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Keowee courier. (Pickens Court House, S.C.) 1849-current, January 11, 1922, Image 4

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KOBO WEE COURIER
(Established 1840.)
Published Every Wednesday Morning
~ SUBSCRIPTION PRICE. .
Advertising Rates Reasonable.
By Steck, Sholor, Hughs & Shelor.
Communications ot a personal
character charged for aB advertise
ments.
Obituary notices, cards of thanks
and tributes of respect, either by
individuals, lodges or churches, are
charged for as for advertisements at
rate of one cent a word. Cash must
accompany manuscript, and all such
notices will be marked "Adv." in
conformity with Federal ruling on
such matters.
WAIiHAIiliA, S. C.
WEDNESDAY, .IAN. li, 1022.
TUM I?KOPIJB AND TAXES.
Tho Conor al Assembly of this
State convened in annual session
yesterday and will likely remain in
session for the whole length of Hmo
allotted hy law, for lhere ls nlttoh
that must be done, and a great deal
that should he left undone.
Considering the serious financial
condition of the people generally, wo
cannot understand how our Legisla
tuto can reconcile their conscience
to the levy of such a lax as some of
the leading members of that body
aro contemplating and contending
for. Tim leaders show plainly that
they realize the condition of affair;?
by their great activity in calling
meetings In Colunubia and asking
tax-payers to hold meetings and dls
CUBS the matter. But what is the use
of such meetings and discussion?
Would the members give heed lo a
decision of such meetings adverse io
their determination? If we can Judge'
the fun tro by Uhe past, we must an
swer no-tor a year ago meetings
wore held and committees represent
ing the tax-payors were sent lo Co
lumbia during the session to beg for
reduced levy and expenditures, and
to result was the highest levy and
greatest expenditure in the history
of the State. We see no relief for
the tax-paying public as long as the
present crowd represents us In the
Legislature.
Three years ago, when everything
?was high and the people were boun
tifully supplied with money from
the high prices they received for
everything they had to sell, tho Gen
oral Assembly was besieged with a
plea from the office-holders, com
plain!*^ of the Inadequate salaries
pa'd them-complaining that it took
so much for them to live on-and
the General Assembly gave ear to
their cry and raised their salaries
to nearly double; but now everything
has gono down and the people are
suffering as those officers stated they
did; hut those same officers now bit
terly oppose tho reduction of their
salaries, and tho members of the
General Assembly turn a deaf ear to
their demand, and tho great suffer
ing public must undergo the same
hardship that tho officers complained
of which found a sympathetic action
in their behalf.
Tho public generally are now
clamoring for a reduction of the ex
penditures of the government and
tho lightening of their burdens as
the people of Israel did to Rehoboam
of old, and tho result may ho the
same. Beware! In reply to our pro
testing people Uhe representative.*
- aro declaring that the oxepndltures
. cannot, he reduced; that lt will take
as much as has been levied for the
sary expenses of the State for this
year. Why cannot expenditures he
cut? For tho last two years the ex
penditure has boon a/bout double
what lt was before that. To ascer
tain the true condition of affairs, let
us Just, review tho appropriations for
tho last ten years and obaervo the
growth. In tho year lill I tho appro
priation was, in round figures $ 1 .
030,000; in 1912. $1.093,000; In
1013, $1.859,000; in 1914, $2.140.
000; In 1015, $2,4153,0-00: In 191G,
$2,989,000; In 1918, $3.37 0,000: In
1919, $3,892,000; in ID20, $0.091,
000, and tn 1921, $6.534,000. All
this continued Increase has .been in
the face of a continuous protest un
the part of tax-payers.
We ask, in view of the presnel
very strenuous financial crisis, why
cannot appropriations he reduced *.c
something like tho expenditure three
years ago? if tho State government
could be administered in the yeal
1918 on an appropriation of $3,370,
(tOO, wo would ask. Why could lt noi
he administered in 1 922 for some
thing like that amount? In our opln
lon. it ts necessary that taxes be re
duced, and if the present officers nnd
representatives cannot seo their waj
to give somo heed to the Just do
mantis of an oppressed public, tlu
next election will witness a complett
change in the membership of Sou tl
Carolina officialdom. Tho voters o
this State are impressed with th?
fact that sovereignty rests In the in
dividual citizens, and un loss som?
more heed bo given them and theil
demands than was at the last sessloi
of the General Assomlbly, tho com
lng session will witness a complet'
revolution and a resultant change ii
Ibo Stato's official "family."
(Wo understand that an effort ls t<
bo made to shift tho burden, to somi
extent, from vlslblo property t<
other sources, hut tho General As
sombly may as well take notice no\
that tho public aro not going to b
so easily misled now ns formerly
They now realizo that taxes canno
be mado to bear hard on any das
of people without affecting them
Thc one fact always prominent 1
One Year ..
Six Months .
Three Months
$1.00
.55
.80
last two years to defray
that, no matter how hard ono ?may
try to hide behind something ol' be
hind omebody else the burden win
finally rest upon the great common
public. This ls the inevitable law,
and the public has learned it. OI??
cialdom may take notice now that
the day of reckoning ie near at hand
and settlement must be made-and
its tarins will demonstrate that no
few men can long dictate what shall
bo done, In tho face of a protesting
public, and who holds the reins of
power in a republican form of gov
ernment, how far they can ignore,
and how far they must heed the peo
ple's demanda.
BAck to TJMIUWHOO.
D. A. It. 'School, Tnmassee, Jan.
6,-Special: After a most pleasnnt
ho'iday, w have returned to Tamas
see. Tho two weeks spent at home
wore, to most of us,, very short. But
as wo neared tho school the voleos
were noticed to rise in excitement as
they had dono on our leave for our
homos. Every girl and every teacher
was just as glad to come back as
she had been to leave.
On the night of our return, of
course, every one tried to talk at
once, telling of different experiences.
But mostly we listened to Mrs. Shep
pard as sho told us of the happen
ings since wo left, lt did us lots-of
good when 'Mrs. Sheppard said, "<"'
I am so glad you are back, for I've
certainly missed you all."
Ono very Interesting piece of news
that roached us on that night was
that Essie Nicholson, one of our
boarding students, had given a little
pig to tho school. Afterwards we
found out that Essio's grandfather
had given her the pig and she had
brought it here. This indeed was a
very unselfish act, and we are very
anxious to see Essie to pour out on
her our "Thank yous." *
Again, on last Sunday morning,
.lan. 1st. we were reminded of our
hearty welcome hack hy the attend
ance at Sunday school. Our 'Sunday
school has Indeed improved wonder
fully. We very seldom have a mem
ber come in late, and many members
have brought new ones in to jo>n
our classes.
On last Tuesday Dr. >B. F. Sloan,
of Walhalla, was called to the school.
This was due to Miss Moore, one of
the teadhers. being very sick. How
over, Miss Moore has.improved rap
idly and is again at her duties.
'Miss Stella Bowen, of Columbia,
and Miss Janie Nicholson, of White
water, have entered our school since
Christmas. We are also expecting
more new students in this week.
Miss Laura Edwards, of Seneca,
visited her sister, Miss Pearl Ed
wards, last Sunday and Monday.
The singing on Wednesday night
was enjoyed by all. We again wish
to say that our song service ls not
limited to any age,-and we shall bc
very glad Indeed to have young and
old as well as large and small. This
holds true also In Sunday school,
which is held every Sunday morning
at 11 o'clock.
Night school ls held twice a week
-on Tuesdays and Fridays-'from 7
to 9 o'colck, for any who wish to at
tend.
We are looking forward to having
Essie Nicholson back with us after
a week's delay. This was caused by
the necessity of having some dental
work done.
?J? ?J? ?J. ?J? ?J? ?J? ?"??J**!* ?J? ?J? ?J? ?J? ?J? (M HMSMM mf"
.fi HONOR ROLL. .Jr
.J? ?J? ?J. ?J? ?J? ?J. ?J? ?J? ?J., J? ?J? *f* ?I* *I* *t*
Walhalla High School.
(Following ls the honor roll of the
Walhalla High 'School for the fourth
month:
First Grade-Irene Crenshaw, Geo
Farmer, Erline Farmer, Elsie Mel
burg, Annie McCall, "Meta Moss, Per
ry Langston.
'Second Grade-(Henrietta Brandt,
Sophie Melburg, Adelaide iMauldin,
Edith Utogers, 'Dewitt Ansel, Harold
Garrett, Marshall Grubbs, Summers
Long, Malinda Rhodes, Frances
Schumacher, Ruth Schroder, Ola
Saddler, Caroline Vernor.
Third Grade-Elizabeth Alexan
der, Mabel Aull, Lydia Gerber, Kath
ryn Macaulay, Bernice'Schroder. Ju
lian Humphries, Henry Hunt, Walter
Moss, Laurie Smith, Louise Lyda.
Fourth Grade - Emily Carter,
Margaret Aull, Thelma Ingrain, Es
telle McCall, iBortle Hughs, Clarence
Mauldin, Edward Schroder.
?Fifth Grade-'Louise Henry, Betty
Hughs, 'Maud Oelkers. Charles Hum
phries, Sam Verner.
.Sixth Grade-'Doro?hy 'Brown, Lil
lian Fant, Leo Hunt, Lora Belle
Lyda. Maud 'Simms, Edith Speares,
Hlx Thode, Frances Watson, Frank
Colley, David Dorsey, Gnorge Jofies,
Louise Muller. Claude Simpson.
.SevenHi Grade-Sara Aull, Maud
Davis, George Ansel.
Eighth Grade-(None,
Ninth Grado - Retta Covington,
Caroline Darby, Ethol Hunt, Anna
Frohst.
Tenth Grade -Louise Brandt, Will
Ountharpo, Elizabeth Thode.
?Eleventh tirade-'None.
Former Jap Premier Den<l
Tokyo, Japan, Jan. 9.-?Marquis
Okuma, former premier of Japan,
died at 7 o'clock this morning. For
i several days , ho had been lying be
tween life and death, and during
' part of (hat Hmo his coma was so
Intense that his death was announc
ed on Fr indy last.
I -.*.
G ron j Hospital for Former Soldiers
St. Paul. Minn., .Inn. 10.-Tho fa
mons surgeons, Drs. William anc
(.liarles Mayo, will treat former sol
diers of the World War in a $200,
j OOO hospital which tho American Lo
gion posts of Minnesota will erect
Patients will bo charged accordl.if
to their ability to pay, this ability t(
bo determined by Lcigon officials.
Wintor mnnoeuvcrs of the com
i bined Atlantic and Pacific fleets o
? tho United States navy aro schedule!
I to tako placo in Panama Bay, Fob
6-13, 1922.
.g* ?I? ?I* ?|* ?J? *|t) 4? ?|t ?I* tiri .!. ?I*
4* COUNTY AGENT'S NOTES. *
?J? .J. ?J? ?J? ?J? ?J? ?I? ?|? ?J* ?J? lil m ?J? ?J*
* . *
.f. OCONEE'S SLOGAN?
4. - *
4* "Swat tho Holl Weevil Hotels.
*!. Clean Up Fields at Once." 1
* 4? *!? ?I? *b * ?I* ?I? h ?I*
Orchard Soho?lSH~Fj!old (Meetings.
Thursday, Jan. 12, at 10 a. m.
At II. C. Hoggs, near Seneca.
iSnme dato, at 2.30 p. hi.-At Geo.
Timms, Shiloh.
Tuesday, .Jan. 17, at 10 a. in.
J. L. Kell's, Keowee.
Same date, at 2.30 p. m.-At N. T.
Dyar*8, Norton.
Wednesday, Jan. 18, at 10 a. hi.
At T. M., Meares, Fairview.
Same dato, at. 2.30 p. ra.-?H. B.
Becknell'8, Now Hope.
Thursday, Jan. 19, at 10 a. m.
At Albert Brown's, Mountain Rest.
Same date, at 2.30 p. m.-At W.
T. Ramey's, Whetstone.
Interest in Orchards .
Field meetings held during the
past week indicated a growing inter
est In home orchards. The average
attendance at these meetings was
very good, and uno meetings will be.
continued until as many school dis
tricts as possible can hg reached.
Several of those present at the meet
ings became very proficient with the
pruning tools, so that they were able
to pruno fruit trees successfully be
fore the meeting ended.
The big meeting which was lo
have been held at D. E. Good's last
Thursday was rained out, so it will
be hold later, in order that more
people may see wfhat can be done
with apples in Oconee. Watch for
tho announcement next week.
An exceptionally low price on ap
ple and peach trees hos been ob
tained from a nursery in Tennessee.
This nursery ls as reliable as any to
bo found, and the price obtained on
ipplo trees In lots of 100 or more
ls 15 cents per tree, 3 to 4 feet in
height, good one-year-olds, and on
peaches ' 12 cents per tree. These
prices are f. o. b. the nursery. Those
interested In getting these trees
should white to the county agent
and enclose check for the amount of
tho order, made payable to "Fruit
Tree Account," Bank ot Walhalla,
as the bank will handle ibo funds in
connection with tho transaction lt
is probable that this offer will re
main open only a short time.
Dairy Cow and Boll Weevil,
Last week G. W. Humphrey Live
stock 'Development Agent of
Southern Railway, paid a visit lo
tho county agent. His discussion of
tho boll weevil situation in Georgia
and Alabama was of muon Inter? .
due to the fact that he is in con1 1
every day with the farmers or' th. ?
sections who have been fighting tho
weevil for the past several years.j
.His views coincided with t?i?. I in
formation tftiat Is now being feiTO))
out in the form of circular loiters *.o
farmers of the county, be!ng thh re
sult of tho county boll weevil con
foronce called some time :igo for th
business and farming lit tores I s of
the county to plan safely for 1923,
Mr. Humphrey cited numero In
stances where the cows or Ute :>oui
try down in Alabama w<ire paying
the expenses of the far vi ev o a
large extent, where a few yen ag"
they were looked down o'> de
spised or called "women'.? worV"
Creameries have sprung up n 1 >ro;;
pered in a large numiber <.? cases
where tlhe weevil had wron gb de
struction. Mr. Humphrey look a li
on the creamery as tho best method
of disposing of the products 1 Un
dalry cows, as whole milk Be ' uo, ls
very uncertain, due to supply and
demand and good markets, and imi
ter making on the farm is very un
certain when it comes to selling, as
hafdly any two people make butter
alike. He states that he has known
the price of country butter to be as
low as ten cents a pound, wfhlle but
ter fat at the same places was sell
ing at thirty cents a pound to a
creamery.
At Ashburn, Ga., 5 4 men put up
$100 apiece for a* creamery. The
first month-last October-3,000
pounds of butter was made; the next
month, Novemlber, 10,000 pounds-pf
butter was made, while In December
the production climbed to 21,140
pounds of butter. This butter ls sold
chiefly to Southern cities and towns
which have been importing it from
tho Northern and Central States.
Mr. Hunvplhrey's article on th?
dalry cow is as follows:
"The foundation of the farm ia
soil and fertility. The first is no
good without the last. A one-crop
system robs the soil of Its fertility.
Save the manure from dalry cowa
and build up the soil. Grow more
feed to feed more cows, and farm
with moro fertility. A farm without
fertility spells FAIM'I-NE.
" Shall we grow cotton? Yes
but less acreage with more seed cot
ton per acre. How? By saving thc
manure from dairy cows and otho!
I Ivostock. Feed the soil and yon feed
the crops.
"Can 1 farm on credit? Yes-ll
your credit ls sound; but let it bc
your friend and not a millstone
around your neck. Reduce your cred
it and sti'engthon lt witlh a few dalo
I cows. Cash during the growing sea
son gives you power. Tho dalry cou
pays ns she goes, and ls the balance
wheel of credit.
"The dalry cow ls a good invest
' mont, as ?ho not only pays a goof
dividend In tho form of milk, bu
j Increases the value of tho origina
_ j investment with her offspring. lr
) other words, from ono cow wc car
" build a herd. Think lt over.
"Grow moro feed crops and SELT
' Ilhorn to tho dairy cow. A few cov.'!
* bring you cash every month darin?
tho year. Let the cow bo your bank
Doposit the food and sho returm
tho cash In tho form of milk. Wh;
" stay In debt? Tho dalry cow will pa:
f Dbe bill.
1 "Oo you want a cash market fo
foed crops? You have tho host mar
' ket In tho world on your own farr
through tho dairy ?ow. abo not onl;
! H anti rigs9 Seeds
1922 Catalog Free
It's ready now. 100 handsomely il
lustrated pages of Worth-while seed
: and garden news for Southern garden
ers and farmers. This new catalog,
we believe, is th? mest valuable seed
book ever published. It contains 100
' full pages of the moat popular vege
j tables, flowers and farm crop plants,
: the finest work of Its kind ever at
! tempted.
j With our photographic Illustrations
j and color pictures also from photo
? graphs, wo show you Just what you can
' grow with Hastings' Seeds even be
! foro you order the seeds. Our cata
I log makes garden and flower bed
j planning easy and it should be In
j every single Southern home. Write us
? a post-card for lt, giving your name
I and address. It will come to you
by return mail and you will be mighty
glad you've got it.
Hastings' Seeds aro tho Standard
of the South, and the largest mall
I order seed house In the world is baok
of them. They've go* to be the bast.
Write now for the 1922 catalog. It
is absolutely free.
H. G. HASTINGS CO., 8EEDSMEN,
ATLANTA, GA.
buys your foed and pays for it, but
gives you back the fertility.
"Sell cream, keep the skim milk
on the farm and feed it to hogs and
poultry. Hitch a few dairy cows,
hogs and chickens to the cotton farm
and pull it out of the'hole.
"Boll weevils don't like tho dairy
cow because they cannot destroy her.
Shu is fighting the battles of other
farmers. Why not lot her fight
yours?
"C. H. P. spells sows, hogs and
poultry, which mean
"Cash, Moines and Plenty.
"Corn, Hay and Peas.
"Cars, Health and Prosperity.
"Calves, Heifers and Pastures,
"Capable Help Provided."
'Arkansas Signs Up.
At this writing nows is received
from (headquarters that Arkansas
has gone "over the top" with her
sign-up campaign for efficient mar
keting of cotton on tho co-operative
contract plan, having Just completed
signing up 250,000 bales of cotton
on the California or Oklahoma jell
ing plan. Her minimum quota was
"0-0,000 bales, which was exceeded
Mee. 31st by 50,000 bales,
j This makes Arkansas the sixth
I State that will market cotton co-op
! eratively during the "coming year.
Tho other States wihich have com
pleted their sign-up of the market-,
! ir.g contracts are Oklahtma, Texas,
I M Ississlppi. Arizona and North Car
lina. "Tho Biggest Thing In the
South" is now certain of being a ro
il1 ?ty.
Why not make South Carolina the
ven th State? Do your part.
George R. Briggs,
County Agent.
Box Supper at Tugaloo Academy.
, There will be a box supper at Tu
naloo Academy school house on Sat
urday night, Jan. 21st, at 8 o'clock,
for tine benefit of tho R. S. I. A. of
galoo school. Cake, hot coffee
: and hot chocolate will be served ex
[ tra, Come, one and all.
'S. L. Powell, Secy.
NOTICE TO TRESPASSERS.
VII persons are hereby notified noi
to trespass upon any lands belonging
lo ir under the control of the under
fed. This notice specifically pro
hibits hunting or any entry upon the
s.d.i lands for any purpose whatso
ttvor without first having received
written permission from party whose
land is enterod. Full penalty of the
law will be Invoked against any one
disregarding this notice.
W. W. FOWLER,
W. B. T. LOONEY,
J. L. SLATER,
H. M. H ARKINS,
MRS. E. A. ALLISON,
MRS. M. J. GALLOWAY,
W. J. COWAN,
MRS. PEARL DOVER,
MISS VICTORIA GREEN,
E. M. DOVER,
J. P. VAUGHN,
JAMES CANTRELL,
MRS. A. M. MCGILL,
WILL ANDERSON,
8. H. ORR,
J. A. LIPSCOMB,
J. B. TRA M EL,
O. F. CANTRELL,
MRS. T. Y. CHALMERS,"
MRS. EVA TODD,
J. C. RANKIN,
J. P. VOLRATH,
W. F. ORR,
LEWIS VOLR?TH,
J. E. GRANT,
J. T. LAY,
MRS. M. E. LAY,
W. L. MILLER,
MRS. A. J. HUBBARD,
C. S. CHALMERS.
OTTO KAUFMANN,
T. B. EA DES,
J. Ri EARLE,
J. F. DAVIS.
T. G. WINCHESTER,
W. C. BURNSIDE,
J. H. GREEN,
A. M. LOUDEItM ILK,
MRS. M. E. DAVIS,
MRS. M. J. McOAREY,
J. K. WINCHESTER,
W. J. HUNT,
LAWRENCE ALEXANDER.
Doc. 21, 1021. 51-2 +
CITATION NOTICE.
1 The State of South Carolina,
1 County of Oconee.-?(In Court ot
, Probate.)-By V. F. Martin, Judge
i of Probate. - Whereas, 'Miss Julia
X Harden 'has marie suit to mo to
. granit her Lottors of Administra
it tlon of tho Edtato of and Effects of
/ Mrs. E. J. Sanders, Docoascd
Y These are, therefore, to cite and ad
monish all and singular the kindred
r and creditors of ?the said Mrs. E. J.
- Sanders, Decensod, that they be and
i appear before mn, in the Court o?
y Probate, to bo hold at Walhalla Courl
?
JANUARY,
THE BUILDING MONTH.
, We have just received a carload of Cor
rugated and 3-V Crimp Galvenized Roofing
Sheets, the price is l?^s than you have been
paying.
Also, a carload Nof Sash and Doors these
came in just before the holidays, we have the
price that will save you money on your
Building Material. .
Ballenger Hardware Go.,
Seneca, S. C.
Winter Time ls Here.
JUST RECEIVED A CAR OF
Stoves and Heaters
SUITABLE FOR
YOUR HONE, OFFICE, SCHOOL OR CHURCH.
SEE US NOW. J*M
Whitmire-Marett Hdw Co.,
-HARDWARE HEADQUARTERS
WESTMINSTER, S. C. WALHALLA, S. C.
Farming Under Boll Weevil
Conditions.
The Mexican Boll Weevil has
invaded our County and has estab
lished a home for himself on nearly
every farm,where, if not destroyed,
he will pass the winter safely, and
wlB be ready early next spring to
multiply and destroy aU the young
cotton squares as fast as they aro
grown. If wo maintain our credit
and present prosperity, conditions
demand that we change our prosent
farming methods at once.
A careful study of the habits of
tho Roll Weevil Win show that ho
moves once a year, and that ls in
August. Now, if wo will clean up
our fields early this fall by chop
ping and turning under all cotton
stalks and burning off all terraces,
ditch banks and other places where
the Weevil has hibernatel for the
winter, wo can kill the Weevils out
and .leave our Holds free from tho
Bank of Walhalla,
Walhalla, S.JC
pest, and then, by tho use of pro
per farming methods, a good crop
of grown bolls can be produced
before the Weevil commences his
annual movement In August.
As a safe program for farming
next year to combat the Weevil wo
would suggest 20 acres to the
plow, planted os follows:
Six acres to cotton, followed by
small grain in the fall.
Six acres to corn, with velvet
beans and peas planted in corn.
Six acres to small grain--two
acres each to wheat, oats and rye.
Two acres to truck crops, con
sisting of Irish potatoes, syrup
cano, sweet potatoes, melons and
beans.
Prepare the ground well, plant
early, using an early-maturing va
riety of cotton; fertilize liberally
and cultivate intensively.
Enterprise Bank;
Walhalla, S.?C.
The Bank of West Union,
West Union, S, C.
Hioti8e. South Carolina, on Tuesday,
the 17th day af "anuary, 1922, aftor
publication hereof, to show cause, If
an,y they have, why the said Admin
istration should .not be granted.
Given under my hand and seal this
30th day of Deceml* er, A. D. 1921.
iPuibli8hed on the 4th and 11th
days of January, 1922, in The Keo
wee Courier, and on the Court House
door for the time prescribed by law.
(Seal.) V. F. MARTIN,
fudge of Probate for Oconee County,
South Carolina.
Jan. 4, 1922. 1-2
MA KB YOUR TAX RETURNS.
AUDITOR'S OFFICE,
Walhalla, S. C., Dec. 19, 1921.
The Auditor's Oflloc will bo open
to receive Returns of Roal and Per
sonal Property for taxation from tho
1st day of January, 1922, to tho 20th
day of February, 1921, Inclusive.
The real estate, lots and-buildings
aro to bo returned this year. Tax
payers will be careful to list exaoily
the number of acres, number of lot-?
and number of buildings on their re
turns, r.S the assessment mado now
will stand for the next four years.
Tho Township Assessors are required
by law to list all those who fail to
make their roturns within tho time
required by law. Monee the difficulty
of delinquents escaping the 50 per
cent penalty, as well as tho frequen
cy of errors resulting from this prac
tice. By all means make your own
roturns, and thoroby save oxponso
and confusion.
All able-bodied men from 21 to GO
years of ago aro tnxablo polls.
For tho convenience of tax-payers
tho Auditor or his Doputles will re
?oive roturns at tho following Hmas
and places:
January 12th .Friendship
January 1.1th.Jordania
January 16th.Richland
January 17th. .Newry
January I8th. .Clemson College
January 19th. .Adams' Crossing
January 20th.High Falls
January 21st .... .Salem
January 23d.Little River
January 24th.Tamassee
January 25th... Mountain Rest
January 26th.Whetstone
January 27th..Long Creek
January 28th, Tugaloo Academy
Jan. 30th and 31st.Seneca
Feb. 1st and 2d. . ..Westminster
Returns will bo taken at all places
from 10 o'clock in the morning until
2 o'clock in the afternoon unless oth
erwise noted.
RALPH M. PIKE,
Auditor, Oconee County, S. C.
Dec. 21, 1921. 51-tx
NOTICE OE FINAL SETTLEMENT
AND DISCHARGE.
Notice ls hereby given that the un
dersigned will make application to
V. F. Martin, Judge of Probate for
Oconee County, In tho State of S DU th
Carolina, at his ofilco at Walhalla
Court House,on Wednesday, tho 18th
day of January, 1922, at ll o'clock
in tho forenoon, or ns soon there
after as said application cnn be
hoard, for leave to make final settle
ment of thc Estate of C. R. D. Burns,
Doceasod, and obtain Final Settle
ment as Administrator of said Rs
tato. C. W. WICKLIFFE,
Administrator of the Estate of C. R.
D. Burns, Deceased.
Doc. 21, 1921. 51-2
NOTICE TO DEBTORS AND
CREDITORS.
All persons indebted to the Estate
of Charles Llnstoadt, Docoased, are
hereby notified to make payment
to tho undersigned, and all persons
havipg claims against said Estate
will present the same, duly attested,
within the time proscribed by law,
or bo barred.
W. T. HUBBARD.
Af?r.iit?Htrator of the Estate of Chas.
Linsteadt, Deceased.
Doc. 28, 1921. \ 52-3

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