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The Charleston daily news. (Charleston, S.C.) 1865-1873, August 29, 1865, Image 1

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VOI_. I....NO.? 14.
CHARLESTON, S. C, TUESDAY, AUOUST ^0, 1805.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
?MLESTON DAILY NEWS,
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Mr. ADO. BREHTANO.NO. 708 Broadway, Now York,
lias always the latest dates of tho Daily News, as he
does of all tho other principal journals of tho country.
NEW YORK CORRESPONDENCE.
[FROM OUn OWN CORRESPONDENT.]
Jlnolher Defalcation?The Ketchum Forgeries?Political?
General Dick Taylor?The next Sensation, etc., etc.
New York, AuguBt 23.
On the morning of tho 19th another defalcation
came to light. Wc do not know how much money
has been stolen, but it ia certain that tho Erie
Railroad freight collector haa run away with some
thing between fifty thousand dollars and an unes
iimated amount. Ilia name ia A_bert A. Jones.
He is a native of Hudson, in this Stato, and for sev
eral years wa8 Foreman of Hook and Ladder Com
pany, No. 15. From t_0,000 to $80,000 daily paaaed
through hia handij to the caehior of tho company,
but some of it atnek to his fingers. Three thou
sand dollars were retained in one. day, and perhaps
ho may have taken away a hundred thousand dol
lars?pcrhape even more. He left tliia city ostensi
bly for Now Orleans, a fortnight ago to-day. It
may he that he went in another direction. He was
not suspected till he gave up his situation, held at
a aalary of $1000 per annum.
The Ketchum forgeries have excited suspicions
ngaiiiBt all salaried men who aro entrusted with
money, and who are living extravagantly. Only a
few of the many robbcra have yot boon exposed.
There aro thousands of small peculators in places
Of public trust, but thero aro somo of them hold
thieves, and their exposure is probable, because
there is close ecrutiny now over everything having
a financial shape. Tho detection of Edward B.
Ketchum is not desired by his frionds. Ho was too
popular to excite animosity, and there ia no moral
sense strong enough in Wall-street to insiut upoi
hia punishment for the sake of example Our
youth aro thus corrupted by their own fathers, and
the lesson ia taught, "get wealth honestly if you
can, but get wealth." The firm of Morris Kotchum,
Hon & Co. will pay about two-tlurds of their in
debtedness.
The politicians here are a little nervous over
changes in the Custom Houso horo and claowhcro.
Hannibal Hamlin, of Maine, has been made Col
lector at Boston, and now thero iu somo expecta
tion that our Postmaster and the Burvcyor will be
dropped from the rolls. They aro Howard-Weed
men. Thurlow AVeed is getting tho cold shoulder
from the President. He has controlled tho Re
publicans for many a day. Ho ia an honest man
himself, hence his influence. That, however, is
waning. The haste to make party platforms will
produce some trouble next month, and thero is a
great struggle going on for the supremacy in State
and municipal matters.
Gen. Dick Taylor was in the city on tho 18th, and
in a brief interview with him I found him in ex
cellent health and spirits. He has decided on no
special action, but will await the trial of Jefferson
Davis, before entering upon any field of special
occupation.
We are all looking for the next sensation here.
The war kept us excited, and robberies and crimes
of every sort are filling the newspapers; but wo
want something more enlivening; or we shall say
that dullness reignB. The truth is that labor has
been demoralized by the war. Men are fevsrish to
become rich, and cannot easily settle down into
their old habits of industry, from which alone can
real wealth, prosperity ana happiness he derived.
We had a fireman's riot here on the morning of
the 20th. Engine companies No. 6 and No. 41
were engaged. One fireman was killed, perhaps
two. Citizens begin to think that it wee no mis
take to break up tho volunteer and substitute a
Said department, which is now going into opera
on with complete success, and lo the salvation of
hundreds of young men who otherwise would bo cor
rupted and ruined by their associations with volun
teer companies. This metropolis is too largo for
voluntary engine companies. They have had
many excellent members, but a sad lot. of mischiev
ous hangers-on and followers.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kean will appear at the
Broadway Theatre next Monday. This will be re
freshing to tho admirers of tho drama. The
managers here are driving almost all of their in
tellectual and tasteful patrons away from their
houses by their wretched plays, which are called
sensation dramas, which are generally ridiculous
?rash, unworthy of public attention. The latest
absurdity is Arrah na Pogue, one of Bourcicault'a
Irish concoctions. It is miserably constructed,
and the scenes aro badly managed to produce ef
fect, while the acting in the piece is beneath no
tice. The press here, generally, is so weak and so
under the agents who manage the newspapers,
th.Bt the truth is seldom told about the baa acting
or . wretched plays. Our theatres are afi
extremely low. At "Wallack's they are running
into the maelstrom of dullness and indifference.
Good acting, even there, fas not looked for. In fact,
the best artists are not in this city, and seldom aro
they encouraged to come here. The managers
get plays of cheap merit, puff them up, ana let
mere novices fill tho characters as beBt thoy may.
So, when Mr, and| Mrs. Charles Kean come, wo
cannot but deem it a delight in store for us.
- The second letter of the Italian opera manager,
Mr. Marctzek, appeared yesterday morning. It
is a scorohing affair, and in it estimates are made
.that tho various demand on the opera made by the
Herald, if reduced to money values, would amount
to about twenty thousand dollars each season. The
complaint is, chiefly, that the dictations of th?
Herald are insufferable, and that it is bettor to
lose it? favor than to submit to its extortions.
The whole story is not oat yet, but it will come in
lime. The Herald wishes to direct who shall bo
engaged and who go without engagements; and
one gentlemim singer, w)io has been residing at
Washington Height? for some months as the guest
of Mr. and Mrs. Bennett, has been pressed upon
the attention of Mr. Maretzok, who knows that he
is not of the right stamp s s an artist for the
Academy of Music. Maretzek will do easily with
out tho Herald?will save money by cutting adrift
from it; and tho Herald will be generally discarded
by managers bo soon as they can find it for their
interest to turn their backs upon it. It has not had
any honesty in its criticism of public performers
for fifteen years. Its critics havo been bought at
cheap rates, a? ?lie ledgers 0f ,m j_e theatres
/ally exhibit CguKB.
- '"O
IiATj-SST UV TEIiEGllAPH.
NEWS FROM NEW ORLEANS.
NEW Oim.ka.nh, August 22.?Tho steamer Star of
tho SoutAi, from Philnilolpliin, and Western Metro
polis and Morning Stnr, from New York, havo ar
rived.
Major-General Wright, commanding the Depart
ment of Texan, has arrived at Galvctiton. The
pitOHHure for appointments at Austin ?b very great.
Two ears,, containing seventy-two bales of cot
ton, were burned between Galveaton and Houston
on the 14th. Lusa $10,000 in specie.
Sight checks on New York J@? t' cent, discount.
Cotton activo ; sales 3000 balea at 42@43c. Mo
lnnseH (Louisiana), C5 cents. Sugar unchanged.
Freight? ou cotton to New York Ji&lic.
AFFAIRS AT CI1ICAOO.?EXCHANGE OF MAIL BAOB ON
RAILROADS WHILE TIIAINH AI IN MOTION, ETC.
Chicago, August 23.?Mr. A. A. Bradley, mail
agent on tho Iowa division of tho Chicago and
North western Rui! road, hau invented a plan where
by mail bags aro taken from tho railroad stations
whilo trains aro running at fttU speed. Tho
experiment has just been tried on tho Illinois Cen
tral Railroad, with the permission and at the cost
of the company, who uro dcBirous to aid tho do
fartment in the test of thin valuable experiment.
t proved a complete success. Tho engine, with
tho car to which wan attached the apparatus, waB
run at variouB ratcB of speed, and in every in
stance the exchange was completely and aatiefao
torily made. Tho experimental trials and intro
duction of apparatus aro under tho direction of
George B. Armstrong, of thia city, General Super
intendent pf Railroad P?stofucca.
Major-General O. O. Howard, the head of tho
National Frccdmcn's Bureau, will bo in this city
next Saturday, and on Sunday evening will address
tho people in behalf of tho Northwestern Freed
mon a Aid Commission. Ho will bo warmly re
ceived hero.
The niinoia State Fair will opon horo ono week,
from next Monday. Great preparations are being
made.
THE GUERRILLA CHAMP FERGUSON.
Nashville, August 18.?Tho Dispatch of to
morrow morning will contain tho account of a
long and interesting interviow between tho local
editor of that paper and tho noted guerrilla chief
tain Champ Ferguson, now on trial in this city.
Tho interview was granted by Major-General
Thomas.
This ia the first correspondence he has had since
his arrest with his counsel. Ho gives a complete
history of his career, and expresaos himself freely
on everything relating to chargea against him.
Ho denies ever having committed many of the
actB charged against him, and statos that those
whom ho Killed were seeking hie life, were inarms
hunting him clown and waylaying him. Ho naya
he has never harmed a Federal soldier in regular
service. Ho has taken many prisoners. He ?tutes
that he could not have been taken in ten years if
ho had remained in Clinton county, Kentucky, hia
home, and not surrendered; that he surrendered
in good faith as a rogular Confederate officer, not
anticipating prosecution.
NEWS FROM 8AN FRANCISCO.
San Francisco, July 24.?Sailed, ship Wild Hun
ter, for Boston, with 7000 hid.-s, 15,000 Backs of
copper ore and 650 balcB of wool.
Tho we ?k opens favorably for increased exertion
in comrr?. ciat circles. Stocks of imported goods
in firet fcpnds aro light, and jobbers show more
disposition to replenish stocka. The mining stock
market is dull.
THE TRIAL OF JEFFERSON DAVIS?MR. DAVIS TET IfJ
NORANT OF THE TIME OF HI8 TRIAL OR THE TRI
DUNAI. DEI-ORE WHIUH HE IS TO UK BROUOHT?A
LETTER FROM MB. DAVIS TO HIS CODN8F.L.
Albany, N. Y., August 22.?Mr. R. H. Gillett,
one of the counsel of Jefferson Davis, in a note to
the Albany Argus, says:
"Mr. Davis has no more information concerning
hie trial than others have."
In a letter from Mr. Davis, dated the 15th ins t.,
to Mr. Gillett, ho saye:
"I am 8?11 ignorant of tho charges against me,
the source of themi and tho tribunals before which
I am to anBwer. Your letter gave me the first no
tice of the Washington indict ment."
Mr. Davis requests Mr. Gillett to have a confer
ence with Mr. Churl- -s O'Conor, hia principal coun
sel, so that they may be prepared for the trial
whenever tho trial may bo brought on, with as
little delay as the nature and importance of the
case will permit.
A direct application to the "proper department,
asking to bo informed, if not improper, when,
where, and before what tribunal Mr. Davis ia to be
tried, remains unanswered, becauso, as ia suppos
ed, neither has been actually determined by the
President.
NORTH CAROLINA?HEALTH OF NEWRERN?PRICES OF
LUMBER?ENORMOUS RENTS FOR BUILDINGS, ETC.,
ETC.
Newbern, N. C, August 20.?The health of New
born continues good. There is no possible danger
of tho reappearance of the yellow fever which
visited this city last season.
Ordinary lumber is selling hero for forty dollars
a thousand, notwithstanding heavy timber land
can be purchased for five and ten dollars per acre
on the river banks, a few miles below this city.
The demand for houses is great, and the rents
are so high that ordinary houees on business
atreeti pay for themselves nearly twelve times a
year.
THE MEETING OF THE GRAND LODGE OF ODD FEL
LOWS AT UTICA?MERGING OF THE TWO JURISDIC
TIONS,
Utica, August 23?The Grand Lodge of Odd
Fellows have agreed to merge the two jurisdictions
of this State by a vote of 117 ayes against 27 noes.
The Grand Encampment havo agreed to report
in favor of merging the two jurisdictions by a vote
of ?7 ayes against 2 noc-B.
THE SOUTHWEST.
Cairo, August 23?The steamer Superior has
340 bales of cotton for Evansvillc, and the Conti
nental has 150 bales. The first bale of Toras cot
ton received in New Orleans, raised in Brazos
county, waB sold on the 16th at 514c.
The Memphis Bulletin, always au unconditional
Union paper, contains a denunciation against Gov.
Brownlow's letter against the Jews.
The worms are ravaging the cotton fields on the
Tallahatchie.
PIBE IN CLEVELAND.
Cleveland, Ohio, August 23.?Outhwate, Sohir
mer ?fc Co.'s oil refinery was burned last night.
Loss thirty thousand dollars.
THE DAILY RAILWAY SMASH?A TRAIN RUNS OFF THE
TRACK ON THE SHORE LINE ROAD?SEVERAL PER
SONS INJURED, ETC., ETC.
New Haven, August 23.?The Palladium says
that about 7? o'clock last night tho evening train
from New London ran over a cow, three miles this
Hide of Branford, and the baggage, mail and first
passonger oars were thrown from the track.
The baggago oar turned a completo somersault
down an embankment, and rolled over twice, and
was badly smashed.
Almost all tbe employees of the road, ten or
twelve in number, were injured, somo serious!?-,
but none fatally. But ono passonger was badly
injured,
A special train roturned to this city with tho
wounded at 12 o'clock in tho night.
Tho New York World has a Washington let-tor
dated 20th, which gives tho following information : .
CONVENTION BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND THE
UNITED STATES OF COLOMBIA. '
The convention between tho United Statos of
America and the United States of Colombia, sup
plemental to that of Septomber 10. 1657, has just
Leon proclaimed. It extends fur nine months tho
joint commission heretofore Appointed for the ex
amination and adjustment of such claims as wero
presented but not heretofore settled.
EX-SENATOR ELY NOT A WITNESS FOB THE DEFENCE
IN THE WIBZ CASE.
Hon. Alfred Ely, ex-member of Congress and ex
Libby prisoner, ?ays that tho report that ho is to
appear before tho Wirz military commission as a
witness for the defence, is without any foundation
or truth. He has been supbmnoed by the commis
sion to appear and testify, in bohalf of tho Govern
ment, to certain facts that came to his knowlodgo
while ho was a prisoner at Richmond.
JEFF. DAVIS'8 COMMISSION.
A witnec-: cajjcd for t-Jio defence op, 'lie Wirz
trial exhibited to various citizens to-d%y the oii^i
nal coinmisaion of Jefferson Davis us a second
lieutenant of dragoons. It ia signed by Andrew
Jackson nB President, and Lewis Cesa na Secretary
of War. Tho possessor of tho parchment pro
cured it at tho iioiue of Davis on the Mississippi.
RUCE-ITS FOR INTERNAI, REVENUE.
Tho rcceipta at the nternal Revenue Bureau for
tho last seven days amounted to netrJy nine mil
liona of dollars.
Among thoao just pardoned aro Cavo. Johnson,
ox-Po-tiiiastcr-General from Tennessee, and ox
Congrcsainau Steward, of Ocorgia. The President
to-day granted pardon to a number of rebela?all of
tho twonty-thouHnnd-dollar class?none? of which,
howovcr, aro of nny importance.
ALABAMA PARDONS.
Governor TarsoiiB, of Alabama, telegraphs to
the PrcBidont: "Please Buspeud all petitions for
fanion recommended by me prior to this date."
t is not oxplaincd what prompted tho Governor
to make this request, but it is believed the object
wna to hoad off a batch of Alahamians who urnved
yoro yesterday to urge then? own petitions for
pardon.
RCnEL CONanEIBMXN.
J. L. Pngh, of Alabama, and Eli 8. Hortcr, cx
membcrs of the United States Congress, and late
members of tho rebel Congress, have arrived in
tho city.
? ?
The we_e known and popular correspondent,
"Druid," writing to the New York JVcics fr^n
Washington, under date of 21st inst., makes the
following statement concerning
THE PRESinENT AND THE MAINE CONVENTIONS.
President Johnson was not hi tho least surprised
at tho action taken by the recent conventions?
Republican and Democratic?in Maine. He has
taken measures to make himself well acquainted
with tho position of party polities in all of the
Northern, Eastern and Western States, and he
know beforehand what? tho temper and spirit of
these two conventions would be. Ho knew that
his plan of reconstruction at the South, and his
views in relation to negro suffrage, would be e:.?
dorBcd by the Democrats, and condemned by the
Republicans. And he expects that thiB will bu the
case, so far as rc.ateB to a largo portion of the
Republican party, in all of the Northern and West
ern States, and also in New England. Mr. John
sou is not blind to tho fact, that the influence of
Mr. Chase, Senator Sumner, Ward Bcccher, and
men of that stamp, in tho Republican party, is
verv groat; that they have been working assidu
ously for the last fow months to induce the Re
publican party to commit.itBelf in favor of negro
suffrage, and in favor of governing tho South by
Military Governors alone lor some four years to
come; of treating tho Southern Statea aa conquered
provinces, and not permitting them to bo repre
sented in the National Legislature at all; ot re
garding the Southern people, in a word, aa a par
cel of subjugated rebela and traitor? who have
forfeited all political rights, and to whom none
whatever ought to bo granted. Such, I repeat, the
President is well aware ia the programme of a
large portion of the Republican party, led by tit?
influential leaders named above.
On the other hand, the President ia well aware
that tho course which he bus adopted?in appoint
ing Southern men to bo Governors of the Southern
Statee ; in recognizing the continued existence,
and, indeed, tho indestructibility of the States ; in
making provision for tho representation, of those
States in Congress, as formerly; and in setting hia
face against negro Huffragc, as he lias done?has
endeared him to a largo portion of tho Democratic
party, and has induced many of the statesmen and
prominent men of that party to array thcmselvea
in support of his administration. Knowing these
facts, therefore, the action of the two recent con
ventions in Maine?Republican and Democratic?
is exactly what tho President expected it would be.
Tho action and the threatening attitude of the Re
publican party does not deter him from his duty.
His policy on the subject of the restoration of tlie"
Southern States to tho Union, and in opposition to
negro suffrage, is fixed and settled; and no consid
eration cas induce him to swerve from it. Ho is
one of those men who would " rather be right than
be President;" and nothing can shake his convic
tion that the Southern people are our fellow citi
zens, and entitled to tho same political rights that
tho citizens of New York and New England enjoy.
Thoso rights he intends they shall have, in spite
of all tho factious opposition of the Republican
S arty. I am not prepared to say that tho Presi
ent will go so far as to remove Gen, Palmer from
his command, because of his recent imwarrantcd
conduct in interfering with the freedom of elec
tions in Kentucky. But I behove that the manner
in which the elections in that State woro conducted
is not such as tho President approves, or intends
to approve. It is probable that tho outrages per
petrated at the'Kentuiky elections will bo Investi
gated, and that where it is evident that the citi
zens were prevented from voting by tho military,
a new election will bo ordered. At all events, I am
confident that tho President is determined that
the citizens of tho Southern States shall have their
rights, and shall not bo molested in the exercise
of them.
Censos of Chicago.?Tho SJato of Illinois is also
engaged in taking a consus. xhe Chicago Tribuno
gives the figures of that city, which appear to h ave
made a greater relative progress in population
than other cities of tho North. Tho number is
177,956. It had been estimated to reach 204,000,
but this ?8 disproved. Tho Tribuno gives tho fol
lowing table; those marked with a star are ap
proximations; the others woro obtained by actual
count:
1829. ?so
1830. 70
1831. ?60
183.. BOO
1833.;. ?350
1834. ?1,800
1835. 3,265
1830. ?4,ooo
1837. 4,170
1838. ?4.000
1839. ?4,200
1840. 4,479
1841. ?0.600
1842. ?C500
1843. 7,580
1844. 10,364
1845. 12,088
1840. 14,169
1847. 10,859
"In the spring of 1B81 there woro twelve fami
lies here; in May, 1632, tho fort contained BOO
souls, and in the following February a garrison of
200, while outside were about 150. In November,
1835, the first census was taken; tho county tho n
contained 9773 souls."
1848. 20,023
1849. 23,043
1850. 29,967
1861. ?34,000
1862. 38,734
1853. 60,062
1854. 65,872
1866. 80,023
I860. ?80,000
1857. ?93,000
1858. ?80,000
1869. ?90,000
1360. 109.2C3
1861.?120,000
1862. 137,030
1863.?1-0,000
1864. 169.363
1850.
Riot ac Chksteh.?The Darlington Southerner,
of last Saturday, has a statement that a riot oc
curred at Chester C. IL, in this State,on the 12th
inst., between colored soldiers and citizens. We
give tho statemont as it appears inthoVoutherner:
It appears that on ttio day named (12th) many
of the citizens from all part's of the Ustrict had
met on special public business, and artoqg thorn
manv who-had been in the Confeder?te kr?y; ool
ored" troops who were stationod thoro took every
opportunity of insulting them by Jostling against
tnom, or saying something very oflonsire. Event
ually the parties insulted were forced to resent tho
indignities put upon them, and a genenl tight took
place between thp citizens and the negro troops,
in which threo of tho latter woro killod and many
on both sides wounded. As soon as the riot was
quelled tho Provost Marshal sent tho trpopa fronj
town.
Tho St. Paul Press, of Friday, has cr<|> reporta
from various sections of Minnesota, all *f which
show an encouraging prospect. Tho ii ury dono
tho growing crops by the lato Btorm was not near
ly as great a? was reported, and tho pospoct for
an abundant yiold of all kinds of graii was flat
tering in the oxtrome. Farmers arc usy with
their harvests now, and if tho weather .?ontinnos
favorable for a week or two longor, tho|rraiu will
be safe.
G. St. Legor Qrenfels, who was condmned to
death by a militarv court held in Cinrihati, has
had his sentence commuted by the rrlildent to
Imprisoniq?aJ fer, Jjic at tUo Dry ??r.hga!
FREE COLLATION
SERVES EVE11Y EVENIX? AT
merci iu.? bar,
Corner King and Society-Streets.
August '20
NEW NOVELS,
just iu:(i;ivi'i) by
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AT THIS
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RTOUE,
No. 108 Market-street.
CABRY'8 CONFESSION-, BT THE AUTHOR OP
Mattlc Astray.price. ,75o
DENNIS DONNE, by Annie- Thomas.price. .Sue
MOTHERS AND DAUGHTERS, by Mrs. Gore...
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MY DIARY NORTH AND SOUTH, by KinHoil.price. .50c
Any of the above Books sent post-paid by 3kt] on rc.
celpt of the above prices.
PHOTOGrRAPHS.
Just received a large assortment of "PHOTOGRAPHS,
including Mr. LINCOLN, Mr. JOHNSON, GRANT,
SHERMAN, MEADE, McCLELLAN, GILL M ORE,
CHASE, BLAIR, BATES. SEW ARB, STANTON, FARRA
GUT, DAHLGREN, DUPONT, WINSLOW, kc, kc
ALSO,
LEE, JACKSON, BEAURBGARD, LONGSTREET,
JOHNSTON. HARDEE, MORGAN, HILL, SEMMES,
BRAGG. Mr. DAVIS, Mr. STEPHENS, kc, kc Price
25 cents each, or five for one dollar. Sent post-paid by
mail, on receipt of tbe price.
Xf%~ Postofflce Box No. 241. -??
??- FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC NEWSPA
PERS AND PERIODICALS received by every
steamer.
REMEMBER
No. 108 Market-street.
August 24 C
S.-T.-18G0-X.
DRAKE'S PLANTATION BITTERS.
They purify, strengthen and invigorate.
They create a Iienlthy appetite.
They arc an antidote to change of water and diet.
They oven-ouie effects of ?lissipatlon and late hours.
They strengthen the system uuii enliven the mind.
They prevent miasmatic and intermittent fevers.
They purify the breath and acidity of the stomach.
They cure Dyspepsia anil .Constipation.
They cure Diarrhoea, Cholera and Cholera Morbos.
They cure Liver Complaint au?l Nervous Headache.
They arc tho best Bitters in the world. They make
tho weak man strong, and are exhausted nature's great
restorer. They are composed of tho celebrated Cali
saya Bark, Cascarilla Bark, Dandelion, Chamomile Flow
orn. Lavender Flowers, Wintergrccn, Anise, Clover-buds,
Orange Peel, Snake-root, Caraway, Coriander, Burdock,
8.?T.?18C0?X., kc.
Tho following is a sample of the testimony doily re
ceived :
SoLnren'a Home, SurERiNTENoENr's Office,)
Cincinnati, O., January 15, 18ti3. j
I havo given your Plantation Bitters to hundreds of
our noble soldiers who stop here, more or less disabled
from various causes, and the effect is itost marvelous
and gratifying.
Such a preparation as this I heartily wish in every
family, in overy hospital, and at hand on every battle
Held. O. W. D. ANDREWS, Superintendent.
Willard'i Hotel, 1
Washington, D. C, Jan. U% 1SCS. j
Gentle men: Wo require another supply of your Plan
tation Bitters, the popularity of wLA-h daily increases
with tho guests of our house.
Respectfully,
8YKES, CHADWICK k CO.
Clevixan?, Dec. 8, 1662.
* * * * * I bad been so 111 with Liver
Complaint and Dyspepsia that I was compelled to aban
don my business. I uBod three bottles of tbo Plantation
Bitters, and to my astonishment am entirely cured.
They ar j the best medicine I ever used, and I shall en
deavor to make them known. Pleaso Inform me what
8.?T.?1800?X. means.
Yours truly, H. B. XINiiSLEY.
Dr. *? '. A. Child?. Surgeon of the Tenth Vermont Re
giment, writes: 1 wish every soldier had a bottle of Plan
tation Bitters. They are the most effective, perfect and
ha.-mlcKB tonic I ever used."
Galt House, Louisville, Ky., Dec. 21,1801.
Messrs. P. H. Dbakk k Co.:
We are compelled to order twelvo dozen Plantation
Bitters to supply friends who bave no other way of pro
curing this admirable article.
Respectfully yours,
SILAS F. MILLER k CO., Proprietors.
Rochester, N. Y., Deo. 31, 1861.
* * * ? * <fuM Plantation Bitters have cured mo of
the worst kind of dyspepsia of near four years standing.
I bave recommended thorn to others, and as far as I
know with signal success. I am, Ac.
REV. J. 8. OATHORN.
Bubsett House, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1
Dec. 20 18C5. )
Messrs. Drake k Co.?Tho Plantation Bitters appear
to bo very popular here. Send us twenty cases more, and
Oblige, Yours truly,
T. P. SAUNDER8 k CO.
kc. ko. kc. kc.
Delicate females, requiring a gontlo stimulant, and
clergymen, lawyers and student ? oxhsusted by mental
[?bor, will ?nd th? Plantation Bitters a most beneficial
tonic.
Every bottle bis the/uc simile of our signature on a
steel plate engraving, or it is not genuine.
Sohl by all Druggists, Grocers and Country 8t*5res.
P. II. BRAKE & CO.,
No. 202 Broadway, N. Y.
Aliffiist IS VQU-Q 3BX0
HATS AT OLD PRICES!
WHOLESALE AM) RETAIL.
WILLIAMS & COVERT,
No. 11G Meeting-street,
CHARLESTON, S. C,
Formerly D. R. WHIInma A Co., IVo. IG*
Mcctlnp-rttrctt),
HAVE RERUMED THEIR OI.l) IIUSINKKS OF HAT?.
CAPS ami HTKAW OUODH, at No. HO MEETING
STREET, lient door to diarlesloti Hotel, where thi-y
will b.happy iOB?'<?. vlieir old euxtoim-rs, friend*, and tho
public gent'iully.
Wo an? preparad lo supply Uta Irado both at Whole.
?Ue and Retail, at old prices.
MeivhantH Wilting th<! city for tho purpose of pur
shaatag Goods, will lind if. toi heir interest to examino
nir stock br.foro purchasing cbtewboro.
I). If. WILLIAM?.HENRY C. COVERT.
Align?t 39 tatbaS?
FOR UVERPOOIi?THE IUUTaSH
DarqiM IRMA, Copt. John Cummin?, will re
ceive Freight on the 24th instant Tor the aliovo
port, end sail with dispatch. Foreug-?ement?
ipply to WILLIS k CUISOLM, Milla House.
Align?t 23
FOR I.I VKlilNloi,.- II11: aTT?rI
?Barli EXCHANGE in now receiving Froight at
?Soutb Atlantic Wharf, and will leave with dh>
patch. For Freight apply to
WILLIS it CHISOLM, Mill- House.
August 22
_ FOR NEW YORK_THE fTr S T
CLAKS .Schooner FLYING .SCUD, J. T. Mc
>Namnr muster, will ?ail with dispatch for tho
=obove port. For Freight apply to
"WILLIS A: CHISOLM. A?onte,
August 2f._Mills House.
, FOR BOSTON.-THE SCHOONER.
FRANKLIN will have quick dispatch for tho
"above port. For Freight apply to
GEO. W. CLARK k CO.,
August 21_No. 145 Meeting.strect.
FOR NEW YORK DIRECT.
TUX FIRST CLASS UNITED STATES MAIL.
STEAMSHIP
M O NEK A.
CHAS. P. MAEWAN.COMM.VNDEEV
THE NEW, FAST, EL_ej,vNT AND FAVORITE STEAM
yuii?
MONEKA
WILL LEAVE ACCOMMODATION WHARF 05*
Thursday, August 31st, at ? o'clock, precisely.
For Freight or Paesago, having miperior accommoda
tions, apply to ARCHIBALD GETTY k CO.,
Hon. 120 and 128 Mcetlng-strect.
AugUBt 29
aNEWvORKA CHARLESTON STEAMSHIPS
LEARY LI1STE.
FOR NEW YORK DIRECT,
THE NEW AND FIRST-CLASS STEAMSHIP3
QUAKER CITY, Side Wheel,
W. H. WEST.CO&LMA-DEB,
GRANADA, Propeller,
R. BAXTER.COUMANDKB.
ALHAMBRA, Propeller,
R. B. BENSON.Commande-.
THE HPLENDID
QUAKER CITY,
WILL LEAVE BROWN'S WHARF, TO-MORROW,
the 30th instant, at ? o'clock, precisely.
For Freight or Passage, having MAGNIFICENT AC
COMMODATIONS, apply to
' THADDEU8 STREET, No. 74 Ea?t Bay.
0g- The GRANADA -will follow, on Saturday, the 2a
September._AugUBt-9
TtfOTICB TO TRAVELERS.
Ift
CHANGE OF SCHEDULE.
Office Geukiul Sup't W. and M. R. It., I
' WlU-lNGTOH, N. C, August 24, 1865. . J
ON AND AFTER 8DNDAY, AUGU8T 27, DAIL?
TRAINS wUl be run over the Wllminctou and Man
chester IUllroad, between Wilmington and Klngrille.
Leave Wilmington daily?t.0:00 A. M.
Leave Kingville daily at.7:35 P. M.
Arrivo at Wilmington daily at.3:05 P. M.
Arrivc at Kingville daily at.1:25 A. M.
There is daily communication North from Wilmington
by Rail. These Train? connect with Tra?na on the
Northeastern Railroad, Cheraw and Darlington Railroad?.
_iid Wilmington mid Weldon Railroad. Tiioy also con
nect at Kingville with a line of Stages for Columbia, and
at Humttr with a line fcr Camden.
HENRY M. DRANE,
August 21 Imo_General Superintendent.
NORTHEASTERN RAILROAD.
OFFICE NORTHEASTERN RAILROAD. 1
CRAButaroM, August 25,1805. f_
ON AND AFTER MONDAY NEXT. AUGUST 28TB?.
tho PASSENGER TRAINS wUl arrivo and depart,
is follow? : :
Leave Charleston.. 0.30 A. M.
Arrive at Charleston.11.00 A. M.
Tho Tri-Wcekly Trains will continue until Friday, lui
ieptcmbcr, when daily tripa wUl be resumed.
8. 8. SOLOMONS, Superintendent..
Augnsttjj_*t> _,
PREPARE FOR BMESS.
A GOOD SUPPORT FOR
ONLY S$30!
A
NY PERSON OF ORDINARY CAPACITY CAN B3
_ qualified an an ACCOUNTANT and BOOK-KEEPER
n a few weeks. A competent Book-Keeper can al way*
ibtaln respectable and lucraUve employment. H'-nr? of
iiBtmctlon from 8 to 10 o'clock P. M. Apply at SLJfv
>ELOT'8 Commercial School, No. 260 King.Btroet, a*rar
>r. Marine's Drug Store. Mr. Pelot can be Been <J?tfiB*
he day at tho office of tho 'Daily NetM," No. 10 wna
itrect. _ . _,.,
4_T Merchanta' Books Opened, Written ?pana um?
jiccdjon moderst? tenna, ?uguiwi?

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