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Keowee courier. (Pickens Court House, S.C.) 1849-current, February 16, 1921, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026912/1921-02-16/ed-1/seq-1/

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"TO THINE OWN SELF BE TRUE, AND IT MUST FALLOW AS THE MCHffi
By Steck, Shclur HugliM & Shclor.
WALHALLA, SOUTH CAROLINA, WEDNj
90 Head to !
Wc have our big barns I
good, fat Mules than you
long time.
We also can show you tl
the Mississippi River, with
Mules. We can feed and
hour's time a day with one
We sold 95 Mules in Jar
be right.
C.W.& J.E
WALHAI
IT PAYS TO Bl
OKORO IA TORNADO SCATTERS
Dca Hi and Destruction-25 Persons
Killed-.Many Arc Hurt.
Ocdn ?e, Ga., Feb. 10.-A tornado
that struck the Gardner settlement,
one mile from here, shortly after the
noon hour to-day, brought death to
two white persons and nearly thirty
negroes and serious injury to five j
white persons and moro than a score
of negroos.
A .stretch of land extending from }
QQOneJ^)most to Toonibsbo^o^Jn^
Wa's h"inft?n c?unty,-nd?ffy flve^mTles
long and about a half mlle wide, ls J
as barren as a prairie to-night, not
a single building nor a tree being
left standing.
Among the dead ls Hen jam in P.
Orr, a 14-year-old youth, who was
decapitated.
The only other white person who
met death in the tornado ls the 3
year-old daughter of E. L. Minor, the
manager of Shepherd's commissary
at the plant of the Cleveland-Oconee
1.timber Company.
Schoo) House Wrecked.
Eighty-two children and three
teachers were In a school building on
tho edge of the Gardner settlen e it
when the tornado struck. Tho build
ing wns literally twisted to piece?
and tho fragments scattered around
for miles. Children wore picked up
by the wind and carried for some
distance, but it is officially announc
ed that only one child was seriously
hurt.
Approximately forty houses were
blown down In tho Gardner settle
ment. Tho Shepherd Uros.' Commis
sary at the big lumber plant was re
duced to kindling wood, and it was
here that Mr. Orr and four negroes
met their death. Ten feet away from
the commissary was tho general of
fice of tho Cleveland-Oconee Lumber
Compnay, which was untouched by
tho storm.
The lu-acre plant of tho lumber
company, which practically owns the
settlement site of Gardner, was not
seriously damaged hy the wind, al
though mullions of feet of lumber,
piled in the yards, was scat lei ed.
Covers Small Aron.
The tornado spent its force imme
diately beyond tho plant of the lum
ber company, in (he settlement of 10
houses and four stores. Most of the
people residing in Ibis section were
negroes, the white people of tho town
residing on higher ground, a short
distance away.
These negro houses and stores
faced tho tracks of the Savannah di
vision of the Central of Georgia rail
road. In the rear of Ibo house was
an open Held extending for dearly a
mlle from the Oconee station to tho
lumber mill, lt was into this field
that nyn, women and children were
carried to their death from their
seats at dinner tables.
Ten minutes after the tornado
wiped out (he Gardner settlement a
Contra] of Georgia local freight, train
from Savannah to Macon, arrived on
the scene. W. (). King, of Wad ley,
conductor in charge, viewed the bod
ies scattered about the ground. Tho
conductor ordered his locomotive de
tached from the train and willi his
crew hastened to Tennlle, 11 miles
away, for aid.
Hoard Driven in Forehead.
Doctors found ono negro hoy with
a board driven into bis forehead.
They removed the hoard and gave
temporary aid. The youth was still
alive when this dispatch was sent,
and it was helloed that he will live.
m En S
Select From.
ull of Good Mules-more
have seen together in a
[ie best Mule Barn east of
every facility for handling
water J 00 Mules in one
man,
mary; so our prices must
. Bauknight,
JLA, S. C
JY FOR CASH.
The body of a 3-year-old negro In
fant was found at the roots of a
tree, the top of which had been liter
ally twisted off. The child's head had
been crushed in, having been carried
head-foremost from his home and
dashed against the tree. One negro's
body was cut in two.
A negro man and his wife were
found dead more than 100 yards
from their home, lying side by side
In tho rond.
The bodies of several small ne
groes were found in trees, out of the
path of the tornado, being suspnoded
on the limbs by their clothing.
The bo ii i es of grown negroes were
! thrown into the field, in a semi-cir
^et^Mf^nAtho oeh^rb^^h?^?rottP
was a goat, who stood like a statue,
too frightened to move, for hours af
ter the storm had passed.
Oak Trees Snapped. Off. '
Rix oak trees along the railroad at
I Gardner were snapped off at different
heights. On tho top of one of these
was a pillow from the bed of one of
the wrecked homes.
According to residents of the com
munity, the clouds lowered just as
the employees of the lumber plant
left their work for dinner. The at
mosphere became extremely hot and
because of the darkness In many
homes lamps had been lighted when
tho tornado broke.
Ono person on the outer edge of
tho storm-swept path which escaped
declared he saw a string of box cars
moving toward him. Then ns sud
denly, he declared, the box cars were
reversed, and when he looked a sec
ond time he said that they were once
moro coming toward him, These cars
were found to have been blown from
tho rails.
Chickens that escaped death in the
path of the storm wore In many In
stances plucked clean of their feath
ers. There were many animals that
were killed, and In a number of in
stances bodies of hogs and other of
the smaller animals were found to be
lodged high In the boughs of trees,
some of them still living and crying
piteously.
Ret? Cross Relief at Once.
Atlanta, Feb. 10.-Arrangements
for relief of the victims of to-day's
tornado at Oconee, Ga., wore made
hero to-night by the American lied
Cross, which ordered automobile
loads of food sent from Sandorsville
and medical supplies and nurses out
of Atlanta.
Briefs from Bounty Land.
Bounty Lund, Feb. 14.-Special:
.Mrs. H. A. Knox and two children,
of Liberty, wore late guests of Mr.
and Mrs. J.J. Ballenger.
Mrs. IC. \J. Foster's many friends
will learn with regret of her recent
indisposition, and will join in thc
hope that her usual good health may
soon bo restored.
Miss Mary Gambrell ls boarding
in Seneca and attending the Seneca
High School.
Marion Hughs, of Atlanta, spent
the week-end with bis parents, Mr.
and .Mrs. W. ll. Hughs.
Miss Sybil Chnmblin was a recent
visitor to her homo in Liberty.
J. I). Stewart will go to Anderson
to-morrow to undergo a physical ex
amination by the government exam
ining board. Mr. Stewart had quite
a good deal of trouble during the war
on account of defective eyes, and has
been called for re-examination,
Jesse Bankin and Morris Crump
ton attended the singing at Jordania
Hun day.
Wagoner Township Singers.
Tho Wagoner Township Singing
Convention will meet with tho New
Hope Baptist church on the third
Sunday afternoon In February, begin
ning at 2 o'clock. All singers and
lovers of music are Invited to attend.
H. A. Wood. President.
W. D. Brewer, Secretary.
PALMAFESTA GIRLS WILL SEM
City of Columbia from Aloft-Aero
plano Trips foi' Candidates.
The committee In charge of en
tertainment during Palmafesta week
In Columbia, March 28 to April 2,
has announced an arrangement with
the Columbia Aircraft Corporation
by which the young women delegates
from tho various counties in South
Carolina will have opportunity to
view Columbia from tho clouds.
The two big Curtlss planes, "Ori
ole" and "J. M.-4," will be put in
commission and piloted by Lleuts. E.
T*. Gaines and C. H. Slebenhousen,
two experienced army aviators, and
dally flights will be made over Cp
lumbia and the surrounding country,
furnishing areal thriller for the fair
delegates who care to make the
flight.
Forty local dally and weekly news
papers In South Carolina are now
conducting contest's to secure the
most popular young woman in each
county. The delegates will go to Co
lumbia for the gala week as guests
of tho Capital City and the Palma
festa Association, all expenses being
paid. During the big week an elec
tion will be held in Columbia, by
which the Queen of Palmafesta will
be chosen from among the county
delegntes. .
Moving pictures of the queen and
all delegates will be taken by one of
tho prominent national film services.
While in Columbia the young ladles
from the various counties will be
chaperoned by State House officials
and their wives. An endless program
of social gayety and entertainment
is being planned by Columbia society
folk.
Palmafesta week will be crowded
with interesting features, Including
the State-wide automobile, truck audi
"tV?otdr slfovT?'- tho^prliTg styl? show ;
automobile, trades, floral and baby
parades; special musical and theat
rlcal attractions, dally concerts,
fetes, dances and nightly exhibits of
fireworks, featuring South Carolina
historical events in specially design
ed set prices. The Packard agency
of Xew York ts furnishing profes
sional models for the fashion show,
which will be staged at the State
Fair Grounds. The automobile show
has been thrown open to all mem
bers of the South Carolina Automo
tive Trades Association, and will be
one of tho largest ever held in the
South.
Select the young lady whom you
want* to vote for ns the most popu
lar in Oconee and get busy with the
work of getting votes for her. Else
where In this issue will be found the
voting coupon, which is good for one
vote. With every paid-ln-advanco
subscription to The Courier you will
bo given a coupon for 100 votes In
this contest for Queen of the Palma
festa. Tho time ls short, so If yan
aro going to work for some young
lady In this Interesting contest, you
will do well to get busy nt once. The
coupon will appear in each issue of
The Courier up to and including
March 9th, and the votes will be tab
ulated on Saturday, March 12th, and
the name of the winner for Oconee
will bo sent to Columbia. There an
election will be held to select ono of
Ibo delegates from tho several coun
ties as Queen of Palmafesta. After
tho queen has been chosen, the other
county delegates will be chosen ns
members of tho queen's court Indies
and all will be guests of the City of
Columbia during Palmafesta week,
with all expenses paid and a hand
some gown for the occasion furnished
without cost to each young lady who
wins In tho county contest.
Child Killed by Heavy Truck.
Darlington, Feb. 13.-An accident
on the public square hero yesterday
afternoon cost the life of little Henty
Tedder, aged 8 years, a son of Henry
Tedder, of Oates, this county. Tho
accident occurred at tho Intersection
of two streets with tho public square.
It seems that Jesse Hostlck, colorod,
driving a big tank truck of tho Gulf
Refining Co., was turning from Pearl
street into Main street at the corner
of tho square, but before turning had
stopped, and at tho signal of the
traille officer on duty there started
on down Main street at a very slow
rato of speed. The little Tedder child
was attempting lo join some friends
on the opposite corner of tho street
and, not seeing tho I ruck, started to
run across the street. Tho little fol
low ran into the fender and in some
way was thrown under the truck, the
IIA)
Ki FORMALLY DECLARER
To llu^o Reen ('hosea as President
rof the United States.
lington, Fob. 10.-Tile elec
Iwarren G. Harding as Presl
iid Calvin Coolidge as Vice
it of the United States was
declared to-day at a Joint
of tho Senate and House In
rober of the latter,
'full solemnity and without a
)f demonstration such as
the "elections" of President
the two bodies canvassed
^s cast by the electors chosen
Elections last November. The
[vote as declared tallied with
formal results known to tho
)n the day after election, with
(es for Mr. Harding and Mr.
fc, and 127 for James M. Cox
inklln D. Roosevelt, the Dem
Fstandard-bearers.
lolcmn and Impressive.
President Marshall presided
??-day's canvass and gave an
effect?ttl warning against any dem
onstration for an occasion which, Mr.
MarsbJP' said, "was solemn and im
portant" and should .be carried
through ?; In silence. Unlike many
previous occasions, the Vice. Presi
den.t'a^iwarning was heeded, except
for a Utter over slip-ups of the tell
ers: in^pronouncing names of State3
In announcing the results.
Hy;'3?ft coincidence, Senator Lodge,
of Massachusetts, Republican floor
leader>:who acted as teller, announc
ed'-.t)^'???)r8t votes, from Alabama, for
px and Roosevelt, while Sen
erwood, of Alabama, Dem
ller, announced the first re
ijr Messrs. Harding and Cool
in Arizona, in the alphabet
ic of the electors* votes.
s
-gftfetigallery. composed mostly
which'were completed In record time
of about a halt hour.
For Washington's Birthday.
The Packet Post school ls planning
an entertainment for Washington's
birthday, and the following program
will be rendered on Fob. 22d, begin
ning at 7.30 p. m.:
Song--"Washington." Hy school.
Recitation-"The 22d of Febru
ary." By Wm. Chalmers.
Dialogue-"Our Fla*; *' By three
small boys .
Recitation-"Little Johnnie on
George Washington." By Obie Gal
loway.
Recitation - "Like Washington."
By Willie Harkins.
Recitation-"Careful Stithces." By
threo children.
Recitation-"The Hatchet Story."
By Leo Powell.
Recitation - "Something Better."
By Mary Julia Coward.
"The Hatchet Song." By primary
grades.
"Emblems of Washington." By
threo primary girls.
"Flag Drill," by primary pupils.
Recitation-"What the Little Girl
Said." By Lattin Cowan.
"Washington." By ten small boys
and girls.
Recitation-"A High Resolve." By
Phidollo Burrell.
"Recipe for Potato Pudding." By
four advanced pupils.
Song - "Dixie." By intermediate
grades.
"Oh, You Teacher!" By Intermedi
ate grades.
Recitation-"Reverie in Church."
By Pauline Todd.
Dialogue-"Guess Who?" By Ber
nice Garrison and EulUS Galloway.
Recitation-"Widder." By Hattie
Orr.
Recitation-"Old Moses Counting
Eggs." Gladys Alexander.
"The Traveling Photographer."
By advanced/grades.
Recitation-"Mrs. January Jones'
Lecture on Woman's Rights." By
James Harkins.
Play-"Tho Suffragettes." By some
"cullin! sisters."
Prof. W. W. West ls expected to
furnish music during the evening.
(.arti of Thanks.
Editor Keowee Courier:
To those kind friends and neigh
bors who so thoughtfully and unself
ishly gavo of their Hmo to minister
to the needs of our dear father dur
ing his last illness, and who so freely
gavo their sympathy and help when
ho had passed to his reward, we wish
to extend sincore thanks and express
our appreciation. May the Lord bless
each and ovory one.
M.r and Mrs. Steve Blackwell.
Conero8s, Fob. 16.-adv.**
back wheels killing bini instantly.
Hostlck was placed under arrest
pending tho rosult of the coroner's
Inquest, but was later roleasod, the
coroner's Jury exonerating him, their
verdict being that lt was un absolute
ly unavoidable accident.
... Lubrica!
-IX QUANTITIES AT
A OAK IJOAI> OE LUHHICAT1
TRACTORS ANO STATIONARY
TY.ami SIXTY-GAIJLON CONT*
I AM GOING TO SELL THIS
MY FRIGE Wllili SAVE YOU 1
THE GALIX>N. IF THERE WA?
SHOULD SAVE YOUR MONEY
YOUR OIL IN I/ A KG ICU QUANr
DTFFERBNCB ?
TRACTOR OWNERS SHOULI
DARREL OFFER BEFORE 1?L(
ONE LOT OIL-ESPECIALLY
SON TRACTOR.
I STILL HAVE A FEW MAH'
TER GET YOURS.
Arthur
Walhall
TEXAS FARMERS ARE REDUCING
Their Cotton Acreage--N. C. Follow
ing Santo Pla??-S. C. Must Do lt.
Columbia, Feb. 14.-Texas farm
ers are going to reduce their cotton
acreage from ?IS 1-3 to 50 ner cent,
according to a letter received by the
South Carolina division of tho Amer
ican Cotton Association from George
B. Terrell, Commissioner of Agricul
ture of that State. He states In his
letter that his department is sending
out leaflets and bulletins In large
numbers dealing with the situation,
"and with every fibre In our being
we are appealing to our Texas fa:
era to reduce their cotton acre* ?
this year anywhere from 33 1-3 to oi>
per cont. v . ... . "v
A letter from A. W. Swain, secre
.tary of the North Carolina division,
also brings the nows that North-Car
olina ls certainly going to reduce. In
his letter Mr. Swain says:
"Wo aro going to reduce moro
than we are asked to reduce, and are
signing up right now almost 100 por
cent on the proposition. We are Just
in receipt of a wire from some of
the counties reading thus: 'Signed up
1,3 00 to date in my county. Will
complete the Job with around ?ir> pel
een t signed up.' Wo have several
telegrams to this effect, and letters
from almost every county, saying 'put
us down for 100 per cent in invor of
reduction this yenr'."
Reports from other States indicate
that the. reduction is going to be
South-wide. Officials of the associa
tion declare, hojvover, that with a
surplus of 9,000,000 bales staring
the South in tho face, lt will be finan
cial disaster for over half a crop to
be raised.
ASSOCIATE JUSTICE GAGE DEAD.
Death Came Sunday Last at Home in
Chester After Long Illness.
Chester, S. C., Feb. 13.-Assoclato
Justice George W. Gage, of the South
Carolina Supreme Court, died at lils
home here at '6 o'clock this after
noon, after a long illness. He ls the
second Associate Justice of the South
Carolina Supremo Court to die In
less than one month. Associate Jus
tice Daniel F. Hydrlck having died
on Jan. 15.
Justice Gage had been ill for four
weeks with pneumonia. Ho was 05
years old. lie studied law at Van
derbilt University after completing
bis academic course ut Wofford Col
lege, Spartnnburg. liefore lils pro
motion to tho Circuit bench ho serv
ed In the lower House of the Oonernl
Assembly of South Carolina. Ile was
eleoted to tho Supreme bench seven
years ugo. Ile is survived by four
sons and one daughter.
Funeral Held Yesterday.
Chester, Fob. 15.-The funeral of
Judge Gage was held hore to-day nt
1 I o'clock. The services at tho home
?ind at the grave were largely at
tended, tho prominence of the highly
esteemed Jurist attracting many from
a distance, who caine to pay the last
id tribute to the memory of a man
/hom everybody loved and trusted,
Doth as private citizen and public
servant.
.'CASCARETS" TO-NIGHT
FOR CONSTIPATION.
Just think! A pleasant, harmless
Casca rel works while you sleep, and
has your livor active, head cloar,
stomach sweet and bowels moving
as regular as a clock by morning.
No griping or Inconvenience. 10, 25
or 50-cent boxes. Chilli ron love this
cindy cathartic, too.-adv.
lil? REDUCTION
IN? Olli FOR AUTOMOBILES,
ir ENGINES-IN FIVE, TH IR.
UN IO RS.
OIL AT WHOLESALE PRICES.
PROM SS TO BO CENTS ON
J EVER A TIMK WREN YOU
IT IS NOW. WHY NOT BUY
HIT ES AND POCKET THE
) TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS
)W TIME.
? HEAVY-FOR THE FORD
ITN DITCHERS LEFT. BET
Brown,
PASSENOER HATE RAISE ORDER
Received by Railroads in South Car
olina-AlCy. ?en. to Act.
Washington, Pcb. 12.-Passenger
fares, excess baggage, switching and
other State charges in South Carolina
were ordered to-day hy the Inter
state Commerce Commission to be
raised to the lovel of interstate rates,
effectlvo on March 21.
The commission said the State pas
senger rate of three cents a mlle dis
criminated against Interstate com
merce, and ordered a rate of 3.6 cts..
per mile.
Tho Seaboard Air Line, which did"
not raise passenger fare In the State
of South Carolina in accordance with .
their d?cision ot'last August, ., was >.
orderea to increase its faros from
Charleston to Savannah to $3.4 2, .
which is figured on a'3.6 cents basis.
The commission also orcfeTed the .
South Carolina Hallway Commission
to establish a charge not exceeding ;
15 cents to be paid by any passenger
boarding a train without first pur
chasing a ticket. The presont rate
In the State is 1 H cents.
Tho commission ordered excess
baggage weight in State travel re
duced from 200 pounds to 150
pounds, the level prevailing in inter
state commerce.
The commission said the evidence
showed that business houses of
South Carolina competing with
houses in adjacent States had boen
unduly favored by the lower State
passenger rates, and quoted the
transportation act as authority for
i ts decision in ordering tho rates
raised.
To Sock Injunction.
Columbia, Feb. 14.-"In order to
prevent this most serious and sweep
ing encroachment upon tho right of
the State of South Carolina to regu
late her purely internal affairs," At
torney Oenoral S. M. Wolfo anno me
ed to-day that ho will Immediately
apply to United States .ludgo H. A.
M. Smith, of tho Eastern South Car
olllna district, at Charleston, for an
'njunction to restrain the railways
operating in this State from putting
Inio effect increases tn passenger and
switching charges ordered by the In
terstate Commerce Commission.
Asked as to the possibility of tho
railways instituting injunction pro
coodings to prevent the Stato of
South Carolina from interfering with
tho increased rates, tho tAttornoy
General said that his office doos not
anticipate such action and will prob
ably seek tho Injunction In behalf of
tho State this week.
- - -* * a*--?
Negro Stubbed Officer to Denth.
Talladega, Ala., Feb. 13.-Depu
ties succeeded in making their way
to Anniston, whero they arrlvod In
the early morning hours to-day with
Teague Cunningham, colored, who
lute yesterday cut Patrolman Eugene
Hobbs to death with a razor, and
who Was threatened by a mob when
officers attempted to board a train
with tho prisoner.
Shorlff Cornett announced to-day
that ho was convinced that Cunning
ham alone was responsible for tho
killing, and that the roport that ho
held tho victim while another negro
did tho cutting was untrue. Cunning
ham is declared by offlcors to havo
beon drunk when the arrest was at
tempted.
Italy is combating illiteracy by tho
establishment of 1,000 new schools.

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