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The Pickens sentinel. (Pickens, S.C.) 1871-1903, May 10, 1894, Image 4

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AND YOU'LL REiMBSEOR ME."
One evening as the sun went down
Among the golden hills,
And silent shadows, soft and brown,
Crept ov*-r vales and rlils.
I watched the dusky bats a-wing
DIp down the dusky lea -
Harkenina, board a maiden sing,
*'And you'll temember me."
When other lips and other hearts,"
Came drifting through the trees;
'In language whose excess Imparts,"
Was borne upon the breezo.
&b I love 18 sweet and hope is strong,
And life's a summer sea.
A.womn's soul is In her song;
"And you'll remember me."
There soman' te ar in ver note,
Still rippling from her throbbing throat,
With joy akin to pain.
There seemed, a tear In every note,
A sob in every strain;
Soft as the twilight shadows creep
Across the listless sea,
The singer sanig her love to sleep
With:. I You'll remember me."
AT THE I ABERNACLE.
A nermon of Imnakery on tho spiltual
Cox filets of L'te.
BROOKLYN, April 29 -The Taber
nacle was crowdeq this morning with the
usual throng of eager listeners. Dr.
Talmage preached on the slpritual con
flets of1ife, taking for his text Genesis
xxxii, 24-20: "And Jacob was it fG alone,
- and there wrestled a man with him until
the breaking of the day. And when he
saw that lie prevailed not against him he
touched the hollow ot his thigh, and the
hollow of Jacob's thigh was out of toint
- as he wrestled with him. And he eaid.
Let me go, for the day breaketh. And
he said, I will not let thee ao except thou
bless me."
The dust, arose from a traveling herd
ot cattle and sheep and goats and camels.
They are the present that Jacob sends to
gain the good will of his Ol'r.ded brother.
That night Jacob haitf by the brook
Jabbok. But thero is ii) ret k.r the
weary man. No 0iniog hlner to t(
the angels down into his dicam, bit a
fierce combat that lasts until the rnorn
ing with an unknown visitor. ''hey
each try to throw the other. The un
known visitor, to reveal his superior
power, by a touch wrncichea ,acob'b
thiah boie from its seeket, perhaps
maiming him For life. As on tih morn
ing sky the cluters of purple letid 1(.
gin to ripe. Jacob :ees 1f i an eugcl with
whom he hits bcen i cotlnding ami1 not
one of bia.brother' toad j utors. Let me
go,'' cries to inigel, liitimv himsellfup
Into increastminv i "'1'hmo daiy hrcik
eth.''
You see in tihe first phce tha (lod ill
lows good jeoplo Otie' imesr' to got in
a terrible struigc. Jacob wa a cood
man, bit here ho is left. aloni in the mid
ni2ht to wrestle whIh a trenmendous in,
fluence by tke ,brook alihok. For Josej)h
pit, for DanioI. a wild beant, de ; for
David, det ronmeinti- ant exith; bor J o n
the Baptist, a wilderness diet aiil ti.he
executiouts ix; for Peier, it prisoo; lor
Paul, shipwrcIk; tor 1dlin destolte 1 .
mok; for VAliti, most iasrul i: crtmt.) ,
for .iosephine, hai.islinieo; for MIt
Sigt.irney. tM. agoy 0f a drunklic.i t
wife; for Jilm W sley, stonems t i ed to
an infuriated mob; for CahliOriowe, ilhe
Scotel. 4irl, 11he drowni: 2 i s-2 'urveo t' tet,
see; for Air. Iiirr s. the hullt-inig of $hm
Monnleatl popuiLce; for J4o1.1n Blown (t
Edminurui, the pietol Shot of L,,rd
Ulaverh. us( ; for Iluui McKiil, 1he cat -
fold; for Lummer, the stinkr-; tor C2hrist,
the cross. Ft wvhom tn's inus , the Lih
betP, the guillotines, the th~uIlibpr 0V9y
For the sons and c daura tt o f iu I, rm
G~od Atmifbty. bomnne one' siaal to a
C2hristian reformer, "T1oa: wrldi is
ogains 300.'' '"Then," h le rephatlt, * 1
amu;against thbe woild.'~
I will go further antd sa tlitt evers
( bristian bus his Ptrtcgle. TI iisn ana,
had his combat, in WVall streed; t'is not
on Broad streely this onte ont lul ina
streei ; this one on Chiestnt atreeccn; tisi
one on State street, tazis 11 one I n li mbard
stree' ; this one oin the buu~rse. WViLe
financial misltortune you hamvO hadl the
midnig~ht wresile. Redbnioitidisasiers
have dro)lpped ini t)o sour store~
from loft, to celhar. What yjou
bought yen coul not sell. Wi'hom you
trusted fled. The help you expeci tdt
would no' c::me. Some giant panic,
with long armiis nod grip like deaith, took
hold of you in an awful wrestle, irom'i
which 30um have not 3 et occpe, aind it
1s umt ertain whether it will throw you or
you will throw it.
Ihero is another in struggle with some
bad aplpetito. ie knew not how stetlthi.
ly it was growing upon him. U.no hour
lie woke up. lie saidi, "For the sake of
my soul, of my family and of my chil
dren antI of my God, I muist stop) this!"'
.And, be hold, he fouind himsel f alone by
the brook Jabbok, and it was mitdnight.
That evil appetmte seizetd upon0 him, and
he seized upon it, and, oh, the horror of
the confliict When once a bad haibmt
has aroused itself up to destroy a mani,
and the man has sworn that, by the help
of the eternal God, he will diestroy it,
all heaven draws itself out in a long line
of light to look trom above, anti hell
stretches itself In nyrmidons of spite to
look up from bcneath. I have seen men
rally themselves for such a stru~gle, ant
they have bitten their hpi andl clinched
their lists andl cried with a blood1 red
earnestness and a rain of scaldiing tearn,
"'God bet1) mt!'
From a wreatle with habit1I haye B een
men fall back defeatedi. Calling for nlo
help, but relying en their owni resolum
tions, they havo come Into the st~ruggie,
and for a time it seetmed as if they were
gettiog the upper hand of their habilt, hiut
that habit rallied again its interinal power
and lifted a soul Irom its standing and
wIth a f orce borrowed from thelpit hurle d I
It into utter darkness. First I saw the
auctioneer's mallet fall on the pictuires,
and tausical instruments, and tihe rich
upholstery of his family parlor. After
awhile, I saw him lall Into the ditch.
TLhen, in the midnight, wheni the cliil- 1
dren were dreaming their sweetesti
dreams and Christian households are sil.
eut with Slumber angel watched I heard
him give the sharp shriek that followed
the stab of his own poniardi. lie fell from
an ho:nored social position; lhe fell from
a family circlet which once he was the
grandest atitraction; hie fell from the
house of God, at whose altars lhe hadt
been consecrated; lie lell-.-.orever! Bunt
thank God, I have oftenr Seen a better
termination than that.
I bave seeni men piepare themselves
for such a wrestling. They laid holtd of
God's help as they went into comibat.
The giant habit, regaled by the cup of'
many temptations, came out strong aid
defiant. They clinched. There were
the writhings ar d dilstortlons ot a fearfl
struggle. BLut the old giani, hegan to
waver, and at last, in the midnight alone
with none but God to wItness, by the
blook Jabbok, the giant fell, and tihe
triumphant wrestler broke the darkness
with the cry, "Thanks be unto God,
who giveth us' the victory, through our
Lord Jesus Christ."
There ~a a wIdow's heart, that first
was desolated by bereavement, ardsie
by the anxieties and trials that came in
tIhe 40ppo'i Qf 4 fatmlly. It is a sad Lfmng
to see a man contendimg for a livelIhood
under disadvantages, but to see a dell
Date Woman, with lielpless little ones at
her back, flghting the giants of Proverty
and soirow. is more affecting, It was 0
humble hone. and passersby know noi
that witbin those four walls were displayi
of courage more adouirable than that o
Hannibal crossing the Alps, or the past
of Thermopylw, or .Balaklava, Where
"Into the jaws of death rode the sh
hundred."
These heroes had the whole world t<
cheer them on, but there were none t(
applaud the struggle in the humbih
home. She fougat for broad, for cloth,
ing, for (ire, for shelter, with aching
head and weak aide and exhauste(
stiengti thrcugh the long night by the
bicok Jabbok. Could it be that nonw
wculd give her help! Had God forgot
ten to be gracious? No, contending s ul
The midnight air to lull of wings comium
to the rescue. She hears it now, In thl
Bough of the night wind, in the ripple ol
the brook Jabbok the promise made w<
long ago ringing down the sky, "Th.1
fatherlees children 1 will preserve then
alive, and let thy widows trust in mel'
Some one said to a very poor woman.
"How is it that in such distress you keel
cheerful?" She said: "I do it by what I
call cross prayers. Whon I had my reni
to pay, and nothing to pay it with, ant
bread to buy, and nothing to buy it witi:
I ased to sit down and cry. But now I
do not get discouraged. If I go along
the street, when I come to a corner of
the street, I say 'The Lord help me.' I
then go on untill I come to anothet
crossing of the street, and agaim I say,
'The Lord help me.' Andt so I utter a
prayer at every crossing and since I have
got mnto that habit of saying these 'cross
prayers' I have been able to keep up
couiralge."'
Learn a:am from this subject that
people olutlties are surprised to find
out that what they have been struggling
with in the darkness is really an ''angel
of blessing.'" Jacob found in the morn
ihg that this strange personage was not
an enemy, but a God dispatched mee
senger to promise prosperity for him
[nd for his children. And 80 many a
maw at tae close Of his trial has found
out that. lie has been trying to throw
down his own blessing. I ycu are a
Christian man, I will go back in lour
history and id that the crandest things
that have ever happened to you have
been .your trials. Nethling short of
r".irging, imprisonnint, and uhipwreck
coubilA have made Paul what he was.
When David was fleeing through the
wildernces, i'ursued by his own son, lie
was bein..t propared to become tho sweet
iinger of Isreal. Tih pit and the dun
.M' ii were the best schools at which Jos
--ph ever griadtiited. The hurricane tiat
LIpst Ie ten and killed Job'a children
Pireoared the ialn of Iz to write the
mnuaile ut poem that has astonshsd
the ageb. There is no way to et the
"tCat out of the straw hut, to thrash it.
There is no way to purify the gold but to
hurt it. Look at. the people who havo
,tlw asa had it their own way. They are
f . , Giatontented, soueles afnd tithllappV
1i oni watit to flud ' heerlul folks go
atuonu those who have - cen purilletd by
the tire.
A a l'r Rsini had rf ntdered "Willharn
T'h" the five hundredth time acompanv
-1 mticians cam Under his window in
Parim and serenaded him. Trhey put
upoan his~ brow a crown ci laturel leaves!
Hur amid all the aapplauise andt enitusi.
inemla m sni turned to a tend and said, "'I
wouiil give ad lui 1.i billiantt sc'~me Jot a
fewv days (t youtth arnd Jove ''. Con trast
the1( melanicholy foolig cif Rossini, who
buad everya hinag that this wnrld couih
X're him1, to the O joyfu expearienlce of
Iaac \Vatte, whose miilritnes wvere
innunwr i iable when he saye:
Thea 11111 of Zion yieldls
A huousatnd sacredl sweets
Ik'foca 14 we reach tilo heavenly faelds;
Or wvalk thei goliteon streets,
IThen let taur soangs abounad
Anud evt-ry tear' he dry.
We are atcarhiang through Imanueln's
gaontt
TIo I irite worhats oan high.
It is prosperity that, kills and trjuble
hat saveS. While the Irealites were on
he march amidl great privations and
aardships they behaved well. Atter
tuvbile they' prayed for meat, anti the
tky daarkened with a great, flock of quails
mdt these quails tell in large multitudes
til abhout them, and the Isrealites ate
mat ate anti stuff'ed themselves until
Lhey diled. Ohm, my friends, it Is not
rtmedship or trial or starvation that in
tres the soul, but abundant supply. It
s not the vultutre of trouble that eats up
the Christian's life. It is the quails, It,
is the quails. You will yet find out that
y'our midnight Wrestle by the brook Jab
bok is with an angel of God come down
o0 bless aand save.
Lean, ngnin, that while our Wrestfling
vih trouble may be triumphant we
nust expect, that it, will leave its mark
upon us. Jacob p revailed, but the angel
ocued him, and his thigh bone sprang
romi its socket,, and the good man went
impig on his way. We must carry
,hrough this the mark of the combat.
What plowed those premature wrinkles
n you face? What wvhitened your' hair
efore it was time for frost? What, ail
mnced 'forever so much of the hilarity of
fouir household? Ah, it is becauase the
inget of trouble hath touacheta you that
ion go iimp)ing on your way. You needi
tot be0 airprised that those wvho have
assed through the fi're dlo not feel as
any as once t hey did(.
D~o not be out, of patience with those
vhio come niot out of their despondency.
L'hey may triumph over their loss, and
et their gait shall tell you that tney
ave been trouible touched. Are we
Oice that we can, unmoved, see our
radle rifled of the bright eyes and the
weet lips? Can we stand unmoved1 and
es our gardens of' earthly delight up
ooted? Will ,Jesus, who wept himself,
>e angry iih us If we pour our tears
ato the eraves that open to swallow
ltown whiat we love best? Was Laza.rus
'tore dear to him than our beloved dead
o us? No. We have a right to weep.
)ur tears must come. You shall riot
Irive them back to scaldl the hearts.
1'hey fall into Goed's bottle. Afflicted
mnes have died because they could not
weep. Thank God1 or the sweet, the
nysterioua relief' that comes to us in
ear, Under this gentle rain the flo.- ers
)f corn put. forth their bloom. God pity
Lhat dry, withered, iarched, all consum-~
nug griefthat wrings its hands, and grinds
is teeth, anti bites its nails unto the
qjuick, hut cannot weopit s may have
hound the comfort of the cross and yet
ever after she v that in the dark uight
and by the brook Jabbok we were trou.
ble touched.
Ag~ain we may take the idea of the
text and announce the approach of the
day~ dawn. No one was ever more glad
to .see the morning thtan was Jacob after
that night of struggle, lIt is appropriate
for p~hIlanthropists a nd Christians to cry
out with this angel of the text, "The day
breaketh." "The world's prospee B are
brightenrog. The church of Christ is ris.
Ing up its strength to go forth "fair as
the moon, clear as the sun and terrible
I'. -
as an army with banners.'' Clap youi
bands, all ye people, the day breaketh
The bigotries of the earth are perishing.
The time was when we were told tha
it we wanted to get to heaven, we tius
be immersed or sprinkled, or we mus
believe in the perseverence o1 fthe saint
or in falling away from grace, or a litur
i gy or no liturgy, or they must be Cal
vminsts or Arminians in order to reacl
heaven. We have all come to confes
now that these are nonessentials in re
lipion.
Luring mny vacation one sumuer:
was in a Presbyterian audience, and i
wae sacramental day, an-' with eratefu
heart I rcceived the holy communion
I On the next S.Abbaith I was in a Motho
dist churcn and sat at love feast. On tW
ifollowing SAbbath I was In an Episco
- palian church and knelt at the altar an
received the consecrated bread. I di
not know which service I eujoyed th
most. "I believe in the communiou 0
saints and in tie life everlasting.'" "'jh
day breaketh".
As I look upon the audience I se
many who have passed through waves o
trouble that came up hieber than theil
girdle. In God's name I proclaim ces
Pation ol hostilities. You shall not g(
always saddened and heartbroken. Goi
will lift your burden. God will Drini
your dead to life. God will stanch thi
heart's bleeding. I know lie will. Lik
as a father pities his children, so li
Lord pties you. The tains of earth wil
end. The tomb will burst. Tile dea<
will rise. The morning star trembles o
a brightening sky. The gates of th<
east begin to swing open. The da
breaketh.
Luther and Melanctbon were t,.lkinp
together gloomily about the prospects
of the church. They could see no hopt
of deliVeranco. After awhile Luthe
got up and said to Melancthon: "Come,
Philip, let us sing the forty-six psalni
of David: "God is our refuge and
strength, a very present help in trouble
i'hereforo will not we fear, though the
earth be removed and though the
imountains be carried into the midst of
the sea, though the waters thereof roar
and be troubled, though the mountains
shake with t lie swelling thereof. Selah."
Death to many-nay, to all-it is a
struggle and a wrestle. We have many
friends that It will be hard to leavo. I
care not how [right our fiiture hope is.
It is a hitter thing to look upon this
fair world and know that wo shall
never again see Its blossoming spring,
its falling fruits, its sparkling streams,
and to say farewell to those with whom
we played lit childhood or connseled in
manhood. In that night, like Jacob,
we may have to wresIle, bit God will
not leave us unblessed. It shill not be
told in heaven that at (lying soul criod
unto God for help, but was not deliv
ered. The lattico may be turned to
keep out the sun, or a book .st to dim
the light, of the midnigl. taper, or the
room may be tilled with the cries ot
orphanage ;md widowhood, or the
church 01 Ci ist, May mourn over our
going, but if desus calls all is well. The
strong wrestling by the brook will
cease, the hour of dieath's night will
pass ,long, 1 o'clock in tile mor alNig
2 o'clock in the moroing, 4 o' -locr 11'
the morning-the day meaketh.
So I woule have it when I aie I am
in no haste to be gone. I. h we no
grudge against this world. ?rr only
fault I have to find with the world is
that it treats me too well. But when
the tnime comes to go I trust to be realy
my worldly allaire all settled. If I
have wronged others, I want thbem to
be sure or their forgiveness. In that
last wres'.llig, my arm en foebleav wth
sickness and my hread faint, I wvant
Jiesurs besIde me. If there bo hands on
this side of the thor stretched otut to
hold me backc. I want the heavenly
handcs str ached out to draw mne for Wvird
Then, (O desus, help mue on and help me
uip. (nfearing, undoubting, may I
step riglat out into the light and be able
to took back to my kindred and friends.
who would detain me here, exclaiming
'Let me go; let me go! The (lay break
eth."
Sweepiton the sonuate,
. WAsINoTON, May 1.-For the third
time in a short space of live weeks the
Senate met today only to hear the an
nouncement of another gap made in
i'8 ranks by death. A fortnight ago to
day funeral ceremonies were held in
the Senate chamber over the remains
ot Senator Vance of North Carolina.
Three weeks before the like sad cere
morial had taken place over the re
mains of Senator Cokquitt of Georgia.
And today theo announcement was
made of the (death of Senator Stock
bridge of Michigan, who died .yester
day in Chicago. The other two Sena.
cors had died in Washington. The
meeting of the Senate today hrad been
postponed from 11 a. mn. to noon, so as5
to give Senators an opportunity of
paying their last tribute of respect to
the memory of Mrs. Morgan, wife of
the Alabama Senator, whose funeral
took place this morning; and in the
Chaplain's opening prayer they were
reminded of the death of their associ
ate from Michigan, whose dtesk and
chair, in the outer row of Republican
seats, wvere covered with black cloth.
An unusually large number of Senators
were present at the opening prayer.
Trhe formal reading of yesterdlay's jour
nal was (dispensed with and then Sena
tor McMillan, thre col loane of the de
ceased Senator, madeo the announce
ment of Stockbridge's death. The
usual resolutions wvere then offered by
McMillan and were agreed to. T1hey
expressed thre great sorrow of the Sen
rate at the announcement of Mr.. Stock
tbridlge's death andl provide for a corn
mittee or sieven S'nators to attend thre
funeral at Kalamazoo, Mich. Senators
McMrllan, Frye, Washburn, Cuillom,
Jones of Arkansa'j, Gibson and Jlan
chard were appointed such committee
andl then, at 12.10, the Senate adjourn
ed until tomorrow at 11 a. mu.
AmLEXANDRtIA, Va., A pril 27.-~Ben
White nnd Jim ltobinson, botha colored,
wvere hanged in the jail yard at Manasas
at 7 o'clock thirs morning for criminally
assaulting two white women no ir Man
Mans late 01n thre mrght of the~ 13th ot last
January, '1The two men, whlo had been
confined in jail in this city since threir
conviction, were taken to ManassaR
Wedlnesday nighrt and1( kept in jail there
till this morning. They sleplt butt little
last night and spent most of the~ time on
the floor of their cell undler tihe cots.
This morning they ate nio breakfast tand
after prayer in their rooms walked with
fIrmi stepls to the gallows In the yard. A
force of twenty deputios armed with guns
Was present, bitt no disordler occurred,
rTe hiangingz was witnessed h'v about fif
ty persons. On the scall'old aftetr the
knots had been adjusted., White asked
to be eiven a few untos to pray, anrd
while engaged ini prayer the drop tell.
The necks of both men were broken and
life was pronouncedl extinct by the dc
tor-s in eight minutes.
Bnlotaed.
NEWv ORLIEANS, April 27.--eorge
Fairbanks committed suicide this morn.
.ug at the Hotel de Louisiana. lie has
been here only a short time with his
wrife and two children. Little is known
of thbe family, but they' ar' said to be from
COlumnnas Ohio
TO BE FULLY SETTLED.
The DIPpeUsary Law Agal Hefore th
Suipr tit Oonrt.
CoIUMir A, S. C., May 3.--The mos
Importaut development in the liquo
situation since the filing of the decision C
the State Supreme Court, occurre,
yesterday, and by Monday evening it I
a likely that the uncertainty as to what th
Supreme Court meant by ite decision
whether it is free liquor or prohibition
will be removed, and everybody will, til
t Justice Gary goes on the Supreme bene
I know exact.y where they are at. Ther
Is no case which has been brou2htbefor
the court recently in which all take e
3 deep an interest as that which starte
on its career yesterday. Many seer
morally certain that it will result in th
court delaring that its recent decisio
meant ab'solute prohibition. Equall
is many are just as certain that Lh
I court will decide that It meant absolute
ly free liquor, and then there are other
3wao consider that the court will say tha
it meant the old license laws woul
govern the situation. This latter clas
does not consist of many, however.
Dke the original cases, which resull
d in the knocking out of the dispen
sary law, the case referred to abov
came up fcom the Pee Dee sectior
Yesteiday morning Mr. P. A. Wilco:
arrived in the city from Florence. 11
had uothing to say to anybody, and di
what lie had to do so quietly that i
was 2:30 o'clock-wheu lie had com
pleted his important work-before an
one knew what he bad come here for
lie was armed with papers which mean
business. There was no session of thi
Supreme Court yesterday, and he wen
before the Chief Justice at chambers.
Mr. Wilcox first made application foi
a writ of habeas corpus in the case of J
Ellis Brunson. The fact was set fort
that Biruuson was arrested by the chie
of polleo of Florence subsequent to thi
passage by the city council of its liquo
license ordinance, for the violation of tha
ordinance. Brunson, it seems, was fined
and is still in the custody of the ch'ef
and Governor Tillman cannot ordoe thal
onllcer to discharge him. The hief Jus
Oco. without liesitatian, granted the fol.
lowing order in this case:
COUN'rV OF FLORENOR:, Third .Ju
ricial District, Ex parte 3. Elli
Brunson.---Potition for Writ of' Ila
beau Corpus.
To. G. -i. Turbeville, Chief of'the Police
of Florence, S. C.:
It having been brought before me by
the petition of J. Ells Burnson that as
chief of police of the city of Florence,
S. C., you unlawfully declare his per
es'n in custody, and the said J. Ellis
Brunson having petItioned for a writ of
haoeas corpus to b, ing said petitioner
before the Suoreme Court to unquirt into
the cause of his detent.ion by you as
aloresaid.
You are hereby ordered and requIred
to thring the body of the prisoner bmfore
the Supreme Court, at Columb'a, S. C.,
at 11 ciock on Monday, the 7th day of
N1,y A. D., 1894, that the- cause of his
coromitment belnur known and seen such
further proceedings may ha had thereon
a are agreeatb:e to law and jus.ice.
HENRY NMIvFER,
Chief Jusuce.
Trhen Mr'. Wilcox, to be doubly sure,
catme up with ajpetition for an n.junction
ai.amint tue towin council of Florence
asking that this body show case8 why
they are charging anrd collecting a liquor
license, and asking that they be re
strained from doing so henceforth. This
putition was presented Oni behalfcoi two
citizens of Florence. The rule to show
eause was issued by the Chief Justice as
follows, and thus the whole thing is
brought, equarely befor'e the court:
.J. L. Bar'ringer and Theodore Kuker,
Petitioners, vs. The City Council of
Fiornco, Respondents.
Upjon the reading the petition of J. L.
Bat ringer and Theodore Kuker herein, it
is.
Ordered that the respondents herein
do show cause before the Stuprems Court,
of South Carolina, at Columbia, at 11
o'clock a. mn., on Monday, the 7th day
of May A. D., 1894, why an mnjunction
should not be issued by said court, re
st~raining respandents, said city council
of Florence, fro:n issuing licenses to sell
intoxicating liquors in the said city of
Florence, prayed for in petition, andl for
such other and further relief as the Eaid
court may deem just. It is further
Ordered that a copy of the within or
der be served on the respondent herein.
HENRY MoIVER,
Chief Justice.
These two casos will permit of all
doubtful points being brought Equarely
before the court, and admit of the so.
couring of a square-cut defimition of the
meaning of the recent decision. It is an
dertood that the arguments will consist
in a great measure of'quotations from the
recent decision. 1t is also understood
that Mr. C. S. Nettles, who maae the
winning fight against the dispensary law
will appear on behalf' of the town coun
cil of' Flosence. It was further ascer
ininedl that the constitutionality of the
new dispensary law will be brought up,
and1( the court will be asked to make its
decision on the original law apply tere
to. State.
Sh, aking Urot ca.
A''HE'NS, April 29.-'l.'he late3t ro
,ports from Atlanti say that on Friday
365 shocks of earthquake were felt
there in eight houirs. For two hours,
the trembling of the earth was almost
continuous. For a radius of three arnd
a hlalf miles on every side of the town,
the fields and high ways have been torn
with deep fissues. The sea has en
cr'oached upon the shore about sixty
f"eet. Dispatches from all parts of the
kingdom indicate that former reports
of death andi damage to property have
undi~erestimated the losses. The list
of (lead and injured grows hourly. The
mnisery in the smaller towns of the
stricken (districts is extreme. Hundreds
who were prosperious householders be
fore the earthquakes are now withou t
food1 and shelter for their f amilies andI
are hogging for help. The government
continues to (d0 all in its power to re
liove the suffering, but the burden is
bey.':i fits means and scorers of fai
lies are alreadly on the ver're of starva
tlon. Nearly one hundred thousand
persons are said to have been left dest
ituite of food and shelter in tne Lonri
districl alone.
A M'atai Miutake.
SARANAC LAKE, Mich., April 28.-Mr
Charles (1oward, or Burke, aged 21, and
his wife, h ave quarreled ever since they
were married, threae months ago. Many
a time after her jealous outbreaks he
has threatened so kill himself, and, the
other day, when he repeated the threat,
she lau ghed at him, dared him to do so,
and handed him a vial of morphine. H~e
walked into his room saying: "You
have always called me untruthful.
Now I will prove the contrary." An
hour later he was found dead. The
young wife, crazed by remorse, was
with diffilty restrained from killinig
herself,
WEEKLY WEATHER REPORT.
D The 33uIeti Iseutd by the wother flu
. reau.
t COLUMBIA, S. .C., May l.--The f. -
r lowing Is the weather crop bulletin
i of the Weather Bureau for the week
I ending April 29th:
The past week has not been a do.
claive or decided one for any crop, al
though the prevailing weather condf
tions were on the whole unfavorable
except in a few counties notably Barn
well, where the reports were of a uni
form favorable character. These re
1 gions were confined principally to the
middle belt of counties, wherever there
c were showers. The sunshine was some
I1 what in excess over the normal,but this
a was more than offset by the cool nights
e and cool drying winds of The first of the
week, although the temperature for the
y week, as a whole, was about normal.
D lam is needed in every part of the
State. There were a few scattered
showers during the week which were
t very beneficial for the limited arm %s
where they occurred. In the counties
that had the heavy showers of the pro
vious week rain is needed to soften the
crust that covers plowed ground and
which rotardo cotton and corn from
coming up freely. In the two tiers of
a counties next the coast the need of
rain is most urgent as the drought is
becoming serious. Throughout this
region the rainfall has beer. but from
3 1-8 to 1-3 of the usual amount in April
and but from 1-6 to 1-2 of the usual
amount since the 1st of March. The
soil for the most part being of a sandy
nature is not as capable of sustaining
a prolonged drought as a cla) ey soil do.
Crops are from ten days to two weeks
behind the season; farm work is well
up, and was not interrupted during the
week.
Cotton planting is nearly finished
the weather haviag been all that could
be desired for the purpose. The same
cannot be said for the seed that is up
or that of later planting, for with the
exceptions -noted, the ground tacks the
moisture to supply the needs of the
growing plant or to germinate the late
planted seed. The standi will depend
on the weather conditions of the next,
two weeks largely. Sea Island cotton
is reported a complete failure.
In general corn is not making a good
stand. Where there were showers It is
looking fairly well, but owing to the
cool nights and drying wind the color
is not good. It will also be a very un
even stand, for while some is large
enough to work other lands in the
same vicinity are just being replanted.
Cut worms are doing much (a mage in
the central and Western counties.
Scattered reports indicate that there
will be but little fruit of all varieties,
and the berry crop will be a short
one. This corroborates the flaet esti
mates after the March free z3.
Wheat has improved in appearance
and is beginning to head,but the heads
are small 'nd the straw very short.
Itust has shown in a fow places, but is
not gneral. 'rite outlook for oats is
les encouraging than last week. The
arought has affected it more seriously
than any other crop, and as it is far ad
vanced in heading, will be less quick
to resoond to more favorable weather.
The straw will be short.
Garden truck is as a rule doing well
except on the large truck f.arms in the
low counties where the drought has
caused a complete standstill in grbwtn.
The seeda of late planting lie in the
ground without showing the least ten
aency to germinate. Cut worms doing
some damage. What wvas said of gar
dens is particularly true of potatoes.
Irish potatoes have been greatly dam
sgedl in places by the Cilorado beetle.
Melons are doing well and have im
proved much during the week. Tihe
r,uns of Sundlay nlignt (29).h) were con
Lined to the Northern parts oi the
htate and even there was not general.
.veraia 'engceance.
RII.\TOND), Va., May 2.--A Staunton
special to the Dispatch says: The trial
of Lawvrence Soiller, charged with the
murder of Lottie Rowe, was con
cluded this morning at 10:30 o'clock.
It was a tragic scene in the bloody
drama when Commonwealth Attorney
Meade F. White bade the burly bla'ck
smith to stand before the jnry, pull1 off
his coat, show the jury his undershirt
and fitted the blood-stained piece of
garment into a square hole in the pris
oner's shirt sleeves, it corresponded
in shape, texture and color. It was a
cleverly arrariged climax. Spillez's
paramour, Rose .'3rown, had ,testilled
that she, at the prisoner's commarid,
had cut the cloth from the shirt that
the prisoner had on.
The defense offered no witness and
the case was given to the jury without
argument. The jury retired and no
tuirned in three minutes with a vy
aiict of murder in the first degree,
which thme prisoner received stoically.
The usual motion for a new trial on the
ground that the velidict was contrary
to the law and the evidence was over
ruled by the court. Mr. White, who
since Sunday morning, with ceaseless
activity and unerring aim, has pushed
the Common wealth's case, asked for an
immediate sentence.
Judge Chalkloy in delivering the sen
tence, asked the prisoner: "You have
had a fair and impartial trial by your
countrymen; have you anything to say
why sentence should not be pronoucedi
now ?"
The prisoner replied: '-No."
Tnue judge then added: "The sentence
of the court is that you betak en from
the court house to the city jaIl and be
there confined until the 8th of Ju mne
and that you be taken thence and
hanged by the neck until you are dead,
and may God have mercy on your
soul."
The State law requires that a pris
oner is not to lbe executed until at
least thirty days af ter sentence.
As the prisoner sat down, lie said in
a spirit of resignation rather than bra
vado: "Well, dleath d'oes not come but
once, and I may as well go now as at
any time." He asked Sheriff Watts for
a drink of whiskey from the bottle
that was found at his home and upon
being told that it was in his boots,
which were used as evidence in the
trial, said: "I don't care for the boots,
but would like to have a taste of that
whiskey." 4s the prisoner was led
back to jail, he passed the West Au
g usta Guards and bowed to them, say
ing: "Good bye, gentlemen."
Yesterday afternoon the R1ev. .John
Donovan of this city conducted the
funeral services at the United lBre
theren Church over the remains of Lot
tie Rio we, the murdered girl. She was
buried at Bethlehem Cemetary in thef
country, ten miles from the scene of
her death. All is quiet there. The
Hlarrisonburg Gauards and the Monti
cello Guards have gone home, having
maoe a fine impression by their conm
duet and bearing. The West Auogusta
Guards are on duty tonight.
A Terrib'n AenlIent.
1IRAUILT, .ttouamnia, April 30.-A
terrible accident occurredl here tolay.
The white pier was crowded with p eo
ple in holiday attire, bound for (alat z,
or the D)anubo, and waiting for the
streamer which was tonvey them to
that place, when the pier gave way
and threw about 120 people into the
waters. Many excursionists it is be
leved were drowned.
MU60 Homes are Happy Homes,
Have you ever noticed- it? Call to
mind the homes of your friends who
have a good PIano or Organ in the
house, Are they not brighter acid
more attractive than those where the
divine art of music never eaters? To
be sure it costs to baty- a good" instru.
ment, but it lasts many years, and will
pay. its costs many a thousand times
over by interesting the young folks in
their homes.. Don't make the mistake
thought of investing haphazard. Pose
Yourself thoroughly- by writing Luddenk
& Bates Southern Music Iouse, Savah.
nab Ga., the great music house of. the
South, established in 1870. They have
sup plied 50,000 instruments to Sou th
ern homes, and have a reputation for
fair prices and honlorable reatment of
customers; and they represent the lead.
inT pianos and organs of America
ey take pleasure in corresponding
it you, sending free catalogues, etc.
Write them.
DGETT PAYS THE FREIGHI
Why Pay Extreme PrHas for Goods I
and for i atalogue and See What You Cu SaMI
,. ZLZGAlIT OAX
IROd W ' UI- T o - -
h,.r-I~ut~i & Wash. -
1)tte, all prices. ~
$69 "0w --$37
. . Just to int uc them.
No freight paid on tiat Or
gan. Guaranteed to be a
--o organ or nxioney re.
funded.
iCgan P11u1h PARLOR SUITS, conalsting
of Sofa, Aron Chair. Rocking r Diva,
%noi 2 uido ' 'htirs --worthi S46W''hilldeliveg
it to your deput for *84. o.v
This No. I
COOUIC
ware wi
dee el I depot
rhe maaufseturer pays all
Lbhe expenlseu. anti I Sill thern
do ou foor.a'7g
aarn N rig pi
a atuar teeem
In Buggy
A $I 40 PIANE
elivered at your depot
end for cataloigue of Ienrniture, Cooking
rho nia5. Beta iner te al
BAVE M ONF!Y. Address aph. a
G.F.PA DGETT a
For Agruiu
S tural and Gin
S eral Plantation
in WuiUe, have earn
Dd their reputa
ntion as the best
on tne mnarket.
Durability a
Hoonomy in
fuel and water
TETOZRR
Hasno Egual.
SAIll0NUU TiesHr
F. l Pr GET Ices Low
Heut faFin.N A -o o
TrmOu bTirmaes Hnardy
Wrteu ayow raLw e
duill 1 an y orn' nIak mor
lidden ic1ai.: . .
Thre L'shr s diiM'l.
kn Bl thea. Bes inteMakt Wite
8tavelachnews, ~sa 'r il
Brik acine s,i
Pantige Miach ~ains, h
Bfyo an saa oo ri,
GVio sanyhoip Saws c i
duland yo allkn' of r
trittiMills $115itoto250.
Sawor 'fry to, pl400l.
Waterow Engines anSBSM .
AVottohGsandPess
NIH 'ad OW ISRADTI E .
to.m 0.or Buying.
SwingBIA. w;,
The M11ti.
COLUMBIA, S. C., May 8.-Orer one
hundred muitary compaies have beeu
organized in South Carolina since the
Darlington affair and It looks like there
will be no end to the orgaliations Which
want to enter the service of the State
and which promise to be loyal to the
commander-iu-chiet in times of trouble.
All the companies which have applied
for admission have been mustered into
service; at least the o1ibers have been
commissioned. The laws of the State
allow only one hundred military .com
panies'which shall receive arms, ammu.
nition and aid from the State. This num
b 5r Is the limit, but there is no limit to
the number ot reserve companies al
lowed. -Including the companies to be
dimissed from service because of their
failure to respond to the call of Gover
nor Tillman there will be vancancles
for about twenty-five of the new
companies. A hard matter will
be to decide which of the himdred and
more new companies shall have the
honor of entering the regular service.
Some of them, those which were organ
ized immediately after the Darlington
trouble, have already beensu' plled with
arms, ammunition and uniforms. Of
course the new companies which do not
get into the regular service will have to
wait.until there are openings.
As a reserve force the companies will
have to supply their own arms and uni
forms it they want them. There is no
necessity, however, for them to do this.
All that is necessary is for them to pre
serve their organizations. Governor
Tillman said yesterday that he had not
had time to consider the reorganization of
the military of the State. So soon as he
gets the time he will issue orders and be
gin the Ireorganization. The Governor
did not say positively yesterday that he
intends to dismiss certain Columbia and
Charleston companies from service, but
the plain inference from his remarks was
that none of them will be Allowed to re
main in military ranks.
The Governor was asked li there was
any law to prevent the companies to be
dismissed from maintaining tlemselves
as independent military brganizations
He said that lie had not read the law on
the question, but did iit knew anything
against their having all the guns and uni
forms they wanted. They could also
drill all they wanted. le was not so
certain that they would have the right to
make a display on the streets 01 their
warlike manoeuvres, but did not sup
pso anybody would interfere with
them. Every man, he said, has a con
stitutional right to bear arms provided it
is with peaceful intent. The indepen
dent companies will not get any aid
irom the State and muat defray their ei
penses. They must buy their own uni
forms and accoutrements.--Register.
Suiode of a Prisoner.
COLUMBIA, S. C, May 2.-The quiet
town of Prosperity, located on the line
of the Colu tibia, Newberry and Lau
rens, and Richmond and Danville roads
about forty miles from Columbia, wait
yes'erday thrown into a considerable
state of excitement, so a gentleman
who arrived in the city last night says,
by the aticlde of a negro prisoner in
the station house, by hanging. The
tellow vas named Dn Sheppard. He
was a powerful built mulatto. Oa
I'-v evniag he was arrested for
assault arwt betsry anid attempted
criminal aissauit. tran th~- person of his
step-daughter, Mary B3:knight, a
mulatto girl about 20 years o1- age. The
city authorities placed him in the sta
tion house for the night. lie told Town
Marshal White when he locked him up
that he "reckoned they would hang him
this tima." Hie meant by this that he
teared serious consequences. Once be
lore he had been arrested on the same
charge, but his- wife being the only
witness against him he was discharged
from cuistodiy. The negro seemed to
uave been thiroughly resolved upon
self-destruction. He proceeded after he
was locked up to make himself a
rope out of the crocus sack covering
on the bed, tying it recurely around
his neck, lie then tied the other end
to the grating of the window, which
was no higher than himself. Then he
knelt down and choked to death de
liberately. When the town marshal
tent to the station house yesterday1
morning to carry him his breakfast he
found the f ellosw in a stooping attitude
his head hanging over on his breast,
cold and death. The coloner held an in
1uest and a verdict of death by stran
gulation was rendered. The negroes of
the town seem to be glad the negro's
carreer is ended, for he was considered
a desperate fellow.
A Repubilican Landslide.
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind,, May 1.-May~
elections were held through Indiana to
clay. The only cities not voting were
Indianapolis, Evansville and Logan
sport. Terre Haute elects the whole
R'3publican ticket by majorities ranging
rom 900 to 1,900. The Republican gain
>n the mayoralty is 880. Union City
ivo the Usual Republican majority. At
Valp~araiso, where the Democrats had a
noajority of 100 tw'o years ago, the Re.
)ublican majorities range from 75 to 300.
Alt K~okomo the Republicans win by
argely increased majorities. Brazil,
isually close, goes Republican. Law
~enceburg, usually Democratic, elects
,he entire Republican ticket, and three
)ut of five councilmen. Lal'orts and
Rtichigan City, usually Democratic, both
ri Republican by increased majorities,
is does Kendallville, Bloomington,
LFranktort and Osborne. Green Castile,
iBimwood and Irwin, the gas belt cities,
show increased Republican majorities.
Ilew Altuany, usually 1,000 Democratic,
slects every Republican but one council.
-nan. T'iFayette goes Republican with
s gain of 500.
,Attemipted Swindle.
CoUmuunrA, 8. C., A.pril 28.-The
Wadesboro Messenger Intelligences
itates that on the 24th of October last
Tame Horne of the vicinity of Wades
boro, took out a polici' for $6,000 in the
Lroviden' Saving Life Assurance Society
>f New York, and 'hat on the 21st of
January last lie and his brother in-law,
James Watkins. left in a buggy for
Uheraw, 8, C.. Watkins returned alone
and represented that Horne had fallen
from the railrcadl bridge at Uheraw and
been drowned in tile river. Nobody be
hioved this. Mrs. Horne applied for the
lusurance money. A special agent came
hlown to Investigate the matter. The
II shiot was that Mrs. Horne and
[ho)ne's brother, J. T., both confessed k
hhut they believed Horne to be still alive
nd the "widow" surrendered the pol
cy. They made very much of a mess
>i the matter.
PROF. FALD, of Berlin, propheies a
very pronable collision between the
arh and the cornet or 1800 on Novem
cer 13, 1899, when the comet will cut 4
rhe point where the earth arrives every
yeair at that time. lBut he does not
think "arm could come of such a'colli
stona, thei arat erikl of the comet being so
light.. unle~ss iti carbonic acid gas of
which it is probably comnposed should
Ison our atmosphere. lint, any way
[aywemay look out for a magnifi,
sent shower of meteors on that date.

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