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Keowee courier. (Pickens Court House, S.C.) 1849-current, May 25, 1921, Image 7

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026912/1921-05-25/ed-1/seq-7/

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What Must I Do to
Be Saved?
By REV. B. B. SUTCLIFFE
Extension Department, Moody
uiblo Instituto, Chicago.
TiSXT-Hollovo on tho Lord JCSUB Christ
and thou shalt bo eaved.-Acts 14:3L
Our eternal destiny does not depend
on wliut we do with certain things
but what we . do
with a certuiu
ne.son und that
Person is the Lord
Jesus Christ.
Men continually
try to Hud salva
tion by doing vari
ous works which
they think are
BUfllclently meri
torious to bring
what they seek.
But after n man
has dune all he
can do he linds himself convince*!
that by his own work he bas not ob
tained what he sought. Do what be
Will be cannot lind salvation until nt
last, like the Jailer, ho eries, "What
must I do tb be saved?" (Acts 10:30).
The answer today is the sumo as
when this question was first asked,
viz.: "Believe on the Lord Jesus
Christ and thou shult bo Strived** (Acts
10:31).
The sense of condemnation rising
from conviction of sin Is the common
heritage of all men. To Hud relief
from dis sense of condemnation man
turns to various expedients, but tho
more he tries to rid himself ol' lt
the more he feels condemned. But
when be huns to the Word of God
he linds written In Jno. 8:18, "He that
believe: li on the Son ls not con
demned."
The possession of eternal life comes
over the same pathway, that of faith
In Jesus Christ. It ls not for tho mun
who works but, "Ho that believeth on
the Son bath everlasting life" (Jno.
8:80).
If it be a question of Justification
before God, It ls simple faith and not
works of any kind that brings lt, for
we are told lu Acts 13:89, "By Him
(Christ) all tba;, believe ure Justified
from nil things from which ye could
not be Justified by tho law of Moses."
No wonder, then, we hear Jesus say
ing to those who asked Him whnt
they should do to work the workB of
God, "This ls the work of God that
yo believe on Him whom He hath
sent" (Jno. 0:20). Fqitli in Christ ls
the only medium by which we may se
cure gifts from God, but Ho has no
gift that may not be ours In answer
to mir faith In this great object of
faith, Jesus Christ, ft ls not there
fore my good life or works, not my
church or religion. n?>t my lotoyx ly
of chuno t< i ur honesty o? purpose,
nor anything that 1 can do, which ls
the object of my trust, but lt ls what
Christ bus done and ls, that must bo
come the object of my faith. . .
Many have vague Ideas about faith
mid think of it much as a pagan
might think of some fetich. But It Is
not tho faith but the object of faith
that holds the power and brings tho
blessing. Noah's faith took him Into
the ark because be believed that safe
ty from tho Judgment about to fall
was to be found only there. Thus lt
was tho ark, the object of his fnlth,
that saved bini. So tho believer to
day Ands his fnlth takes him to
Christ, tho object of his faith, who
sa vos him.
A man may have splendid faith, but
If the object of his faith he unworthy
the faith Is useless, however good lt
may be In itself. For Illustration: A
man moy place bis money In n bank
and by doing so provo he has splendid
fnlth In that bank. If the bank falls
and the man loses his money, lt ls be
cause the object of his faith was un
worthy, and not because there was
anything wrong with lils fnlth.
Again, a man may have good faith In
n boat and prove bis faith ls good by
entrusting his life to thot boat. But
If lt goes down at sea and the man
loses his life, lt ls not becnuso his
faith was not of the right kind or
that there ans not enough of it, but
simply because the object of his faith
was bud.
Today there are ninny men and
women trusting their future wei faro
and their hope of salvation to good
works or upright living or honesty of
purpose or sincerity, who will lose
their souls not because there ls any
thing wrong with their faith, but be
cause any of these things, however
good In themselves, ls an unworthy
object for faith. All of them put to
gether could never save a soul. Noth
ing but Christ cnn be a worthy ob
ject for faith which brings snlvutlon.
A mini may bo n moral, praying,
Church-going man, as Nicodemus was,
and not bo saved ; may bo an upright,
clean, almsgiving man, as Cornelius
was, and not be saved ; may be a zeal
ous man. blameless heforo tho law,
os Saul of Tarsus was, and not bo
saved; hut none can lie a believer In
the Lord Jesus Christ and not bo
saved, becnuso tho Word of God still
declares, "Believe in the Lord Jesus
Christ and thou fthult be saved" (Acts
.10:81). It ls Christ, tho supreme ob
ject for the sinner's faith, wdio cnn
and will and does save all who put
their trust In Him. The aviator In
tho air bas no other stay or hope
than the machine In which ho rides.
If tho machino proves good the man
Is safe, but If the machine ls bad lt
ls Just tho reverse, for lie has no
other stay-he hus put his faith tn lt.
So to bs u believer on Christ menus
that a man lins no other help or stny
or hopo than tho Lord Jesus Christ.
l.UibRoribe for Tho vier. (Best.)
?I? fy fy fy fy. fy. fy. fy. ?}. ?fy .J- fy.
?fy THE SP1UNG TONIC. fy?
fy fy, fy fy fy fy fy fy fy fy? fy? fy? fy
(Winthrop Bulletin.)
Now that ?pring ia tully upon us
it seems very timely to stress tho
importance o? keeping our liddies
physically "in trim." In order to do
this Avo need a liberal supply cf
iron, calcium and phosphorus. 'Green
vegetables, fruits and milk are our
best sources for these three import
ant minirals.
To quote 'Dr. 'McCollum In his
"The American Homo Diet:
"Many will recall how our grand
mothers insisted on the frequent
treatments with sulphur and mo
lasses, the periodical dosing with
bitters, and tho efficacy of sassafras
tea in the spring as a means of 'thin
ning the blood,' which was supposed
to become Impure and thick during
the. winter. Among our pioneer an
cestors tho idea was generally ac
cepted that there was a need for a
spring medicine of some kind. There
can be little doubt, that this belief
rested on common experience. We
know that in the early settlement of
many of the 'States, the people suf
fered great hardships. With little
capital and no food reserve, their
winter diet, was generally very slm
I plo and monotonous, and there is
good reason to believe that ll was
j chemically unsatisfactory for ibo
: maintenance of health."
j There are still some of us who
have ibis belief that we need "spring
: Ionic" in the form of medicine in
; order to become physically fil nfler
j a long winter. We lose sight of thc
i foci thal often our diets have boon!
j confined to seeds, tubers and cereal j
! foods.
Dr. McCollum further says:
"lt has beet? found impossible to
nourish laboratory animals satisfac
torily on any diet which is derived j
entirely from cereals (wheal, oats,
I corn, rice.) and other seeds; tubers,
j such ns the potato, turnip or beet,
I together with meats "which aro dc
i rived from the muscle tissue of ani
mals (ham, steak, etc.) Even when
j fed a diet containing wheat flour,
? corn meal, p^eas, beans, potato, tur
; nip, beets and round steak, young
I animals have always failed to grow
to moro than two-thirds of their nor
; mal adult size, and they grew moro
? slowly than they were capable of
; growing. The same diet, with a lib
' oral supply of milk added, produced
' a remarkable contras in similar j
groups ot nh'lmals fed ut tbe .mme
.time. Phc above described diet <<!*
cereals, peas, beaus, tubers, roots j
and meat is also remarkably Im
proved by ibo addition of such loaves
as celery tops, spinach, cabbage, tur- |
' nip tops and other green vegetables.
lt is obvious from these results that
there ls some .remarkable difference
between the dietary properties of
leaves or of milk as contrasted with
any of the ordinary seeds, tubers,
roots and lean meat which are com
monly used as food for man and ani
mals."
With these convincing evidences
in mind, we cannot stress too much
the importance of milk, fruits and
vegetables, particularly the leafy
vegetables In the diet as sources of
these Important minerals-iron, cal
cium and phosphorus-iron for regu
latory purposes, calcium for its bone
building qualities and phosphorus
for its function in helping build
bone, nerve and cell tissues and to
aid in regulating the neutrality of
the blood. For Iron ont fruits and
vegetables; for calcium drink milk,
oat celery, string beans, cabbage,
cauliflower, carrots and spinach; for
phosphorus drink milk, eat eggs (the
yolk.) spinach, onion and whole
wheat cereals.
Immigrant Dies of Typhus.
Now York. May 10.-Ellis Island,
through which the bulk of the coun
try's Immigration passes, to-day was
placed under strict quarantine be
cause of the death yesterday from
typhus of Andreast Seinback, a Jugo
slav. 'The 1.700 Immigrants were
removed lo tho de'ention station nt
Hoffman's Island. Thc victim was a
five-year-old boy.
Commissioner of immigration Wai
lift announced that the Ellis Island
station would not be reopened for
48 hours. During thal time arriving
immigrants will be held on the ships
that bring (hem.
Officials could not tell whether the
Steinback boy contracted the disease
on shipboard or at tho station. His
death was the first from typhus re
ported here for several weeks.
On "Ragged Edge" Financially.
Columbia, May 20.-A meeting of
the executive board of the South
Carolina Anti-Tuberculosis Associa
tion will bo held here in the near
futuro to consider the future of this
organization, which ls said to he on
tho "ragged edge" financially. Tho
work of tho association is ftbOUl to
go under, unless something cnn he
done. Salaries and the personnel
havo boen cut to thc bone.
EX-GOVERNOR. OATT? MISSING.
< 'lim ged with Peonage, Federal Au
thorities Seeking Him.
Pensacola, Fla., May 19.-As a
result of the indictment here yester
day of "Sidney J. Catts, former Oov
ornor of Florida, hy the Federal
grand jury on two counts which
charged Catt's with having held two
negroes In peonage, tho former Chief
Executive is hoing sought hy both Jtho
F?deral authorities and tho authori
ties of Bradford county., ile recently
was indicted by the Bradford grand
jury for alleged acceptance of $700
from a life-term convict for his In
fluence in obtaining a pardon for the
convict.
Tho last time Catts was seen in
Florida, so far as is known here, was
several weeks ago, when he visited
his former home in Walton county.
The specific charge against the for
mer Governor, in the peonage case,
is that he held In a state of Invol
untary servitude Fd. Brown and .lob?
Henry Rodgers, and forced them to
work on his plantation in Walton
county for a period of several
months. TJio negroes, both former
convicts, were pardoned while Gatts
was Goevrnor and the chairman of
! the State Hoard of Pardons, lt is
! alleged that when they were releas
ed from the Slate prison the negroes
I were taken into custody liv agents
I nf Gait's and transported to his plan-'
, talion, where they were put to work.
I There they remained until a few
i weeks ago. Roth appeared before the
I grand jury, and Rodgers previously
1 had lesaified before the special logls
? la live committee investigating Hie
1 conduct of Catts while in office. Mr.
! Gatts' term as Governor ex?>?red on
j .lan. :? last.
Colds Cause Grip and Influenza
LAXATIVE BROMO QUININE Tablets remove tho
cause. There is only one "Bromo Quinine." E.W.
GROVE'S signature on thc box. 30c.
j liane's Ashes Scattered to Winds.
Chicago, May lil.-The body of
Franklin Iv. Lane, former Secretary
of the Interior, who died at Hoohes
ter, Minn;, was cremated nero tc-day
and the ashes will be taken to the
top of Bl Capitan Peak, in the Yo
semite Valley, California, and scat
tered to the winds, in compliance
with a request made by Mr. Lane
prior to his death.
Relativ-- of Mr. Lane explained
tile uiluwa] request by saying thar
j he had spent much of h! lifo In tho
: cosei ' region and 'a ol grown io
love it so much that he wished his
ashes to be taken thore when he
died.
Tito body reached here this morn
ing from Rochester and was immedi
ately taken to Graceland cemetery
for cremation. There was no funeral
service-another request of Mr.
Lane's-and only the Immediate
family attended the cremation.
Rub-My-Tlsn: is a great, pain kill
er. Relieves pain and soreness,
Rheumatism, Neuralgia, Sprains, .Ve.
j -adv.
MAN TAKEN AT LAST IN DEATH
Wagon Caso - Explosion Occurred
Eight Months Ago-ii? Deaths.
New York, May 20.-The wheel of
the law Thursday caught a man who
j is believel to have boen directly re
sponsible for the bomb explosion in
which, eight months ago, the United
States assay office and part of tho
'Morgan firm's building in Wall
street were wrecked, and which caus
ed 39 deaths and the wounding of
200 mon and women.
The man is Giuseppi de (Filippo, a
ll iddle-aged Italian truck man, of
Bayonne, N. J. He is accused of be
ing the "death wagon" driver, for
whom world-wide search has been on
from the moment it became clear to
thc authorities that the explosion
was a plot. De Filippo had been un
der arrest in Rayonne for several
days. Issuance of the warrant for
his arrest came al the end of a day
of terrific grilling by the police of
Rayonne and Department of Justice
agents.
This grilling liad been interrupted
several times by attempts to idontify
him, one of which was successful. Ho
was placed in line with len other
men picked nt random, and then per
sons who swear that, they saw tho
"death wagon" driver on the scene
of the explosion just before the blast
were called In to pick him out.
Ono witness positively Identified
him as the man he saw standing near
tho "death wagon" a few minutes
before the explosion.
Two other witnesses picked him
out as a "man resembling a man"
they had seen.
To Cure a Cold In One Day
Take LAXATIVE BROMO QUININE (Tablets.) It
stops tho Cough and Headache and works off the
Cold. E.W. GROVE'S Elgnaturc on each box. 30a
Rlack rats wore Introduced in
America from IOuropo in 154 1, but
were exterminated by brown rats,
which weio introduced In 1775.
The Fordson Tractor
$025 f. o. b. Detroit
ST10ADY, LIGHT, ALIO HT, POW IO lt TO SPARIO, 10CONOMICAL
OF OPBRATIOJ?. WATCH A FORDSON TRACTOR AND YOU WILL
WON DIO H HOW TI I OS IO A PPA HUN TI J Y CONTRA I>H3TORY QUALITIES
OF KTHKNGTH, LIGHTNESS, I ?DAV IOU AND SPEED COULD EVER HM
COMBINED IN ON 10 UNIT.
TUM FORDSON'** SPEED IS A VA I DA 111.10 FOI! TH IO HAULING
OF HEAVY LOADS FOH LON<; HIS TA NUUK. ITS POWER IS A VIAL
AUDIO FOI? DRAGGING PLOWS OH DISC HA BROWS THROUGH TH IO
ll MAY HOST SOIL OR FOR RUNNING THF CUTTING-RON, GRIN DIOR
OH TH HMS! UNG MACHIMO.
WE TA KIO PHI DM IN HAND LINC SICH A COMPACT, CORTA
DLE I ?OW IO B PLANT.
WIO ARM EQCI IM'ED WI TH MYMHY FACILITY FOR GIVING
QUICK SERVICE FOB Tl 110 FORDSON.
Piedmont IVIotor Co
5
WALHALLA, C. WESTMINSTER, S. C.
PHONE 34
LESSEN LOSS IN
PRODUCING PORK
University of Illinois Gives Ex
pert Advice on Care ot
Sows and Litters.
TIMELY REMEDIES OUTLINED
Tan Times as Many Pigs Lost in First
Two Months After Farrowing
Then '-rom Choler;?- -Good
M II ngement fiRacntiaf.
- , J. B. raen;
\V AC WM ubuaiiy ligure the profits
and losses in raising hogs from the
time of weaning to marketing, there
ls a chance to make seine difference
In tie cost of production up to the
time the pigs are taken from the sow.
Clolera causes a greater financial
loss than any other disease, hut about
ten 'lines ns many pigs are lost in the
lirsttwo months after farrowing than
are lost from eholern. Hog ehulern
gets Into the herd when each pig rep
resent? a larger Investment Chan is the
case with the suckling pig.
It may be fair lo ask tile question
whin ls a fair-sized litter for a sow to
wein? I have heard of men who
wenied on the average eight or nine
pigs per sow. We have all, no doubt,
head of such cases. These stories
usiully. are not told In a "nonbrog
gln?' way. That is why we hear of
sud records. The man who raises
tine pigs per sow seldom remembers
niuo about the reeord or very firmly
estmllshes the fact in the minds of
his leighbors. The normal farrow of
n HOV ls seven to nine pigs. About 10
por cent of these either are dead
winn they come or die during the llrst
24 lours. Then, due to various causes
dining the first week or ten days, as
maiy more die or are killed; and by
the time the pigs are two months old,
yoi may say that you have done ns
wei as "common" If you have an aver
age of five pigs to wenn from the
80V.
"lils leak in pork production as told
by 102 farmers, in 1018 In auestlon
Sow and Pigs on Rape.
paires sent to them, ls shown below. A
few suggestions nre given on how it
nay be stopped.
The Loss Be-fore Weaning and How to
Stop lt.
Overlaid by Bows-!?. 13%.
1. Do not have tho iowa too fat.
2. Provide the pen with a good guard
rall.
8. Remove pig? from nervous ?ow a?
farrowed. Return when sow has fin
ished farrowing and quieted down.
4. Have as little noise and commotion
about the pen as possible for the first
Jew A.?)?!..
6. ?tve Die sow and litter a little care
ami attention during the HMM week.
6. Do not nae largo quanti tien of bed
ding.
farrowed Weak or Dead-23.34%.
1. Havo the BOW gaining In Hosh at
brooding timo.
During tho goBtatlon period:
2. Ke*d tho sow a good ration.
3. Keep hor in good physical oonditlon.
4. Give her plenty of exorcise; moke
hor go Homo distance for her feed each
day.
Chilled-16.88%.
1. Bo present at farrowing time to
warm the chilled pigs.
2. Keep the beds dry and free from
drafts.
Baten by Sows-4.69%.
1. Feed a balanced ration during the
gestation period and while the sow is
suckling the Ptter. Too much corn ls
often fed.
2. Sell thr.p?? Kows that hu ve the habit
or sating their pig?.
Abortad-4.66%.
t. Keep "piggy'" nows from other
ctftNttea of Itv-'; mock.
3s. (N> not nllow sow? heavy In jilg Itt
R.? over obstruction?) or very rough
ground.
3. If contagious abortion, sell the sows.
Scours-3.43%.
1. Feed tho sow a light ration for the
first weok or ten days-increase it
gradually.
2. Do not chango the feed of the sow
too .suddenly.
3. Keep tho pens and trough's clean.
Thurn PH-1.78%.
1. Ilcdiiso th? amount of feed given to
the KOW.
2. Exorcise the pigs.
Necrobaclllosia (sore- mouth. .Middles, bull
nose, etc)-|.6fl%.
1. Disinfect pons before the sow far
rows.
2. Treat abruslonn in the skin about
Hie pig's mouth wit)? solutions of cresol
dip, permanganate of potash or othor
good disinfectant.
3. Clip (not break off) pigs' teeth.
Cholera-1.01%.
1. Have immune sows.
2. Keep place cleaned up and free
from the disease.
3. If In danger, vaccinate soon after
weaning pigs.
Miscellaneous-6.64%.
1, Get pigs to eating well before time
of weaning. Make a creep for them.
2. Tait? extra good care of the pigs
during the first few weoks following
their removal from tho BOW, for they
will miss her if you do not.
((titi CUl'OS .Malaria, ( bills and Fe
ver, I ii I iou-. Fever, Colds ?ind Iai
(.'lippe, ol' money refunded.- adv.
Ancients developed tho art of en
graving on emeralds which were in
great demand.
The fruit, of the banyan tree is
much like a fig, although the tree ls
in no way like a fig tree.
CORNS
Lift Off with Fingers
Doesn't hurt a bit! Drop a llttlo
"Freezono" on an aching corn, In
stantly that corn stops hurting, then
shortly you lift lt right off with
fingers. Truly!
Your druggist soils a tiny bottlo of
"Freezono" for a few cents, sufficient
to removo every hard corn, soft corn
or corn between tho toes, and the
calluses, without soreness or irrita
tion.-adv.
When Folks Aro Married.
(Hy Douglas Mallock.)
When folks aro married wo extend
our warm congratulations
Wo loll tho couple married life's tho
happiest, of stations.
We tell tho brido tho groom's a
prince, the groom tho bride's a
beauty ;
Wo talk a lot of constancy, and talk
a lot of duty.
But that's no limo to mako a fuss
tho timo ls ton years hitor,
For thon, if all is well with thom,
their love ls vastly groator.
If ton long year? she's looked at. him
and ttreks ho's nobie looking, '
\\ ho bas stood her woman trtondg "
and sm /uiivived Iii i. . n ones.
And each the other's relatives-tho j
noar and now-and-thon ones-1 /
if he can Uko her sister's beau, and
sho can Uko his motlier-.
There Isn't any doubt at all, they
really love each other.
For time's Une test, of married life;
you can't toll much about lt
ny Just "I will" and Just "I do,"how-'
evor loud they shout it.
They havo lo have their ups nnd
downs, their worry ami their
trouble,
lliive Fa th or Time got out his scythe
and puncture every bubble;
They have to have their lillie burta,
and havo lo rise above 'em
If ten long years their love survives
life's llttlo Irritations,
That ls tho timo to como around and
yell congratulations!
Piles Cured In 6 to 14 Days
Druggists refund money If PAZO OINTMENT falta
to euro Itching, Blind, niccdinft or Protruding Piles.
Instantly relieves Itching Piles, and you can get
restful sleep utter tho first nnnllcatlon. Price 60c
Doitth of BOIM> Wood.
Dobo Wood, son of Mr. and 'Mrs.
E. P. Wood, of New Hopo, died at
hi's homo on May 2d. Ile. had been
in declining health ever since bia re
turn from service willi the American
overseas forces in the World War.
In tho service of bis country he waa
a willing soldier, ready always to
do his part,<ln defense of right. After*
his return home he was never well
and suffered greatly, but was never
hoard to complain. He was alway?
cheerful and carried constantly a
smilo for every one. For several
weeks preceding bis death he had
been in a precarious condition and
lils family realized that it was only
ti matter of time until death would
como to ibo relief of his sufferings.
Mr. Wood was 28 years of ago.
(lenHe of manner, and with a heart
as generous as ever beat tn a human
breast, he had hosts of friends, who
will sadly mia's him.
Funeral services were conducted
ni tho homo on account of his mo
ther, wno ls In a critical condition,
After /ho sorvlco thero the body was
fiiken to tho New Hope comotery,
where it was laid to rest hy tho sido
of his father, brother and sister, all
of whom preceded him to tho gravo
aoveral years.
Tho heartfelt sympathy of tho en
tire community JOOS out to the he
roaved ones in their sorrow-mott
especially to tho ?'..ricken mother,
who, lt is hoped, will soon bc re
storod to hoalth. A Frlond.
Tradition places tho boginning of
Cambridge University as far back as
tho seventh contury.

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