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The Sumter watchman. (Sumterville, S.C.) 1855-1881, March 16, 1870, Image 1

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VOL. XX WEDNESDAY MORNING, MARCH 16, 1870 ~ _NO 45.
DEVOTRn TO LITERATURE. IUORALITF AND GENERAL INTELLIGENCE.
The Sumter Watchman
(ESTAD LIBBED IS ISM.) .
x . rmuuu
BVKHT WBDNE?DAT MOB ff IN ? ?
AT SUMTER, 8. O. ? BY
GILBERT Si FLOWERS.)
Terms.
oo.y..v......M.??; j;
gu mumu*... J ?J
Three mouthe. * v
ADVBRTISBMBNTS ineerud .? ?h?
,f OMB DOLLAR AND ?iTf?5N,T8 f.or
Satre for the Int, ONB DOLLAR ?or the
,Mon.l, aod FIPTY CBNT8 for ?nobi .ubiaqaent
laiertlon. for ?nv nerlod lee? then three months
t?0mMlWw^'*IU OF RK8PBCT
.ad all eoioiaualeatloiit whleh eubierva private
loUrttti, will be P4iJ 'or a? ?-tvertlsemeuU.
Pen a?d"7?k Sketches,
LEE ANO JACKSON?
LEE'S PIETY AND PRUDENCE
I spent the evening et Lee's house.
The General leaves upon one, io a re?
markable degree, the impression ot a
lofty Christian character, and yet there
lt a total absence of anything about him
?ike ostentatious piety. It is rather the
atoio-sphere that surrounds him. I can
remember nt ihe table the solemnity
?;ith which-standing before his family
-he asked God's blessing on the fond
Also, when he spoke of Jackson, how
Strung un emphasis he placed upon his
piety ;uud when he mentioned a gentle?
man whom ho wished me to seo in
Richmond, I remember his saying that
be had rarely met with a nobler pr moro
Christian, mau. It was only a word,
and yet it showed by what standard be
gauged a man's worth.
I knew from report that Lee was
reticent on political subjects, and wisely
so, his position iu the country since the
war demanding the utmost produce. I
therefore mude DO attempts to "draw
him out" as the saying is ; at the same
time I spoko freely on all subjeots that
came natural ly io tho way. Political
topics were, therefore, referred to at
times ; but Leo was on his guard, and I
could not but notioo the admirable deli?
cacy aud tact with which, as often as
the conversation threatened to become
political, he contrived to turn it into an?
other channel.
For instance, when I happened to
speak of the colored people during our
first interview, Lee, just as if he were
going to enter on tho subject, said they
wero flocking in great numbers into the
towns. I would seo many of them in
Lexington If I went about as he hoped
I would, there being several points in
tho town and its neighborhood that
would interest a stranger-some of which
he went ou quite naturally to speak of
til! tho colored peuple were as lar away
(rom the line of conversation as if
they had never been mentioned.
lu the evening, the negroes happen?
ed to be referred to again. Lee, as
if interested to know how.fur my expe?
rience corroborated his observation,
said, "Did you see many of them to
day ?"
1 told him that on (.ho contrary, I had
seen very lew.
"The raiu must have kept them with
in doors." said Leo, "aud 1 fear it would
prevent you seeing our littlo town to
?avantage. But you must wait till il
clears up, and visit the ?Natural Bridge
of Virginia. You could ride there and
back iu one day with a good horse;"
and he proceeded in his gentlemanly way
to describe a visit he had himselt paid
to the bridge-the negro silently van?
ishing from the conversation as before.
Suu.c of the Professors were there
that night, and convocation went on
briskly; but I noticed that, whenever
they introduced political topics, Lee be?
came .silent and allowed tho conversa?
tion togo on without him
One of his sons told me that his
father's answer to direct inquiries on
vexed questions was that ho was a soldier
not a politician.
LEE'S CHARACTER ILLUSTRATED.
Travelling through the South, I found
no name more revered than that of
General Leo. His fine qualities as a
soldier, which placed bim at the head
of thc Southern Array, had been asso?
ciated with a noble modesty and a
Christan deportment, which had made
him as much beloved as he was ad?
mired. Almost everybody I met in the
South had some little incidents to tell
illustrative ot bis character. Richmond
and Petersburg especially were full of
memories of him. The family with
which I stayed at Petersburg had twice,
during tho terrible siege of that city,
sent up a present of fruit and vegetables
to Lee's head quarters, hoping to add a
relish to the scanty faro which ho shared
with his officers. They showed me a
warm note of thanks which he had re?
turned; but, they said, it turned out
that, instead of tasting thc things him?
self, he had distributed them amongst
his wounded and dying men.
At Petersburg, a gentleman told me
that, during the war he was one doy
travelling by rail to richmond in a car?
riage (the Americans call it a "car")
full of soldiers, lt must bc remembered
that these American railway cars are
like long narrow rooms with a passage
down the middle, abd no separation of
classes. A poor fellow, with his arm in
a sling, got up and tried to pull on his
overcoat. He hud to use his teeth
along with his sound hand, but once and
agaiu the coat fell back. His effort at?
tracted thc attention of an officer at thc
other end of the car, who roso, went
forward, and tenderly assisted htm,
drawing tho coat very gently over his
wounded arro, and buttoning it up very
comfortably for him before he went back
to his seat. That officer was Genera!
Lee. The gentleman who described
thc circumstances said-"It was a pic?
ture nf his whole oharactcr. The man
used ta call him 'Uncle Robert.' They
loved him as if he had been a father."
Illustrative of tho feelings with which
Lee's presence inspired the troops in
battle, he mentioned the following inci?
dent :-At Fredericksburg, H position of
vital importance having fallen in the
hands of the enemy, Leo gave orders
that it should be immediately retaken
at all hazards.-Thrico it was assailed
with fury j but the leaden storm that
met the assailants toro their ranks to
pieces and drovo the remnants bock.
Ihe carnage and repeated failures wero
rapidly demoralizing the tooops, and at
every attempt it became more diffioult
to make them return to the ohargo. In
the meantime, reinforcements wore
hurrying up to tho help of tho assailed
It waa a critical moment-one of th oso
moments that decido great events. At
this juncture Geooral Lee rode to the
front, fuoing the enemy's Are. The
sight of this nan produced an instanta?
neous effoct. The scattered troops be
Kan to rally with shouts, fugitives at
sieht of their ehief became inspired
with a new courage, and flowed back
into the rauks. Lee took of bis hat, !
and, pointing to the enomy, called on j
his men to follow. Tho troops were.
ready for another charge, but they re- !
fused to move unless Lee went baok.
Regardless cf their entreaties, the Gen?
eral had begun to move forward wheo
several JO? the men, acting on the uni?
versal impulse, rushed round him, sei?
zed the reins of his horse, and implored
bim with passionate earnestness to go
baok. "Go back General, for God's Make.
Give us one ohauco mere- Go back and
see us do it."
His horse was hold. The ranks, with
a wild oheer, swept on, and in a few
minutes the place was theirs.
I met several of Lee's officers in the
oity, some ot them pious mer., who
testified to the high Christian character
of their chief. Onr of thom showed
me, aod allowed me to copy, a letter he
bad just received from Lee, to whom he
had written, on behalf of the Sunday
school, for his 8?goaturo on sotno pho?
tographs which it was proposed to dis?
tribute among the children. The fol?
lowing wus Lee's reply :
"My Dear Major-lam very glad to
learn from your letter of the 27th that
tho Sunday School of ?t. Paul's Church
is in so flourishing a condition. My
interest in the citizens of Petersburg is
as great now as when L was a daily wit?
ness in the dangers they were subjected
from the seige of their beloved city ;
and my admiration of tho fortitude aud
courage they displayed has not ia tho
least abated. The children of the city
will always have my warmest affection ;
and I rejoice that they so early possess
a desire for that knowledge which leads
to righteousness and eternal life, and in
comparison with which all other learn
tug is valueless.
..If it will gratify them, I will with
pleasure send the autographs you desire.
"Please present my regards to your
good pastor; and with my best wishes
for your own welfare,
Your obed't servant,
"R. 10. LEE."
The dangers and sufferings of the
citizens to which he refers in this note
hud weighed heavily upon his heurt.
One of these dangers was thc number
of shells that wore continually dropping
into the city, and exploding with terri?
fic noise in the streets, imperilling inno?
cent lives.*
His chief of artillery (General E. P.
Alexander,) told uio that when the city
was being fired upou from any particular
point, Lee had often ordered him to
push forward guns to bear upon that
point, from his unxicty to draw its fire
away from the defenceless people.
* [n ronny houses tho pecplo woro compelled
fur grea.r.;- security, to livo in tho cellar or huso
mont. Ono lady gave me a frngtiiont of ii huge
abell that came plunging through bor house,
bursting in the yard behind. It had beer, load?
ed with "laoks," and lett the .M.rd littered wit
thesu useful little nails. "I iras just in need of
them," said tho lady, ''but I didn't like the mode
of transportation." The house occupied by
Charles Campbell, Ibo historian of Virginia, was
struck seventeen times. Ono abell bur. t lu his
studj, blowing out tho winowa and hringiug
down all the plaster. Fortunately for the pros
pects of nnoihcr volume of Virginia history, Mr.
Campbell was down io tho basement.
LEE'S FAMILY AND ESTATES.
General Lee comes of an old and fa
?nous Virginia family. His ancestor in
Charles the First's time was Richard
Lee, a cavalier, who, on emigrating to
Virginia, became Secretary ol'the colony
and on Cromwell's death got 'Miarles II
proclaimed "King of England, Scotland,
Franco, Ireland, and Virginia'' though
the restoration did not take place for
two years after. Coming down to later
times, wo find amongst tho champions
of American independence, Henry Leo,
who captured Jersey City tort from the
british, and received for this service a
gold medal from Congress. One of this
soldier's sons (by his second wife) was
Robert E. Lee, the great Confederate
commander.
Lee was born in 1807-is therefore
now 63 years old. At the military aca?
demy at West Point he graduated in
1829 at the head of his class. Ho was
distinguished for his studious habits and
gentlemanly conduct, and ns one who
never tasted intoxicating liquors nor
used tobacco. .
Io 1832 Lee (then a lieutenant) mar?
ried Miss. Custi, the grand-duughter of
the wife of George Washington. It was
in this way that ho came to inherit the
House and Kst&to of Arlington. He
distinguished himself under Gen. Scott
in the Mexicun war, and afterwards in a
desperate battle with the Indians
In 1859 ho returned to Washington,
and was called upon to tako part in the
'.John Brown wur," which was thc pre?
lude to tho war of 1861.
It was said at Washington, where Leo
was well known personally, that he had
been deeply attatcheo to tho Union, and
had from the first deprecated secession
in thc strongest possible terms.
But brought up Uko most of the
Southerners (the Virginians especially)
to place tho State first aud tho Union
after it, no sooner had Virginia taken
tho fatal step, and called upon her sons
to rally around ber, than Lee's hesita?
tion oeased.
Montgomery Blair was sent, it is
said, by President Lincoln to offer Leo
tho command ot tho Federal army, an
offer which, had ambition boen his mo?
tive, he would eagerly have aeoepted.
His reply was, "Mr. Blaif, I look upon
secession as anarohy. If I owned four
millions of slaves in tho South I would
saorifioe them ali to the Union. But
how can I draw my sword-, against my
native Stato? No, it cannot bo, I will
stand or fallasvith Virginia."
As late as Deoember, 1861, Mrs. Lee
thus deseribed bis feelings io a letter to
a Northern friend:--"My haabaod hoi
wept tears ot' blood over this terrible
war, but, as a mao of honor and a Vir?
ginian, he must follow the destiny of
his State."
Lee, therefore, must not be confound?
ed with the secessionists and fire eaters
who pushed the South into that disas?
trous war. Wheo ho resigned his com?
mission io the National army, and fol?
lowed his Stale into secession, Arlington
(as has already boen mentioned) was
talton possession of by the Federal Gov?
ernment, and has not yet been restored.
If, however (as I think is the case),
death wipes out the taint of treason in
American law, Arlington will return to
Lee's family. It is thought by sotno
that a magnanimous Government, re?
cognizing th? difference between seces?
sion and ordinary treason-secession
(that is) before the war had settled the
question of State Sovereignty-may
even rostoro the property to Lee him?
self.
At the time of my visit to Washing?
ton, the mansion house was desolate und
half dismantled. Many of its fine old
trees had also been out down to muko
room for a national cemetery, in which
thousands upon thousands of the Federal
dead lie buried--a ghastly memento
awaiting the family of the Confederate
chief I
LEE AND JACKSON.
Lee and Jackson stand forth as the
twin-heroes of thc South. Both are re?
presentative men-Lee representing the
highest culturo of the South, Jacksun
its gcuius and intrepidity. Lee was
greatest iu defence ; J ackson in attack.
In his rapid marches Jackson sped like
tho messenger of Fate-no difficulties
seeming too great for him to overcome.
Gue of the marches be made in his
mysterious advance upon Romney in '61
has sometimes been compared to Na?
poleon's passage of the Alps. A sudden
and dreadful change in tho weather
found Jackson already on his way with
an army uusuppliud with tents, over?
coats, or blankets. At night tho sol?
diers had to keep themselves iroiu
freezing to death by lying round the
bi coutte fires. One mau said ne built a
fire at eight o'clock, went to sleep by it,
awoke at twelve, found thc fire out, sud
about three ?oohes of suow over him.
Jackson shared the hardships of his
men and inspired them with his own
enthusiasm. On they passed over roads
heavy, wet and slippery with half frozen
sleet. Men were continually fulling and
their guns going off. Thc long trains
ol wagons dragged heavily along, some
of tho horses crippled, and blood stream?
ing from their knees. Hundreds of men
had tu be detailed to st? ady tho fain ti ug
animals and help to push tho wagons
torwurd. With unwavering purpose,
through blinding storms of ruin, hail
and sleet, Jackson pressed on, till,
roaching Ha.h, with au army that might
have been tracked by tho innumerable
prints of nuked and bleeding feet, he
encountered the Federals, attacked them
with fury, routed them, and drove them
across tho Potomac Leaving Loring at
Romney, he had just carried his old
brigade back to watch thc enemy al
Winchester, when Presidcut Davis, not
understanding these tuovcineut?, ?md ut
this carly stage, mistaking Jackson'*
genius tor madness, ordered Romney tc
bc envacuated, leaving Jackson's pur
pose a mystery to this day.
Almost all Jackson's great movement!
wcro veiled in mystery, but when hi;
genius became known he was no longci
interfered with, and on more thau on<
memorable occasion thc mystery of hil
disappearance was solved when he sud?
denly appeared descending like a thun?
derbolt upon thc flank of his bewildcret
enemy.
Thc koy notes of Jackson's polioj
were mystery and action. AttaJc th<
enemy ; never wuit till ho attacks you
It you are repulsed, bc watchful-readi
in an instant, if opportunity occurs, ti
give thc enemy an unexpected stroke
and chango defeat into victory. If yoi
succeed, pursue the enemy-cut him t
pieces, and by quick, decisive blows cot
the war. Lee was moro in favor o
stauding on the defensive, giving hi
men all thc advantage of fortified posi
tions, seeking rather to baffle and wear
the enemy than destroy him.
THEIR DISCIPLINE.
There was asimilar difference bctwcci
Lee and Jackson in their mode of deal
ing with their own troops. Lee wa
considerate and gent?o to a fault, on
was so icluctant to hurt the feelings o
a man who might, ho thought, bo doin
his best, that ho allowed many ollie ci
to retain their command, even afte
they had proved their incompetence.
Jackson, on thc other hand, was ster
anil remorseless in his disciplino. (I
did not hesitate to huvo n mau she
instantly who disobeyed orders ; and :
even a general officer seemed unfit c
remiss, Jackson thrust him aside with
out a moment's hesitation. A souther
officer told mo that, on ono ocoisioi
when A. P. IIi?J was taking his me
into action, Jackson, who thought th
movement was not being made wit
sufficient alacrity, dashed up and too
command ot the division himself. Hi
was an officer of eminent ability an
felt hurt.
..General," ho said, "if you cominan
my division, you hud better tako tu
sword."
"Retire to tho rear, sir I" said Jacl
son sternly, "and consider yoursolf ui
der arrest."
These was nothing for him but I
obey.
Jackson, thinking of i. jibing but, ho
to turn tho tide of tho battle, took Hill
division and hurled it into notion, whi
poor Mill, for his too hasty words, ht
to romain behind under arrest ""ttl r
leased by Lee.
Off duty, Jackson was an modest ar
unassuming ns a child ; and oven in wo
wheu men had done their best, ho oou
i be as lenineut aa hia ohief. After tl
1 battlo of S harpsburg, when hil oom m at
was crossing the Massanotteo Moan? i
tains, some of the regiments io Early's i
division, finding the district rioh in old i
pea h, and th inking it possible that in <
their exhausting maroh they were in
need, like Timothy, of a little wine for
their stomach's sake and their many
infirmities, iudulged in a good deal more
than the Apostle would have bren likely
to sanction*. The consequence was that
Stonewall, happening to ride io the rear
of Early's division that day, found the
men scattered for miles along the road,
some of them dancing polkas, others
sitting by the roadside, weeping over
their absence from their homes, or
cheering themselves with fragments of
bacchanalian songs and psalratuoes.
Early had tried to terrify the soldiers
with a report that the huts on the
mountains were full of small pox, but in
vain. He had been along m person,
warning, expostulating, and swearing
(this last was said to be Early's forte).
At last, disgusted, ho had given it up,
hud ridden to camp, and was toasting
his shins in the frosty night before a
rousing fin?, when an orderly rode up
and handed him a despatch from General
Jackson. Early took tho note and read
as follows :
"HEADQUARTERS, Left Wing.
"Sir:-General Jackson desires to
know why be saw so many stragglers io
rear ol your division to-day.
?'Signed) A. S. PENDLETON."
The grim old soldier got a bit of paper,
and penciled the following roply :
"HEADQUARTERS, 1
Early's Division. f
*' Captain :-In answer to your note,
I think it probable that the reason why
General Jackson sato so many of my
stragglers to-day is that he rode in rear
of my division.
"Respectfully,
"J. A. EARLY."
' Jackson, who had a great regard for
tho brave nud eccentric soldier, aud had
probably discovered that he had dono
all that, man could do, made no further
inquiries.
With all their difference? of character,
Jackson and Leo were well mated. Jack?
son bad imp icit confidence in Lee, and
always epoko of him with profound re?
spect. Leo was equally attached to
Jackson, and regarded him as* his most
efficient, commander. After the battle
of Chancellorsville, when Jackson's
shattered arm was amputated in the hope
of saving his life, Lee said--"Jackson
has lost his left arm, but 1 have lost my
right."
Everywhere in the South the names
of Lee and Jackson go together, and in
the galaxy of Southern heroes shine
forth like two Jupiters against the star?
dust of some distant constellation.
Even in tho North, Lee and Jackson
arc spoken of with that veiled admira?
tion which lofty and heroic characters
command even from an enemy ; and no
doubt tho day will come when (all
bitterness of party feeling having passed
away) thc name of Lee will be honored
in tho North as in tho South, and the
achievements of Stonewall Jackson and
hts men remembered with as much en?
thusiasm as thc career of Dundee or
Priuce Charlie, and tho Rebel Highland?
ers aro remembered and sung about
amongst ourselves. .
[Florida Correspondence Fort Onines Mirror.]
AN UL, Ii I? II A NT AND VIVO CAMKLS
ATTACKED BY A 1.1,1 (? A TO It S IN A
FLOR I O A SWAM I?- ri.lt lt IF IO
II A TT I. IC AN? IMC AT II OP ONU
CAMEL, TWO DOGS AND A COLT.
Thc peregrinations of showmen are
beset with numerous difficulties while
pcrsuing their daily avocations in this
our Southern country, which with the
usual wiutcr rains, heavy roads, and
fording of streams, makes it very diffi?
cult fur the managers to make good the
promises of tho agents. fc'uch was thc
case with John Robinson's Circus nnd
Menagerie a few days since. While
performing in Tallahassee, Fla., it was
mentioned to Mr. J. P. Robinson, Jr.,
that he might expect some difficulty in
passing through a long and dismal
swamp between that place and Quiucy,
on account of tho Iftrgo number of alli?
gators which infested the ford at this
particular locality, and who aro at this
season of tho year very ferocious, and ou
the watch for any unfortunate mule or
horse that may become entangled in the
numerous roots, quicksands, and holes,
which abound at the ford ; but he re?
plied, as the agent had already made
thc arrangements for him to go through,
and it was not his nature to turn back,
he had nothing .eft but to follow, trust
ing to his previous good lortuoe iu
getting thus fur. The result of his
occisi?n, although anticipating some
difficulty, was far more serious than ho
anticipated.
At 3 o'clock P. M., on Tuesday, Feb?
ruary 25th, Prof. Lewis Houston, who
has charge of the animals, started with
the elephant Empress, the largo Bruc
tian camel, the beautiful Arabian white
camel, a fine thorough bred maro and
colt, and two spotted coach dogs, to
make tho trip to Quincy, although
repeatedly warned by Mr. J. F. Robin?
son, Jr., not to attempt tho passage of
tho swamp in any other than daylight.
Ile howovr went through. Before
approaching thc ford, an occasional
bellow or roar was heard betokening
hat the inhabitants of the locality had
not retired for thc uight, aud a sudden
plungo and splash in the water would
denote that the enemy were on the alert
for mischief. The elephant would every
few steps, throw her trunk aloft, emit?
ting nt tho same timo a foud screech ol
defiance, the camels uttering low mon ii r
whilo the horses almost refused to stir
and stood trembling with fear, while th<
dogs kept up an inoessant bowling.
?Approaching the water of the ford
Houston daAermined upon the immediate
Eassage through before the alligatori
ad time to summon their orew.
Bidding the elephant ontor, sh*
* ? ' ?? '? ?i -'i^k ''..-<.,, . ?. /"vi
stepped boldly in nt the.annie time lash?
ing the water furiously with her trank,
the camels, horses nnd dogs following
olose tnvthe renr. He hnd passed two
thirds ot the way when n sharp yelp of
pain from one of the dogs nnd his sad?
den disappenrnnoe denoted that the
swamp fiends wtsre nt work, nnd before
he could collect his thoughts the other
dog went under with n long death howl,
lie now began to think of his own
safety, nnd calling to tho elephant,
commanded Jjer to turn, ns she did. So
s fearful roar was heard from the large
Bao tr ian camel who lind nt that instant
beon nttaoked. The water seemed alive
with alligators. Tho roaring, bellowing,
and screeching of elephant, oamels ana
alligators were terrific. They would
throw their ponderous jaws open and
tear huge pieces of1 flesh from the camel,
while the poor brute would utter heart?
rendering groans and ories for relief.
Io the mean time the elephant was not
idle. Ever solicitous for the welfare of
her keeper and companions, she had, at
the moment of seeing them safety landed
upon the opposite shore, rushed baok to
the assistance of her friend, the rumel,
who by this time, was nearly gone, and
by creating the greatest furore among
her assailants, sucoeeded in bringing the
hoad of thc camel to tho shore, that
portion being all that remained of the
poor animal.
In the confusion thnt ensued, Hous?
ton did not miss the colt until warned by
a shrill scream or neigh, which seemed
to come from several rods below. Upon
rushing down tho stream a few yards, a
terrible scene was presented to his view.
It would seem that the denizens of
Chattahoochee swamp for miles around
had become cognizant of some extra
attraction at that particular point on
this night, and had started for the ren?
dezvous, and upon reaching the scene of
action had unexpectedly encountered
both food and opposition at tho same
time, for simultaneous with the moeting
of the oolt they met their pur?
suers, and an awful battle ensued.
Several times it seemed as if the cojt
would escape and regain the shore, so
busy were the alligators in destroying
ejich other; but just bofore the poor
creatute would reach the land, some
monster, more ravenous than brave,
would leave the melee, pursuo and drag
it baok into deep water, until finally it
became exhausted and fell an dasy prey
to tho fearful reptiles, while Professor
Houston stood looking on with blanched
and terrified looks, wholly unablo to
render the least assistance, threatened
with a terrible death should ho even
attempt it. As ho turned to retrace his
steps towards the place where he lott
the remaining animals, ho counted tho
cost. He had niado the passage, but at
a terrible sacrifice. Ile had started with
an elephant, two camels, two dogs and
two horses. He came out with an
elephant, one camel and one horse.
Tho camel was valued at 85,000, and
very rare. Tho oolt Mr. Robertson had
repeatedly refused 91,000 for. It will
bc many a long year before Houston
will forget the horrors of passing through
a Florida swamp at night. J. A. M.
[Correspondenceof th? Pittsburg llepublican.1
STRUCK DEAD ii A M BM NG-ST A K -
IM; BEAUTIFUL DIAMONDS AND
A GOLD WATCHBAN ENORMOUS
STACK OF CHIPS-DEATH CALLS
FOR HIS OHtI'S -HOW HENRY
PETTIBONE DIED.
Tho number of persons who have
died suddenly in gambling houses in
this city during the past year has been
remarkable. At 17 Ann' streot is a
gambling hell, kept by a man generally
known among the fraternity os "Undo
John." Ono night, about six months
since, a young man dressed in thc height
of fashion, with gold watch and dia?
mond pin and rings, entered and began
to gamble He wa3 unlucky, and rap?
idly lost his money. His diamond pin
was next risked, and still fortuno was
against him. Then he took from his
(loger a ring-a beautiful solitaire dia?
mond-and for which he was allowed
one hundred dollars. And now he woo.
Fortune seemed to have changed and
was smiling upon him. Every bet ho
made he won, until his "stack" of
"checks" was larger thun that hold by
the "bank."
Suddenly his head dropped forward
on the table, and he was dead. Of
course, immediately all was exoitement
and confusion around tho table, during
which "Uncle John" quietly raked in
the checks and closed tho "bank" there?
by saving himself over 86,000 whioh
the dead man hud won. On the inside
of the ring was ongraved thc dead
man's naree. Ho was a young mun of
good family, nnd was to have been mar?
ried next week. His friends wore noti?
fied and took the budy away, and it was
given out that he had diod suddenly of
heart disease while rending a paper at
homo.
Fur distant from this was tho case of
the poor devil who died in a gambling
hell in East Broadway, a short timo af?
ter. Ho was ono of tho "regulars."
For twenty years he hud been nooostant
habitue ot' faro banks. When ho com?
menced, ho waa doing a good business,
had a happy wife, and was in a fuir way
to fortune ; when ho died ho was a va?
grant and outcast-hie wife died of a
broken heart loog ago, his children had
grown up in misery aod vice, and he
had not a friend in tho whole great city,
where once ho had hundreds of thom.
The Coroner was notified, an inqtiost
held, and a verdiot rendered that ho
too, had died of heart disease, but no
effort was made to conceal the fuet of
where ho died. II? hnd no wealthy
friends or influential politicians to "see"
tho Coroner and press and "fix" things.
No one was harmed by the fact that
Henry Pottibono died suddenly in a
fourth rate gambling hell in East Hroid
way.
There have been at least haifa doaen
other sadden deaths in faro banks in
this oity dnring the psst year, to SST
nothing of three who have committed
suicide there.
I ft TER VIEW AT COVINGTON, KY??
BETWEEN GENERAL GRANT'S
FATHER AND A REPUBLICAN.
Mr. Grant.-Aro you the Marshall
that wrote a letter to Senator Drake
about me ?
Mr. Marshall (smiling).-I wrote a
letter some time ago to Senator Drake
protesting ?gai nst your appointment as
postmaster of Covington.
Mr. Grant (nervous and exoitod and
olutobiog his oane).-You dirty rebel
Democrat, what did you do that
for?
Mr. Marshall (ooloriog somewhat).
I want you to understand, Mr Grant,
that I am no rebel or. Democrat ei?
ther I
Mr. Grant.-They told me in Wash?
ington you were a rebel Democrat.
Mr. Marshall.-Nobody told you that
unless John S. Nixon did. I never
voted for but one Demoorat in my
life, and that was Judge Kinkead.
Mr. Grant.-And you think I am
not fit for a postmaster at Coving?
ton.
Mr. Marshall.-I said nothing in my
lotter about your fituo9s or unfitness for
the position ; but you well know, Mr.
Grant, that a very small number of
people in this city desire to soe you en?
joying that lucrative office.
Mr. Grant.-I suppose you would
like to havo the place yourslf?
Mr. Marshall.-1 should not object to
it.
Mr. Grant.-I have saved to the Gov*
einment since I have been postmaster of
Covington, $5,000.
Mr. Marshall.-Yes, I suppose you
have, but it has been done by your
hiring clerks at starvation wages, when
tho Department at Washington allows
all postmasters a libera! amount for olerk
hire. With all your boasts about
economy and saving money for the Gov?
ernment, I netice you never declino an
increase of your own salary.
Mr. Grant.-You are a pretty Repub?
lican to be writing such letters as that
about me. *
Mr. Marshall -I claim the privilege
of writing what I please, so that it is
the truth, and I will do it, even though
it concerns the President's father or the
President himself. Mr. Grant, I do not
wish to converse any further on this
subject. Good day.
The parties then separated. Father
Grant probnbly thought that inasmuch
as he had been unanimously confirmed
he could afford to let Marshall go with?
out the promised tin ashing.- Cincin
natti Commercial.
Why aro your nose and your hand?
kerchief like deadly enemies ? Because
they never meet but they come to
blows.
Jehial Slab says that if you want lo test
n Christian set him to putting up old
mismatched stove pipe and keep him at
it for an hour. If he don't ouss, he's
seasoned.
It is all very well to talk of a "silver
lining" to a cloud ; but Will thinks be
knows a young fellow or two who would
greatly prefer a silver lining to their
pockets.
Girls sometimes put their lips out
poutingly because they are angry, and
sometimes because they aro disposed to
meet you halfway.
Josh Billings pertinently says:-"Be?
fore I would preach the gospel as some
ministers are obliged to, for 8450 a year,
I would git a livtn as Ncbukcdnezzer
did, an' let thc congregation go to grass,
tew.
"Ma, has your tongue got legs ?"
??Got what, child ?" ??Got legs, Ma."
.'Certainly not, but why do you ask that
question ?" O, nothing'; only I heard
pa say that your tongue was running
from morning till night.
New Hardware Store,
Main-st. under Sumter Hotel.
L. Pa LORIN G,
--- AOENT FOR
Messrs. Kmg & Huppman,
BALTIMORE, TH. D.
Would respectfully announce to his friend* and
tho public, that Ito lins received and opened, at
thu abovo establirhment a
Stock of Hardware and
Family Utensils,
embracing every article in this line of buiioere,
wbiwh he intends to sell et the
LOWEST PRICES, POB CASH.
Ho viill keep UIWHJB In moro, a complete assort?
ment of *
Collin's Axes, Ames' Shovels and Spades,
Trace Chains, Hoes,
Rakes, l'iteb Forks,
Grain Cradler, Soy tho Blades,
O nano Soires,
Pocket and Table Cutlery,
Brow Preserving Kettles,
Tin Ware, Windon Olars-all sizes.
Persons in want of the most convenient and
economical Stoves, ean bo supplied with tho
latest improved puttorns at priors vfcich cannot
fail to give entito satisfaction.
May 20_
JAMBS CALDWELL.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN
Boots, Shoes, Hats.
Trunlts etoo.
Opposite J. T. SOLOMONS,
Sumter. So. Oa.
! fob 18 Hoot.
C. T- MASON.
WATCH MAKER
AND
?X Jj-J \A/ ET ?~E53RL
SUMTER, S. C.
Has jost received and keeps always o? hand
Now and BMU tlful St j lt J or
JEWELRY, FYEGLASSES, &C.
WAT0IIB8, CLOCKS and JEWELRY RK
PAIRBD WITH DISPATCH.
March SI_
O. F. HOYT.
SUCCESSOR TO
P. HOYT, & SUMTER,
SO. OA.
^yOULD respectfully inform bil friends
ind th? publie of Sumter, and adjoining coontie?,
that ha baa recently received a ohuice selee
tton of
LADIES' A NJ) GENTLEMENS'
Wat ones,
JEWELRY, SILVERWARE,
SPECTACLES, ?fcc., &c,
His ?tock embraces all "the lateit styles, and
will be told at reasonable raies.
Sept 29 _
1870. 187U.
MAYESVILLE, S. C.
J. A. MAY?S & CO.,
WILL CONTINUE DURING THE YEAR TO
KEEP ON ll AND A FULL SUPPLY
OF GOODS IN THEIR LINE,
CONSISTING OF
DRUGS, MEDICINES,
GR 0 0 ERIES,
ft H 8 ?R.0?IS?8SS,
ind hopo to merit a continuance of the liberal
pat ron ago they have been receiving.
We desire to cali partioulnr attention to our j
trade in
FLOUR.
It is our aim to keep for sale only good quail- I
ties of FLOUR, and families may roly upon our |
Block as affording the best grades of
Extra and Family Flour,
to be had in the markets.
Our grocerios generally are all
FIRST-CLASS GOODS,
and our DRUGS and MEDICINES aro war?
ranted to bo pure end genuine.
Besides the usual stock of DRUGS and MED?
ICINES, we heep always on hand, we offir two
invaluable preparations of our own manufacture
Anti-Malarial Specific,
FOR THE PERMANENT CURE OF
Chills and Fevers.
TONIC BITTERS,
an admirable combination of TON ICS adapted
to all cases neoding Tonio Medidnos.
COUNTRY PRODUCE of nil kinds taken In
BARTER for gooda at fuir prices.
J. A. MAYES A CO.
Jan 1, 1870 __ ly
TO THE
Planters of Macsville
aiid Surrounding Country.
G KHTI.RU nw;
We moat reipcetfully offer you the following
manure*:
PERUVIAN GUANO, direct from th? agent,
FARMERS PLASTER OR GYPSUM, up loi
standard,
SOLUBLE PACIFIC GUANO,
COMPOUND ACID PHOSPHATE, for oomposh
ting with cotton seed,
DISSOLVED BONE A SUPERTOR ARTICLE
FLOUR OF RONE,
li AUG H'S RAW BONE PHOSPHATE,
CAROLINA FERTILIZER,
TH.E NAVAS9A AMMONIATKD SOLUBLE
PHOSPHATE of Wilmington,
cash orders lolicitod.
MAYES ? COOPER Agents.
Jun 5-3m_
n . R. NAIR. P. N. nVLIN
NASH & DULIN,
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Manufactured Tobacco,
SMOKING AND CHEWING, OF
DIFFERENT GRADES,
SUMTER? SO. CA.
AL3D
Keep a good supply of NORTII CAROLINA
RYE end CORN WHISK KY, S EGA RS,
LIQUOIIS ol' furious kind-.
TOBACCO nt Wholesale furnished at Manu?
facturers' Prices.
Country Morotaant* will do well to call and
examine our Muck.
All orders promptly execute! when accompa?
nied wi'h tho cash.
The oustoui of my old friends whom I have |
furnished by wngon for sorernl years is re?
spectfully solicited.
B. H. NASH
O't. 3 -Cm._
For Sale.
1UIAT VALUABLE) PROPERTY,
called Brookland, Situated in Sumter County,
about one mile from Statosburg, and which was
the family residence of the lute John Bradley.
It eonslst* of a large and floe Dwelling House,
with 10 rooms. (8 unusually large,) Brick Kitel?
sn, Stable, Ham. Carriage House and other nee
sssary out building?, all in thorough repair, and
about 141) aerea of tend. Plaoe entirely hoaltby.
Price $.1000 00 and terms aeoomodatlng. Fur
other partloulara, apply to tho undersigned, at
Marin!in, (ta., or to J. S. G. Rlehardaon, Esq.
. t Sumter ?, C.
Feb.as- tf. ELLEN BRA DI,RY.
' 't.'*' '
?ftalft
EVERY
PROMPTLY BXBCTJTB?,
.* " rj ' . i "*. ./
oific? o>
The Sumter Val
-rn UBI ?r-4iLs
Highest Style of
SUMTEU
IVI AUBINE Y?
THE undersigned would moist T*J^'r)f?H
?nnouneu to ?ho poop!? of BooHor a?^?MHp
rounding country hat ho have jun T^tl|mH|
8PLBNDID LOT OF . -}{
IVE et ar "to 1 o'-v. ^S
?nd Is now propnred to reoelvc and cxeNlw?sG
diera of all kinds iu his lino, with ut|HC*is^i^||
IRON RAILING FURNISHED TO ^l^m
Harbeck, Coiiklin & Willis^
Manufacturers of K\??,
Stoves, Tin and JapaiiecVWave^
And Agents for ^~ *? *
Kaoline and ?naraoleti Ware,.7*;^
For salo by - ''^?3
L. P. LO RING, Agent,.
Juno 9- Sumter 8? ?. H'i
- . ?-?? ? ?. ? ?- ? v-?.-??^itnJ
COIT'S ' 4$
MILITARY ANO COMMERCIAL^
Academy, '-|9j
MA Y E S VIL L E, S. C. |J|
TN HHS INSTITUTION HOYS and YaUN*CT*
X MEN will be thoroughly fitted lor COLLliGK ?
or BUSINESS.
In addition to Anoientand Modern LnnguagesA';
the Silences and ordinnry Eugllsh Hrouohos/. ;
pesoial instruction will be given in PENMAN:'
SHIP, BOOKKEEPING. Business Form?, a nef*?:
Accounts, and In Vooal Music. . .?.-"'.?
The Princlpnl refers with pride and s/r tit IO t;o-,>;'
tion to his former pupils, who huve taken.hlgVff
positions in College or Business. ' -*v
THIS FI11ST SESSION begins Ootober ' lt*?$
and closes February 16th. \vjj
THU SECOND SESSION begins February Htojr*?
and olosos Juno 30th. . *. ;
TERMS t $IOti per Session for Board antf/
Tuition, invariably in advance. ' [v
French, German and Drawing extra. . -
For Circulars address '- -? V ?
CAPT. WILLIAM TI. COIT/^S
Mayosvillo.S. 0*; $
REFEREES : - 1 v|
Rov. J. Loighten Wilson. D. D.', Dr. J* ?A4?
Moyes, MaycsvUlo, So. Ca.; Gen. W.Ifif^Wm
Princo, Cheraw, 8. C.; Kev J. R. Mack. <:ii?rle?>c
ton, S. C.; Rov. G. WTPotric, D. I)., Mnntgofri. <
cry, Ala. ; Messrs. Ulauding A Richardson,*
Sumter. S. C. . ' .
Jan 20 _ _t?july. ^
St. Joseph's Ac?dem^
coNouuTr.r? av TUB ? . .,^..\>
Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy/
SUMTER, S. .0.
yWSiv TH 15 Colb-gialo Exercises of HH
/ifFirst Class Insiitule, will bo resurtr?A>
^^mSnSon tho 1st of September. A . frotnf&i
^ofirjSrattciidftnco is requested in order WK
^Sfcy facilitate tho progross and arrangeai
ment of tho classes. The now buildings '?rt>(
spacious and elegantly finished, fnrjii?hiifg,ev- ,J
cotuniodotions for ona hundred bourdor*. xTf-o',:
extensivo grounds nnd piazzas sro ample for open,"'
air exercise, and young Indies nre thoroughly'.*:
instructed in English Mathematic-*, French, luv v
lian, Music, Drawing.Painting, Ac, Ao. Location/,
healthy. a?r puro, wu er unod, und Urins rei^soa^
aldo. Fur particulars apply to th? Ki?portore|&?*??}
St. Joseph's Academy, Sumter, f>r lo thc- (Uni;'*-? j
rioress of tho Sisters of Mercy, <'!turlcitonr*M&3
will endeavor to meet thc pressure w tho titnnS./
Nov. JO ;
" MUSIC" LESSONS.'"""'^
Vocal anti Instrumental^
> ?91
- . ' *-M
The umlorsigncd having talton his r?-.-ld?r)^(*s}l/^
Som.nr. will givo b'-s-ins in Pingina ?nd op H'M*?
I'LA.NO and VIOLIN. ll* ?ill l?towl*? fciie'jJjV*
struoti'ttis in FRENCH, tl LUM AN and ARITH**1?
METIO. "\ ^
TUNING OF P?ANOS ATTENDED TOY.
For further particulars, apply t<? him at [
rosiJeuco iu liarvin Street.
ll. C. M. KUPFP. - ?
I?2zJL_? ;
WOPFORD COLLEGE. ;
SPA UTA MU! Kt; C". IL, . "?
* so. CA. ;
FACULTY:
lt EV. A. M. Rilli?!', I). M.. Pr. iu!;Pt; V
Professor Menin! mid Mural S<1 rei.- '
DAVID DUNCAN, A. M.. Pro!os.-..r AoenftftJ
Languages nn-l Lileiiitur.i. ?V - ','*.','
KEV. WIIITEPOOCD Ml 1 I ll, l>. 1? , r^?fo?fe^
Engllrh Liter.i'ora. MwB
WAUKEN DU PH.':, .\. M., l'i**t?r*l1
Seience. - ,
JAS. II. CARLISLE, A. M , Prof.-.-sor MeihjtsV;
matles. ' *" ,'?
REV. A. II. LEST Ell, A. M., I'>.!o-s..r Hlstory"
ami Bibliciil Litevntiiro. >
The Preparatory S-h-ml, iinde? thn 'tnin<Mf)-itV:'.
supervision of tho l'iculiy, Jun. \V. ?lliPP,^
A. lt., Principal.
Divinity rjcli-iol - Rev. A. M. Slr) p, TL Dj^j
Ror. Whitefoord Smith, J>. I>. ; J:, v. A. If s
Loslur. A. M. . . ?'
Tho first.Session of the Sixteenth ^'Heji^/i
Ve.ir begins on tho first M. inlay in XlctoherKU
I8o0, the second Si-?si-m lir^-in.? ->n th.? lirri?M?ns(i
day in .Linnury, |S7?. **irgiV
Tlie coin?.- of siudi 'S ,o l tho i-.A>:???rd\*|?
soholirsliip romain imoban^D-l, b:,i iii,-' {'acnlvyv.'''
now admit inegnlur .*tni'. nts or (ho.xo v.T.o' WN^vi
to ?iiirsue p irtn iibn -til lie.. ,inly. SJ
Tho Sohool.j ?No ..|"." ni th* lolmc ft-ne. -MBH
T'lition per year. i'\ ?'.dl"rr-? Cias?o?, Inolijillna*V
contingent fcc, $54 in -'pe. ie, ol its c.ji.tvjljra^w -1
Currency.
Tuition por ye ir. in Prop i rat.-r> ^O,,0*M)HHSJ3
lng contingent fee, S I ? in r ivy.
Bills ]niy>?l !i? "to- hnlf in rtiNa-.ico. iV'^dy.tllsMH,
Month, from ?!f? ti Sift in currcu-ji, 'v ..H'-*SB&H?
Fnr fwrth. t i m tt'-nlsr^ H i ii ? .s . . V:%'^.'-}
A. M. si:;;*?, pr?-. I h^'^K
Msyl? .?.kX&j

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