E. M. Gambrell, Mrs. Clara DuBoso,
John Brandt, J. Gordon, Marshall
Abbott, Mrs. J. E. Addis, G. L.
Barker, J. Davis Abbott, W. M.
Payno, J. C. Barker, C. E. Gam
broll, Geo. M. Ansel, Mrs. Sophia
llittor, Mrs. D. M. Rimrodt, Mrs.
M. J. Koli, B. P. Sloan, John A
Ansel, W. T. Alexander, R. M. Al
exander, S. H. Collins, J. H. Bar
nett, L. A. Guyton, E. M. Smith
Jamos L. Burley, Mrs. Florence
B. Richardson, Miss Maggie Raj
Burley, M. M. Burley, .Nellie Mud
son, Mrs. L. D. Chandler. Jessie B
Boozer, Mamie Burley, Gladys K
Burley, Toarle I). Barron, H. B
Burley, Mrs. Carrie P. Gillison am
W. VV. Burley, Petitioners,
vs.
Roy M. Abbott. J. Ed. Addis. B. D
Breazeale. J. i). McMahan, W. lt
Davis, John D. Rums, Mrs. Blrdb
II. Wiekliffe. VV. S. Dean, C. R
Dean, and Frank Dean,
Defendants.
ORDER.
This case coming on to he heard
and the preliminary repon ol' tit
Coard of Viewers having this da;
boen Hied with ibis Court, and hav
iiig been examined and found to 1)
i'i due ?UKI proper form, the Cour
I nri lier linds from Hie Viewer's rt
port that the Drainage District i
i practicable and will properly dral
! the bottom land of said district an
: be beneficial lo the public health an
protect Hie public highways cross
ing said proposed Drainage Dlslrlt
and creek, and will lie conducive t
; the general welfare and health of th
community; and tho Court horeb
.appointa the 28th day of DEOE.N
'? BER, 1020, nt ton A. M.. nt Walhall
Co,.rt House, as tho time and plu<
when it will further hear and coi
sider and pass upon the said repor
IT IS FD RT 11 KR ORDERED, Tin
a copy of this order bo posted at th
Court Houso door and at flvo coi
spicuous plncos within the Drainer
District, and bc published In Tl
' Kcowco Courier, a newspapor of get
i
eral circulation within the county,
for two conaocutivo weeks.
Given under my hand and official
seal, this 30th day of November, A.
D. 1920. JOHN F. CRAIG,
(Seal.)
Clerk Court Common Pleas In and
for Oconee County. S. C.
R. T. J A YNES, Attorney.
Dec. 1, 1920. 48-19
SIX PER CENT BONDS
FOR SALE.
Tho County Highway Commission
for Oconee County, South Carolina,
will offer for sale, at cloven o'clock
A. M., on TUESDAY. DECEMBER
14th, 1920, Three Hundred Thousand
Dollars Serial Coupon lionels, bonr
Ing interest at tho rale of six por
i (fini, payable semi-annually. On the
first days of January and July of
each year, made payable in Chicago.
Those hoods will mature in annual
installments from two to thirty years.
They are in den oin ina tl ont] of $1,000
each. Ample methods are provided
for taking care of tho payments of
interest and installments as they
maturo. They are exempt by law
from Federal Income tax. all state.
County and Municipal and School
'l'axes.
These bonds have beet? authorised
hy an Act of tho Legislature, ap
proved the tenth day of March. 1920.
and are part of the Four Hundred
Thousand Dollars in bonds thornby
authorised, One Hundred Thousand
having already been sold and paid
for. Monds are subject lo approval
of Attorneys Storey, Thorndike, Pal
mer & Dodge, of Boston, Mass.
Thc Commission offers these bonds
for sale on competitivo bids on DE
OEM MER 14th, 1920, to bo delivered
January 1st. 1921, at which time in
terest will begin to run on them.
Certified or Cashlor's Check for
$0,000.00, made payable to tho Sec
rotary of the Oconoe Highway Com
mission, as a guarantee of evidence
of good faith, must accompany all
bids. Tho Commission reserves tho
right, to rojoct any and all bids.
M. R. MCDONALD. Socrotary.
Walhalla, S. C.
Dec. 1. 1 920. 48-49

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