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Keowee courier. (Pickens Court House, S.C.) 1849-current, January 04, 1922, Image 6

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?SJ?OWEE COURIER
(KstnbUshod 1840.)
PubR?hod Every Wednesday Morning
7 SUBSCRIPTION PRICE.
One Year .tl .00
Six Months.8?
Throo Months.30
Advertising Ilatos Reasonable.
By Stock, Sholor, Hughs & Sholor.
Coniniunications ot a personal
oharacter charged for as advertise
ments.
Obituary notices, cards of thanks
and tributes of respect, either by
Individuals, lodges or churches, are
charged for as for advertisements at
rate of one cent a word. Cash must
accompany manuscript, and all sucb
notices will be marked "Adv." In
conformity with Federal ruling on
such matters.
WALHALLA, S. C.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 4, 1022.
d )>.???*????.?? . ..?...?..?...-?.??.??..?.?..??.-?....??J
The Story of
Our States
By JONATHAN BRACE j
XL.-MONTANA
TI 110 mon- i
11 o n of ;
Montnna his- !
tory Inunedl- j
ately brings
to mind tho
Caster Mas
sacre as ono
ot tlio most dramatic Incidents
in Indian warfare, lt occurred
in 1870, the Centennial year,
when special emphasis wus be
ing laid on the cause of peace
throughout tho world. The
Sioux Indians had been driven
Into Montana by the gold miners,
nnd the United States govern
ment took steps to force them <
back into their reservations. Gen
eral Ouster, with less thun SOO
men, set out to round up th?
tribes which were on the war
, path, and at the Llttlo Bighorn
river, was ambushed by Sitting
Bull and 8,000 warriors. Custer
and all his troopers were killed.
Soon after this massacre the In
dians were defeated and many
Ot them fled to Canada.
Gold was discovered In Mon- ?
tana as early as 185'2 hy the half- ?
breed Francois Finlay near Hell !
Gate river. This, however, ere*
! nted little stir and lt wasn't un
til live years later when John
SHverthorn discovered gold In !
; quantities, that mining settle
n monts sprang up in tho moun
' tnlns. This region had been part jj
" of Nebraska territory, which In
18611 was subdivided and became
a portion of Idaho territory. The
next year lt was organized as
the separate Territory of Mon
. tana.
Virginia City was the capital
i and hero In 1805 was issued tho ,
\\ Montana Post, the first newspa- ?
per of the state. Da 1874 the
capital was changed to Helena
nnd ten years later a state con
stitution was adopted. Tho state
was not taken Into tho Union,
however, until 1880.
Montana comes from the Span
ish adjective meaulng "moun
tainous." Its area ls 146.000
square miles, making it the third
largest state of the Union.
?? by McOluro Newspapor Syndicate.)
*j K*~* '* * * t f t"t"t"f I' t tittil! |ii>i.fii|i<
. NOTED PHYSICIAN SUCCUMBS
To Yellow Fever in Mexico-Was a
Rockefeller Instit ut-e Mian.
Vera Cruz, Mexico, Dec. 28.-Dr.
Howard li. Cross, of the Rockefeller
Institute, died hero this morning, a
.victim of yellow foyer.
Dr. Cross canto here early this
month to opon a laboratory for the
study of the yollow fever and the
marsh fever for the Rockefeller In
stitute. Twelve days ago he went to
Tuvtepec, center of tho yellow fever
district, and after .spending two lays
there inspecting sanitary conditions,
contracted the disease. Ho was Im
mediately brough! hero, and futile
efforts were made to .save hi.s Ufo.
The funeral will take place to
morrow and will be attended by Mi.:
m?dical corps and representatives of
the authorities.
Dr. Cross is the second American
physician lo die here of yellow fever
within a year, the lirsl being Dr.
1 hied rick, attached t() the American
consulate.
. . -
IP STOMACH IS BAD,
LUT DIA PEPSIN KN I)
GAS, INDIGESTION.
"Pn.po's Dlapepsin" has provon It
nelf tho surest relief for Indigestion,
gase?, flatulence, heartburn, sour
ness, fermentation or stomach dis
tress caused by acidity. A. few tab
lots glvo almost immedlato stomach
rollef and shortly tho stomach is cor
roctod so you can oat favorite foods
without foar. Largo case costs only
fow cents at drug store. Millions
helped annually.-adY.
HE N N ETT8 VI IJLIE ROBBERS MAKE
Confession - Drugged Taxi Driver
Jmid ?toi o Car, then Hobbed.
Columbia, Dec. 29.-T. J. Cun
ningham, chiot of police of Bonnotts
ville, ls in Columbia to take back to
iBennottsville members of the gang
of thieves rounded up hore Tuesday
and Wednesday and charged with
the theft of a Columbia automobile
and the robbery of several stores In
Bennettsvillo, lu which they took
articles reaching in value to several
thousand dollars. Four men and two
women have boen arrested, and the
men havo all confessed their part
in tho robberies, but have stated that
tho women were not main actors in
the affair, and asked that they be
left out of tho prosecution.
The four men aro A. J. Rowe, Wil
son Anderson, C. S. Bryan and W.W.
Fulmer. Tftie women are Evelyn
.Mooro and Margaret Bright, and they
haven't good reputations in Colum
bia, having boen under tho oyos of
the vice squad before. Bryan was
arrested carrying ton sticks of dyna*
mlto. Several of the party wero ar
rested at Killians, where they were
walting for a train to Camdon.
On Christmas eve tho sextette
hired a Columbia taxicab, driven by
a negro, to take thom to Camden.
Tho negro, Ben Bynum, says they
gave him a drink, and the next thing
ho know ho woke up on tho siri.? of
the road near Camden, his car gone.
Tho car later was rocovorod, and
other clues led to the arrest of the
men and women in connection with
tho Bennettsvllle robberies. R?wo is
from Bennettsville. Bryan is a saxo
phone player of Anderson. Fulmer
is a native of Newberry. Tho others
are Columbians.
Want? to Make "Lust Debt" Less.
St. Louis, Dec. 29.-The Church
Federation of St. Louis has taken
steps to reduce the cost of funerals,
following tho receipt of this brief
expression as to bite condition which
most people lind themselves, and the
fact that this situation ls often taken
unfair advantage of: "When great
grief comes no ono is in a bargain
ing mood, but wants the best."
A committee of ministers was ap
pointed to confer with a delegation
of tho St. Louis Undertakers' Asso
ciation, which claims that "under
takers do not fix funeral charges, but
take orders from relatives of dead
persons."
Radium Recovered from Ashes.
Newton, Kansas, Dec. 27.-Nen ly
$2,000 worth of radium, or about
one-third of a quantity missing from
Axtel Hospital here, has been recov
ered from 300 pounds of ashes oy
Eastern chemists, lt was announced
to-day. The radium disappeared
about two months ago, and investi
gation prompted tho theory that it
had found its way to the furnace *.n
bandages removed from patients.
More ashes will be shipped to the
chemists for examination, lt was
stated.
RED GROSS RESCUED
600,000 FROM DEATH
Spent $1,200,000 for Relief of
Famine Sufferers In China
Last Year.
To help overcome conditions of acute
distress In five famine stricken prov
inces of Northern China, where mil
lions of persons were affected by an
unprecedented shortage of food, the
American Red Cross during the last
fiscal year spent more than $1,200,000,
$1,000,000 of which was contributed di
rect)' by National Headquarters and
the remainder by various groups In
terested in the welfare of China.
Through the wide relief operations
thus tnnde possible lt ls estimated that
more than 000,000 famine sufferers
were saved from starvation.
To the end that similar prompt re
lief measures hy the organization may
always bo possible the Red Cross ls
asking continued support by the Amer
ican people by universal renewal of
membership at tho Annual Bed Cross
Roll Call, November ll to 2?.
The method of relief employed by
the American Bed Cross In Its opera
tions In China was particularly effec
tive, for in addition to saving hundreds
of thousands of lives lt provided China
with more than 000 miles of permanent
roads that are sorely needed to pre
vent a recurrence of famine. At one
time the Red Cross employed 74,000
Chinese workmen, paying them In food
for themselves and dependents, this
food being brought In from Manchuria
and elsewhere.
A bill has been (introduced In
Washington to make Armistice Day
a permanent legal holiday.
Tho Navy Department has porfocr
ed a radio compass which onablos
airplanes In flight to find each other
without pre-arrangod course or ren
dezvous.
READ THIS
ISA 1*1'* SICK, CROSS HUSBANDS
WILL Bli HEIA?EI> BY GUDE'S
1'EITO-MAXGAN.
Is he '"cross as a bear" when he
comes home? Is he nervous and a
blt pale, and always tirod? You can
help him back to health with Gude's
Pepto-Mangan. He is run-down, and
Pepto-Mangan, the wonderful blood
tonic with the right kind of iron in
it, will build him up. iHelp your hus
band get plenty of red blood and ho
will be well and good-natured again,
and stronger, too. Good blood, good
health, makes happy good humor
that ls the way lt goes. If you don't
glvo him some kind of a tonic ho will
probably get worse-they usually do.
Go lo tho drug store and ask for
Gude's Pepto-Mangan in liquid or
tablet form, lt ls pleasant to take
and works wonders if taken daily for
a few weeks.-Adv.
WOMAN'S SPEECH IS RESTORED, j
Ono of Most Extraordinary Opera- ;
Hons ls Performed.
A recent dispatch from New York
says: j
Speechless ns the result of a fr.ic
tured skull and other injuries re- j
ceived In an automobile accident 3 2 |
days ugo, Miss Mary Moore, an act- ?
I
ress, who was aided recently by Dr. ;
Adolf Lorenz, noted Austrian ortho
pedic surgeon, spoke to-day for the
first time.
Shortly after she was brought to I
the Broad Street Hospital one of.
the most extraordinary operations '
known to science was performed on ;
her while she was In a death-like
stupor. One vertebrae had been frac- ;
tared and bhere was a Subluxation .
of three other vertebrae, besides a i
multiple fracture of the skull. The j
fractured vertebrae was set, the
.three misplaced ones were returned
to their normal positions and a de
compression operation was perform- ,
ed on the skull. When Dr. Lorenz ;
saw her on the first time, she was J
wearing a harness over her head.and
neck and shoulders. He rocom'mend-^
ed that the Injured members be
placed In a plaster cast and suggest- j
ed a mode of treatment, which was ,
adopted by the surgeons In charge.
She gradually regained her strength,
and when physicians and nurses first i
talked to her she could only articu- ]
late "yes" and "no."
Later in the day Miss Moore wa3 ;
able to speak short sentences and to '
write brief notes. She w<as so dc- j
lighted with Wie success of her hand- j
writing that she asked permission to
write Christmas greetings to her
friends.
VICTIMS OF LIQUOR POISONING.
Alleged' Liquor Takes More Human
Toll in Now York.
New York, Dec. 30.-A gray-halr
ad woman and a 14-year-old boy to
night kwere added to the Hst of New
York victims of poisonous holiday
Honor, which now totals nine dead
i*nd five blinded or seriously 111.
The woman was found lying on
the sidewalk and died en route to a
hospital. In her hand-bag was a
*llp of paper loaring the name "Misa
Sergeant." She was about 5 0 years
sid and well drossed. Medical exam
iners said sho had drunk wood alco
hol.
The, boy, John Dooley, was taken
'rom his home after losing consci
ousness. At the hospital police an
nounced *hat he had been given
liquors by neighbors and also had
drunk some that ho found near his
lome.
During the day Charles Williams,
\ negro, died in a hospital, whither
lie had made his way, half blinded
From drinking poison which he
l.hough't was gin. Hospital attaches
said it was wood alcohol.
The fourth fatality within twenty
four hours was Goo. L. Henry, a
salesman of Brookline, Mass., who
was found dead In bed In a Broad
way hotel. An empty bottle labeled
'gin" and another containing al
leged whiskey wore found nearby.
Of those still living ?wo are ,wo
inon and ono is an unidentified man
taken to (Bellevue 'Hospital after
having boen found lying in a gutter
unconscious. Ho was said to be suf
fering from wood alcohol poisoning.
Pilos Cured in 6 to 14 Days
DruHfllsts refund money If PAZO OINTMENT fail?
to cure Itching, Mind, nlecdlnft or Protruding Piles.
Instantly relieve:) hchlnd PIIC3. nnd you mn ttet
restful sleep ofter the first iWDllcatlon. Prlco 60c
Tho World War has cost tho na
tions that engaged In lt, In monoy
alone, $250,000,000,000-as much ns
tho entlro wealth of the United
States.
RED CROSS GIVES I
ANNUALBUDSET
$19,361,657 Allotted for Cur?
rent Program of Relief
and Servloe.
MILLIONS FOR VETERAN AID
Medical Aid for European Chil
dren Will Cost $6,000,
000 This Year.
Washington.-Expenditures totalling
$10,301,057 f?r carrying through ita
program of relief and services in the
United States and overseas ure out- j
lined in the budget of the American !
Red Cross for the current fiscal year.
This total ls more than $6,000,000 low
er than the expenditure during the
last fiscal year, when the disburse
ments reached $24,402,741, lt ls an- :
nouuced at National Headquarters in
a statement calling attention to the j
necessity of continued support of the i
organization by response to the An- 1
nu al Roll Call, November ll to 24,
If the vital work of the society is to
be effectively carried on.
Outstanding among the items of the
domestic budget ls the appropriation
of $8,000,250 for work in behalf of j
the disabled ex-service man and his
famiiy. This appropriation represents j
the nmount alloted to this work from '
National Headquarters only and does .
not take into consideration the mil- !
Hons being spent In chapters for re- |
lief of the World War veteran. It i
ls in the chapter that the greater j
amount ls spent In meeting this obli- !
gatton of the Red Cross, the announce- j
ment continues, as manifested by fig- |
urea of the fiscal year 1020-1021 when :
the total was approximately $0,000,- j
OOO, of which $2,092,004 represented i
the disbursement of National Head
quarters while the remainder waa the !
chapters' contribution to this field ol '
Red Cross service.
Vast Work for Disabled
Chief among the sub-divisions ol
the appropriation for work with vet- !
oran? ls that which concerns itself <
with assistance to disabled men and '
women In government hospitals. This j
Item of $1,790,000, an Increase of mor?
than $500,000 over the appropriation
for the same work in last year's bud
get, will provide those personal aerv- .1
Ices for the disabled and their families 1
which are Indispensable to supplement i
those provided by the government. !
The director of the Veterans' Bureau ,
has recently expressed his desire that
the Red Cross should continue and j
extend these "humanising services." i
Other Items of the appropriation for
veterans' relief are proportionately In
creased. An additional appropriation
of $400,900 has been made for Red
Cross work in connection with regu
lar Army and Navy hospitals and
with the regular Army and Navy.
Por disaster relief, the Red Cross
has set aside for the current twelve
months an appropriation of $048,070,
virtually doubling the appropriation
for the some purpose for the fiscal
year 1920-1911.
More than $8,000,000 ls provided for
service and assistance to the 8,000
Red Cross chapters by the national
organization.
Helping Destitute Children
Other items of the domestic budget
include $498,640 for miscellaneous ac
tivities, including contributions re
stricted for special purposes and $768,
600 for management. Bach of these
items represents large reductions over
similar appropriations of the previous
year.
From a fond of $10,000,000, $8,000,
000 of which was contributed through
the European Relief Council campaign
and $5,000,000 allotted by the Red
Cross fer child welfare work In
Europe, there remains $8,765,108 still
available, of which lt is estimated
that $6,000,000 will be required for
this work during the current year.
For Red Cross participation in the
joint effort to relieve famine condi
tions in Russia, for final work In the
China famine, for Junior Red Cross
and other overseas activities including
the closing of the old general relief
program In Europe $4,078,000 ls made
available. j
In announcing the national budget, :
the Red Cross makes It clear that ,
the figures do not Include chapter ex- I
pendlturcs or place any cash e Imate
on the Invaluable service of volun
teers In chapters.
CARRYING ON
SERVICE FOR
DISABLED VETERANS
OF THE WORLD WAR
THAT IS COSTING
$10,000,000 A YEAR,
THE AMERICAN
RED CROSS IS HELPING
FULFILL THIS
NATION'S OBLIGATION
TO ITS'DEFENDERS.
HELP THE RED CROSS
CONTINUE THIS WORK
BY ANSWERING THE
ANNUAL ROLL CALL
NOVEMBER 11-24, 1921.
Subscribe for The Courlor. (Bea?.)
oaaaananoDBBDi
i Colds &
?? "For years we have used
ll and I have never found any
O place," writes Mr. H. A. Stacy
Q cy, who ts a Rutherford Com
mm Draught as a medicine that si
SJ hold for use in the prompt tre*
g vent them from developing inti
g THEDE
g BLACK-E
B
Q "It touches the liver an<
n declared. "It is one of the fc
? cold and headache. I don't t
g* family if it wasn't for Black-D
31 dollars ... I don't see how ?
M out it 1 know it is a reliable i
Q in the house. I recommend
tn never without it."
?.v At ali druggists.
Accept No
Here's X2?
Progressive Farme
$1.00 year,
The Keowee Courie
$1.00 year,
Either paper well \
Price of Both. (
NOTICE TO TRESPASSERS.
ALL PERSONS are hereby notified
not to trespass on any of my lands
In Oconee County, S. C., without
written permission from me, by
hunting partridges, rabbits, squir
rels, opossums or other game, or by
cutting timber for cross-tlos or for
fire-wood, for the purpose of mar
keting same. All persons so tres- ?
passing will be prosecuted os the law
provides. WM. J. STRIBLING.
Dec. 14, 1921. 60-1
NOTICE TO TRESPASSERS.
WE, the undersigned, hereby for-,
bid any Bird Hunting on any of the
lands owned by us or under our con
trol. Any entry is forbidden posi
tively, and all trespassers will be
dealt with to tho fullest extent of
the law. (Signed :
S. A. TOW,
GEORGE HEAD,
E. A. ANDERSON,
L. C. WILSON,
H. H. WHITEHEAD,
L. SPURLOCK,
J. L. CROW,
J. M. BEiLL,
L. E. DEAT0N,
W. D. MOSS,
J. S. BARRETT,
A. Q. HAND,
J. H. HUNNICUTT.
Doc. 14, 1921. 50-1*
NOTICE TO TRESPASSERS.
NOTICE is hereby given that any
trespassing on my lands, or any lands
under my control, is hereby positive
ly forbidden, under pain of tho pen
alty prescribed by law for tho offense
of trespassing on private property.
Any entry without written permis
sion from mo, for any purpose what
soever-hunting, fishing, cutting of
Umber or arv other such offense
will bo bandi. J legally.
W. O. WHITE.
Walhalla, S.O., Doc. 14, 19 21.- i .
Anthracite coal was first discov
ered to bo. valuable as fuel In 180S.
Common yarrow is soniolimos sub
stituted for hops in brewing.
A TONIC
Grove's Tasteless chill Tonic restores
Energy and Vitality by Purifying and
Enriching the Blood. When you feel its
strengthening, invigorating effect, seo how
'it brings color to tho cheeks and how
it improves tho nppotite, you will then
appreciate its true tonic value.
Grove's Tasteless chill Tonic is simply
Iron and Quinine suspended in syrup. So
pleasant ovon children Uko it. Tho blood
needs QUININE to Purify it and IRON to
Enrich it. Destroys Malarial germs and
Grip germs by its Strengthening, Invigor*
cuing Effect. 00c.
Black-Draught In our family,
medicine tiiat could take its
, of Bradyvillej Tenn. Mr. Sta?
?ty farmer, recommends Black
?ould be kept in every house
itment of many little ills to pre
) serious troubles.
'ORD'S
?RAUGHT
i does the work," Mr. Stacy
?est medicines I ever saw for a
[now what we would do in our
raught. It has saved tis many
iny family can hardly go wlth
and splendid medicine to keep
Black-Draught highly and am
8
8
Imitations g
1.81 M
i ea EB B m u ss n BS ES SS sa n S
?i Chance
For
Both
For 12 Months
worth Combination
)rder yours now.
?j? ?J? ?J? ?J? ?j? ?J? ?j? ?J? ?|? ?j? ?j? ?j? ?j.
4? PROFESSIONALi CARDS.
?j. *|? ?j? ?j? ?j? ?j? ?|? ?j. ?j? ?j? ?|? *|? ?j? ?j?
* J. R. KARDE,
?J? Attornoy-at-Law, ?J?
4? WALHALLA., S. C. .J.
.J. State & Federal Court Practice. 4?
4? I A KM LOANS. .J.
?J- ?J. ?J? .j. ?J? ?J? ?J* ?J? ?J? ?J? ?|? ?J. ?J?
4- *
.{. E. L. H ERN DON, 4.
.J. Attornoy-nt-Law, ?J?
4* Phone No. Ol, Walhalla, S. c..J?
4? *
?j? .j? ?j. ?j? .j? .j. ?j. ?j. .j? ?j. ?j? ?j. ?j? ?j?
?J? J. P. Carey, J. W. Sholor, .j.
4* Pickcns, S. C. W. C. Hughs, ?I?
4* OAKEY, SHELOR & HUGHS, 4*
?I* Attorneys and Connsellors,
4? WALHALLA, S. C.
?J? State & Federal Court Pracltce. ?J.
?J. *|? ?J? ?J? ?J? ?J? ?J? ?J. ?J? ?J? ?J? ?J. ?J? ?J?
? 4?
.J. W. I>. WHITE, .f.
4? LAWLER, 4*
4? WALHALLA, S. C. 4*
4* 4?
?I? ?j? *|* ?j? ?j. ?j? ?j., ?j. ?j? ?j? *|? ?j? ?j? ?j.
DR. J. C. STRANCH,
Optometrist?,
Austin Bids* - Seneca, S. C.
?j? ?j? ?j? ?j? ?j? i|t ?j? ?j. ?j? ?j? ?j? ?j? ?j? ?j?
BAH UL ?Soon,
HigH Class
Guttering a Specialty,
Walhalla, S. C.
NOTICE OF ELECTION Ol' STEW
ARD OF POOR FARM.
Tho Supervisor and his Board of
Advisors will oient a Steward of the
Poor Farm for the fiscal year of 19 22
in tholr office at Walhalla, S. C., on
FRIDAY, January 6th, 1922. Board
will oloct tho lowest responsible bid
der, rosorvlng tho right to reject any
and all bids. Applicants for the posi
tion must stato tho names and ages
of the members of his family, and tho
salary for which he will take tho Job.
Tho County will allow the Steward a
roasonablo salary for himself, and
will pay for, or allow off of tho farm,
sulflclent amount of wood for his
family, solf and tho paupers. All bids
should ho souled.
J. C. SHOCKLEY,
Supervisor.
J. B. S. DENDY, Clerk.
Dec. 7, 1921. 49-52
Subscribe for Tho Courior. (Best)

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