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The Charleston daily news. (Charleston, S.C.) 1865-1873, August 26, 1865, Image 1

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VOL. I....NO. 13.
CHARLESTON, S. C, SATURDAY, AUGUST 36, 1865.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
THE
CHARLESTON DAILY NEWS,'
iCATiiCART, McMillan & morton,
PROPRIETORS.
No. 18 HAYNE-STKEET.
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Tho following are tho Agents for this paper:
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G. L. PRATT, Columbia.
M. M. QUINN k BRO., Augusta, Ga.
H. ESTELL, Savannah, Ga.
FROM VK W ORLEANS.
[C*??rapond</ice of the Boston Fost.]
New Orleans, August 6.
?THE COTTON CROP.
I have Been ho many crudo statements about old
cotton crops of tho South, tho probable stock on
hand, and the quantity, including the growing
cropj.tocome to market, that I have been to the
trouble of looking up tho exact figure?. You
?mow that thiB industry and trade havo boon so
dniportant to our port for many years, that wo
havo kept doily, weekly, monthly and yearly tho
most accurate accounts of it. A largo number of
careful mon are constantly employed on tho sub
ject, for tho press, buyers, sellers, and factors
generally, as also for tho planters, and their
figures can scarcely be wrong. In default of the
exact'figures, these same mon are equally adepts
at estimates, and often these estimates have va
3'ied but slightly from tho actual crops, receipts
and BalcB. Many, in fact, are bo well acquainted
with the planting region that it would be very difii
cull/for them to go wrong. From these authentic
aourcea, I have made out tho following table of the
total cotton crops for fifteen years past, the re
ceipt? at New Orleans, and the average prices. It
la important and enriouc :
Total Crop, N. O. Average
"Year bales.' receipts, price.
1861-2.3,616,027 1,429,18.1 8c
18G2-3.3,262,882 1,664,864 9c
1853-4.2,930,027 1,440,779 8>i"c
1854-5.9,847,339 1,248,768 9 1-lOc
1855-6.3,627,845 1,769,293 9c
1856-7.2,9ir.),619 1,513,247 12 }{,c
1857-8.3,113,962 1,078,0 It) 11 ??C
1858-9.3,651,481 1,774,298 11K?
1859-60.4.C75.770 2,255,448 10?.C
IfiCO-l.3,699,92ft 1,849,811 lie
1861-3 esti'd..3,500,000- 88,880 10c
loo^-3.esti,d..l,100,000 22,078 68??c
1863-4.csti'd.. 500,000 131,044 85c
1864-5. CB?U. 600,000 Thus far 192,150 Aug., 38<S\44c
The above estimates are from observation and
calculation. In that of 1861-2,1 have made a de
duction of 200,000 as compared with the preceding
crop, becauso of tho breaking out of the war.
Early in the ecaeon und all through it, young men
were hurrying off to Virginia, taking many negroes
with them. The disturbed state of affairs and
withdrawal of labor were certainly equal to
200,000 balea. In the following year, well informed
gentlemen, who were constantly traversing the,
cotton belt, think the crop could not have exceeded
my estimate. In 1863-4 a much larger crop was
. planted in the lower Mississippi valley, bayous of
Louisiana, and other regions within the Federal
lines, hut the worms and heavy rains did much
damage to it, not only on tho river but in Tennes
see, and especially in Texas. No one estimates it
higher than 500,000. The estim?t o of the growing
crop is, perhaps, less to bo rolled upon. About
two-thirds of a crop was planted In Texas, which
will givo 180,000 bales. About the same propor
tion was planted in some parts of Louisiana, His
?iseippi, Alabama, and Tennessee. In several
States, or parts of States, none whatever was
planted to speak of, because of tho presence or
breaking up of the hostile, armies. This was tho
case in the Bod River country and parts of Ark
ansas,, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, 'Molina,
and Florida. The crop all through this rich cot
ton region Is very small, and the best statisticians
put down tho total growing crop as low as 000,000
boles. I think 600,000, however, a more accurate
estimate, and have hopes that the crop, which is a
very fine ono, and ae yot unhurt by worms or bad
weather, will even go above these figures.
STOCK ON HAXD.
And now as regards the stock on hand and to
come to market. It is well known that the crop of
1860-61 was all gotten off, probably cleaner than
any previous one." Wo have, then, the following
figure?:
Three old crops...... ;.6,100,000
Growing crop. 000,000
Total. ,t...:.I....8,700,000
Deduct old crop export*. 500,000
Three years' consumption.2,200,000
Burned, as estimated.?.....'....... 600,000
Damaged, as estimated.,.. 400,000
Total exports, consumption and destroyed. /3,80O,000
Leaving for ei-fort. 1,900,000
EXPORTO.
The exports from New Orleans since the lvcgin
ning of the year have been, up to date, 126,130
kales; how many from other ports I hare not tho
data to say. It will be borne in mind hero, that I
have added into the Bum total tho estimated grow
ing crop of 600,000 bales, so that we shall have no
moro till another year. As to "burned" and
"damaged," estimated abovo, I havo given the
opinions of others. I am quite confident, how
ever, that tho estimate is far too high. The open
lag of water-cotirscs and railroads has been fol
lowed by an influx of the staple that fully proves
it. In but very few ease? would the people burn it
themoorws, ond sometimes^ as wot* the caso jilth
Dick Taylor, o?ficerA'liigh in command ref?fi?il to'
ordor it. X am Justjinf-Miiy-d. that tho.pooplevof
the Otiacjnts conntfy trag' trenchcH,' lined tii?m
well with timber, and buried thoir cotton in. them.
These hidden treasures ap? now, for tho first timo,
coming to light, and making their way down t?
nurket. The awarap?, ??so, aro full of cotton, and
it will soon be coming 'along. As" to the j"dan,
aged," I imagine the sorious injury to it will prove
Wrb. Ifitf ?Xtcnidve thfta at flj?t believed, Good
bagging aud ropo wiU make the most of it all right
again.
IUECK1TT8 OK TUX WERK.
The total reeeipta tho laut oommcrciolwcck have
been 25,455 bales. Export? 10,010; to Now York
7812; to BoBton 2027; to Liverpool 1071. Stock on
hand, including yesterday? receipt?, t3G,110. Thus
far tho woathcr and rivera have favored tho com
ing in of tho staple; buyers, especially for epin
iicre, aro numerous, and only o-h thing operate?
against a very act:,o business, and that is want of
freight room in fast stoamore. Tho aolea of tho
week, therefore, have been only 8500 bolea, against
9000 last week, and 9500 tho week before. The
market doses at 3r3<g40c. for low n?ddling and 42
@44c. for middling. The saleB of tho last thrco
weeks have been about 27,000 bales, mostly to
spiuners, though the sp?culative demand hats
made itself felt. Gold is still the most acceptable
pay. Every steamer that comes brings thirty to
fifty thousand dollars. Those which nailed from
Hew York last Saturday, and now due, have on
board some $300,000. Freight? continued to ad
vance till some of the late Bteomere have gotten
Sc. A large number of vessel? have lately arrived,
adding so much to our cotton tonnage, that prices
ure'now tending downwards. There are twelve
steamships here in port, and four more arc on the
way. They are all in this profitable cotton car
rying traue. Among the new steamship enter
prises in the Ncsliaimock, of 2000 toss, built at
Philadelphia for tho New Orleans trade. Wo for
merly had two steamships from that city. The
Sou?cr went down to South America, the Electric
Spark to the bottom of tho ocean under rebel
pilotage. This is the beginning and ending of
t Philadelphia and New Orleans steamship commu
nication.
STEAMSHIP LINES.
Among others I notice that the Haze, North Star
and Matanzas aro alBO bound out here, all after
cotton. The Cahawba is likewise here, and your
Young Rovor arrived yesterday. So you see my
prognostication ab?nt sea-room for steamships
-.y?B right. Boston ought to have one a week at
least; yes, two for that city of Bolid men and cot
ton trade. "Tho Now England Cotton Manufac
turers' Association" is noticed by all our factories
hero, as we notice everything connected with cot
ton. 1 am sorry to say, in closing, that the army
worm is doing damage in somo parts of our conn
try, and especially in Texas. The Galveaton News
says it has made its appearance "on many planta
tions of Wharton County, and is threatening many
of the largest fields on Caney. One entire field of
two hundred acres was totally destroyed in a Bin
gle night, and adjoining fields were threatened
with similar evil fortune." More favorable ac
count? come from other sections, and we yet hope
generally to escape both the insect and had
weather. We have hitherto had excellent weather,
but rains have now set in, just in cotton-picking
time, and some apprehensions are felt.
OKNEBA& BANKS.
Judge Dnroll yesterday paid a very high com
pliment to Major-General Banks, who is still here,
apparently enjoying himself. He said, in i cgard
to the arguments on the test oath question, that
though the General had not given many years of
hia life to the study of the law, yet with one day's
preparation, by mere strength of mind, he had
struck upon the same course of reasoning as did
Judge Tucker, in tho caso of Watkins Leigh, of
Virginia, and Chief Justico Collier, in the Alabama
Dorsey .case, and he strongly believed it based on
sound law. And he added, "if the gentleman
who so ably sustained himself should become a
permament member of the Louisiana bar, ho
would bo an ornament to his profession." Gen.
Bank? imh no command here, and is supposed to
he idle; hut X presumo ho is delving into Coke and
Littleton. Dr. J. C. V. Smith, of your city, having
concluded the work of tho Christian Commission,
is about to leave for the North, with the intention
of spending a year in Europe. Ho has made hosts
of friends during his quiet residence here. The
Fung Shuey loaves this evening. Gold 1484. Ster
ling 156"f for currency.
.??
?Letter from m. Crazy Governor.
ABOUT JOHN BELL-THE CLAUSES WHO OPPOSE
BBOWNLOW.
The following letter from Governor BnowNLOw
appears in tho Knoxville Wing:
Nashville, August 5.
Rev. Dr. Sehon, after an absence at tho South
for some time, has returned, and is on his way to
Washington in search of pardon. Ho talks like a
man of sense, and admit? that he did not act like
a man of sense when ho joined in with the rebel
lion. The Doctor is thoroughly subjugated, and'
intends to make a good citizen from this out.
I have had a long interview with John Bell. He
is ten years older, in appearance, than when the
war began. His teeth aro out, and that affects his
speech. His hair and whiskers aro very gray, and
he is very much stooped, aud leans upon hia staff
liko an old man is expected to do. I treated him
very kindly. He talks very freelv about the rebel
lion, and in. opposition to it. He says the seces
sionist? in tho South are all lunatics without any
lucid intervals?that is to say, they are crazy all
the time. I believe it a principle, in law, that if a
lunatio have lucid Intervals at times, ho is respon
sible for acts perpetrated in thoso intervals. And
medical writers say that lunatics without lucid in
: terrais are incurable.
I accompanied the old gentleman to tho hcad
' quarters of General Thomas, and after a short but
agreeablo interview with the General, wo went to
the office of the Provost-Marshal-Gonoral. where
the old gentleman took the amnesty oath, and
placed himself right on tho record.
' Those who aro so greatly displeased with my
course as Governor, and wlio see auch revolting
doctrines in my editorials and proclamations, are
of tho following classes, in nine cases out of ten :
1. They aro rebels ana have boen guilty of trying
to destroy tho Government.
2. If not rebels, they ai-e rebel syninathizcrs. and
have-rebel kin involved in the rebellion, and my
teachings have not aided any in' their roloaso,
3. Last of all they are persons who have lost
their dear negroes, and they arc ontr aged with tbe
Federal Government, and at war with all who do
not regard Lincoln's emancipation proclamation
ns unconstitutional and contrary to God's Word !
W. G. BBOWNLOW, Editor of the Whig.
.-'.. ';;i ", .* ?*?*???t? i .
T?? Attempted Adduotton of Geoiwb N,'San
debs?The Toronto Leaiier nays that eight per
sons who wore concerned in the attempted abduc
tion of Geo. N. Sanders .are in custody in Montreal,
and'that a stranger named Wayne, arrested,,?!
Caughnawaga, had lii his poesusabn portraits of
Sanders, Clay, Thompson, Tucker and Jefferson.
Tl\e pttlic?iwho stopped the carriages'on the La
chine' ?oad were fired on by tho kidnappers, but
nono of the allots teok effect. Tho names'of the'
men positively connected with tho abdnotlon 4ro
Chatios E. Hogan, W. A. Burns, Walter Clayton
ami Anthony Wayne'. , Somo'of tho names are be
lie red to bo fiel it Ion*?... Tho prisoner*? will ho ex
amined and tho caao V'HJ bo JtfpiajKjQll (9 the
Queen's Bench, 1
NeVvH from Washington.
[Correspondence of the A'cti? ycrfc .TctM.)
W/.su:ngton, Aug. 16.
CONTEMPIUTED WITIIDKAWAZ, OF T3K FllENCH TUOOrS
fhox uxxico.
I believe I am warranted in Haying that in a low
days more tho public anxiety in relation to tho
Mexican question will bo sot at rest by a semi-offi
cial announcement of tho fact that tho Mexican
imbroglio has been settled hi a manner consistent
with the honor of tho American people, and in ac
cordanco with tho principles of tho Monroe doc
trine. The reported settlement is said to bo the
result of Mr. Howard's diplomatic labors for some
months past. It is said that immediately after
tho surrender of tho rebel army under General
Lee, Mr. Seward caused tho Emperor of Frauco to
bo informed, through tho proper channel, that tho
Government of tho United ?tates was then, or
Roon would bo, in a position to maintain tho prin
ciples of the Monroe doctrine ; that, owing to the
difficulty which had been experienced in suppress
ing tho rebellion, and tho length of timo which
tho work occupied, tho United States hod been
compelled to stand and look on, and tacitly consent
to some things which wcro entirely opposed to tho
spirit of our institutions; that among thom was
the establishment of a foreign monarchy in Mexi
co on tho ruins of the Mexican republic; that the
United States Government is now able to devoto
tho proper degree of attention to its foroign rela
tions; that tho Monroo Doctrino constitutes ono of
the most cherished principles of our Government,
and that the President is determined to enforce it;
that in a few weeks we would havo a veteran army
of half a million of men, who could bo thrown hito
Mexico in a few days; and that, if it became ne
cessary, this great force would be employed in tho
expulsion of Maximilian and tho Fronch troops
from Mexico, and in the restoration of tho repub
lic there. These, of courso. were not the words;
hut it is paid that this was tho tenor and effect of
tho dispatch, and that it has had tho intended ef
fect: and that tho Government has recently receiv
ed from Franco tho assurance that tho French
troops shall all be withdrawn from Mexico, and
that Maximilian himself wiU soon abdicate his
throne and return to Austria. It is only since
the receipt of this most gratifying intelligence
from Franco that orders havo been given for the
gradual disbandment of the United States troops
in Texas. They were sent thero because it was
not yet known what the decision of Napoleon would
be; and there was a prospect at ono time that
their services would be actually needed for tbe ex
pulsion of Maximilian by force. Now, however, it
is known that the Monroo Doctrino will be respect
'cd by Napoleon, and, therefore, tho necessity
which existed for their being sent to the Rio
Grande has nasscd awny. Tho Monroo Doctrine,
therefore, w?l bo established on a firmer basis
than ever before; and tho friends of Mr. Bcward
declaro that this is entirely the work of the Secre
tary of State. Tho abdication of Maximilian, and
the re-establishment of th? republican form of go
vernment in Mexico, must not ho looked for imme
diately. But that these events will take place
within a reasonable time, it is said, thero ib no
doubt whatever. I intimated, some time ago, that
if Maximilian did finally abdicate, the Secretary of
State would claim tho credit for having brought
about that residt; and if what is stated above is
founded on facts, it will bo evident that tbe Secre
tary can make out a pretty fair case.
THE RECLAIMED HUSBAND.
Mneh interest is excited in fashionable circles
here, by the return to this city of Mr. and Mrs.
G-?, whoso adventures have recontly ocenpied
so much space in tho Now York papers. Tho lady
was for many years a groat favorite in society
here, and bas many warm and influential friends.
Every one sympathises with her in tho trials she
has undergone, and hopes that her troubles and
trials are now at an end. . I do not think you would
care to have me repeat all that the gossips Bay
about this unhappy case. The husband has inti
mated his intention of living with his wifo in
future, and of giving her no ground for complaint;
and as long as lie doCs this, tho publia hau no right
to indulge m speculations about his family.
THE PBESIDENT'S H0U8E.
The President's unwillingness to leave the "White
House, causes a great deal of remark. Several
members of the Cabinet have declared that they
will not attend the meetings of that body, if they
are to bo held at the White HouBe; ond it is even
said that four of them have united in a petition to
the President, entreating him to remove to another
house, and declaring that they will not risk their
health by inhaling the poisonous malaria of the
present building, and that they will not attend the
Cabinet meetings in that house any longer.
The War In. South America.
In South America thero is always a "Military
Situation" of some kind for tho study of thoso who
feel an interest in war for itself ; but to one who
looks at it from a higher position of observation.
as a meaiis of redressing wrongs, emancipating
races, overthrowing false and injurious ideas, and
the like, and only justifiable on such ground, there
is little that is attractive or worthy of investiga
tion in these petty wars of the mongrel South
American races, which continually keep open the
doors of their Temples of Janus. Just now, how
ever, thore is a war waging between Paraguay on
the one sido, and the allied States of Brazil, the
Argentine Republic, and Uraguay, on the other,
which has assumed more than ordinary impor
tance, and possesses a very considerable degree of
interest.
The war alises out of the long-determined and
selfish desire of Brazil to extend her boundaries to
tho Rio do la Plata, on the south, and the Uraguay
on the west. Such an acquisition of territory
would give Brazil control of la Plata, and the fer
tile lands which that large stream and her tribu
taries drain, a tract of land 70.000 square miles in
extent. Tho Argentine Republic?though it is the
natural enemy of Brazil, and has had no end of
contests with its comparatively powerful neighbor,
comes into tho ?ch?me, wliich would seem to offer
the r?public few immediate advantages, while it
would give tho empire an overshadowing influence
?to repossess Paraguay, which onoe belonged to
the confederation, and open to improvement and
development the whole northern territory of the
confederation, now shut out by the narrow-minded
and restrictivo policy of Paraguay, with regard to
the navigation pf the Paraguay .Hiver. Paraguay
lights for selfish agrandizement, to resist encroach
ments, and to sustain hex policy. This, in brief,
is tho meaning of the war..
Paraguay has a population of about 00,000, un
der a military despotism, with a strong army and
a well fortified territory. She can nut 60,000 men
into tho field. Tho Argentine Republic can scarcely
furnish'?5,000. Brazil, though the largest of the
three States, cannot send more than 80,000. So,
hi tho matter of numbers, Paraguay has the ad
vantage. President Mitre lead? the Argentino
forces, President Florea the Uruguayans, and.
President Lopez tho Paraguayans.
On tho land, the contest ?bows thus far about
evenly balanced sucoeos and defeat for both par
ties. On the sea, the Paraguayans have been
badly whipped. A naval, fight took place on the
11th of June, threo leagues below the city. of Cor
rientes, in which tho Payagnayan squadron was
almost completely annihdatcd by that of Brazil.
Tho forces were of formidable size and tho fight
hotly ; contested. Tho Brazilians had nine gun
boats, mounting G2 guns, many of them rilled.
Their enemy had o i flit steamers and six floating
batteries, mounting in all 47 guns. They also had
the aid of land batteries of 80 guns, light field
pieces. Tho Paraguayans lost tlueo steamers
sunk and ono Burrendcrod; Tho remainder es
caped, but only after; having suffered what the
Brazilians claim to be irrepwablo damage. All
the accounts, whiohby tho way, are only Brazilian,
gly<! the Paraguayans credit for the greatest valor.
To uso'a slang phrase?they fought for a funeral.
Tho Brazilians lost, killed and wounded, over
300, while they claim to. have put 1300 of tho fleet
of their cftbmVrW? da combat, besides 600 in, the
shore batteries, live of which a surrendered.
Though sb badly worsted, Mi o Paraguayans havo
no idea of giving up tho contest, and ntiflhopo for
8?OCC89, which thq In6t accounts show their laud
forcCBtobo ?till achieving in various quarters o?
tho field of war.?Ariiiy and Navy Gazette.
A broker has 'disappeared from Philadelphia
with ?26,000 and, a WpRHfe 39*01 MWthv? wan's
property.
?a- WUUUAMBUURU ELECTION.?MESSRS. EDIT
ORS : Ma/iy of our people being dissatisfied, in part,
with the nomliiK'loti nado in KinsBtrc\ ft lew ?lays upo,
w<; rc^ky-tfnlly propone the lollowiu;; uam'-'S for the Con
viction, viz :
Col. WM. COOPER,
Dn. J. A. JAMES.
August 2C 1 "MANV VOTERS."
ffii WE AKE AUTHORIZED TO ANNOUNCE Mil.
THOMAS GADSDEN as a candidato for tbo Conven
tion. August 25
?S-GOLD AND SILVER.?THE HIGHEST PRE
MIUM paid for GOLD and SILVER, at
August 14_No. 255 KING-STREET.
*?- UNION TICKET.?TUE FOLLOWING GENTLE
MEN aro submitted as candidates for election as mem
bers of Uio Convention, being tliu.su who recognize the
existing state of political affairs, and will use every" effort
to restore tho Hiato to hor proper position in the Federal
Union :
3. D. L. McKAY.
2. GEO. 8. BltYAN.
3. Hon. A. G. MACKEY.
i. JAS. B. CAMPBELL. I
6. R. W. SEYMOUR.
0. M. P. O'CONNOR.
7. Col. A. O. ANDREWS.
8. DAN. HORLBECK.
0.-.
10.
11. GEO. W. WILLIAMS.
12. JNO. HEART.
13. H. W. SCHRODER.
14. DAVID BARROW.
15. BERNARD ."-'NEILL.
16. Rev. JOS. B. 8EABROOK
17. C. R. BREW8TER.
18. H. JUDGE MOORE.
19. R. S. THARIN.
20. GEO. 8. HACKER. August 15
_
JOS- DR. T. REEN8TJERNA, HAVING RESUMED
his Practice of MEDICINE AND SURGERY, wiU bo
found at bis Office, No. 100 BROAD-STREET, between
King and Mccting-Etrects.
N. B.?Diseases of a Private Nature cured with dis
patch. August 15
H?-BATCHELOR'8 HAIR DYE !?THE ORIGINAL
and best in the world I The only true and perfect HAIR '
DYE. Harmless, Reliable and Instantaneous. Produces
immeiliately a splendid Black or natural Brown, with- ;
out injuring the hair or skin. Remedies the ill effects o
ba?l dyes. 8old by all Druggists. The genuine is signed
WILLIAM A. BATCHELOR. Also,
REGENERATING EXTRACT OF MILLEFXEURS,
For restoring and Beautifying the Hair.
CHARLES BATCHELOR, New York.
August 17 lyr
"ON, |
55. )
HEADQUARTERS
MILITARY DISTRICT OF CHARLESTON,
Chaiilkrton, 8. C, August 25, 1865.
'General OnnsBS, No. 89.]
IN ORDER TO PERFECT AND PRE8ERVB IN A
legal manner all reconls affecting the title to proi>erty,
It?? Register of Mcsne Convcytnces, the Clerks of the
Courts of Common Pleas, and tho Ordinaries, who held
office on the 18th day of Fr/r.ru&ry, I8C5, after having
taitn the Amnesty Oath prescribed in the Proclamation
of Fret_'dent Jqbnbon, of ih?> 29th ti May, 1PC5, and if
belonging to either of the crcepted elapses, shall have
obtained t pardon, aro hereby directed to resume the
exercise of their ??vil functione.
By command of Brevet Brig.-Gen. W. T. Bennett.
LEONARD B. PERRY,
August 20 3 Assistant Adjutant-General.
HEADQUARTER8, FIRST SUB-DISTRICT, 1
MlLlTARV DISTRICT OF CHARLESTON, J
Charleston, August 25,18G5. )
JSrBciAL Orders, No. 73.)
ON AND AFTER THE FIRST DAY OF AUGUST, 18?5,
TAX OF THREE PER CENT, will be levied upon all
rents in this city, for the support of tho City Fund.
Owners of property will report, before the 5th of each
mentb, to tho City Tttiaeurer and register their rental
recoipis.
By order of Brevet Brigadier-General W. T. Bennett,
Commanding Post and First Sub-Dletrict.
GEORGE S. BURGER,
First Lieutenant 64th New Tork V. Volunteers,
Anglist 20 _3_and A. A. A. General.
BJECADQUARTEBfl, FrR8T-8UB-DISTRICT, )
Military Dibtbitct or Charleston, J
Charleston, S. C August 25, 1865. )
A SESSION OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
1st Sub-District of tho Military District of Charleston will
be held at Cainhoy, S. C, commencing on Thursday, 31st
August
By order of Brevet Brigadier-General W. T. Bennett,
Commanding Post and First Sub-District.
GBGRGE T. BURGER,
AngtiEt26 lirt Lieut MthN. Y. V. V.,aadA. A. A. G.
HEABQUARTERS, FIRST SUB-DISTRICT, )
Military District of Charleston, J
Charleston, 8. C, August 23, 1865. )
[SrnciAL Orders, No. 117.)
I. MR. JOHN K. BEVTN IS HEREBY APPOINTED
INSPECTOR OF NAVAL STORES FOB THE CITY OF
CHARLESTON.
By order of Brevet Brig. Gen. W. T. Bennett, Com
manding Post.
GEORGE S. BURGER.
First Lieutenant 54th New York V. Volunteers,
Angostas_3 andA. A. A. General.
HEADQUARTHB8, DEP'T OF SOUTH CAROLINA, \
Hilton Heap, 8. C, August 20th, 1865. j
[Special Orders, No. 40.1
II. CAPTAIN JAMES W. GRACE, 54TB MASSACHU
SETTS VOLUNTEERS, Is hereby rclJaved from duty as
Acting Ordnance Officer of the Military District of Charles
ton, and will turn over at once all Ordnaiioe Property In
his possession to Captain GEORGE T. BAI.en, Unltod
States Ordnanco Department.
Captain J. W. GRACE will then proceed to join his
aeghnent without delay. ,
a * . * . * *
By command of Major-Oenerol Q. A. GBXmore.
W. L. M. BURGER,
August 24 8 Assistant Adjutant-General.
llEABQ'RS MILITARY DI8T. OF CHARLESTON. I
Charleston, 8. C, August 21, 1865. j .
[GENERAI. OBDEBS, No. 86.] '
t SURGEON CHAS. T. BEBER, U. 8. VOLUNTEERS,
having reported In actxmhuic? with Special Ordera No.
o, Uoadiiuarters Department South Ctroltno, is-hcroby
announcod as Chief Medical Officer of this District, re
lieving Snrgeon JOHN O. BRONSON, U. 8. Volunteers.
He will bo obeyed and respected accordingly.
2. Captain t?. E. LORD, O. 8. V.t having reported for
duty, Is hereby announced as Chief Commissary of Sub
sistence for this Command, ami will be obeyed and re.
spected accordingly.
., By command of Brevet Major-General John P. Hatch.
LEONARD ?.PERRY,
Assistant Adjutant-General.
Official: E. Harri? J*wett, Pirat Weutenaat and A.
A. O. ' 3 ; AngnstiW
RICHARD ALLISON,
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
No. 00 flKEKMANVSTHEET,
.REIVYOIUE..
COTTON AND OTHER PRODUCE SOLD ON COM
MISSION. General Merchandise purchased and
/orwarded. \g ord?r. ?ny.-? AWHlX*
apply to
August ' ! '!
FOKLIVERPOOL.-TI1B 11K1TIS1I
Hnnpio IRMA, Cant. John Ciiiiiniinii, will re
?ciivo Freight on the 24tli instant tor the aliovo
'inni, nuil nail with il if pao li. Koreugngoiiu-nt?
WILL1H Ac CUISOLM, Mills HoU3e?
August 22
KOU laVEKPOOL-THB Al BR.
Hark EXCHANGE is now r.vHvitig Fr?tent at
Siiiitli Atluntio Wharf, anil will leave with dlS
liatt-h. For Freight applv to
WILLIS & CMSOLM, Mills Housa
FOIl NEW YORK_IHK FIRST.
CLASS Schooner FLYING SCUD, J. T. Mo
?.?amar master, will sail with diHpatch for tho
?above port. For Freight apply to
WILLIS le C111SOI.M, Agent??,.
August 20 Milli? Unuse.
. -t^ FOR BOSTON.-THE SCHOONER
LCjkFRANKLIN wiU have quick dispatch for tho
K-Sa^ibove port For Freight apply to
? GEO. W. CLAItK k CO.,
August 21 No. 145 Meeting-street.
, FOR. I'l 111, A 1 >l : I.I? h I \ ._ VU j.; UN?
8cboou??r J. W. LINDSAY, Capt. Boycc, will bs?I
>with dispatch. For Freight apply to
? II. P. BAKER k CO.,
August 25_3 No. 20 Cumberland-Btrevt.
FOR NEW~Y0RK DIRECT.
THE NEW AND FIRST-CLASS
ALU AM BRA,
ROBERT B. BENSON.Commande?,
WILL LEAVE BROWN'S SOUTH WHARF OH
Saturday, the 23th instant, at 10 o'clock A. If., precisely?
Freight and PaHoengors taken at lowest ratea. Apply
to THADDEUS STREET, No. 74 East Bay.
xnt- Tho GRANADA will leavo on Saturday, the Ht
of September. August 21
FOR NEW YORK DIRECT.
THE SPLENDID BIDE-WHEEL STEAMSHIP
QUAKER CITY,
WEST.COMMAiTDEB-,
WILL LEAVE BROWN'S SOUTH WHARF ON TUES
DAY, the 29th instant, at ? o'clock, precisely.
For Freight or Passage, having 8UPERIOII ACCOM
MODATIONS, apply to THADDEUS STREET,
August 23_Na 74 East Bay.
FOR NEW YORK DIRECTT
THE FIRST CLASS UNITED STATES MAIL.
STEAMSHIPS
CUMBERLAND
AND
M O NE KA'.
THE NEW AND ELEGANT SIDE-WHEEL STEAMSHIP?
CUMBERLAND
WILL LEAVE ACCOMMODATION WHARF OX
Monday, AuguHt 28th Instant, at 1 o'clock P. M.,
precisely.
For Freight or Passage, having superior accommoda?
Uon?, apply to ARCHIBALD GETTY & CO.,
Nos. 126 and 128 Moeting-Btreet.
?K??- The favorite steamship MONEEA, C. P. Mahbh?
man Commander, will leave Thursday, August 31.
August 25
For Georgetown, Cheraw,
AND INTERMEDI ATE LANDINGS ON PEE DEE RIVEBv.
THE LIGHT DRAFT 8TEAMER SYLPH WIU?
receive Freight This Day, at her wharf foot of Ha?
sel-Etreot
For Freight or Passage, apply on board, or to
SNEED & COXE;
August 26 ? No. 274 King-street.
FOR CHARTER.
Excursions Aroun4 Charleston Harbor?
THE FINE FAST STEAMER ROOELAND, GEORG*
W. BEAUFORT Commander, having a handsoino
saloon and splendid accommodations.
Apply to ARCHIBALD GETTY fc CO.,
August 17 Non. 126 sud 128 Mae ting-street.
NOTICE TO TRAVELER?.
I?
CHANGE OF SCHEDULE.
Optics Genkbai. S?p't W. and M.
B. B.,1
Wilminoton, N. Ci August 24, 1866.
ON AND AFTER SUNDAY. AUGUST 27. DAILY
TRAINS will he run over the Wilmington and Man
chester Railroad, between Wilmington and Klngville.
Leave Wllratagton dally at.0:00 A. M.
Leave KmgvUlo dally at.7:38 P. M?
Arrive st Wilmington dally at.3:05 P. M.
Arrive at KingviUe dally at.1:25 A. M.
Them is dally communication North from Wilmington
by Rail. These Trains connect with Trains on tho
Northeastern Railroad, Cheraw and Darlington Railroad,
and Wilmington and Weldon Railroad. They also con
nect at Klugvllie With a line of Stages for Columbia, anil.
atSimW wlth.Une r**?&^ ? DRANE>
August 21 lmo Qenoral Siiperlctenflent.
KORTIIE ASTERN RAILROAD.
OFFICE NORTHEASTERN RAILROAD. >>
CHAni-KbXi?'. Auunst 25. VEK?ifA*"-.
ON AND AFTER MONDAY NEXT, AUGUST JHTBv.
the PASSENGER TRAIN8 will arrive and depar*
as follows : .. . ?
Le*vo Charleston.??t S'
.ArrivestCharleston....i.>...... ":{** : ...
Tho Tri?We<-1>:U Trains wlU continue until Friday, 1?*.
September, when daily tripi? will be renutned.
p ' M. ?. S0LO1I0N8, Superintendent,
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