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Keowee courier. (Pickens Court House, S.C.) 1849-current, January 19, 1921, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026912/1921-01-19/ed-1/seq-4/

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KEOWEE COURIER
(Established 1840.)
Published Every Wednesday Morning
suitscitirnoN IMHCE.
Ono Year .$1.00
8ix Moni Iis .5.1
Three Months.80
Advertising Unies Honsonnhle.
Ry Stock, olor, Hughs & Shelor.
Commun) 'ons or a personal
character c'.. ged for as advertise
ments.
Obituary notices, cards of thanks
and tributes of respect, either by
individuals, lodges or churchos, aro
charged for as for advertisements at
rate of ono cont a word. Cash must
accompany manuscript, and all such
notices will bo marked "Adv." in
conformity with Federal ruling on
such matters.
WALHALLA, S. C.
WEDNESDAY, Jun. tl), 1021
l l NHS IOU TH E CHILDREN
Tho starving children of Europe
aro Hading now friends in Oconeo al
most daily, and tho fund for the re
ih ' bas grown considerably since we
acknowledged contributions In last
week's Courier. The fund to-day is
as follows:
Acknowledged last week ....$32.50
.("ash". 1.00
D. K. Good and wife. 2.50
"Anonymous," Walhalla .... 10.00
Mrs. J. H. Darby. Walhalla.. 5.00
Mrs. Jasper Doyle. Seneca Ht. 2.mi
Mrs. Dean Davis. Seneca Itt.. 1.00
Norton School . 7.00
.Mrs. Julia Shanklin. Richland 1.00
O; W. Cronshaw, Walhalla Rt. LOU
Mrs. Alfred Ernest, D. A. R.
School. Tamassee . 10.00
Total to date.$73.00
Additional Appeals
have boen received during the past
few days by The Courier, urging the
continuous and liberal contribution
of funds for the two causes we have
offered to receive and remit funds
for. The starving children of Europe
have sn far nun with groat favor at
the bands of contributors. And this
is well. Rut we have given more at
en tb ' ' .
?
' i ve ' erv.
?
-.
received by them. The resume ot tue
work will, we feel sure, prove inter
esting and will appeal to the gene
rosity of all:
'?Columbia, Jan. 17. -Miss May IL
Meotze. executive secretary, and N.
A. Hoynjlan, field secretary for South
Carolina of the Near Bast Relief,
have returned from New York, where
they attended a meeting of the Near
East Relief workers. Thoy report
that representatives were present
from practically every Stale.
"Miss Meetzo said that a report of
ibo achievements of tho .Near East
Relief was submitted at the meeting.
'This report showed,' sbo said, 'that
much has boon accomplished.'
"One million Armenians are now
living who would have perished had
not America gone to the rescue.
"Pi ve hundred thousand would
have starved to death last year had
not Near Kant Relief been ibero to
represent tho Amorlcan people.
"In Harpout 0,000 children are be
ing cared for in comfortable dormi
tories.
.Ten thousand homeloss children
are well housed tn Alexandropol.
"There aro 227 other orphanages.
"Altogether li 0,000 children are
under Near East care ami are being
Riven vocational raining, which will
enable them to becomo self-support
ing.
"Due Near East bakery, located at
Constantinople, alone produces two
tons of bread each day.
"Tho ii" Near East hospitals con
tain 6,052 beds, which are constantly
full.
"There are 127 clinics, where all
who apply are given I rca linen I
"Kleveu homes aro maintained for
Rills rescued from Turkish harems.
"Five hundred and thirty-eight
mea and women. Chosen in America,
are devoting their lives to the salv
age of a nation."
Sn much for tho work bein? done
In savin); Ibo peoples across (he wa
ler from death by starvation. Tho
various relief works hoing carried on
are all of similar nature and similar
result. The lives of many have been
saved, are being saved to-day, and
the future will record thal yet thous
ands will be saved by tho generosity
of the American people.
Designate your contribution either
"Starving Children of Europa" or
"Near East Relief."
In tho last six months 80,000 dor
man war prisoners have been trans
ported homo from Russia via tho Bal
tic and 50,000 via Vladivostok,
AS FAKMHH SBKS SITUATION.
Reduction of Cotton Acreage lind Di
versilleation of Crops the Remedy.
Editor Koowee Courier:
j Please allow ino a little ?paco,in
your paper to common! on tho pres
ent situation. Everybody wonders at
tho cause. We till know the effect,
and many are seeking a remedy.
Some say that over-production and
j speculation and cotton buyers' unions
I uro the cause of the trouble. Others
' claim thal high labor, high fertili
zers and farm supplies are tho under
lying cause of it nil. Rut be the
cause what it'may, the effect has al
most been disastrous to the business
world and has well-nigh bankrupted
the farmers. I heard a good farmer
say the other day, "I put in this crop
approximately $2,000 and I will
make something like $100. All my
money is gone, also my labor and my
family's; also. I am left with debt
and absolutely nothing to finance
another crop. Rut I am willing to
work another year to proserve my
credit." Snell is ?he condition of the
majority of our farmers to-day.
Agriculture is the basis of a na
tion's prosperity. A country rises .>??
falls with Its agricultural interests,
and the remedy lies in the hands of
the individual farmer. Each farmer
can work out his own salvation ny
crop diversification. Por a two dior m
farm-say 30 acres-sow ten acres
in grain and hay. Reserve ten acres
for corn, and then plant cowpoas n
every other hill at second time of
cultivation. Cse two acres for pota*.,
patch and sorghum cane, and, lastly,
plnnl eight acres in cotton.
Many will say this is too much
grain, but I say no. Why? lleca tl se
on ibis ;i0-!i ' ' .
t loast four cows, two beef year
lings, a sow and a couple of shoats
the sow to consume the buttermilk.
Patton the shoats and beef yearlings
for home use. (Sell some of the meat
if all is not needed. I
The cows will furnish most of the
fertilizer in the shape of compost,
This will gradually eliminate the
costly commercial fertilizers. Pick
your peas and use one-third peu.;,
one-third cotton seed and one-third
corn, crushed, to feed 'he cows. This,
supplemented with plenty of peavlne
hay, makes an ideal dairy feed, and
you. Mr. Farmer, are Independen* of
i i he oil mill s\viij? ipil 1'i t hey can al
:
. ? .
East but not least, sign a cotton
acreage plodge, and then reduce to
the bone, and then some.
Crop diversification and acreage
reduction is the key to the whole sit
uation and rests entirely with the
farmers. Think of what will happen
if this year's experience is repeated.
There is already a big surplus and
approximately ?100,000 bales in stor
age. Now, suppose we raise another
113,000,000 bale crop-and see if you
can sell a bale at any price. Take
your pencil and ligure a moment as
to what your IOSH, will be. Can any
business prosper, or evon exist, that
sells its products for less than cost?
No-emphatically no. In order to
decently live, government statistics
declaro that a farmer is due a good
living and ten per cent dividend on
invest mont. Do you get yours, Mr.
Farmer? If you don't, you must
change your methods. All the busi
ness world plays with a safe margin,
but we farmers trust to a hit or miss
game --and it is most'.y 1 iss with us.
All of us realize that something
MUST be done ; but wo cannot help
oursolves and others by resorting to
tho old plan of planting more cotton
to buy more corn, hay and flour and
bacon. Rut cut cotton acreage and
use divers!Ileation and you will have
more money and plenty at home for
man and beast.
Please allow a little personal note:
I planted lt; acres in cotton last year.
I am going to plant eight acres this
your. On the land I have reserved
for a tenant will grow corn and peas
exclusively. 1 am telling this be
cause I believe something must bf!
done. I also believe that it rests en
tirely with the farmers to meet this
situation. 1 also believe that cotton
acreage reduction and crop diversifi
cation i.-; the one and only solution
for our troubles. S. C. Smith.
ICEIU'KE THAT IS MERITED.
Mr. Hughs lukes Roth Writer and
Tlie Courier to Task.
(Odilor Keoweo Courier;
I make no claim io any of those
splendid qualifications characteristic
of our preachers, nor do I claim to
Ix' Defender of the Faith; but as an
ordinary man, worse than many, bet
ter than somo, with a decent regard
for things sacred, I must in all good
consclonco offor protest against tho
flagrant, bold and inexcusable act of
sacrologo committed by your papor
of last week when you publlshod that
choap, mediocre, poorly written par
/
UL TT
ON'S
Semi-Annual Clearing Sale
The object of 'his Sale ist ?irst, to convert into cash the balance of our Fall
and Winter StocKs; Second, to acquaint the patrons of this store with the best
values in new goods that can now be procured in the Northern MarKets for Spot
Cash; Third, to attract new customers, malle new friends, do a bigger and better
business. This ve shall endeavor to do buy giving the best values your money
will buy.
Ladies'1 Shoes.
Ladle?' ${*.?0 ami $4.00 Shoes
Scini-Aniiuiil Salo Price .
Ladies' $1.50 and $5.00 Shoo
Seinl-Aunual Salo Pri?e .
Ladies' $0.00 Shoe?
Semi-Annual Sale Pri?e .
Ladies' $7.00 Shoes
Semi-Annual Sale Prlco .
Ladies' $8.00 and $10.00 Shoes
Semi-Annual Salo Price .
Men's Shoes.
.Men's W. L. Douglas $?.00 anti $10.00 I ?ress Shoes
Semi-Annual Sale Price.
Men's W. L. Douglas $0.00 Heavy Shoes
Sciui-Ailliuul Sale Trice .
Men's $($.00 Dress Shoe?
Semi-.\lUllial Sale Price.
.Mens' $|.50 ami $5.00 Heavy Work Shoes
Semi-Annual Salo Price.
Boys'* Shoes.
Hoys' $0.00 Dress Shoes
Semi-Annual Salo Price.
Hoys' S LOO Dress Shoes
Senii-Annunl Sale Price.
Hoys* Scout Shoes, sizes lit to 'J
Scmi-Anunn! Sale Price.
RIVERSIDE CHEVIOTS.
Solid Colors, Stripes and Checks in Riverside Choviots
Seini-Annual Sale Price.
DRESS GINGHAMS.
Xcw Dress Ginghams, in a good assortment of colors
Semi-A nnual Salo Price. .
APRON GINGHAMS.
APRON ??IXGIIAMS in Staple Colors
Soinl-Annual Salo Price.
OUTINGS.
Outings in Medium and Light Colors
Semi-.\nnual Sale Price.
36-Incfc SHEETING.
iiO-lnrh Unbleached Sheeting, real good quality .
Semi-A minni Salo Price.
STA NJ ? VFD APRON GINGHAMS,
(li>u*l Si iph Colors la >i. ?o': il quality Apron Glnl?.h*iuH--~
Soun-Vimnal finie i i I? ,,,.\.
mtWs PANTS
Midi's S:<. .t' lim! ?1. ' .' Co I'll 111 \ Klint?! KIlO I'i'-s "allis -
Senii-Auniial Sale Price.
MEN'S HALF HOSE
.Men's Cotton Socks, assorted Colors
Senii-Annunl Salo Price.
MEN'S WORK SHIRTS.
MK
MK
MB
ME
MU
MI:
MJ5
X'S 7.->c. WORK SHIRTS
Semi-Annual Salo Price.
X'S $1.00 WORK SHIRTS
Semi-Annual Sale Price.
X'S $1.28 WORK SHIRTS
Seni i-A nun al Salo Price.
X'S $1.50 KHAKI SHIRTS
Semi-Annual Salo Price.
MEN'S DRESS SHIRTS.
X'S $1.25 DRESS SHIRTS
Semi-Annual Salo Price.
X'S $1.75 DRESS SHIRTS
Semi-Annual Salo Price.
X'S $2.50 DRESS SHIRTS
Semi-Annual Salo Prico.
MEN'S OVERALLS.
MEN'S MEDIUM GRADE OVERALLS
Semi-Annual Sale Price.,
MEX'S GOOD WEICHT OVERALLS
Semi-Annual Sale Price.
MEN'S' HEADLIGHT OVERALLS
Semi-Annual Sale Prico.
COTTON CHECKS.
IJght-Wnight Cotton Checks, in good Dark Color.1
Semi-Annual Salo Price.
$2.95
$3.45
$3.75
$4.50
$4.95
$6.50
$6.00
$4.40
$3.50
$3.75
$2.95
$1.45
19c.
15c.
10c.
Underwear.
Ladies' Set-Snug Vest and Pants
Semi-Aiiminl Sale Price.
Ladies1 75c. Vost and Pants
Semi-Annual Salo I*rice.
Ladies' $2.50 Union Suits
Semi-Annual Sale Price.
Ladies' Set-Snug Union Suits
Sein i-A n m i ti Salo Price.
$1.00
48c.
$1.40
$1.75
Remnants and Short Lengths
Remnants from our stock, also a shipment of mill short
lengths, various kinds of goods in lengths from one to ten
yards. In this lot are some unusual values.
Half Price. Half Price.
Ladies' Suits at Half Price. Middv Suits at Half Price.
Ladies' Coats at Half Price. Millinery at Half Price.
Ladies' Silk Waists at Half Price. .Outing Gowns at
Half Price. Cotton Blankets at Half Price.
HOYS' BLUE SERGE PAX Ti
ROYS' $2.50 PANTS
Semi-Annual Sale Price.
ROYS* $3.00 PANTS
Semi-Annual Sale Price.
ROYS' $9.50 PANTS
Semi-Annual Sale Price.
ROYS' $4.00 PANTS
Semi-Annual Sale Price.
BOYS' PANTS.
SIZES 8 (o 1H YEAHS.
$1.75
$2.00
$2.25
$2.50
BOYS' OVERALLS.
12i/zc.
10c.
121/2C.
10c.
HOYS' OVERALLS, up to Size 7
Semi-Annual Sale Price.
ROYS' OVERALLS, Sizes ? to 12
Semi-Annual Sale Price.,
HOYS' OVERALLS, Sizes lil to IO
Semi-Annual Sale Price.,
85c.
$1.00
$1.25
BOYS' SHIRTS.
HOYS' STRIPED CHAMBRAY SHIRTS
Semi-Annual Salo Price.
HOYS' SOLID BLUE HEAVY SHIRTS
Semi-Annual Sale Price.
ROYS STRIPED ! <:? H.) 1 SHIRL'S-.
'..omi. Viinu.it s.ilo I'rico.
?{. n S' |>R1 ... SHIR t's
Scint-A nunn! v\h I 'rice ...
50c.
75c. j
75c.
$1.00 I
50c.
75c.
95c.
$1.00
25c. BLEACHING Vx,
?iO-iiic.li Blenching, perfectly smooth- no ..ian li, .xl gouil
quality- Semi-Annual Sale Price .
SHIRTING MADRAS, 29c.
Shirting Madras-a really good quality
Semi-Annual Sale Prico.
95c.
$1.25
$1.95
$1.25
$1.75
$1.95
10c,
15c. TOWELS 10c.
15c. j
29c.
10c.
15x81-inch Bleached Towels, with Red Border
Semi-Annual Sale Price.
50c. TURKISH TOWEL, 29c.
Heavy Weight Blenched Turkish Towels, size 10x10 inches- 00A
Semi-Annual Salo Price.?uvi
32-in DRESS GINGHAMS, 25c.
Short Lengths in Bates il2-lnch Dross Ginghams-Thcso were OC
00c- Semi-Annual Salo Price.?JO.
PERCALES?
ems, Silver G rn j
ml Sale Price .
CHEVIOTS.
n Dark Stripes
27-Inch DRESS GINGHAMS.
A good Standard quality 27-inch Dress Gingham-Xew
Patterns- Semi-Annual Salo Price #.
iRi-inrh Percale Dress Patterns, Silver Grays and Solid
Colors- Soini-A nnual Sale Price.
.Medium Weight Cheviots, In Dark Stripes
Somi-A nnual Salo Prico.
BEST OUTINGS.
Solid Colors ia tho very' best Outings
Semi-Annual Salo Prico.
19c.
171/2G.
19c.
I71/2C.
Sale Opens Friday, January 21st.
Seneca. PATTERSON'S, Seneca.
ody on tho Twenty-third Psalm, ci |
titled "A Ford Slam." Your paper
would have hoon hotter if thc space
devoted to that bit of wonderful lit
oraturo, iuHpired of the ilovll, had
hoon loft blank. Hut belier still If
instead ot* the parody you had pub
lished thc Twenty-third Psalm itself.
lt la admittedly ono of tho most beau
tiful pieces of modern and ancient
literature. On tho oilier hand? tho
parody bas nothing to recommend
it. lt was neither funny nor witty;
neither elevating nor enlightening,
except as an example of what gross
?acre!oge mero man will dare against
things pertaining to dod. Tho best
that you could do would bc to print
tho same space in your next paper as
black as printer's ink will mako it,
with the request to your readers that
they cut it out and pasto it ovor tho
"Ford Slam" of thc week before.
In conclusion, just take any two
verses of tho real Psalm and the par
ody and compare them, and tho sa'
reloge will bo so apparent as to cut
Uko a knife.
For instance: "Yea, tho' I rido
through tho shadows and darkness
!
of night, I will fear no evil, for my
Kord Ia with me, and it comforteth
me."
Sow, the beautiful language, and
thought of tho Psalm: "Yog, tho'
I walk through tho valley of the sha
dow of death, I will fear no evil, for
Thou art with me: Thy rod and Thy
stafl' they comfort mo."
Tho person who wroto the parody
and the ono responsible for its publi
cation will have to repent of the sin
or else need moro than "riding in his
Kord forever" to comfort him on the
other sido of the Valley of the Sha
dow of Death. Yours vory truly,
Harry R. Hughs.
-^ ? ?.-..
Contar Township Singing Association
Tho Centor Township Singing As
sociation will meet at Cross Roads
church on tho fourth Sunday even
ing at 2 o'clock, .lan. 28. All good
Bin gor S and lovers of music are in?
vitod. J. VV. S. King, Secy.
A wood-boring beotlo in Califor-1
nia has put hundrods of telephones
out of commission by boring through
tho telophono cables.
TO? ??? ? ? ? ?? ? TO? ? ? ? ??? ? ? ? ? ? ? ??*
The Willard was first,
The Willard is better built,
The Willard lives longer,
The Willard is used most.
THEREFORE, You want and must have
The Willard Battery
in Your Car.
We have a complete linc on hand. Thc name Willard
is a guarantee of perfection in the battery world. Our personal
guarantee goes with every baticry,
Hughs Garage,
Main Street, !-! Walhalla, S. C
"Satisfied Customers" is Our Motto.
4?9f9r??&&&?r?t& ? @ m m w ? *2M# m ?

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