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The Sumter watchman. (Sumterville, S.C.) 1855-1881, February 16, 1870, Image 1

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VOL. XX
WEDNESDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 16, 1870.
NO 41.
DEVOTED TO LITERATURE. MORALITY AND GENERAL INTELLIGENCE.
The Sumter Watchman
{ESTABLISHED IM 1850.)
it rpiiiiliD
BVBIt* VSDNMDAT KORN INO
AT SUMTER. 8. C., BY
G1L.BEKT ?fe FLOWERS?
Terms.
One yesr......M.~?.?."M JJ
SI? months.?... f ??
Three mon the.<-<. 1 ~
V OVBKTISK M KNTS inserted at th? r?te
of ONB DOLLAK AND m'TY ?BNT8 per
2,uar? for th. first. ONB DOLLAR for the
second, end FIFTY CBNT8 for ??ch subsequent
Insertion, for ?ri? period lees than three months
and fill communications which subserve prirat?
Int rests, will he paid 'or SJ? advertisements.
PBABL8 AMII) TSB PEBBLES*
BY MI88 HATTI B. 8WINEF0RD.
Io the hidden depths of the iramor
tal foul amid the pebbles which cover
Us rocky bed, lie pearle sparkling with
radiant glory, pearls of intrinsic worth.
In ellis hiddeo retreat they exert ao
influence which, pure and bright as
themselves, ia reflected with every ray
of light. Like the rays? ol' tho suu, these
gems nf the soul shed their brilliancy,
upon all ; tho evil and tho good, the
exalted and the oppressed alike being
patticipuots of their cheering bright?
ness.
Io the toilsome journey of life, these
pearls arc often hidden from our view,
concealed by the pebbles which the ad
vertui tide hus vast upon them. But as
thu same nil powerful arm which some
times for wise purpose? casts the soul
into obscure darkness and again restores
it to the smiles ol a kind Benefactor, so
the sumo means which -hut cut these
pearly mys from our night, again disclo
M'S* them Hut wild disappointments
docomo, and happiness and peace give
place to distrust, and too frequently to
dull despair, then Hope, a pearl most
precious, diffuses tts radiance, giving
wings tn despondency and illuminating
the in,-.iic future, the frowning cures
of which so lately clouded the horizon.
As the sunbeams dispel the raiu clouds
ninl mid life and beauty to nature's
charms, so Hope disperses clouds from
the mind, inspiring it with new vigor,
giving freshness and vivacity to its la?
tent powers, and as a guiding star,
faithfully points to tho beacon murk
beyond 'Che pearl of Hope is a gem of
which every heart is the possessor; it
makes light the onerous burdens which
duty urges upou us, smoothes the
4 rugged' path to the lofty templo of
science, und renders harmless tho thorny
footsteps of fortune. This pearl never
grows dim, "Hope Dcvcr dies," but with
unfailing purity retains its lustro till
thu last spark of life has left these
tenements cf clay.
The deceptive pearl! of Fortune too
often proves a guildcd pebble, whoso
glittering dross ensnares the unsuspect?
ing, until too late to discover that its
enticing charms were but an illusion.
With untiring zeal and assiduity thc
ambitious aspirant endeavors to grasp
the coveted treasure, enduring hard?
ships, overcoming obstacles of every
kind, bowing ahmst, io ardorution to
thc object of his pursuit. And if attained,
how little does it reward him for thc
labor! and how often, too, arc his hopes,
entirely frustrated, the apparent bless
iug proving a course to his ardent de?
sires
Then appears thc pearl ol Friendship,
more humble in pretension, but, in
value, richly compensating for loss ol
earthly treasures. It is a jewel rare,
which hus baffled all attempts of skept?
ics to depreciate its value ; and though
its numerous counterfeits often rcuder
it despicable, they but provo its real
worth. To the disappointed and care?
worn this pearl brings joy and happiness;
it brightons thc life of the wretched,
loosens thc bonds of the oppressed, nod
brings sympathy and love to the heart
of the mourner Yes, there nrc every?
where pearls amid tho pebbles; und
though tho pebbles of misfortune are
ct re wu far und wide, wo may ever find
pearls of friendship appearing to lighten
our sorrows
Poverty, a gross, unseemly pebble, is
everywhere to bo met, under various
forms and colors, yet the estimation in
which it is held is almost invariably thc
same. It is said that it brings unhap?
piness, and often disgrace, upon its pos?
sessor, deburring him from society and
its pleasures, and thus rendering him
thc object of contempt and ridicule.
But with the aid of the naturalist's eye
we may discern Charity not fur off.-n
lillie unassuming pearl almost concealed
hy the dross of worldiucss, and too
often by thc love of applause ; but to
thc Refiner it is priceless value, bearing
on its bright surface not only smiles ol
love and friendship, but of sympathy
and comfort.
Apart from thc rest, in humble
obscurity, the pearl of Humility may bc
found, meekly submitting to the supre?
macy of ?ts larger und more ostentatious
neighbors. Unappreciated by many, and
Utterly disregarded by tho votaries ol
Fashion, it lies almost invisible save by
its unwavering brilliancy, which thc
clouds d misfortune cannot dim, nor
thc smiles of prosperity brighten. Hu
utility is thc embodiment of Heaven's
rarest virtues ; truth and hone r arc
reflected ft om its surface, while beneath
the bright exterior ute enshrined glories
which love nod hope only can produce.
This pearl is unknown to the ambitious,
whoso only incentive is emulation; foi
with modest influence "Humility louds,
on, through thc bitter sea of experience
its votai ?cs until it brings them to the
bright rock ol Safety." This prcciou
pearl, too, lies among pebbles, the lar?
gest and most unsightly of which it
Pride, in its importance almost crushing
I its modest neighbor. Pride, so disa?
greeable in itself, also brings with ii
many sad influences; it binds its fetten
- firmly uround the heart of its victim
find with ?ron will guides his footsteps
inciten his mind with desires of a bam
.nd vicious nature, and leads hit
thoughts into channels of impurity
"?nile his actions all boar the stamp o
selfishness and vanity. This pebble
^ so often io tho possession of the exalted
wealthy, and beautiful, may also bi
found within tho breast of fortune's lest
favored ones, where, like a canker worm
^rankles, destroying with its bittei
If i S006 th6 finer 80,>8"t>iHtie8. Iti
j deluded victims aro ever prepared ti
gJi in the exulting language of th?
Pharisee, '?I thank Theo that I am no
M other men."
Purest and brightest of the number i
JfJWi an inestimable pearl, envelopin
?0 it? beautiful light. Love on toi
? *
p. '
the heart.,swaying with ita gentle in?
fluence the actions of ita recipients,
subduing the most r?bellion? and exal?
ted, while it ennobles the humble and
depressed. Destitute of thia treasure,
wan becomes degraded, and his heart is
made capable ot committing the most
grievous crimes, while the possession of
it elevates him io a standard with those
who reign with him (,whoso name is
love." This beautiful pearl, so rare
and costly in its purity, is often in the
possession of the destitute, who, with
hearts alive to happiness, have secured
the gem, and with vigilance have pol?
ished well tho rc ugh exterior, the bright
surface of which now shines conspicu?
ously io their crown of virtue. Not alono
in the halls of royality and splendor does
it shed its ruys, but upon the lone
hillside and iu the secluded vale, upon
the ocean's billows or among the t>now
dud mountains.
Let imagination lead thee to this
rook bound coast whose pebbly coverings
disclose to view man's inner self, and
(ruth its pearly treasures select with
cautiousness thy casket. Hero Faith
and Truth lie sida by ?ide, blending in
ono their bright rlys ; Meakness, r\iti
enoc, and Long Suffering go hund i n hun d
spreading fur and wide their sweet
influence ; while Joy, Mercy, and
Temperance, by their untarnished
purity, piocluira their vulue Oh, who
would not .secure this pearl wrought
chaplet ! Moro valid is it in tho duily
strifes with mun and self than the
helmet of thc warrior. May wc obtain for
ourselves this crown of pearls on curth,
that, after this life, we may find hud up
for us in heaven ..a crown that fadcth
not away."
GOVERNMENT DY NEGROES.
Que of the most temperate and Well
balanced of our English juurnnls, the
Pall Mall Gazette, has an article upon
this subject, written in its best tone,
from which we make the following ex?
tracts :-"Io the interest both of history
and of political science, it is much to be
wished that more were known of thc
nature and effects of the system of gov*
eminent which is on its trial iu the
Southern Stutcs of America. Thc ex?
periment is without precedent, and is of
vast importance, whether it succeeds or
fails; but there is ac almost entire want
of authentic information us to thc facts,
they gave assistance of any sort to thc
Secessionist Government of tho State
otherwise'thun under physical compul?
sion,' and that thc Federal (und not thc
State) courts tahal? entertain prosecutions
for perjury in falsely swearing to this
elleet. If it hud been generally under?
stood that the North did not intend at
auy time to relax its grasp upon thc
"This scarcity of trustworthy informa
tion is thc moro provoking because it
has become clear that the Congress of
the United Stales is not trying govern
ment by negroes as a merely temporary
arrangement. Tho Act which it hus just
passed for thc settlement of tho affairs
of li corgi a shows that it inlett ?ls to
watch continuously over its system of
reconstruction, and to insist on it being
applied in its integrity, whenever it is
accidentally or totally deranged. It di
rects that thc Georgia Legislature shall
reassemble exactly in the condition in
which it found itself before thc expul?
sion of the negroes; that nobody's elec?
tion shall bc disallowed for reasons of
race or colour; that all persons returned
shall take an oath denying, in language
of minute precision, that during thc war
South, there would have been nothing
very wonderful in this measure, con?
sidering what thc conduct of thc Georgia
State Legislature had been. Hut its
formidable character arises from the
contrary assumption having been made
and from its having been supposed that,
when the general Reconstruction Law
hud been literally complied with, he
reconstructed Southern States would be
left to themselves, and their public acts
submitted for allowance or disallowance
to thc law courts exclusively. It must
now he assumed that if thc experiment
tried in thc South fails anywhere to give
the result expected hy the Republicans,
tbe Congress of the United States, so
long as that party is dominant in it, will
interfere to correct thc miscarriage. On
thc morrow of the conquest thc treat?
ment of tho Southern leaders by the
United States was marked by n Liontleness
which will always bc remembered to
their honour. Hut in the next stage of
their relations with thc South, thc ne?
cossily for combining despotic rule with
something like the forms of local self
government, forced them to adopt a
policy which has more than nindn up for
their abstinence from bloodshed. No?
body whose intelligence has not been
impaired by tho habit of repeating
formulas about universal suffrage can
tloubt that th- punishment inflicted 03
tho Southern whites is far the severest
which one community hus ever inflicted
on anothor. England governed Ireland
through a minority which thu mass of
thc Celtic population, however it might
hate, never dreamed of despising; the
United States rule thc South through a
majority of the negroes, contempt for
whom was almost a religion with thc
planter before thc attempt at secession.
Wc aro not considering whether thc
I ""ishment was deserved, or whether
UK Northern States could possibly help
inflicting it ; wo morely say that, alter
the capacity of tho negro for improve?
ment hus been rated as highly as possi?
ble, and after all possible- deductions
havo been made from the credibility of
the stories pubiishod by tho Democrat?
ic press, the fact remains that govern
mont of white men by coloured ex slaves
is the aeutest form of moral tortue which
has over boen applied to a oommuoity.
How unfortunate it has boon that the
punishment of the South has taken this
shape the United States are not likely
to feel until the lime comes (and it will
. .. ' .'*.*?? *...* . ' j. j ' ' > ? -
Av ' '...*.. . . ,, ,?V
certainly come) wheo the people of
the North ?rill be animated with the
strongest wish to be reconciled to even
the most obstinate zealots of secession.
We should be sorry to lay down that
tho United States would have done
well to shed blood like water io the first
momenta of triumph, if only they could
have devised some less degraidug con?
trivance for the provisional government
of the South. Yet it is quite certain
'hat bloodshed is easily forgotten ; per?
son;! 1 outrage with the greatest difficulty
At the present moment we are well
aware that nothing seems lens important
to the great majority of the Northern
people than thut the experiment which
they are trying in the South causes ex
cesa i ve discomfort to a parcel of coquer
ed rebels ; but they will probubly here?
after view this experiment wah other
eyes when there comes the inevitable
waking to sympathy and pity, and wheo
much ?bout the sumo time, it appears
that the neproes who are the instru?
menta'of punishment have become not
only a Southern but a Northern power,
weighing heavily in tho scale whenever
the uutioual decision hus to be taken.
CANINE FIDICI.ITY.
A French merchant, having some
money due him in u neighboring village,
set out on horse back, accompanied by
his dog, in order to recover it. WHaving
settled thc business, he set out foi his
residence with the bag ot money tied
before him. The faithful da?; seemed to
partake ot his master's satisfaction
After some miles the merchant alight?
ed to rest iu the shade, und tukinjr the
bug of money in his hand, luid it down
hy his side under a hedge, und, 01: re?
mounting, forgot it. The dog, per?
ceiving tho forgetfulness of his master,
run to fetch thc bug, but it was too
heavy for him to drap, along.
Ile then ran back to his master, and
by whining, barking, and howling, seem?
ed to endeavor to remind him of his
mistake The merchant did not under
stand his language ; but the faithful
creature persevered in its efforts, and
trying to stop the horse in vain, at
lust begun to bite ?his heels.
The merchant, absorbed in deep
thought us he rode along, und wholl)
lorgctful of his bug of money, begun to
think the dog was mad. Full of this
suspicion, in crossing abrook, he turned
buck to sec if thc dog would drink ;
but the faithful animal, too intent on
his muster's business to think of itself,
continued to burk and bite with greater
violence than before
"Morey !" cried the afflicted merchant,
"it must be so; my poor dog is certainly
mad ; what must 1 du ? I must kill him,
lest some greater misfortune befall mc,
but with what regret ! Oh, could 1 find
any one to pt rtbrin this cruel office for
me.! Hut there is no time to lose; I my
self may become thc victim if I spare
him."
With theso words he took a pistol
from his pocket, und, with a trembling
hand, took aim ut his faithful servant.
Ile turned away in agony us he fired,
but h s aim wus too sure. Thc poor
animal fell wounded ?nd weltering in
his blood, still endeavoring to crawl to
wanls his muster, as if to tax him wit!,
ingrui it tide.
Thc merchant could not bear the
-ight. Ile spurred on his horse with a
heart full of sorrow, and lament ed he
hud taken a journey which hud cost
li i m so deur.
Still, however, the money never en?
tered his mind ; he only thought of his
poor dog nnd tried lo console himself
with the reflection that he hud prevent
ted a geatcr evil, by dispatching a mail
? niinal. than he had suffered a calamity
hy his los?
Hut such a thought pave him little
satisfaction
"I um most unfortunate," said ho to
himself; "I would almost rather have
lost my money than my dog."
Saying this he st recited out his hand
o grnsp the treasure. It was missing;
no hap wus to be found. In an instant
he opened his eyes to bia- rashness and
folly
"Wretch that I am." said he, "I
ulone am tu binnie ! I could not under?
stand tho meaning of my flop's actions,
nnd I have killed him for his zeal. Ile
only wished to inform mc of my mis?
take, and ho has paid for his fidelity with
his life "
Instantly he turned his horse, nnd
went off ut full gallop to the place
where he had stopped. He saw with
half'-avorted eyes the scene where thc
tragedy wus acted ; he perceived tho
truces of blood us ho proceeded ; he
wus opprc sed nod distracted ; but in
vain did he look for his dog; hu was
not to bc seen on the road
At last he orrived nt the spot where
ho hud left his money. But what were
his sensations ! his heart was ready to
bleed with thc sight that then met his
view. The poor dog,^unublo to follow
his dear hut cruel muster, had determin?
ed to give his last moments to his ser?
vice. Ile hud crawled, all bloody as ?ic
was, to thc forgotten bug, and now in
the agonies of death he lay watching
besido it.
When ho saw his master he still tes
tined his joy by the wagging of his tail.
He could do no more ; he tried to rise,
but his strength was gone; even the
caresses of his muster could not prolong
his life for a few moments.
Ho stretched out his tongue to liok
tho hand that wan now fondling him in
the agonies of regret, as if to sen) forgiv
IIess of tho deed that had deprived him
of life. Ho then casta look of kind?
ness on his master and closed his eyes in
death.
! A Miss Marshall, who has boon lectur?
ing in the South oo Woman's rights and
temp?ranos, has just beeo soot to jail io
Teuuonsoe for druukennesB and disordor
1*. oonduot.
vf:. .
i
AN ELOQUENT EXT JU A CT.
The following beautiful extract is
from ? speech delivered by HOD. D. W.
Voorheesj of Iodiftoft :
It is s melaooholly speotaole to be?
hold ft free government die. The world,
it ts true, is filled with evidences of
decay. All nature sneaks the voice of
dissolution, and the highway of history
and of life is strewn with the wrecks
which Time the great dcspoilcr has made,
But the hopes, bright visions of reviv
ing glory, ure nowhere denied to the |
heart ot' mun, save as be gazes on tho
downward full of legal liberty. He lis.
tens muornlully t? the autumn winds as
they sigh through dismantled forests,
but he knows that their breath will be
soft and vcrnul in the spring, and that
the dead flowers and withered foliage
will bloHsom and bloom again. He sees
the sky overcast with the angry frown
cf the tempest, but he knows that tho sun
will teappear, and the emblazonry of
God cannot perish. Man himself, this
strange connecting link- between dust
and Deity, totters wearily, onward
under the weight of years and pain
toward the tomb, Out how briefly his Hie
lingers around the spot. It is filled with
teurs and grief, and the willow and cy*
press gather ?round it with their loving
but mournful embrace. Aud is this all ?
Not so ! If a mun die, shull he uot livo
again ? Beyond the grave is the dis
tant Aidenii Hope provides an elysium
of the soul where the mortal assumes
"immortality, and life becomes and end
less splendor. But where sir in ull thc
dreary regions of the past, filled with
convulsions, wars and crimes, ean you
point your finger to tho tomb of a free
Commonwealth on which tho angels of
resurrect ion have ever descended, or from
whose sepulchre the stone nf despotism
hus been rolled away ? Where, in what
age, and in what clime, have the veins
of constitutional freedom renewed their
youth and regained their lost estate ? By
whose strong grip ha.? the dead corpse
of tho Republic, been raised ? The
merciful Maker who.walked upon the
waters and bade the winds bc still, left
no ordained apostle with power to wrench
apart thc jaws of national death, and
release the victim of despotism. Tho
wail of the heart broken over the dead
is not so sad to mc as the realization of
this fact. But all history with a loud
unbroken voice, proclaims it ; and thc
evidence of what tho past has been is
conclusive to my mind of what tho fu?
ture will be. Wherever in tho domain of
human conduct a pcoplo onco possessed
of liberty, havo surrendered tho great
gifts of (jud at thc command of the usurp
er, they have never afterward proven
themselves worthy to regain their for?
feited treasure
'.ivmtvvi:vi;ii?LMn,i? SUNSHINE
THESE l?A V'S."
The remurk struck upon our car with
singular force as we passed onward, ll
was carelessly mude, perhaps thought?
lessly, but what a world of meaning was
contained therein. "Very little sunshine
these days." Lin le enough, (iud knows,
not only in thc material world, but in
our condition and its surroundings.
When we contrast oui situation now
with wliut it was a lew years ago, when
wc look around and perceive ignorance
and vice sitting in high places aud riding
rampant over tho land, blotting out all
thu ancient landmarks which had come
down to us Iront generation to genera?
tion, and which were sacred and hallow?
ed as the memory of those who bequeath
ed them ; when ve see strangers dc
vouring our substance and exulting in
their triumph, while around us and
above us the clouds hang heavy and
thick, and the future becomes more dim
and obscured, may wc not exclaim with
i ruth "we have very little sunshine
these days?" *
VVho has not felt thc want of this sun?
shine in his daily walks through lile?
who among us has not experienced the
cares and troubles, tho anxieties and
sorrows which bow down tho strongest
frame and make thc heart heavy ns lead?
When the hand of affliction is laid upon
us, and we hear no longer that voice
which though hushed is still sweet in
our ears as the memory of lovo can
make it, when the rain comes down in
heavy drops and thc days are dark and
friends are few, and we look abroad for
some light, however faint, to guido our
wandering steps and see nought but
gloom around us, in thc anguish of our
heans we exclaim, oh, for ono ray ol
light to gladden our path-one flash of
the sunshine to cheer and console.
Where may we look to find that for
which wc so ardently long ? It is casi
ly answered-in tho discharge of kindly
offices tn th040 around tis, in minister
tug to thc wants of the poor and needy
- du comforting tho afflicted-in doing
unto others as wc wish they should do)
unto u.>-and above all, in thc faithtu)
performance of duty.
It matters not how dark and dreary
thc days may bo, how black and lower
ing the clouds may hang, or how large
thc drops of rain that fall, for there
will then bc sunshine on the heart, a
glorious light that will gild our path
through life to death, through death to
lifo eternal.- Wilmington Journal.
TUR DILBOTItIA OP RECONSTRUC?
TION.
The Southern States were required to
ratify the Fifteenth Amendment as a
condition of restoration to the Union.
As they could not bo trusted to como in
and then ratify it, they ratified first and
then came in. They were, therefore,
not in the Union whoo they acted on
the Constitution, or else thoy were
nevor out of tho Union. Either, theo,
all the reconstruction laws of Congross
oro invalid, or theso Southern ratifioa
tiona of tho fifteenth Amendment ar?
invalid. If the States *ero io the
Union thero was no coed to admit them,
and if (bay ware not io the Uoioo, they
could not participate io making laws for
States that ftre in.-Af?w York IhrahL
COIT'S
MILITARY ANDI COMMERCIAL
Academy,
MAYES VILLE, S. 0.
IN J HIS INSTITUTION nOYS and YOUNO
MEN will ba thorongblj flited for COLLEGE
?r BUSINESS.
In addition to Anoten t and Modern Languages,
tue Sciences and ordinary English Branches,
peseial instruction will be given in PENMAN
sillP, BOOK KEEPING, Business Forma and
Accounts, and in Vocal Muslo.
The Prlnoipnl refers with pride and gratifica?
tion to hie former pupils, who have taken high
positions in Colloge or Business.
TUB FIRST SESSION begins October 1st,
and oloses February 15tb.
TUB 8ECOND SESSION begins February 10th,
.nd oloses June SOth.
TERMS : $100 per Session for Board and
Tuition, invariably in advsnee.
French, German and Drawing extra.
For Circulars address
CAPT. WILLIAM n. COIT.
May cs ville, S. C.
REFEREES:
Rev. J. Leighton Wilson, D. D., Dr. J. A.
Mayes, Mayesville, So. Ca.; Gen. W. L. T.
Prinoc, Cher?w, 8. C. ; Rev. J. B. Mack, Charles?
ton, S. C.; Rev. G. W. Petrie,D.D., Montgom?
ery, Ala.; Mcssr3. Blandiog A Richardson,
Sumter, S. C.
Jan 2?_t7july.
WOFF?RD COLLEGE.
SPARTAN H Ultu C. H.,
. 80. CA.
FACULTY:
REV. A. M. 811IPP, D. I)., Prcsidont, an
Professor Mental and Mural Sci.nco.
DAVID DUNCAN, A. M., Professor Ancient
Languages ami Literature.
REV. WHITEFOORD SMITH, D.D., Professor
English Literature.
WARREN DU PRE, A. M., Professor Natural
Science.
JAS. II. CARLISLE, A. M., Professor Mathe,
matice.
REV. A. II. LESTER, A. M., Professor History
and Biblical Literature.
The Preparatory Schcol, under tho immediate
suporvisioo nf the Faculty, Joo. W. SIIIPP,
A. ti.. Principal.
Divinity School-Rov. A. M. Shipp, D. D.
Rev. Whitefoord Smith, D. D. ; Rev. A. U
Lester, A. M.
The first Session of the Sixteenth Collegiate
Year begins on the first Monday in October,
18A9, the second Session begins un the first Mon?
day in January, 1870.
The cnurso of studios and the standard of |
scholarship remain unchanged, but the Faculty
now admit irregular students or thuse who with
lo pursue particular studies only.
The Schools also open at the sumo time.
Tuition per year, in Colloge Classes, including
contingent feo, $54 in Specie, or its equivalent ?L
Currency.
Tuition por year, in Preparatory School, includ
ing contingent foe, $44 in currency.
Rills poyablo ono half in advance. Board, pe
Month, from $10 to $16 in ourrency.
For further particulars address
A. M. SUIPP, Prosldont.
May 19_ly
St. Joseph's Academy.
CONDUCTKO Dr TIIK
Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy,
SU MT KR, S. O.
TUE Coll.-giatc Exercises of this
First Class Institute, will be resume?
^on thc 1st of Sc [i tem ber. A prompt
attendance, is requested in order io
facilitate tho progress and arrange
mont uf tho classes. The now building* nre
spacious and elegantly finished, furnishing no
eoniinodtttions for ono hundred boarders. The
extrusive grounds and piazzas aro ample for open
air exorcise, and young ladies are thoroughly
instructed in English Mathematics, French, Ita?
lian, Music, Drawing, Painting, Ac, Ao. Location
lu-.nlthy, air pure, wa er good, and terms ronsun
uhlo. For particulars apply to Iho Superioress of
St. Joseph's Academy, Sumter, or to tho Supe?
rioress of tho Sisters of Morey, Charleston, who
will endeavor to meet tho pressures Ul' tho times.
Nov. 10_
New Hardware Store,
Main-st. under Sumter Hotel.
L. P. LORING,
-AOKNT FOR
Messrs. King & Huppman,
BALTIMORE, M. D.
Would respectfully announce to his friends and
the public, thnt he bas received and oponed, at I
the above establishment a
Stock of Hardware and
Family Utensils,
embracing overy article io this line of business,
whiuh he intends to sell at the
LOWEST PRICES, FOR CASH.
Ho will koop always in store, a completo assort
mont of
Collin's Axes, Amos' Shovols and Spades,
Trace Chains, Hoes, .
Rakes, Pitch Forks,
drain Cradles, Soy the Blades,
Guano Selves,
Pocket and Table Cutlery,
Brats Preserving Kettles,
Tin Wure, Window Glatt-all sises.
Persons in want of the most convenient and
economical Stoves, can bo supplied with tho
latest improved patterns at pi ices which Cannot
fail lo givo entiro satisfaction.
May 20_
B. JOHNSON & CO.
UMBRELLA MANUFACTURERS,
301 KING STREET,
Charleston, S. C
AFULL assortment nf UM ORELLA S AND
PARASOLS, always on hand, bettor r.nd
chea;.cr than any imported,
Wholesale & Retail.
-ALSO
A large assortment of WALKING CANES
We pay especial attention to the manufaotur
f BUGGY UMBRELLAS,
which wo cnn furnish ns low >>s any house North
snd of a butter quality for thc PRICE.
Oct. 13._Om.
MUSIC LESSONS.
Vocal and Instrumental.
The undersigned having taken hts residence at
Sumter, will give lessons in Singing and on the
PIANO end VIOLIN, lie will llkowlse give in.
stmolions in FRENCH, 0 ERM AN andjt H IT tl -
METIO.
TUNINO OF PIANOS ATTENDED TO.
For further particulars, apply to bl? at his
l^enoelaHarvlnStr^ 0. M. KOW.
FsbJ^tf
Just Received,
Fall and Winter Stock,
J . E . SHAKES.
DRY GOODS, GROCERIES,
BOOTS and SHOES,
CLOTHING,
Together with a variety of other Goods.
Old Bye Whiskey.
Th? Subscriber wishes to announce (bat he
will bo in constant receipt of tho COPPER DIS?
TILLED MOUNTAIN PURE and UNADUL?
TERATED
WHITE & COLORED RYE WHISKEY,
Direot from the Distillery at Hannaville, Bork
ley County, Westum Virginia.
-ALSO
Brandies, Gin, H ines, Porter & Ale,
AU of tho Best Brands. Also
A CUOIOE LOT OF SEGARS.
J. E. Suares,
MAIN STREET, WEST SIDE.
Sept 29_Sumter, S. 0.
F urniture
-AT
THE SUMTER
FURNITURE WAREROOMS,
A LARGE LOT OF
Bedsteads and Chairs,
AND
Cottage Setts,
The Subscriber is receiving and will continue
to receive a stock of
FURNITURE.
direct from the manufactory, consisting of almost
every nrticlo in that line.
J. E. SUARES,
^ Main Street, opposite the Expross Office
Sept 29_Sumter, S. C.
TO THE
Planters of Maysville
and surrounding Country*
GKNTI.KMBSJ
We most respectfully offer yon the following
manures:
PERUVIAN GUANO, direct from the agent,
FARMbKS PLASTER OR GYPSUM, up to
statidnrd,
SOLUBLE PACIFIC GUANO,
COMPOUND ACID PHOSPHATE, for composi?
ting with cotton seed,
DISSOLVED BONE A SUPERIOR ARTICLE
FLOUR OF HONE,
BAUGH'S RAW RONE PHOSPHATE,
CAROLINA FERTILIZER, '
THE NAVASSA AMMONIATED SOLUBLE
PHOSPHATE of Wilmington,
cash ordors solicited.
MAYES A COOPER Agents.
Jan 5-3m
STOVES.
Manufactured by
Harbeck, Conklin & Willis,
Manufacturers of
Stoves, Tin and Japancd Ware,
And Agonis for
Kaoline an?! Enameled Ware*
For solo by
h, 1\ LORIN0, Agent,
Juno 9- __8umtor _S. C._
FALL AND WINTER
CLOTHING, CLOTHS,
I>. J. WINN,
-AGENT FOR
Shipley, Roano & Co.,
HAS now in sioro n large ami fine stock of
Full und Winter Goods, consisting of
FINE DRESS SUITS,
Business Suits,
Heavy Ordinary Clothing,
Fino Cloths, Cassimeros,
Cloths fur ladles' Cloaks,
Salem N. C. Joans,
Shirts, Drawers, Merino Vost?,
Sucks. Suspenders, Cravsts, Ac.
Possessing unusual advantages, nmd being In
this lino only, horan and wi'l soil clothing omi
elolhs, cheuper than they cnn bo elsewhoro
bought. And all he asks is a eareful Inspection
and this will be douionsirated.
_0ot_o_tf_
THE SUBSCRIBER
HAS established himself In a room adjoining
tho Post Office, for the purpose of
MAKING AND REPA l RI Ntl HARNESS AND
8ADDLB8 TO ORDBR.
Any one favoring Mm with their work may be
assured that it will be done with neatness and
dispatch;
All kinds of trade will be taken for work dana
in his shun. Give him a trial ?nd satisfy your?
selves. ROBERT KIRKLEY.
No* t? .. ?*,... tat
O. F. HOYT.
SUCCESSOR TO
P. HOYT, & SUTER,
so. OA.
"^jyoULD respectfully Inform bb) friend*
.nd tho pub) io of Sumter, end enjoining count le?,
that he bee recently received a choice ?elec?
tion of
LADIES? AND GENTLE M ENS'
Wat ohos.
JEWELRY, SILVERWARE,
SPECTACLES, &c, &c,
Hi* atook embraoea all ?tho latest styles, and
will be sold at reasonable rates.
Sept 29_
C. T. MASON.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
WATCH MAKER
AND
Si;M TER, S. C.
Has just recolved and keeps always ca hand j
Now and Beautiful Styles of
JEWELRY, PYE GLASSES, &C.
WATCHES, CLOCKS and JEWELRY RE?
PAIRED WITH DISPATCH.
March 31_
NO. 3
GROCERIES.
THE ONLY STRICTLY
Grocery and Liquor House
IN TOWN
HE UN DE RSI Q NED BEING DULY
Authorised to continue the business of the late
linn of CHANE A EB ER ll A RT, begs loave tn
oall the attention of his friends and tho public]
generally to bis
NEW AND WELL SELECTED
STOCK OP
Heavy and Fancy Groceries
Which bo offers low for CASH ONLY.
^pjj. All artiotes warranted as recommande
Pure Medicinal Liquors kept constantl>
on band.
J. n. EBER HA RT.
Surviving partner.
Pee 1?_tf
PICTURES
IN TUE
HIGHEST AND LATEST STYLES
OP ART, ARE NOW TAKEN BY
WILDER & WHEELER,
At tho Gallery in Sumter, lately kept by H. It
MCCALLUM, such as
PHOTOGRAPHS,
IVORYTYPES,
AMBROTYPES,
FERROTYPES, A
FR AM KS of all siaos fnrnuhod.
PICTURES colored,und old pictures denned
and remounted.
STEREOSCOPES AND STEREOSCOPIC
VIEWS for sale.
Nov. 3_
MILLINERY
AND
Fancy Goods,
j MISS E. D. BRITTON
HA VINO returned from thi North ls pre?
prepared tu ofTcr her friends nnd patrons a
HANDSOME AND COMPLETE STOCK OF
Fall and Winter Millinery,
FANCY GOO?S, &C.
Carofully selcctod hy herself. Sho will continue
io get fresh supplies overy thrco or faur week?.
KO should a nv tb in ir new occur in the styles of
HATS and BONNETS, liter in ?ho sent?n, she
will bo furnished with thu verj latest.
ELEG ANT BRIDAL
HATS AN? BONNETS,
made to order on short notice.
Country orders will receive strict attention.
Oct o_ tf
A* WHITE,
Fire & Life Insurance Agcnl
SUMTER, S. C.
UNDERWRITERS, AGENCY, N. Y.
SECURITY INSURANCE CO., N. Y
ENTERPRISE ? " Cum
GEORGIA HOME ? Geo.
RICHMOND RANKING IN. CO
SOUTHERN LIFE INSURANCE CO.
[Memphis um) Atlunta.
Capital RcpmoHtmlt ?12.000,000.
HENRY BISCHOFF & CD
WHOLESALE GROCERS
AM DEALERS IN
Wines, Liquors, S?gars,
TOBACCO, &C, *
107 EAST BAY,
Charleston, 8. O.
' H. BISCHOFF, C. WUI.DKRNj Jf. H. PIBP?R
Bm 9 . \ . :? . . \ ?m.
I- ???
EVERY DEge^?WB
rtu>*r TL Y txacv%9m%tt
The Sumter Wai?^H
Highest Style of t$*|
Charleston Adyerti&elp^BI^^^
PAN KN I N'S HEPATIC BfTTI^^
-? ri II -> *^i*8?eS|^H
THEY CURE ^TgPEPSIA,'^m?
ARB ALL *>ISiASKS Or TRI
STOMACH AND LIVm|j
Tnir AM &ivv?a?rDU> ST va? > '^iffijffifB
MEDICAL FAOOI^VW' |?M
-
HEGEMAN Sc CO<?l
A.OENTS, KEW YORK.
Manufactured by C. F. P?1
ORBOST AMD APOTHKAIT, - . ??H
OHARLBSTON, ^'W?M?
49>Jn>r Aol? oy ThrvygUU A'uuigsutas *>4|ft
MO??EYS?W
CHEAP AND FASHIONABLE SHOE H0USE?
D. O'NEILTi & SONS,
No. 376 KINO STREET,
(BKTWKKN ?K0HCK AND t,'AI,UOUK ,VTR?BTS,) ?*
CHARLESTON, 6. C. :
Hliclcsale And lirlail
DEALERS IN ".^^BB
i^^^^^^^^^^^ til o North eeU^
and forwarding ?took to us by every Stosraor, weyr *
ean assure our friends nnd buyers generally that ^'<eh
wcwill give perfect satisfaction. Ij would.bo joy.v?
tho interest of Country and City buyers to gif? ?Ja
us a outland examine our stock which has Ji?st. ^ ^t,
boon replenished. - ~ r j$
Oct 13_. '?jf^j :%3
HOLMES & CALDER-''^
M A M; F A CT mu: us, IMPORTERS AMP DBALI?US - ,\:
PAIN rs, oiks, GIiAsM
Varnishes, Brushes, Etc, \*m
No. 205 EAST BAY, / ;J
Charleston, S. O. '
W. E. HOLMES.
REFERENCES.
W. CAXDRB
Col. L. M. natch; Oon. Johnson Hagood; Wm . .'
0. Dukes A Co; Col. Charles H. Slinonton; L. W . %
Spratt, EBq; Col. J. B. E. Sloan. .-Vi ,5
Oct 13_
WM. HARRAt. Wit, FI Aim AL, Ja ?
WW. HARRAL & CO, ?
F0RMBRI.T
(UARBAL, NICHOLS A CO.)
No. 19. HAYNE STREET, . -,
Charleston, S. C. \ T
WE RESPECTFULLY CALL THE AT- (.. ;
tention of the morchnnts of Sumter and a
the adjurent oountry, to our well seleoted steele ??
of Saddlery, Saddlery Hnrdwaro, Couch and Har* ?fy
nea* Mutorials, consisting iu part of y**.?I
SADDLES, WHIPS,
BRIDLES. COLLARS, $'?J
HARNESS, OIKT HS, &
SPOKES, AXELS,
HUHS. SPRINGS," 'At
RIMS, SHAFTS, .At
ENAMELED CLOTHS. PATENT DASI* f ,
LEATHER, HAUNERS LEATHER, '
AO., AO.
oct. i3. ta :m
' Campsen Mills" Flour J
RECEIVED THE &
\st Premium, at thc So. Ca. State Fair
in Columbia. 1869.
MjinE undersigned ? ffcr t<? their country Monde
\_ and tho public in gouural a choice and pure .< *
artil lo of Flour. ,
Wo hu vc on hand mid aro grinding dally a full. 'y
supply of choice 1 ?
Family Extra &, Super Flour "H>
ALSO _ - ;
Niorthcrn and Weitem Flour at lowest murk? . S
price " ?j f ?
Corn, Oats aud Hay. .
?.Ono Bushels P imo Whlto Corn.
J ono " Oats.
.'.CU Bs " Ensti-rti and N. River flay,
JOHN CAMI'SEN A CO.,
Charleston, S. 0. ?
IV 8_?mos..
WM. G. WHILBEN & C?7, ?
niri?BTI?KS AND JOBH?RS OP.
C rOoKe:r y,
137 RZoettng-St. 5
WATCHES, JIOWELIIY ANp/- I
SILVER WA HE, k
?55 KING ST/CE/Crcor.o/JJeati/ainl ' ^
CH A ll LES TON, S. C.
Sept 8 6m
POREST HOUSE;3
100 KING STItKKT,
Charleston, S. C.
HY GEORGE JJ. FRAT?a V.
BOARDING.
Transient Board, one or two cloys, $2 00 perday . '
Transiunt Board, 3 or moro doy*. JU.50 per def ^'lij
Ergular Board - *7."0 tn $8 rf) por week '1 V?
Day ll..m d .... Stu p.-r werk ' ' ?
Having rorrntly lokrn this Ja.-/? and eAasafft '*SP
tlcii*c, n few ?loors lio'nw Mailoi ?Huit, s,ilitnliJd ^>$'
in ii .lolik'htful and convenient Wi1?ty f.-r th? Xv*
lnfim'SH community. |Ad thor. iiuhly r\'ri?vatho> '-xiA
and rtfurnlsl.Cii It-in twd. pnrtn>?nts. I cm pra.'
par? d to nrronunod <tc lionrdcis ni thr modrtahi.'jSS
prices HS stated above nn<< premlse ?tiitre satlSk .?Wi
faction, both as to ale-nir;? acroii>niodstioD and? 'iv
tablofarr. HEM KM ,?K1-. T1, K No. HW KINS
STREET.
_8o|itJ_.__J*:J( . .;
a?LL POND & I
OYSTERS.
SITPPLTKD In qnnntltle* to suit T ur h?*er#, Vi^
Otdsrs fromall p.irts-il ?hcintrrl r <<dh|'tc/^ ';
?iddrns' Tho? Mt'Cr.?dy, A^ent, I?, o. Bo)t|?^t?
Ohnrlcston, O. / V*
R?fcre?r?s.-^J^m^e^^

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