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The Charleston daily news. (Charleston, S.C.) 1865-1873, August 21, 1865, Image 2

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DAILY NEWS.
CHARLESTON.
MONDAY MORNING. AUGUST 21, 1865._
The Situation?Plantation Culture in tni?
State. ' ~-^--~? .__.
Tho rccorit chungo in tho lnbor system of this
State must of necessity induco important changes
in pursuits, and what those changes muy bo i? DOW
iho question of mo3t abHorbiug interest. That
pursuits will bocomo moro varied, and that much
of our labor will bo withdrawn to employment in
tho arts and enterprises collateral to agriculture, is
reasonably cortaiu ; but what, then, will bc*lhc ef
fect upon existing interests, and particularly upon
Investments in plantation culture, is a most impor
tant question. Thoso interests, in tho seaboard
sections of tho Stato at loast, aro vast, and it is of
vast concern whether under proacnt circumstances
wo can sustain them. Plantations are peculiar
forms of agriculturo. Thoy arc seldom seen except
in slave or densely crowded countries. They arc
exclusively devoted to a single product, and through
such devotion raiso it at a rango of prices quito too
low for any other form of competition. Such en
terprises roquirc for their success order, discipline,
and constant and officient labor ; and under pres
ent circumstances can they got it ? So far, at loast,
the experiment has boen unsuccessful?the late
disturbances havo been quite too great for discip
line or labor, and the culture, thorofore, for this
year mirstprovo a failure. But will the next be more
successful ?
It ia not within our provinco to predetermine a
point of such importance; but from the lights we
have, wo venturo to affirm that tho indications
are - against it. To entertain reasonable pros
pects of success, tho. planter must start the
year with all tho labor necessary for the place.
At every Btep that labor must bo at hand ;
it must bo prompt to evory occasion ; patient
under hardships, and do everything that is
to ho done in an efficient and perfect manner.
Without this it wore a vain and visionary enter
prise, and of such labor tho nogro furnishes no
assurance. ' They work well under the stimulant
of excitement?well under tho pressure of superior
authority?well ovon in pursuits accordant with
individual inclination; but oxperionce baa yet given
no evidence of their ability to undergo distasteful
labor under tho stipulations of a contract. Such
labor is gonerally distasteful?distasteful to whites
as well as blacks. It is monotonous, constant, and
severe, and it is to bo questioned whether even
white men will over furnish the necessary labor at
any rate of componaation which such culture can
naturally offer. In fact, plantations have rarely
heeu successful except in slave countries or coun
tries whose population is so douse that the pressure
of want is asstringont as tho pressure of authority.
And in accordance with these viows has been the
experience of planting intorcsis in the West Inches
and on the Main. In English Guinea particularly,
their lands wero in high and profitable cultivation.
Prior to emancipation, tho labor was officient and
entirely manageable; But, after emancipation, it
became insufficient. A part left for tonus and
villages?a part took small tracts upon the borders
of estate??some formed small communities and
purchased estates, which they divided between
them. Proprietors, anxious to sustain their es
tates, gave extraordinary inducements to retain
their labor?extraordinary wages to induce it.
Competition commenced. As tho labor became
more expensive, it became more scarce and less
efficient; the expenses rose as products fell, and
struggling on for a period of eight or ten
years?hoping still for soino change?importing
Portuguese from Barbadocs and Coolies from
China, and trying every species of labor-saving
machiner v, and exhausting their capital and credit
in tho effort to stem tho current of their adversary
fortunes,?they had at last to yield to the ruin
which, wc believe, ongulfed every estato in that
province Tho oxperionce of planting interests in
this State may not necessarily ho the samo. It is
hoped that the want of negro labor, as fast as it
may occur, will be supplied by oinigrants from the
North or Europe. But they also had the parent
hive in the United Kingdom to draw from. Emi
grants wero then going in vast numbers to Aus
tralia, Canada, and tho United States?some per
haps evon to that colony?hut not to plantation
culture. And so hero, thore is large emigration
from Europe, and we will doubtless havo a large
accession to our population and enterprise from
abroad. We may reasonably hope that this will
infuse the energies of life and progress into every
pursuit to which voluntary labor flows; hut whilo
such pursuits are open, it is not to be supposed
that it will flow to plantations. The life is not so
attractive; the average of inducements are
not so great; tho pursuit will not bo
commended by tho charm of habit and
associations; and though it be true tho pro
ducts of our cotton and rice plantations, for some
years at loast, may bo exceedingly valuable, and
auch plantations, therefore, may pay high for
labor, and by such prices tho system may be
forced along for a period,?but every thing at last
must find its level. Cotton and rice cannot continuo
permanently in disproportion to other products; the
demand will diminish; the supply from other sour
ces increase; tho price of other products will rise
also, nnd hero the problem may be again demon
strated that plantations cannot ho successfully
cultivated by voluntary negro labor.
It ia not intended to establish that plantation
vrill henceforth cease to bo of value. On the con
trary, it is quite probablo thoy may bo of greater
value than they ever wore before. That form of
culture abandoned, each may become tho homo of
a prosperous community of farmers; and such a
community, properly ordered, and mutually sup
porting each other, and making enough for subsis
tance;?enough for rent, and a surplus, small or
great, for market?moy yield more to the proprietor
than did the successful prosecution of his planting
enterprise.
It is not contended that tho colored race will not
he ready for the ordinary labors of the State. On
the contrary, wo hopo they will he moro produc
tive of permanent interests than they ever have
been. We havo reason to hope thoy will enter into
trades ?,n.d the arts; that they will become thrifty
farmers; sm^ss competitors for property and con
sumers of piMnots, will contribute much to tho
culture and voateos?4tere8t9 of the etate#
Nor is It intendod 0^w that there will he no
furtherproduction of ricwnd cotton. Wo think
that tice and cotton wUl 8ti?K%prodaCod ^ C(m.
siderable quantities, but not apOv^^ pjant_tlon
syatgrii:1: Thoy will be tho enrplus, aih*_ot th0 ox_
elusivo object of pursuit?losi in amount,?,,,, not
necessarily of 1 o hi value; And that thus, in ra?-??
our. supplie a at home and sending only our aurplu?.
abroad^-In exchanging the plantation for the farm
ing ay's torn?.wo may do, if not better than we have
done; at le dot 'the beut that would seem possible in
tho. proaqpt co??ilion of our affaira. True, wo will
not have tho aattefaotlon of contributing such val
uable, producto to tho commerce of the world;?we
will not establish'auch balancea to the credit of thlo
coqfotrjr_$a i{h;e pajafttSjOf Europe;?we will not
_-again have the eatiaSactlon of furnishing cotton at
& balrHqe pried at'whldh It can be furnished elao
W where, ,:fmt w?may be consoled that, thug working
_____ within oursolvoa, our oivn, shave of prosperity and
|?oU being will not bo lot? than it hid been before,
To News Deniers.
We woulil inform our friend? that we now have
in successful operation our fust printing press,
which will onablo U8 to fill all orders tot the
"Daily News" promptly. Order? fur extra supply
should ho given the day previeras.
The Scrttli Carolina Society.
The wo y "d?cli ha? jn?t ?loeod has brought to a |
level the rich and the needy?t!Te*?Jr*!???W?s?-iiaasj
humble?and han taken in its relentless grasp from
the coffers of the charitable those mean? which
they had of blessing the widow, educating the or
phan, and bestowing happiness upon the nufortu
' nato gcnorally. In its wide-spread devastation,
liko tho raging firo on the plain, nothing has been
spared; the mite of the poor and the wealth of the
opulent has been licked up by it? flaming tongue,
leaving behind nothing but ruin and desolation.
Associated bodies whose benevolent kindness sus
tained tho bereaved widow, and pointed the way of
honesty and virtue to the child of many a deceased
member, have, with the rest, been pecuniarily
struck down; and no one has felt more forcibly
the harshness of the blow than the Society whose
name heads this article, mid whoso bounties were
of the most extensivo kind.
Believing that a short history of this Association
will bo interesting to many of our readers, wc will
occupy, in two or three numbers, a small space to
it, taken from the Introduction to tho Rules of tho
Society.
Several refugees and then- descendants, mem
bers of the ironch Protestant congregation of
Charlee town, having among them an individual,
who waB in low circumstanccB, and had opened a
small tavern in order to maintain himself and fam
ily, agreed to meet at his house, whenever they
had any business to transact and to spend un eve
ning or two there, every week, purely to assist
him. They wero then generally called the French
Club. As their sole motive was charity, they after
a short time agreed, each to contribute fifteen
ponce at every meeting, towards raising a fund fur
tho relief of any others of their members who
might stand in need of support, and from that cir
cumstance the society derived the appellation of
the Two-Bit Club. (Four half-pence passed for
two bits, and amounted to ill'teen pence of the then
currency?equal to three cents and seven mills. )
This happened about the end of the year 173?. or
beginning of 1737; and having fixed on everv
Tuesday for their weekly meeting, limiting their
expenses to two shillings and sixponco currency,
and their contributions to one shilling and three
Eenco per week, thoy appointed one of their mim
er Steward, to collect and take care of the stock,
and keep a rcgidar account thereof.
After this association had continued for some
timo, several persons who had a knowledge of tho
French tongue, became members, that they might
improve themselves in that language, no other be
ing yet allowed to be spoken in tho socictv; and as
donates would sometimes naturally arise, they
found it necessary to have a presiding officer and
two constables; but their number being small, it
was agreed that their Steward should be the Pre
sident, and bo addressed by the title of "Mr. Stew
ard."
These regulations continued until tho first of
September, 1737, when they made further rules,
dated the regular comnencoment of the club from
that day, admitted the English language to be
spoken, and adopted the namo of the Carolina
Club.
Mnnv disputes and disturbances arose amongst
them between this period and the 1th of April,
1738, whereby tho Club had nearly undergone a
dissolution. "But, happily, before that day the
members agreed to frame now rules, alter the for
mer name to that of tho Carolina S^jiclv, admit
no language to bo Bpokcn butF.ngl?Hh, and to have
the following officers, viz: a Steward, to he their
Eresiding officer; two Wardens as assistants to
im, and a Treasurer to he elected annually; it
was also agreed that a Clerk and two Constables
should bo chosen quarterly; which being done, tho
whole stock, amounting to ?218 16s. currency, was
put into the hands of the Treasurer, and the new
rules were signed by all those who choso to con
tinuo members. At this time the Society consist
ed of forty-three members; they then appointed
Tuesday in Easter W^ck for their annual meeting
and for the election of their principal ofiicor?.
The foregoing account is nearly taken from tho
introduction to tho sixth edition of tho rules, and
giveB tolerably satisfactory information of the ori- !
gin And progress of tho institution. . Wo tbenco,
further learn that tho then existing rules tended
rather to induco confusion than promote peace
and good order; in consequence of which, a com
mittee was appointed to revise and new model '
them; tins being done, and approved on the 1st of '
May. 1739, they were engrossed and called the ori
ginal or constitutional rules.
. - ? ?
Canada, ar.? !Ue United States.
ANNEXATION DISCUSSED AND DENOUNCED.
A Quebeo-, dispatch to tho Toronto Leader, of
August 14, says:
Some conversation has beon caused to-day by an
incident that occurred publicly last night in the ?
St. Louis Hotel. In the office of that establish- j
nient several American tourists were conversing j
with a number of members of Parliament, among (
them Mr. Christie, of the Upper House, Sir. White, (
of Halton, Mr. O'Halloran, of Mississippi, Mr. Ma- j
gill, of Hamilton, Mr. Walsh, of Norfolk, when tho j
subject turned on the probability of war with tho j
United States. Messrs.'White ahd O'Halloran ex- i
pressed the conviction that in, the event of war not ]
one-half of tho active militia, or people of Canada, j
would consent to serve against the Americans, and |
that the manifest destiny and only safety of this -
Provinco was annexation to the United States. Mr.
Magill, indignant at these sentiments, warmly re- ?
pucliated them, and condemned in just terms "men j
who, having :worn as members of Parliament to '<
sustain the H 'one and uphold tho constituent, j
cast such slanderous imputations upon the lovalty (
of the pcoplo of Canada. Ho also censured the i
"grave senator" Christie for listening quietly to i
these disloyal utterances, and giving a tacit assent i
to them. Then, turning to the Americans, who <
might as well go away with the opinion that Cana- <
dilu?s are disloyal to tho core, Mr. Magill asked i
them whether, thd case were reversed, they would t
not despise men who-acted towards their country (
as Messrs. White and O'Halloran acted towards t
this. ' i
Mr. Magill has been much praised for his manly i
vindication of Canadian loyalty, and his castigation <
of the faithless Canadian legislators. 1
The discount ori American invoices for the week I
is 20 per cent. 1
*.* i
Southebn News by Teleobaph.?Sinco tho end 1
of the war we have boen making efforts to ro-estab- '
lisb telegraphic communication with the South, ]
for the benefit of the public; but obstructions were .1
placed in the way by .tho War Pepartmont. A dis- ]
patch, received yesterday, explains the reason why j
the public have been shut out from telegraphic
intercourse with ?ho Southern States. It is that
tho lines aro overburdened with government busi- '
Bess when not used py private commercial tolo- (
grams. It strikes us that tills is very poor logic.
If private business dispatches aro permitted to go ]
ovor th?'lines, why not the press be accommo- J
dated? Why should a few individuals bo favored l
and tho public excluded? ' Tho press is the con- I
servfltor of tho interests of the commercial com- <
munity as well is of'tho whole "pooplo, and if dis- i
fatches on commercial laatters were published in 1
he nowspapers, all cir.sses would get the news, <
and ho oue individual could take advantage: of it. '
It may be quite fair that the government should i
have the first claim upon tho telegraph linen which i
have been reconstructed at their own expense; but i
if any fa vorn are t> he granted., w? think that the i
press, which represents the'publio r.t largo, is en
titled to thora.?ZT. r. Herald.
-,i.
A chemist of this country has patented a new
ink from the residuum of petroleum refineries, or "
the fc'>-called waste produot. Inks for printing )
have been made since the origin of .printing from
linseed oil and resin, and many substitutes have 1
been tried with indifferent success. IJnsood oil J
and resin have been very dear, and will continue '
D>/or BOmo time, and any improvement in the '
DresSi?8 fftVti* Trfil be welcomed by the press. The '
deodor?eS611*1011 consista hi taking the residuum, '
thorobyrn??SJ?3 carbonizing it with the waste acid, ; !
of tho ink wbWt oort of wax for the foundation
black. Tlie ink ir^i?8 but little rosta or l??p
tho type, and leavosl^ fee,d we]kdo?8 pot fl?
tho paper. The pricn;]?\oolor without staining i
ingredients used, ehc^beS?*?*?? ??AllA. c0J>t of <
seed oil. ink?.-Some-fine coluVh?" tb** ?f Un* 1
aniline odloW are'also said to bo cSJnk* from the. i
brilliant than those made-from v??r ??dmore
have also a fine specimen of "white hecSttPn- Wo
from petroleum, besides .''tanner'? oU,1*Sn,a(le
1 sperm oil," and ''?perm candlea" from the oafiajo
Negiws In New ?rlcam?.
THE QUESTION OK BOVXaUOl-??DOB ABKL. OS CON
TRABANDS AND NKOBO Sn?TBAOE AOITATOH8.
The charge of Judge Abel was dolivered on tho
7th instant, and fi?>m it wo quote as follows :
The calling together a Grand Jury at this season
?.f the vear is unusual, but I yield to the earnest
request ?if the Attorm-v-Genoral of the State. Hon.
1). T. Lvnoh, who has ? better opportunity ?/know
ing the"pressing demanda of publie interest than a
Judge on the bench could have.
tcntiou.
It is the congregration of contrabands in this
city without employment, or disposition to procuro
it, crowded together in filthy and unwholosomo
?lens, ill provided for. They will invito disoaso and
epidemic, and become food for its ravages, and will
greatly endanger the general health or tho city.
I counsel yon to confer with tho beat informed
of your fellow-citizens in different portions of the
State and city as to the best modo of provitling
against this influx, and to deviso and suggest ways
mid means of employment for them hi tue country
at remunerativo wages.
There is, gentlemen, a Bureau of Frccdmcn's
labor existing in the State, oroctod by an act of
Congress and n-gulatod by military authority. It
was created, I believe, as a war necessity, anil hav
ing filleil its mission bv the return of peace, I en
tertain no doubt but that it will soon bo removed,
and tho whole subject be reforrod to tho Stato
authorities.
Every honorable means should bo used that can
be devised to induce the Government to removo it
at the earliest day possible.
It appears to b? at war with the best interest of
the colored people, and destructivo of tho produc
ing interest of the State. Planting and farming
cannot bo regulated by hours; they are required
to bo pressed at certain times and seasons, which
is followed by corresponding relaxation nt other
seasons, which more than compensates for tho
extra exertions of laborers.
These unfortunate pcoplo leave a permanent
home, where they have no rent to pay, a healthy
air to breathe aiid a fair compensation for their
labor, and drift in herds to the city, whero you
find them crowded together in filth and idlonoss.
Tho Bureau, it appears to me, if continued in
time of peace, would go to history as a nursery of
discontent ami a school of vagrancy, alike destruc
tive to tho interest of the freedmen and tho Stato
and city.
Labor must regulate itself upon the meritorious
conduct of la borer?. If tho masa of these people
can be, induced to remain at their old homos,
whero tuoy are comfortable, have a pure air to
breathe, and their morals protected, thoy would
have more ready cash at the end of the year than
by drifting from place to placo.
"The former owners were induced by tho Consti
tution and laws of the United States and of this
State to invest largo sums of money in slaves and
houses for their protection, and it is just and fit
ting that these people, now that they aro freo, bo
encourage?! by the Government to remain at homo.
Gentlemen,"there is a class of politicians among
us who seem to think their political merits can be
discovered, understood and appreciated by tho col
ored pcoplo only. They induce many of them to
believe that all* they now require to make them
groat and happy, is' to be admitted to the right of
Franchise. Tins" creates discontent. With these
gentlemen I differ. I am of tho mind that if the
colored race advance in knowledge, civilization or
wealth, it will be by honest conduct, faithful, con
stant andpersevcriiig industry. And this I believe
to be the language of the true friends of the color
ed man. The respectable and well-behaved among
them in the city of New Orleans have ac?piired their
property and 'standing in that way and not by
voting.
If admitted to the ballot box they would ho herd
ed to the polls to vote for a favorite of their em
ployees, and if my premises are correct, these poli
ticians would be "gravely disappointed, and should
be well satisfied if they received one vote of a hun
dred.
Gentlemen, I recommend you to appeal to tho au
thorities at Washington in favor of encouraging
the colored people to remain at their homes by
every means in the power of the Government; and
I am sure that Major-General Canby, whoBO very
name is honor and discipline to the army, strength
to tho Government, and confidence to tho pcoplo,
will, as far us consistent with his own instructions,
not turn a deaf ear to respectful suggestions or
appeals you may make for stopping the ingress and
turning the tide of these contrabands to The couu
try, whore they can i'md employment and be useful
to the Stato and themselves.
Wo are bound by our oaths to obey all acts of
Congress, all proclamations of the President of tho
United States, until abrogated, repealed or de
clared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court of
the United 8tates. Every good Southerner will
implicitly obey, for tho sake of upholding law and
order; but his right to petition and remonstrate is
inalienable, as long as we nro a free people.
A God-inspired Trojan said:
"To Bpcak hin thoughts la every frecdman's right,
In peace and war, in counsel and in fight."
Your powers in the premises arc limited to sug
gestions, petition and remonstranco; let them be
respectful, let them be earnest and just.
; ??^-? ?
Augusta.
Augusta has presented a vecy lively bueincas ap
poaranco for the past two weeks, but more ao the
present week than we recollect for years. Cotton
iias come in freely by wagon and rail, and found
jood demand. It is being repacked and shipped
is fast as transportation can he procured. The
jreat sale of government stock and wagons at
tracted a very largo number of farmers and freed
men. The nontis have been crowded and the
itrects thronged from early morn till dewy eve.
En addition to tho two steamers Union and R. H.
Vlay, built here, and lying at the wharf Sunday,
:ho*Amazon and Helen* arrived that day from a'a
vannnh, with heavy cargoes of freight.
Our old merchants, the solid men of Augusta,
ire rousing up, and gotting roadyio vie in the race
!or prosperity, with those who come in the wake of
?vcnv.'i, to turn a thrifty penny on the wing, or who
?avc tume to make Augusta* their home. There
ire no vacant stores or dwellings, and rents are
lot near as reasonable as before the war. The
uerchantB, howover, are doing mostly a local busi
ie8S only, supplying tho innumerable* wants of the
:ity and surrounding country. The enormous
marges on froight by the river?the chief route
low open?of four cents per pound, make it out of
tho question for them to compete with tho mor
. hants of Atlanta for the trade on the upper end of
ho Georgia Kailroad. Goods can bo Drought so
mich lower from Nashville; besides, no prudent
nan w?l bring a heavy stock at tho present tariff
m freight, with the risk of having to compete with
;hoso who will in a short time he able to receive
:hcir goods atiesa than half the present rates. The
joatB now havo a monopoly, anil of course aro en
itled to profit by their good fortune. Wo trust,
lowcver, from no ill feeling to their energetic and
mtorprising owners, but for the good of our whole
;ity, that tho connection by rail with Savannah will
ae pushed forward to completion with every posai
?le energy?then, with euro communications: and
reduced freight charges, may wo confidently ex
pect Augusta to regain and maintain her well earn
;d commercial advantages.?Constitutionalist.
???>
Change ts the Custom House.?Our dispatches
From Washington this morning announce tho fo
il o val of Simeon Draper, the Collector of Customs
it this port, and tho appoint in cut of Hon. Preston
Sing aa his successor. Tho change is to take
place on the 1st of September. This proves that
['resident Johnson is determined to carry out his
policy In regard to the Southern States, and in
iends that no subordinate officials shall be retain
h1 who attempt to throw obstacles in its way. This
& encouraging to all friends of the administra
ion, and we doubt not la but the beginning of tho
lecapitation of tho friends of Chase. This remo
val upsets many nicely arranged plans, and is the
precursor of the overthrow of the Loyal League
ntriguors, who have mado the Custom Houses
ind Internal Bevenne offices their nesting place
'or some time past.?New York Herald.
--?,. a? ?
Tho New Orleans Picayune nays tho talk of emi
grating to Brazil continues In that part of the coun
try, the emigrants being discontented Southern
Families, who. now that tho rebellion is over, can -
lot make up their minds to livo in this country.
Fhe country to which tho proposed emigrants pro
pose to ?a ia the upper valley of thoToc-ntiua
River, whose chief se a port Is Para. It is a country
similar to that watered by the Amazon. The Pio
lynni ia of the opinion that the movement will not
imount to much: home ties are too strong for any
;onfliderable emigration to take place. Tho Texans
ire talking tho samo way. -
-_-?f. "'
Histoey ov the Wab?Intebesttno CtmioarriBs.
Wo loam that Mr. Edward A Pollard, whose name
is already known aa au annalist of the war, and as
roe of the oditore of the Bichmond Examiner, has
been recently making a tonr of the South for the
purpose of collof u'ig materials and memoirs
touching the war, witu the view of writing an ola
borato hin tory of tho paat four veara. Mr. P. has
been eo gaccoagful in Bichmond that ho has secur
ed many of tho original papers of Gen, Lee, and a
completo aerie? of Eia dispatches, which, of tueav
solve?, will bo the most interesting epitome of tho
events of tho war. Somo of these autograph dis
patches will bo of infinite interest to collectors of
curiosities of tho war.? Whig.
OBITUARY.
DEPARTED THIS LIFE, on tho 22d of July, IMft, at
Waltorboro", aftor a protracted antl painful UlncKs. Mrs.
ELIZA It. GLOVER, aged 75 years, relict of the lato
Mr. PETUnGnoVEB, of the same place.
Tho subject of this brief memorial was, for ? long
course of year?, an unconimou Bu?cror, by lingering
and acute disease. Her Heavenly Father, in His inlinitv
wisdom, BBwiUnnlBii-t her with more than ordinary
' to verify. In her
h much tribu
guish, and tWtWC^Bkmsm
case, the scriptural maxim, that
latiou wo must enter the Kingdom of He
depths of her sorrows and sufferings only
tho moro upon tho grace of her covenant with God,
stimulated her the stronger to cling to the Cross of her
loving Saviour.
Por about forty years she was a warm-hearted and
consistent professor of the religion of her Muster?lov
ing His service, submitting to His will, and endeavoring
to perform her duties in the varied relations of life.
Retiring in her manners and induatrlous in her habits,
she sought her happiness in tho bosom of her family
and tho discharge of domestic duties, and greatly en
deared herself to her household by her faithful and un
tiring attentions. Gonorous, too, In her disposition, she
rendered assistance, according to her ability, to the
needy; and was both warm-hearted and liberal to the
church of which she was o member, making a kind do
nation at a most opportune season.
Passing thus through a long course of year?, endea
voring to serve tho Lord to the best of her ability and in
her humble, quiet uud devoted way, she was called to
testify to the faithfulness of her Redeemer in supporting
and comforting her through months of most agonizing
suffering?. Aud It was upon this long aud last bed of
illness that bIic shone most brighUy as a patient Christian
sufferer, never murmuring, but ever praying for faith
and patience to enduhk as well as do her Master's will.
Longing and panting to bo at rest, she nevertheless
bowed her will to the will Supreme, and making the
utterances of Job her honest language?"All the days of
my appoiuted time will I wait, till my chango come."
And when that change did como, it found her plumed for
the skies and prepared for immortality. "Precious Sa
viour, precious Saviour, take me to thyself," was her
frequent and fervent outcry, and, dressed for immor
tality and glory, she was called, as wo trust, to bo with
her Lord forever.
Her numerous friends, while they mourn her depart
ure, acquiesce in her removal; and her dutiful aud
stricken children, while they feel and deploro her loss,
yet feel freo to say?"Not our will, but thy will, O Lord,
be done." May the affliction be divinely sanctified to
them all.
&B~ NOTICE.? THE MANAGERS OF ELECTIONS
of the Parishes of St. Philip and St. Michael arc notified
that a mcctluj of the same will bo held at the Masonic
Hall, on Monday Evening, 21st inst., at five o'clock.
CHARLES LOVE,
August 19 2 Chairman Board of Managers.
43bT- NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT APPLICA
TION will be made at the next Session of cho Legislature
for au AMENDMENT OF THE CHARTER OF THE
CHARLESTON GAS LIGHT COMPANY.
August 21 mth
t}?~ THE PEOPLE'S TICKET FOR THE CONVEN
TION.?The following gentlemen are respectfuUy named
as suitable to represent tho people of Charleston in the
forthcoming Convention. They >\re all well known for
their honesty and sincerity, and ore truly representatives
of the masses :
G. W. WILLIAMS.
A. F. RAVEN EL.
J. M. EASON.
WILLIAM LEBBY.
W. S. HENEREY.
W. J. GAYER.
H. F. 8TROHECKER.
L. T. POTTER.
W. J. BENNETT.
THEODORE G. BARKER.
T. R. LOCKWOOD.
A. CAMERON.
H. T. PEAKE.
?. K. CHICHESTER.
August 10 wfm3*
?3- UNION TICKET?THE FOLLOWING GENTLE
MEN aro submitted as candidates for election aa mem
bers of the Convention, being those who recognize the
existing state of political affairs, and wlU use every effort
to reatoro the State to her proper position in the Federal
Union:
1. D. L. McKAY.
2. GEO. 8. BRYAN.
3. Hon. A. G. MACKEY.
4. JAS. B. CAMPBELL.
C. R. W. SEYMOUR.
C. M. P. O'CONNOR.
7. Col. A. O. ANDREWS.
8. DAN. HORLBECK.
0. F. A. SAWYER.
10. G. W. DDXGLE.
11. GEO. W. WILLIAMS.
12. JNO. HEART.
13. H. W. SCHRODER.
14 DAVID BARROW.
Iff. BERNARD O'NEILL.
16. Rev. JOS. B. SEABROOK.
17. C. B. BREWSTER.
18. H. JUDGE MOORE.
19. B. 8. THARIN.
20. GEO. S. HACKER. * August 15
t?f DR. J. P. CHAZAL HAS RESUMED THE PRAC
TICE OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY. Office and resi
dence. No. 9 Society-street. fstu3* August 18
??-DR. T. REENSTJEBNA, HAVING RESUMED
his Practice of MEDICINE AND SURGERY, will be
found at his Office, No. 100 BftOAD-STREET, between
King aud Meeting-streets.
N. B.?Diseases of a Privato Nature cured with dis
patch. August Iff
jOS-BATCHELOn/S HAIR DYE !? THE ORIGINAL
ond best lu the world I Tho only true and perfect HAIR
DYE. Harmless, Rellablo and Instantaneous. Produces
Immediately a splendid Black or natural Brown, with
out Injuring the hair or akin. Remedies-the ill effects o
bad dyes. Soul by all Druggists. The genuine is signed
WILLIAM A. BATCHELOR. Also,
REGENERATING EXTRACT OF MILLEFLEURS,
For restoring and Beautifying the Hah-.
CHARLES BATCHELOR, New York.
August 17_1 y r__
HEADQUARTERS. FIRST 8UB-DISTRICT, )
Mii.itauy Distoict or Chabxeston,
Charleston-, August 18, I8t?5. )
[Special Oudeus, No. 113.]
V. THE FOLLOWING NAMED PERSON8 ARE HEREf
BY appointed Pilot Commissioners of this Port, and will
Immediately enter upon their duties as such : Captain
JOHN FERGUSON, Captain CECIL O. NEU., Mr. F. P.
ELFORD, Mr. JAMES H. TAYLOR, Mr. JAMES R.
PltlNGLE. '
By order of Brevet Brigadier-General W. T. Bekkett,
Commanding First Sub-District.
CHARLES O. CHIPMAN,
Captain 84th Mass. Vols, and A. A. A. G.
August 31 ' ' 3
HEADQUARTERS, FIRST 8UB-DISTRICT, )
M ILITAJt Y DlSTBICT OF ChabLESTOH, >
Chajii.rb-ion, S. C, August 17, lB6ff. J
[SreoiAt, OBUEas, No. 112.] i
I. CAPTAIN W. W. 8TEPHKN80N, lMth N. Y. VOLS.,
Is announced as Post Treasurer,
Captain ROBERT R. NEWKLL, Mth Mass. Vols., will
turn over to Captain STEPHENSON all funds and re
cords pertaining to the Post Treasurer's Office, taking
his receipts for the same.
By order of Brevet Brigadier-General W. T. Bknheit,
Commanding First Sub-Dlatrlct
CHARLES O. CHIPMAN,
: Ciptaln 54th Massachusetts Volunteers, A. A. A. G.
August 21 -?"
HEADQUARTERS, FIRST SUB-DISTRICT, ) ;
Militajit Dnrraio? or Cuabxcston, |
OHA?lMTOH, S.O., August Iff, 1885. )
t? MB. G. W. DINGLE IS HEREBY REUEVKD FROM
duty m Ajnoelat? Judge of the Second Circuit Court of
the First Bub-Diotrict, Military District of Oharieoton, on
account of 111 health. ? . ,,
n, Mr. ALFRED H. D?NKIN is hereby appointed
Associate Judge of ?ha Second Circuit Court of tho First
Sub-District, MUitary District, of Charleston, vie? G.,W.
Dinolb, Esq., relieved.
By order of Brevet Brigadier-General, W. T. Bsmwrr,
Commanding s?ott CHARLES O. CHIPMAN,
ttUt'mtn C?ptala Mtb. Maas. Vols,, A. A, A. QiT
Offioul i % W, toWf&tov, UW? K, X, ,Y? *nd A, Ai
? ft. ??M ', -. to*/, , AofMtiT
THEATKE.
TITF THEATRE MILITARY HAM., WENTWOBTH
tflu^?rrWEKN MEETING AND KINO.^
UNPRECEDENTED ATTRACTION !
Enga??mieut for a row night? only ol Uta celcl
Irish Cornelian, ______ T .... _r
Mit. T. J. O'SULLnAN.
lato of thirQucen'??Thcutre, Dublin, ami re-appenrar
of the old favorite, ___,
MB. W. SIMraON.
The Company, returning thanks to the public: for
kind patrounpe bestowed upou tliem oni previous occj
?Iouh, denlrc to ouiiouuci that th?y will spare noith?!
? xpeilBP or labor in trying to have the kind support cot
tinned. __. . _, , _1
The performance will commence This fc.vciun??j
Aitoiist 2lHt, with John Brougham's celebrated dmmu ot
TUE IRISH EMIORAST: OB, TEMPTATION.
lorn Boha?nk .MR. ???Xft&. ?.
O'Brien (theEmigrant).MR. O SULLIAAM
?l,...,-..y ".MB& BOBWELL.
piuTSH ____I____N<; ! LAUGHABLE FABCEI !
Poliv BoHB "* *? - - **
COMIC HT^
August 21
THE II\DKRHH;\KI)
HAVE ASSOCIATED THEMSELVES TOGETH
under the name ofOOLHURN, HOWELL ?V CC
lor the purposo of transacting a GENERALIN8UBAN0
AND COMMISSION AGENOY in this city, and rcapec
full v solicit tho patronage of their friends and the nubil
generally. J. H. colbuun, ? ??.?..???ii.
SIDNEY 8. HOWELL, j Charleston,
H. E. NICHOLS, Columbia. L
August 21
r
NOTICE.
TUE FIRM OF COSGBOVE * FARRALLEY WA
diaaolvt-d on the 18th February", I860, by mutiil
consent. JAMES COSGROVI?.'
AllgMttt 3*^ A. FARRALLEY.
WANTED, |A RESPECTABLE Will'ii
WOMAN, to do general house work In a plcasaa
village in the country. Wages and a permanent houfc
may bo secured by such u one. Apply at Chariest
Hotel for two days, between the hours of twelvo at
two_2*_ _August 21
WANTED. A RESPECTABLE WHIT
WOMAN as Cook and Housekeeper. To one ha
ng good recommendation?, good wages and pormanei
employment will be given. AddreB?, for three days,
A. B.C., Daily Ncwo office._3 _ August IS
WANTED TO BUY, A FIRST CI? A S
BUOGY HORSE, from 0 to 9 years old, good si
and ?rtyle, warranted sonnd in every respect. Apply
Mr. KEGLEB, No. 255 King-street, corner of Bcaufai
street, between 10 A. M. and 2 P. M.
August IB
rO RENT, THE WAVERLEY HOUSE, A
tho Bend of Klng-strect.
ALSO,
DWELLING HOUSES AND STORES in King-street
Apply to H. H. RAYMOND,
Cornor of Water-street and tho Battery
August 18 ftnw
NOTICE TO TRAVELERS.
ON AND AFTER FRIDAY. AUGUST 18. DATI
TRAINS FOR PASSENGERS AND FREIGHT w
be run over tho Wilmington an?l MancheRtor Railroa
between Wilmington and Kingvillc. Thcso Trains w
connect with Trains on the Northeastern Railroad, CI
raw and Darlington Railroad, and Wilmington and Wi
don Railroad. There is daily communication Nor
(rom Wilmington by rail.
There is dally communication by Stages to Columb
connecting with these Trains. HENRY M. DRANE,
August 21 13 General Superintendent.
NOTICE.
THE SUBSCRIBER HAVING RETURNED TO TR
city, wlU contract for all kinds o? H0U8E-BUIU
ING AND REPAIRING. W. H. ORUVER.
No. 144 Wentworth-street
Or at Dawson ?? Blackman'u, No. 17 Broad-stroet.
August 21 _?
FOR CHARTER.
Excursions Around Charleston Harbor!
THE FINE FAST STEAMER ROCKLAND, GEORG.
W. BEAUFORT Commander, having a handsoml
saloon and splendid accommodations. /
Apply to ARCHIBALD GETTY & CO.. I
August 17 Nos. 12(1 and 128 Meeting-street.!
ATTORNEY AT LAV
OFFH?E OVER M'KAY A CAStPBEIX, HA3E1>STREET,
NEXT DOOR TO POST-OFFICE.
He wiB act as Agent in procuring PARDONS and
justing CLAIMS on Treasury Department.
August 16
J. 1ST. EOBSON
HAS RESUMED THE
COMMISSION BUSINESS
AT HIS OLD STAND,
No. 62 EAST BAY.
4?- PartlculEr attention given to the salo of COTTO
FLOUR, CORN, etc., and, from his long experience,
feels confident of giving satisfaction. He will also i
tend to tho RECEIVING AND FORWARDING BUf
NESS. 10* August 14
WILLIS & CHISOLM,
FACTORS, COMMISSION MERCHANT
AND
SHIPPING AGENTS,
office, nrcrxs house,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
E. WILLIS.A. B. ?H?S0LS)
WHiL ATTEND TO THE PURCHASE, 8ALE AN
SHIPMENT (to Foreign and Domestic Ports) ?
COTTON, RICE, LUMBER, NAVAL STORES: to th
Collection of Drafts, Purchase and Sale of all Sccurith?
Consignments of vessels solicited.
BEFEBS to:
Messrs. JOHN FRASER A: CO.. Charleston, 8. C.
Messrs. GEO. W. WILLIAMS & CO., Charleston, 8. ?7,
Mesara. GEO. A. HOPLEY k CO., Charleeton, S. C.
GEO. 8CHLEY, Esq., Augusta, Ga.
T. ?. METCALF, Esq., Augusta, Ga.
F .?i-s. CLARK, DODGE k CO., New York. . V
Messrs. MURRAY k NEPHEW. Now York.
Messrs. E. W. OLARK & CO.. Philadelphia. Psnn. I
Messrs. PENDERGAST, FEN WICK k CO., Baltimore!
Md.
Messrs. SAM'L HARRIS k SONS, Baltimore. Md.
OS" Tho Columbia Phoenix wiU publish every othei
lay for one month, and other South Carolina papen
weekly for the same period of time, and send bills totbii
Dfince. August 14
I
DAVID BARROW,
Wholesale Commission Merchau
AND
FACTOR,
nSTp. 153 Eaac Bay,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
; 49-COSIGNHENTS SOLICITED.-ft?
' August 14 _. _ mwf lmo
H. F. BAKER & C0.t " r
SHIPPING AND C0MMISSI01
MERCHANTS,
No. SO Cumberland-Street
fl. r. BAXKB.X. F. SWEEOAN.cms. K BAKU
August 14 _ :_6
ARCHIBALD OETTY & CO.,
SHIP & STEAMBOAT AGENT?},
. .AND .
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Nos. 126 AND 128 MEETING-ST?tEE?,
Chorloston, S. C.
EDMUND A. BOUDER k CO., Philadelphia. PonnJ
ITvTHaSTON, FOX * CO., Agents,'New York.
F. A. WILOOZSON, Agent. Oratigebnrg, 8. O.
LIBERAL ADVANCES MADE OK CONSIGN
August IS | _^^
RICHARD ALLISON,
COMMISSION MEBOHA]
No. 96 BEEKMAN-STRHETj,
WKW YOHI
COT^l??NDOTB^aPRODUCK'?ot? CATC
MISSION. GHneral Horohandi?. p?JHJ??nH
femrded to wAw? . too?

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