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The Sumter watchman. (Sumterville, S.C.) 1855-1881, February 23, 1870, Image 1

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VOL. XX 'WEDNESDAY MORNING?, FEBRUARY 23, 1870. NO 42*.
Tia.?* Da?a?i Kt Doa? Por?Bie?.-Vir?. _
DEVOTED TO LITERATURE. MORALITY AND GENERAL INTELLIGENCE.
B-KIIV WBDNSSDAV ll O EB TS ii
AT SUMTER. S. 0.? BY *
GILUBUT 4c FLOWERS.'
-.-r
terms.
..S3 oo
Si. -."?'..;..i. \
fbree roooths.......i?....?..
.UVBRTHBMBNTS inserted r*t#
f os ii DOLLAR AND rim own MI
?"re for the list. OXB DOLLAR for th.
!>< HI l, *nd FIFTY CUNTS for ??eb subsequent
>..,??n fer ?n > period loss lhs,n three months
''ffit?A?l?'TRIBUTES OF llBSPBCT
..I sil eommunlentlons which subserve private
j", r?it?. will hs paid lor es advertisements.
paTiUrnle
^MASSACUlsBTTS SNUBBED.
Dj: TL Hit CASTIGATED IPI THIi|
IIOVSBAND S IUI NEE IN Til8 SEN?
ATS.
It is evident enough that members
have become tired ol the impudent rule
ot Massachusetts. Hoar has been re
jected, Boutwoll has been snubbed, and
Sumner's ignorant protensions and But?
ler's blackguardism have been signally
rebuked in the Senate and House by
ill parties. Gentlemen on the Demo?
cratic side were advised some time ago
to spit in his lace, instead of begging
him for the privilege of a- five minutes'
speech, lt was unknown that our mo?
dern Captain Bobadil would stand it-as
he did, literally, at Charleston iu 1860.
True, physically speaking, the thing
itself was not done yesterday in the
House-probably because it might have
been considered "unparliamentary."
But I um Ireo to say that, so far as the
?rules" would allow, the spittle was at?
tempted, with all tho loree at tho com?
mund of Mr. Cox, tobe driven into the
invulnerable cuticle of Butler's face of
brass. Hoar the spunkey little Repre?
sentative from New York. 1 quote from
aa authorised copy ot his speech :
"Mr. Cox said (among other things)
he (Mr. Butler) had no sensibility to
bib position before the country, aud did
not know how people regarded him
His own colleagues intimated that he
was a thief and a robber, and he did not
take it up; but it had been left to him
(.Mr. Cox) to defend him ; and because
he had done MO iu a spirit of good nature,
he (Mr. Butler) had made his covert
negro minstrelsy attack upon him. Why
did ho net attack his colleagues and
make them call for a committee of iuves
tigation on his past derelictions and
past alleged robbery ? Why did he stand
here, the condemned man of this Con?
gress? Why did he reserve all his fire
for his friends, as ho did in the army,
and then, when attacked, retreat like a
bomb proof soldier and hide himself ?"
Rather plain language this-culling
thc "honorable" leader of the Radical
Grant party in the House a '-rogue'
a "thief" und a "robber"-while also
stigmatising him, a whilom "General ol
the Grand Army of thc Jumes" as not
only a coward, bu' a miserable poltroon!
This, however, is but "candle ends and
cheese parings" to what Sumner is daily
getting from members of his own party
in the Sei atc. Mr Trumbull stood up
io Iiis place, yesterday, and tor the third
time denounced the Massachusetts ego?
tist as u deliberate slanderer and liar,
and what is more to the purpose, proved
it by incomestible documentary evi
dence. Look ut Sumner's pusillanira
ous rejoinder!
Thc debate in the Senate yesterday
was important and curious in other re?
spects. I do not allude to the develop
menis as to thc power and its nbu-e of
the '.caucus," about which Mr. Thur?
man made a short speech. Everybody
known that thc country hus becu gov?
erned for tho past hali* dozen years by
a cabul outside of legitimate legislation.
A caucus governed the party, and "the
party" governed Congress, and "Con?
gress" governed the country. This has
ellalong been clear enough ; but-it was
asserted yesterday, by no less a person?
age than Mr. Sherman, Chairman of the
Finance Committee, that "the small
Democratic minority, by concentrating
their strength," "would have rendered
futile any attempt at reconstruction"
vpon the principle of negro suffrage ; or,
indeed, upon atty other. This is most
extraordinary , revelation. Who are
they that refused to "concentrate ?" I
quote his remarks upon this delicate
point as I find thom in his speech at
large, for the purpose of calling the at?
tention of those composing the "small
Democratic minority" at that day in thc
Senate to this damaging development
There must certainly be some mistake.
Yet no Senator seemed to contradict
Mr. Sherman, although several of thc
implicated members still remain iu the
Senate.
Mr. Sherman spoke of the various
bills on reconstruction that had been
introduced, and the contrariety af optn
ion among thc Republican Senators,
and that it became evident that the
?mall Democratic minority, by conccn
Bating their strength with one or the
other clique into which thc Republican
party was then divided, would havo ron
tiered futile any attempt at reconstruc?
tion. Then ho (Mr. S.) moved the
appointment of a committee of seven
to take all these bills into consideration,
to as tu mature some measure whicn
would command thc approbation of all
?that committee the late Senator from
Main (Mr Fresseden) hud made a forci?
ble argument against incorporating this
?offrago clause, but solely because it
was unnecessary. There was no dif?
ference of opinion as to the propriety of |
u Mr. Hcvordy Johnson, tho Demo
eratic Senator from Maryland, had him
'eli brought forw ard, two days before
.ne Cituous, tho proposition to incorpo?
rate colored auftrage.- Wash. Cor. Bal?
timore Cnn tte.
TIIIIEB < WEERING SIGNS.
The Washington correspondent of th.,
oaltuooro Gazette sees three signs pro?
mising a better future: First : Senator !
Stewart s bill for the removal of disahil
?les would have been carried but for thc
inopportune objection of a Democratic
pember. Second : Mr. Marshall's rcso
Wiori against protective tariffs was ta
Med by only twelve majority, the West
"id South voting with unusual uuant
?% on this occssion Third : A grow?
ls jjitpoaitioo to recognize tho claims
.?.11 parties who claim j>e%ts in Coo
Jf*.""der the broad scsi of tho States,
?nether democratic or not.
THB BBP?BUOA?! PA BTV IN CON.
GK tri?*--SIGNS OP A BBBAK-UP
WHAT THBNf
There are signs of coming' discorda
fend divisions among the Republicans in
Congress. There is a division of the
party on the tariff question, which, with
a few more votes, will give the Home
to the advocates of a strictly revenue
policy of taxing imports. Trouble is
foreshadowed io the camp betweon tho I
Eist and the West on thc late legal
tender decision of the Supreme Court,
and upon the money question in all its
phases, while quite as suggestive of par?
ty demoralization as any thing else is
tho'confliot for the position ol' the recog?
nized leader of the (louse, a position
which in a party view, is somewhat
antilogous to that of the prime Minister
of England, especially when held by a
man of the sagacious, tonnoious, reso?
lute and decisive character of the late
?.Old Thad Sto^eus."
A grand, simplo, comprehensive and
popular idea, however, is necessary to
tho success of thc party in power. What,
shall it be ? We hear the cry of''Specie
payments !" but there ure so many the?
ories upon this idea that it involves both
parties in confusion. "Retrenchment and
reform !" General Jackson was first elect
ed upon this idea against tho awful
extravagances involved in the cxpendi
tures amounting to thirteen millions a
year, all told. But this is an old hob
by, and General Giant is doing as well
with it as could be expected. Upon this
money question there is no simple aud
comprehensive idea upon which the
Republicans can hold togothcraud hold
the field. We know that taxes must bc
lightened and equalized ; that thc debt
must be settled ; that tho national cur
renoy must be brought to thc specie
standard ; that the jobbers and schem?
ers, and speculators and gambling rings
resulting from the war, whereby thou?
sands have been enriched and hundreds
of thousands have been impoverished,
have had their high carnival of revelry
and spoils, and wc feel that the day for
honest work and ligitimate business is
at hand ; but thc transition must still be
subject us much to circumstances as tu
the leading ideas of grasping politi?
cians.
Tho Republican party then cannot do
mach on the money question, and it
must look to something else for a new
leading idea. General Grunt might give
them the winning war cry on the Alu?
burna olui'.ns, or on thc Oubun question,
or on the Mexican question ; but Gon
eral Grant seems to have settled down to
the inglorious policy of masterly inac?
tivity, the policy of taking thiugs qui?
etly und trusting to luck. He seems to
forget that, though elected for his first
term on his great and gloriuus achieve?
ments as a soldier, he will be judged as
u candidate for a second term upon his
merits and achievements us a statesman.
ile seems to depend upon his party,
while his party depend upon him to
clear thc way for thc succession, aud this
is the road to defeat. Indeed, it ap?
pears to us that the only alternativo to
thc administration and the party behind
to avoid discords, and divisions und,
defeat is thc popular idea of annexation,
in the settlement ul the Alabama claims,
the Cubun or thc Mexican question.
On the idea of thc annexation of Texas
a comparatively obscure politician de?
feated the great statesman of Kentucky,
and personally thc most popular mun of
that day. So now even the popularity
nf General Grant will not save him and
has party if they fail to take a new de?
parture.
I ho American people ure like tho
obi Romans when Rome was extending
her boundaries in view of her manifest
destiny as mistress of tho world-they
believe their government equal to any
extent of territorial expansion. We say
then, that "the almighty nigger," with
whom in slavery the old Southern Dem
ocrutic party flourished, collapsed and
died, aud with whom, in thc minio of
liberty aud equal rights, the Republican
party has fullfilled its mission, is an
ensign which must now give way to some
new idea, in order to hold this Rcpub*
ican party together, or in order to build
around thc administration the ruling
party of the future. This necessity conics
more distinctly in relief in view of the
probability that in thc elections of next
fall for Congress tho opposition in the
Southern States, in a general compact
with the blacks, will regain thc South?
ern balance of power. Under the pres
ent condition and tendencies of things
tho administration is drifting with
Congress to demoralization, failure and
defeat.-JV. Y IlrraM.
"fllAirirtli*?? IliiVKLS,
It must have been a goodly sight to
sec the luminous Sumner seated in thc
gallery of thc Senate chamber talking to
"Old Aunt Dinah" Revels. To do it
was a part of the character he has been
playing so many years, and,- of course,
such an opportunty of playing this
strongest of cards was not to be lost
Paney the rotund, oily Charles, in his
new fashioned brass buttoned coat and
Brecher tit, sitting side by side willi au
elderly old, "Mammy" whose toilette
probably consisted of a yellow and white
linsey woolsey . grown with wooden
buttons in the back, cut skimp in thc
skirt, with her head tied up in a red,
white aiidiblue bandana* 'hundkerehierf,"
a pair of dollar brogans, and copperas
dyed yarn socks on her dainty feet, her
knitting in hand, n id a well worn cob
pipe solacing her. Imagino an old
darkey, fresh fro n "the quarter" nnd
tho control of an army of little negroes,
dressed in their skins, suddenly invested
with nil the honors und rank of a Sena?
tor's wife, and then believe, if you cnn,
that cant could make oven Sumner make
inch an exhibition of himself as he has
by being seen with her. It is about
eqoal to dressing up a gorilla and intro?
ducing her at the court of St. James.
Sumner, though, must play his part. It
ploaaea his people.-Courier Journal 1
i?txsctllantom.
TUE BEAUTIES OF TUE CREATION,
? T P. B. L.
The more attentively wo consider the
face ot nature, the moro deeply wo pry
iuto its mysteries, and make ourselves
acquainted with its secrets, the more do
we acknowledge the wisdom of the Cre?
ator, the more do we feel that "the hea?
vens declare the glory of God, and the
firmament showeth his handy work."
Every advance in science, every now
discovery tn the struoture and organ?
ization of the bodies that surroui.d us,
does but increase our admiiation, and
confirm our assurance that '-tho hand
that mado them is divine."
Tho geologist investigates the crust
of the earth. He ovsorves the nature of
its strata,-tho position, superiorly of
such as aro porous utj I permeable deep
cr down, thoso that arc tenacious and
resisting. He recognizes in this arrange
mont the source of "tho rivers that run
among thc hills " Ho obsen that had
this order been reversed, thc rain which
falls from heaven would havo deluged
the surface of tho cart li without pene?
trating its bosom, and would in wild de?
vastating torrents have swept from its
face those fruits and plants that tt now
so beneficently nourishes and evolves.
The chemist analyzes what were for?
merly looked on as elementary substan?
ces. In the air he finds two gases, ono
of which is by itself fatal to animal life,
while au undue proportion of the other
would change the air we breathe into a
corrosive poison ; yet they are mixed in
such proportions as to form thc com?
pound most suited to support that curious
vital phenomenon,respiration. And whe?
ther this compound be examined in the
depths of thc lowest mines or at tho
greatest heights to which men have as?
cended, the proportions of this combi?
nation are found to bo unvaried. Ho
examines the '.-artli, he considers their
uso for the growtlrand support of plutus,
and he asks for himself what should
they consist of for this purpose. Plants
ho finds tn contain oxygen, hydrogen,
carbon and salts. The two former eau bc
derived from thc air that surrounds the
water which moistens them : for the
latter they arc dependant on the soil in
which they aro rooted. However various
the conipositon of this soil, it consists
essentially ol' two parts. One is a certain
quantity of earthly mutters, such ns clay
lune, and magnesia; the other is formed
from thc remains of animal and vege*
table substances, which, wilt ti mixed
with the former, constitute common
mould The rain then percolating
t'irouuh this mould dissolves the soluble
salts with wliieh it conics in contact,
together willi tho gaseous, extractive,
and other matters formed by the decom?
position of animal and vegetable re?
mains. Saturated with these nutritious
matters it is presented to the roots, by
them it is readily absorbed and sent as
sap to the leaves, there, by exposure to
air, to undergo the final process ol'
assimilation.
The botanist here steps in and adds
his nile to that beautifully continuous
train of evidence, which like thc golden
chain of tbe poet, binds together heaven
and earth. Ho observes tho beautiful
adaptation of the plant to the soil in
which it is intended to grow. The
stately red tuangrovo springs in a wet
and boggy soil which could scarcely sup?
port it erect against tho first passing
breeze Hut how wisely is this cared for !
It arises from several roots, each root
rising some feet above the earth before
it unit s with its fellows to form thc
tiunk ; further, slender shoots about
titree inches in circumference, quite
bare, and jointed, grow from thc trunk
and branches in great abundance, then
descend into thc earth, take root, and
thus afford support to the parent stem.
The cocoa, which is a largo tree of the
shores of the torrid zone, grows in pure
sand, which it interlaces with such a
prodigious quantity of fibres, as to form
around it a solid mass It is on this
basis that it withstands thc most furious
tempests in the midst of a moving
soil.
, Tho constant supply of moisture is
necessary to thc life of tho plant; and
when the thirsty soil fails to impart this
through i lie root, how beautiful is the
provision that enables thc leaves to ab?
sorb tho aqueous vapor from tho atmos?
phere, and by thc faculty they possess of
radiating heat, so to reduce their
temperature during the night as to
cause the deposition on themselves of
'.tho gent?o dew from heaven."
Heat is essential for evolving and ma
turing thc delicate organs ou which thc
reproduction ol the plant depends. Thc
organs ure situated in the centre of tho
blossom, which, gathering the rays, re?
flects them in on its tender charge,-an
effect very much increased by ?ts general
incurved form Hut what cohirs are
most favorable to the reflection ol heat?
Science has shown that light colors
.(?fleet, ubi lo dark absorb. Hut although
this fact was so long undiscovered by j
science, how ?kiIf'u 1 ly has il been taken >
udvantage of by Almighty Wisdom ! j
.Consider the lilies of thc field." Is ;
not the dazzling whiteness of tho snow
drop, thc delicate tint of tho hyacinth,
the narcissus, ami tho carly anemone
intended to reflect tho chill rays of a j
wintry sun, and to inereasu to the utm -st i
thc scanty heat it affords? Is not this!
intention assisted by their general low? I
lying position, which exposes them to1
all the heat the earth radiates'/ while
t' 3 deep colors and lofty stems of the j
summer ond autumnal flowers clearly
evince that such contrivance was hero
needless, at.d was lb ere foro omitted.
With equal care are they guarded
against tho effects of a too scorching
beat; und whilo wit h us they aro found
in thc meadows, cnnmeling^io soil, be?
tween the tropios they at o raised aloft
and made the ornaments of tho forent,
wbioh 6y ita foliage shelters them from
the blase of the mid-day sar., while, by
their situation, they are sufficiently re?
moved from the parched and burning
earth.
How beneficent was it of the Almighty
to ordain that corn, so necessary to the
support of man, should grow, not on
bulky vegetables, requiring much space
and length of time for reproduction, but
on small, slender plants, which spring
up almost as soon as the seed is put into
the ground. In the former caso the
destruction of a crop would have been
followed by famine for many years; in
the latter, there is nothing more than
inconvenience for a few months.
But, beyond all measure, the roofet in?
teresting as referring to tho curious and
intricate of the worka of the Almighty,
aro the discoveries of the anatomist and
naturalist Every step he makes in the
acquaintance with nature, every now
tuet that he discovers, opens to him suoh
a boundless exhibition of wisdom, good?
ness, and mercy, t hut,
"Transported with the view, he's lost
In woader, Iq/o, and prnUo."
Me observes the countless tribes of fishes
"that have their way in the deep, and
occupy themselves in tho great waters."
How admirably is their shape adapted
to cleaving their way through tho watery
element ; how powerful the muscles of
the tail, by which chiefly they ure pro?
pelled ; how ingenious the situation and
construction of the air-bladder, by which
they are enabled to rise or sink at plea?
sure ; but, above all, how beautiful is
the mechanism of their respiration !
That which to animals wi1 h lungs would
be painful and laborious, is, by the sub?
stitution of gills, rendered easy, and
free (rom trouble. The fish fills its mouth
with water, and, instead of swallowing,
suffers it to pass through its gills. To
each branch ot* th^ gills is distributed a
vein und artery, by means of which the
blood is exposed to the vivifying princi?
ple contained in the water, or in the uir
which is held dissolved in the wuter;
and thus the same chango is produced
us in us by thc passugo of the blood
through the lungs,-it is arterialized
and rendered fit lor the nutriment cf thc
body.
In birds the great object, ?cents to
have bean lightness, to e*.<ible them' to
soar through tho spac'.ous fields of uir,
the element it was in randed they should
occupy. For this purpose their bones
are hollow, and tilled with air; their
lungs ure continuous, with a number ol'
air sues, which ruu down into the abdo
men, occupying much space with little
weight, while at the panic time thoy
assist in thc lupid aeration ol' the bluod
so necessary to animals of such quickness
nf motion and rapidity of impulse.
Their wings ure widely extended, itt
comparison with thc S?Z? of their bodies,
by which means they are enabled to
condense a considerable body of air,
which, by ?ts elasticity, assists them in
their flight. To cuable them to maintain
their position in thc air, it is necessary
that thc centre of gravity should lie be?
neath the lino of their wiugs, else they
would tumble over in their flight. To
attain this object, one of the large mus?
los for elevating thc wing is actually
placed willi thc depressors of thc wing
on the front of thc breast, und made to
turn, ns it were, over a pulley, to gain
thc back of thc pinion, and euableit to
exert its proper action. Thc mcuns by
which a bird, while sleeping, mainta ns
its hold on the branch, is equally ad?
mirable. Tho tendon running from the
muscle, which is situated high up on
the thigh, to the extremities of the
talons, runs behind thc joint, or elbow,
of the leg- As tho bird sits down this
joint is bent, and the tendon pnssing
over it is, of course, strained ; from which
results, raovhuuioully, tho clo tu e of the
talons round tho object on which they
ure placed, und thus, without any mus?
cular exertion, thc hold is kept while
thc bird sleeps.
And now, as we approach man and
thc higher order of animals, facts crowd
on us in such countless abundance, in
such rich profusion, that we kuow not
how to reject, or which to select. They
arc too important to bo curtailed, too
numerous to be inserted at the end of
an article. But, before we part, let us
glance with our mind's oyo over tho few,
but interesting, facts wo have collected.
Let us observe their exquisite ingenuity,
their beautiful adaptation and suitability
to circumstances. And shall we then
attribute them to a blind chance, on
indiscriminating destiny ? No; wo shall
not so fur insult our reason. Voiceless,
though they bc, they declare, in lan
piuage not to be misunderstood, thc
existence of an ever wiso und ovor
bottuteous Creator, "God ovcrull blessed
forever."
A ?OOD OM!,
In an article upon the probable
scarcity nf ire during tho next Rummel
tho Hartford Post tells tho following
story :
"A good many years ago, when ico ir
sumner was a rarity in cities and au un
heard of thing in tho country, a goori
deacon of a rural church was chargct
willi having got decidcly fuddled ont
4th of July in New York. Ho wai
arraigned for his misconduct. Will
tears in his eyes he confessed his fault
but pleaded in palliation t hat it was t
prodigious hot day, and tho lemons ant
ico in thc punch did look so cool nm
inviting that bc couldn't resist th
temptation, und ho supposed ho di<
actually drink to intoxication. A low
browed brother on a back seat listone
atlcniively but incredulously to th
defence, and nt its conclusion arose. '
huint no objection,' said he, 'to a mun1
getting drunk if he own? up ?o it^ind i
sorry for it. That's a thing a mau'
liable to, and p'raps sometimes he can
help it; but when the doaoon comes i
hero and undertakes to excuse himsel
in any suoh way as that-talking aboi
seeing ?oe in July-I go for jerkin' hil
out for lylo7"
ft ;. ; , ,. . ' ?v ' .-\
Established' 1834.
G. KL Reese.
& Brothers.
207 & 209 W. Pratt Street
BALTIMORE, M. D.
WHIMS ILE AND
FAMILY GROCERS
WE RESPECTFULLY INFORM THE I
Citiiens of Sumter and ila vicinity, that]
we are prepared to furnish
Every Article in our Line,
(Except Spirituous Liquors )
At as Low Raies as any House in\
' the United States.
Our long experience and unsurpassed facilillo*
for procuring goods upon tho most favorable
torras, enable us to guarantee satisfaction te
every purchaser. We pay particular intention to
T EH A.&9
and can nt any time, oui of our extensive stock,
furnish the finest, as woll as nil other grudes that
come to this country. Purchasers may rely upon |
having their goods oarofully paoked, and pr mpU
ly forwarded.
Sept 22_13m
COIT'S
MILITARY AND COMMERCIAL
A cad erny,
MA YES VILLE, S. C.
IN iHIS INSTITUTION DOYSnud YOUNO
MEN will bo thoroughly titted for COLLEGE
. r BUSINESS.
In addition to Ancient and Modern Languages,
the Suiencos and ordinnry English Branches,
peseial instruction will ba given lu PENMAN
SHIP, BOOR KEEPING. Business Forms and
Accounts, und in Vocal Music
The Principal refers with prido and gratifica?
tion to his former pupils, who havo taken high
positions in Collcgoor Business.
THE FI I;ST SESSION begins October 1st,
and doses February 15th.
THE SECOND SESSION begins February 18th,
and close? Juno .?tuh.
TERMS : $:00 per Session for Board and
Tuition, invariably in advance
French, Oermnn and Drawing extra.
For Circulars address
CAPT. WILLIAM II. COtT.
Muyesville, S. C.
REFEREES :
Rev. J. Leighton Wilson, D. D., Dr. J. A.
Mayes, Muyesville, Sn. Ca.; Gen. W. L. T.
Prince, Chornw, S. C. ; Rev J. B. Muck. Charles?
ton, S. C. ; Hov. G. W. Potrie, D. D., M inimum
cry, Ala.; Messrs. Blunding & KUhurdaon.
Sumter. S. C.
Jun 26 tTinly.
St. Joseph's Academy.
CONDUCTED BY Til K
Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy,
SUMTER, S. 0.
THE Collegiate Exercises of this
_First Clans Institute, will heresuniod
ion tho 1st of September. A prompt
attendance is rcquestod in order to
facilitate the progress and arrango
munt of thu classes. The now buildings nre
spacious and elugnntly finished, furnishing ac?
commodations for one hundred boarder*. Tho
extensivo grounds nnd piazzas aro ample for open
air exercise, and young Indies are thoroughly
instructed in English Mathematic*, Fronch, Ita
lian, Music, lira wing. Painting, Ac, Ac. Locution
healthy, air puro, wa er good, nnd terms reason
able For particulars apply to the Superioress of
St. Joseph's Academy, Sumter, or to tho Supo?
rioress of tho Sisters of Mercy, Charleston, who
will endeavor to meet the pressuro of tho times.
Nov. 10_
MUSIC LESSONS.
Vocal and Instrumental.
The undersigned having taken his residence at
Sumter, will give lessons in Sluging and on the
PIANO nnd VIOLIN. Ile will likewise give in
stnicii'ius in FRENCH, GERMAN nnd ARITH
MUTIC.
TUNING OF PIANOS ATTENDED TO.
For further particulars, apply to him nt his
residence in Harvin Street.
II. C- M. KOPFF
F.b 2-tf
WOFFORD COLLEGE.
SPAIITANDVIIG C. II.,
SO. CA.
FACULTY:
REV. A. M. SIIIPP, I). D.. President, nn
Professor Mental and Moral Sei nen.
DAVID DUNCAN, A. M.. Professor Ancient
Lnngunges and Literature.
REV. WHITEFOORD SMITH, D. D., Professor
English Literature.
WARREN DU PRE, A. M., Professor Natural
Science.
JAS. H. CARLISLE, A. M., Professor Mathe?
matics.
REV. A. H. LESTER, A. M., Professor History
and Biblical Literature.
Tho Preparatory Schcol, under Ibo Immediate
supervision nf tho Faculty, Jim. W. Sill PP.
A. H., Principal.
Divinity School -Rev. A. M. Shipp, I>. D.
Rev. Whitefoord Smith, D. D. ; Rev. A. II
Lester, A. M.
Tho first Session of the Sixteenth Collegiate
Vonr begins on the first Monthly in October,
IStVJ. tho second Session begins un tho first Mon?
day in da n o a ry, 1870.
Tho conreo of studies and tho standard of
schohrrshlp romain unchnnged, but the Faculty
now admit irregular students or those who wish
to pursue particular studies only.
The School* also open nt the sanio timo.
Tuition pur rear, in College Classes, IneludiOf
contingent fee, $54 in Specie or its equivalent ii
Currency.
Tullian pcryeir, in Preparatory Pohool, inclue
ing contingent fun, $11 in currency.
Bills payable -ne half in advance. Board, pc
Month, from $10 io $15 in currency.
For fur tin r particulars address
A. M. SHIl'P, Proeldont.
Msy IO _-ly
COMFORT AND CURE FOR THU RUP
TUBED-Sent port paid on rureipt of 10
els. Address Dr. E. B FOOTE (Author of Med?
ics! Coo.mon Sense.) No. 120 Lexington Avenue,
New York. _
AWAY WITH SPECTACLES. Old eyre
made new, easil*, without doctor or med!
cinea. 8cnt post paid on receipt nf 10 oonts.
Address Dr. E. B. FOOTE, 120 lexington Aven?
ue, New York.__
TTINTTT? Tila. JHlLDIititTS ?*nTfr.-e on
pl rceolpt of one lotter stamp. * Address Dr.
K B. PO OTB, 120 Lexington Avenue, N. Y.
Febll . .
?V . . : - - . v. v ??. .v .
LORICCARD'S
Steamship Line.
The Magnificent New Iron Ste'msblps
Volunteer, : : capt. JONES,
Regulator,
Capt.: PENNINGTON
Fanita, : : : Capt. TRUMAN,
Now form a SEMI-WEEKLY LINE between
NEW YORK and WILMINGTON.
Connecting; ?Rh tho W. A M., W. A W. and
the W. C A R. lt. Railroads.
Freight consigned to the lt. R. Agent will go
f rward promptly, without delay.
This Line brings goods from New York at the
following rates.
Flonr IO Coot* per Barrel,
Pork IO Ceuta per Barrel.
Mol nose* IO Cents per Barrel?
Sugar IO Causa per
Measurement 'gooda 2 couts per foot; Woigbt ]
goods 10 cents per 100 lbs.
For Freight apply to
BARRY JJROTIIERS, Agents,
Peel-_
BALTIMORE AND WILMINGTON
Weekly Steamship Line,
r isi^&sW
OOnPOSED OP
The First Claas Steamships
Lucille,
(W. 8. HARRINGTON, Commander.)
-Tames A. Crary
(ll. L. HALL, Commander.)
One of tho nbovo Steamships will leave BALTI?
MORE and WILMINGTON every
SATURDAY,
forming a Rcgulnr
WEE KL Y L IN E.
and the only authorized through oonneotion with
Wilmington A Manchester Railroad.
COTTON anl other Produco consigned to our
core will bo shipped to BALTIMORE by first j
steamer,
FREE OF COMMISSION.
Having rover.nl Wharves in WILMINGTON
and RA I,TIMORE, goods can be received at oil
times and ho properly protected.
A. B. SH EPPERSON & CC. Ag'ts,
Nos. ll and 12 North Water Street,
Oct 20 Wilmington, N. O.
nes
500
BARRELS FLOUR-all grades.
4000 SACKS SALT.
50 SACKS RIO COFFEE.
30 JAVA COFFEE, (Cboioo.)
10 II ill) s. SUGAR.
50 URLS. COFFEE SUGAR.
300 " .MOLASSES'.
10 HUBS.
20 BACON SIDES A SHOULDERS.
35 ? DRY SALTED BACON.
100 COILS ROPE.
SH TONS BEARDS COTTON TI KS.
100 ROLLS FLAX A GUNNY BAGGING.
For sale ut Lowest Figures, by
A. B. SHEPPERSON A CO.
Wilmington, N. C.
Pol 20_
Provisions.
30 II11DS. SMOKED SIDES
AND SHOULDERS.
15 II H DS DRY S ALT KD SIDES
AND SHOULDERS.
For salo low by
A. B. SHEPPERSON A CO.,
No. 11 und 12 North Water Street,
Oct. 20 Wilmington, N. C.
Sugar and Molasses.
20 HMDS DEM AHA KA SUGAR.
YO nuns, PORTO RICO SUGAR.
50 BI ?LS COFFEE SUGAR.
100 Bli LS. MOLASSES.
20 II ?IDS. MOLASSES.
For salo btw, by
A. IL SHEPPERSON & CO.
Wilmington, N. C.
Oct 20_
?alt! SaltT!
2f)00S\CKS AMERICAN SALT.
1500 SACKS LIVERPOOL SALT.
For salo-froiu Wharf at Lowost Figures.
By A. B. SHEPPERSON A CO.
Wilmington, N. C.
Oct ?0._
GEO. Z. FRENCH.
Commission Merchant
REAL ESTATE AGENT,
WILMINGTON, Ne C.
WILL PUBLISH, August 1st, for Free
Distribution, a Cataloguent1 LANDS FOR
SALE IN NORTH AND SOUTH CAROLINA.
Semi in it description mid price of lands.
& fe- No charge nu Ivs? ii salo is olfucied
I. H. ALEXANDER,
DSNTiST,
BROAD STi;EUT, CAMDEN, S. C.
Evory description of w^.rk executed with
promptness, mu? in thc most approved and'dura
Ido stylo. Sets of Teeth furnished at very mod
erato rote?.
lt BF KRRNCT53:
Gen. J. Ii. Kerina*, Camdon, 8. C.
T. Burnell, M. 1?.. " ?.
L. li. 1?>IIS, " ?'
J. .M. Duvis, Esq., " ?
Jan 5 8m
For Sale.
rp ll B H. uso and Lot, in the Town of Sumter,
JL owned und held hy Sumter Circuit, as a
Pnrsnungc. The honse ls eoiufortablo, with ant.
pie lot for garden, Ac, aod necessary ont build
ings.
For term?, Ae., apply to
A. A GIELERT.
Jan l*-,tf .
UL
Old Carolina Bitters.
A Delightful Tonic.
WK TAKE GREAT PLEASURE IN OF
FERINU TUB
OL.D CAROLINA HITTERS
to the publie. Thej are compounded M Uh great
care, and contain soioe of tho best Tonics in thc
Pbarmncopla. As evidence of tho superiority ol
our HITTERS over all Others, wo have eui tin?
ea tes from many of the leading physicians in our
State, who have prescribed them in their prac?
tice.
The Old Carolina Bitters
Will be found invaluable for
WANT OF APPETITE,* O EN ERA Ii DEDIL
ITY. CHILLS ANi) SEVER' AND DYS?
PEPSIA, j '
We do not offer opr RITTERS as a eure for all
diseases, but us an Aromatic Tonie, they have no
equal.
For sale by Draggif^and Grocors everywhere.
Principal Deputy
Goodrich, wineman & Co.,
- i Importers of
CHOICE DRUGS AND CHEMICALS,
Fob 16-ly _Charleston, S. C._
PHOTO? ii A Bv?i??,
AT REDUCED PRICES.
JESSE II? BOIilsES'
FINE ART GALLERY, NORTH-EAST CORNER
Kins ?nd. ff?a?kct, Streets*,
CHARLESTON, S. v..
PROCEL.AIN LIKENESSES
LIFii-SIZE PORTRAITS,
In Oil, Water, anti Pastel Colors,
Taken in tho
HIGHEST PBICPBCriON OP ART.
1? II O T O G It A P II S
tOF ALL KIXDS AXD SIZES.
Feb Dj-6m _
A. It. STILLMAN,
(Formerly of Fogariles A Stillman,)
-DEALER IN
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC
Dry Goods, Hosiery,
FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS &c.
281 Kiny Street, West Side,
FOUBTII nOOR UK LOW WKSTWOnTH ST UK KT,
Opposite the Ililbors House,
CHARLESTON, S. C
Terms Cash or City Acceptance.
Feb 16-Sra_
HENRY BISCHOFF & CO
H HOLES A LE GROCERS
AND DEALERS IN
Wines, liquors, Segars,
TOBACCO, &G\
197 EAST BAY,
Charleston, S." G.
H. BISCHOFF, C. WU LR ERN, J. II. PIEPER
SepUJ_ _ 6m_
ANDREW McC?BB, Jr.,
Commission Aie reliant,
AND DEALER IN
LIME, CEMENT*
PLASTER PARIS,
And other Building Material.
-ALSO
LAND PLASTER AND HAY.
217 East Hay,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
Popt s-6ml Opposite Now Cost rm linus?
JAS. HATtRA?i & CO
COTTON
AND UEN'ERAL
COMMIS SI O .V MICH CHANTS
23 WHITEHALL STREET,
(Lower ond of Broadway.)
. NEW YORK.
Liberal advances made upon Rillr Lading.
Nov St C n.is.
B. JOHNSON & CO.
UMBRELLA MANUFACTURER^
301 KINO- STREET,
Charleston, S, C
4 PULL nssortmonl nf UMBRELLAS AND
iV PARASOLS, always on hand, letter and
cheaper limn any Imported)
Wholesale ? Itetni?.
"AL?0
A large assortment of WALKING CANES
We pay especial attention to tho manulaclui
BUGGY UMBRELLAS,
i
which wo can furnish ns low ns nnv house North t
and of a better tinalit> for thc PRICE.
_0ct 13. . Oin. I
IvA V A LEN TI X A
SEGAR FACTORY,
No. 118 EAST HAY STREET,
HAVE FOR SALK th? choicest burnda or i
Pure Havanna KEGARS. Also, good do
j rues ile Segar*, nt low prices.
ALFRED A. RA RR OT. Agent.
Soft 8-6? m Charlaste*., 8. C.
The Sumter
IN TUB -
Highest Style ofv
?PHiD^?X I
John F. Taylor &'>\MSM
M X CKSSOUS TO ?A <i> .un.N <? ?WttlflB
Engineers, Boiler-Makcvsv^^^H
Nos.4, U, 8, 10 & 12 rJti'roiiAR'(^^H|
(NICAu Tm?: mw r.ooKftyt?B
CII.WU,KSTOX, S;>.
Steam Engines anil K^Ue^S?
MAIUNK, STATIONARY 4 i'0'4T^?>t?^^
Rico Trcsliers, und Mills ''^??S
every description. .
Shafting Pullies and Gcar??v^P|
Iron Fronts for I - ii i 1 cl ip g^i'^^S
Castings of every kind }?
in Iron or Brass. - ,
Wc guarantee to furnish ?ng?n^gSS
and Boilers ofj\s good qua!? '^.fS
ity and power, and at 'Vv?.^ffl
as low rates as can .
be had in ' . S
New York, Baltimore or Fhila*ra|
dclphia. . '?."??|?
AGENTS VOR '"-$$?1
JUDSON'S -CKI.r.liUA'J Ki) ' GOT^?l
KKNOIt AND STOP VA MT 14, '?f$
which aro put on all of our ]3nj*lnoa?.%V$
Feb JO-Stn_2_ "
WO NE Y SAVED i IS MONEY MADE^?
CHEAP Ar\D FASHIONABLE 6H0? H0USfe.\ ' y<
D. O'NE IL. Ls ?? SONS, yw?!
Nu. 375 KINO STIIRUT,
(IIKTWKKN UKOUOK AS1> CALHOUN L-TKKJSJ}''
CHARLESTON, S. C. ?
Wholesale and Keir.il /; M
DEALBUS IN 3
*?S??73r~4 T I! K J. A T K S T ? ,
fc/W*t V atylca amt best quail* '. .'<#
?vuSV&vJ Dos ff Hoots, Short,. Vf!!
-^^'?"??-.U Trunk.., Travellng^^
J&-'i^'i*''-M*\ Valises, S at o li? "
/#?^^.^.<{'o, Ac. i j
11,0 lN"r:h ^)
ami foi warding mock to us hy cvory Sicamor, wo
can nfsuro our fricntle ami bujera Ronorully that
wc will giro perfect satisfaction. It would bofto .
?ho Interest of Country nm! City buyer? lo glv* "3jj
us u oall and oxninine our ?tuck which hat just ; \>
been replenished. S3
Oct 13 ?in ?
HOLMES &
.MAM l AcruiiKiiR, Iut'OIiTKUK AS
- IN
PAX'S ?$;QiW, miASSg ?j
Varnishes, Brushes, Etc, ; ;
No. 205 EAST BAY,
Charleston,. S"C. T...;':
W. E. IIUMIRH. \Y. C/i.nr.n '
UEFERBXCKS. '
Col. L. M Hutch:-Hen. Johnson Uagooili'wTiW . ?;
O. Pukes A C; Col. Charles ll. Sitiioutonj L.' IV? .
Spratt. Ksnj Col. J, 13. E. Sloan.
_Ort Di _.. _ Om
P. P."TOALJ3J j
Charleston, S. C., Mur.oltii-im. r o! -.
Doors, Saginos, ?3??n?s?|p
'?'Xi
~" * ' *"''* ;
nAVINO tho f.-irjr-vt ard im st po^p!iJaV$S
Kiu't'tr.v in tho Southern S ri tvs.-f? . i <..;/.
lng ultra}* on limul n largo nod u.??*i coonil, ia's ja
<t-o-k nf DOORS, SASHES, lil.'NOS* St?h \?1
Om.rs, Stor.i Doors. Shutters, M- ir-r.r.g?. Ac., ?. i*
I mu <. untiled to .-.ell low und ut miiiivfiieliireriv' "\
trieos. .
,N. lt.-Sirlet attention pail to shipping in
^niid or i'ir. . '
July 21 _ _ t3a
II A II I) W A it E. :
SAI????2L H. KL*,??mih
JMPOUTKK AND DjJA 'lil \>
. I
- ? ?
TT AV. T? WA EE, CETLKMY. <.'V . IMA, f
li. rV I?. M in kits, I'ov.'.ijr. .-!?..?. . , . .. ?.
I iges, A.v-.'S, l.'otton C;i i .1. ? .i*.*. iii. S'.- f r.neV, . vf?)
I'.iitt.ui I.? Se,(Jiii.iM. n.... ,. U-.rU*. i;>-ilt
og no i Wnn ci iii. siiM.i ? /.?.i ,\}::i*. i;ii;'iieh . "'
.Iv.ois. I't.fs ami Spiter., I " -. > I . I .>? ll.ki own re, - }
;?|.ifk-iiiiilis. C.trpoi 1er.? ur. ? '!'..:.io\: 'fools. . .
Ag'eu' variety Tin nod tV ?. !. n-Wuro, SeluO'*
1'wiuus. < i. 11 '. 11 ir St ine*. A ln^f i'l.rk ni' fingi? ?
.u l ll oi'.i.ii U.ttrel tl'li.s. nix um iiiij.iu t:iiinD' of '
.dviitil .Mi.lit'W. -
A:.mi tor iii? l>od;,s C. '.. '.?- ile '. Pl wt aqJ .
.to. I .tt M tlol.-i.il-; wi Ile;, tl. '
SUI KiNti Sf , ei.ii. ..I ?U (,.!H ?I'S,
Un. la. Jiui
FORE ST H 0 IT SB? \
PJO KINO ?TKKri'?,
12 V Ul?Olt&V. L- I'llAT'CcM
BOARDING ?
Prarfle-tt M"?rd. eon ur twt? d.i v*. f>0 pcrtlay,*):.^
i'm ii - t.-ii t Do.?til. t:r more ! i y-. s U>?> per tlajr
ilio.ula. ?ii.I - i'T.i';' io i-'.oi? ?tr w*vl??'".'?
:) i\ Jt : r l - - - - .. ''> |U-r We. U ' '
Hu vii:.* itec.t'y I .tit.-ti llii.t '-ree m.'! pIi-HM'lii
M.ll-e, II ?(itv ii., irs lie ow Mi? ri . : f reit, t jill il. il
l;l n deli ?I-1 fill itiol eoi.\rm I .r-tlt-y for th? \^
'.Ul-': nv"' ililli noi.'.'y, :n '1 ll.!.!)' I .-'ii v r. ; >'y
and ixfa/iilsiictl n m "'I ... ; ifrn.; -'s I N?.ip ??BS
|MI .1 lu neeeiiiiiioil ile De. I .!. ; ? ll I I 'io ?m> .\j?* ^
priors ns st ilfl .iii .ve, MM t \ i..i'.l--. "Vulin*'WiUj
ioctl n, b it'i at- t i sJoepi--T. '<? .m*t??l'i??op ;jff?*'\T'?.
"Udo lar.- H Eil BM i! !i' '-: r -M KfN^)-^
rfu -? ' ' XaU

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