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The Charleston daily news. (Charleston, S.C.) 1865-1873, August 30, 1865, Image 1

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VOL. L.-NO. 15.
CHA~?lJG^STO_^ ^?V^ 30, 1SG5.
PRICE FIVg CENTS,
THE
CHARLESTON DAILY NEWS,
ICATHCAIIT, McMILLAN & MORTON,
riiopniETorts,
No. 18 HAYNE-STREET.
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Tlic following are the Agent? for this paper:
JOSEPH H. SEARS, New 8outb," Hilton Head.
H. L. DARK, 8__oter, 8. C.
3. T. HEHSUMAN, " Journal office," C&mdcn, S. C.
J. W. DROWN, "?Southerner office," Darlington, 8. C.
G. L. PRATT, Columbia.
M. M. QUINN A; BRO., Ausueta, da.
H. ESTELL, Savocnab, Ga.
Mr. AUG. BRENTANO, NO. 708 Broadway, .No- York,
has always the latest dates of the Daily News, .as be
does of all tUo other principal journals of iho country.
THE RiDlCAtS CAMPAIGN.
ATTACH TITOa TUE BOUTS! AN? PRESIDES* JOIESfBaN'S
ABMINKTRATIO??.
The following extracts from the leading Aboli
tion organ? of ?ho North will give a good idea. of
the deriros of that party is the forthcoming poii
tical cinnpaigh:
?THE TRIXZKT 6ENTJ2CENT8 A?TO-TEACHINGS OFfiOimi
I_tN EEAIiEIM
JFrom. the Neto York Times.]
If any number of people in tho North have look
ed for anything like humiliation on tho part of
Southern people?anything even going bo far au to
conspicuously confess defeat?wo are not of that
number. * * With much regret we
confess our disappointment. Admitting many'
honorable exceptions, we conclude (from every
source of information within our reach) that pub
lic sentiment is still as bitter and uidoyal as irr
1861, and that cohesion in that section of tho Union
but too often means "military superiority," Wo
have, by public and private adrices, the ever-re
curring assertion that the people of tho South are
couquercd, not conciliated; tnat they submit to
force, not to reason; that they arc still truculent,
revengeful, ?nil equal to any retaliatory action
that may promiso success; that they treat the
Emancipation Proclamation ?ir of no effect; that
they retain by force, and coerce, by the old style
of flogging, tho men and womon who now owe
them no service; that they look upon with suspi
cion and treat with tho utmost contumely the
??orthcrn men whOBe duty or inclination leads
them to their vicinity; that they almost unani
mously regard the oath of allegiance os a thing of
form only?a soda powder tvftei': a grand debnuch?
an oath that it is not only permissible to break,
but, in fact, a virtuo not t? keep?as if it were
taken under duress?and that, therefore, the
takers were not only excusable, but commendable
for breaking it. Loth a? we are to believe Buch a
state of menais possible in a fairly civilized com
munity, we ?mat confess to the broad and dis
graceful fact?for it ia too true?that thousands of
men have taken the oath only for the purpose of
betraying its spirit, in voting for most notoriously
disloyal men for office. * * * *
To be plain, thus it is: There is a very wide
spread idea nmoug tho Southorn people that tho
abolition of slavery is not an actual verity?that
Mr. Lincoln did not really mean it, and that by
and by tho good old institution will be restored.
Hence most wickcel maltreatmont of freedmen, re
fusal to pay them for labor, utter disregard of
contracts, the denial of employment and forcible
expatriation?all with tho view of showing the ig
norant black tho t his government liberty is worth
less, anil that Ids safety consists only m still and
ever remaining, practically, at least, a slave.
Heneo tho half concealed spito against the pres
ence of Northern men in Southern cities; the si
lent contempt and open virulence with which they
(most of them compelled there by duty) are treat
ed; tho solemn and often ridiculous pride with
which tho more extreme Dav?B?tes,glare upon out
side barbariaiiH, and point to their vest patterns,
whereon tho awe Btruck stranger is expected to
see in letters of llamo, "Subdued, but not con
quered." Hence tho more moderate and more
(langerons coquetry of tho Southern leaders with
the fragments of the late Democratic party, and
the hope that the said Southorn leaders, with the
aid of the yet unbaked doughfaces of the North,
may be able to control the great legislative body of
the nation. We read soft platitudes in our South
ern exchanges about crops and cotton stock, and
the heart-rending scenes that necessarily follow
the fiery track of war; we ar? regaled now and
then with reports of reconstruction meetings; but
under, over, in and through all these, permeating,
coloring and intoning all, moans the grand theme
of "subdued, not conquered?outnumbered, not
i beaten?unsuccessful tuis time, but hoping for
better luck in the next venture?victory postpon
ed, but not despaired of?the Union triumphant,
but only for a little while?our treason strongly
repressed, but watching for the first promising
opportunity to blozo anew.".
THE UNSUBDUED REBELLION. . .
[From the Independent.)
The humiliating tone of Southern society,
-whether political or rolIgloiiB, with which they re
cognized, a few months ago, their State as con
quered, and their fate as victims, is fast pausing
away. The government has thrown open the
gates of political power to unrepentant robelsj
has elevated to political sovereignty bitter enom?os
of tho idoas ami even of the existence of tho re
public; has adhered to tho dogma of State right?,
where its recognition insures tho triumph of
every undemocratic and anti-Union principio, and
has especially excluded from any share in their
government their moat loyal, often their only loyal,
ciMzons. Tho consequences of this course are
becoming most disastrous Freedom of speech is
dying beforo It is born; the Union soldier, if of
African descent, in scourged, robbed and murdor
ed by tho white rebel, and is powerless to defend
bis liberties, whether by the ballot or by tho very
rifle wherewith ho saved his country. The churches
that of late seomod lifeless and dissolved hito their
original dust, appear compact, organized, d?liant.
The field which Northern councils and synods
looked upon as void end ready for their spirit nal
occupation, is 800u to bo teeming with Satanio
life. The r?bellion is yot unsubdued. General
Grant, with his lieutenants And Ids million of mus
kets, has broken the military power of the Confed
eracy; it is still potent and insolent in its civic and
religious form?. Tho struggle of tho future is to
be no leas sovero ?rid much more prolonged than
___?_*_? tb-at of the past Slavery is* gone, but
the barbarism it engendered and that engendered
it?luto death and it? mother, sin, ever begetting
thoir hellish broode-is yet ailing their hearts
-with hate and thorr mouths with Masphcmy, dic
tating tho policy of the State and Church, and re
establishing its Bway through, all that land.
Like those cast out from'heaven, they instantly
riso from off tho burning marl, and plot to regain
their lost domain. What, thon, is our ?bity? It fe
twofold. First, wo must, as citizens, wago a'cease
less warfare agamst any recognition of these
States in their present rebellious attitude. These
venomous masters should bo put under tutors and
?overnors till tho timo appointed. A freedman's
lire au pi lea?- Hooded than * rebel'? bureau. It ie
tho wJiito moro t?ian tho black should be carcil
for. Tho government must appoint military gov
ernors and grant negro suffrage. Public nieet
higs, bko tbat in Fanouil Hoil, should bo hold over
over all tho land to constrain it to this courue.
Tho un alto is (scotched not killed. Tlio President
muat tako tho ating from it; muet put bia heel
upon it? bead by making hiB doiuocracy real
democracy, by recognizing loyalty as citizenship,
and loyalty only.
* ?
THE SOUTHWEST,
THE COTTON CHOP OF liOUISIANA ANO TfcXAB.
New OnuuANH, August 12, 1865.?All reports to
the contrary, I am able to state that tho dreaded
army or cotton worm bas not appeared in thiB
Stp.te to do uerious barm to tho coming crop. The
cotton never looked tinor or was more abundant.
Cotton picking has already commenced in every
portion of tho State. If the worm keeps out of the
cotton another week tho whole crop will bo Bavcd.
In Texas tho worm lias undoubtedly appeared
in Wharton county, where it has destroyed thou
sands of acres. A number of tho Texas journals
despair of picking any cotton of consequence this
year on account of the ravages of the worm, while
other meuvspapers stato that these reports have
been greatly exaggerated, and though agrocing
that the army worm ban appeared and devastated
thousands -of acres, ibero is yet a good prospect of
a fair crop from the quantity of cotton planted.
The crops of corn, migar, rico, ?Src, in these
States, were never liner than they are this year.
illOH FIlEIuriT AND LOOSE P1UCTICE IN Al.ARAMA
COTTON.
The Mobile "Register and Advertiser of the 8fch
hint., says :
Pile? of cotton, wo lean, arc .awaiting transpor
tation to Kolmu and other points on tho Alabama
river, but refusing to pay twenty-five dollar? a
"balo freight to tho steamboats. Fivo cents a pound
freight is pretty strong, and as we heard a gentle
man ?ay that nothing but stolen cotton could bear
"the weight of the charge, perhaps ?ho boat owner?
assume that most cf tho cotton' offering for trans
fiortation is "stolen cotton," and, .therefore, comes
egitimately within tho ralo. We fear thoy are
about half right, for cotton has come to be regard
ed aa tneaHuro trove, and tho moral? of the day
teach that any one .can lay his hands on it whon it
is found-"laying around loose." There is a deuco
of a screw loose somewhero in this cotton busi
fiines8, which timo and vigilance will discover.
Meantime -"so-called"* government cotton suffers
by this delay, and the government agenta cannot
.pay such prices. The result is that a flfet of cot
ton flats is in process of consrx-uction, which is a
cheap method of transportation commendable to
both government agent? and private owners.
GENEBAX, WEBSTER AND THE SOUTHERN" lAlLROADfl.
The* press of this city are jubilant over the arri
val of Brigadier Ceneral JamcB D. Webster, Chief
of Major-Gouerai ?Shermaa's staff. General Web
ster is on a tour of inspection on tho condition of
the Southern railroads. Hie orders from Wash
ington are to report, if possible, tlio costof placing
tZrem in running order. In referring to this the
True Delta of yesterday has the foDowing: This
mission is supposed to be preparatory to an offer
of sufficit'nt aid from the government to restore
these road?! to operation at the earliest ,"poi*aiblo
moment. This would be an act of noble goneroai
ty on the par t of the government, and at the same
time one by wiiich the whole country would large
ly profit. Speedy and s*fa means of inter-com
munication are absolutely necessary to? tho revi
val of business prosperity in the South, and upon
this prosperity a great deal of the success of tho
North is dependent; and tho era of restored har
mony and good feeling will also bo hastened by
tho aam?'. means. Nor ib this all the benefit the
nation may ??v?yo by assisting to refit and repair
the Southern railroads. In caso of war with the
French in Moxico?nn event by no means improba
ble, or one against which tho feelings of the
American people would rebel?every lino of rail
way in the South would be needed for tho trans
portation of men, supplies and munitions of war,
to.the Atlantic Gulf ports; and President Johnson
is too far-sighted not to have thought, of this mo
mentous fact. Wo again say that General Web
ster's is a highly important mission.
- - personal..
Major-General Gricraon, accompanied by Major
Woodward, of bis staff, left this city last night, for
the North, on a leave of absence.
Dr. Feebk'B. Collector of tho port of Galveston,
and Mr. Shorburne, special Treasury Agent for
Texas, left this city ?n Thursday last, for Galves
ton, Texas. The businesB of clearing vessels and
shipping goods unrestrictedly to Texas ports will
commence immediately.
General Wright, from the Army of the Potomac,
has left New Orleans for Galveston, where his
headquarters will be for tho future.
-
THE CROPS IN VIRGINIA.
[Correspondence N. Y. Herald.]
CONCEBNINQ WHEAT, TOBAGO AND COIlN.
Ri?-hmond, Va., August 9.?The Southern com
moroial horizon is all aglow with constantly re
curring signB of renewed and growing prosperity.
For a period of timo subsequent to the Union oc
cupation of this city, it was thought that ?i per*
mancnt blight had settled upon commercial afiairs
in all thiB section of country. But tho lapse of
timo?a gentle and suro physician for such a mal
ady?has brought us face to face with the most
gratifying evidences of a now and uncommonly
prosper nus business career now opening through
the South. Hero, iu Richmond, it is ontircly easy
to discover tbat an order of things, of late years
not ho common, is already being established m tho
vigor on 8 preparations that are being mado in the
reconstruction of warehouses, atorea and shops
throughout tho burnt district. Even lots hitherto
vacant, and heretofore considered out of range of
tho business portion of tho city, are being rapidly
built upon. In viow of these facts, I propose, in
this dispatch, to tako tho measure of the present
wheat crop and the stock of tobacco now existing
in this section of the country, for the reason that
these- two staples constitute tho sole basis of the
trade and commerce of this important port. .
THE WHEAT CHOP.
Tlio lowest estimate of the wheat crop that
would reach this market hitherto mado has placed
it at one-sixth of tho cro' of the year I860. My
investigations, now that .ho crop has been har
vested and secured, convince mo that oven this
low estimate is oxtravagant. Tho wheat raised
this year in tho country for which Richmond is the
market ia not in quantity onc-twontieth of tho crop
of 18G0; whilo tho quality, even of tho DCBt, is bo
inferior as to utterly unfit it for tho manufacture
of what was in former times so favorably known
tho world over as "Richmond family flour, ' which.
I. am orodibly told, in tho South American and
Australian markets always commanded a higher
price than flour of any other brand whatever.'
What with tho fly and rust, the constant rains
that have prevailed during the time of harvesting
and threshing, and - the excessive quantity of wild
onion and cockle, the mercantile value per bushel
of the crop is altogether inferior to that of any
season for tho pact twenty years. Bat the, far mer
and his commission merchant in this city And in
this unfortunate conjoncture a substantial com
pensation and consolation. If tho wheat is scant
in quantity and inferior in quality, it nevertheless
brings first-class pnecp. An article which in ordi
nary seasons would not havo been regarded oh fair
was yesterday bringing from $2 25 to $2 8*5 per
bushel, and oven the most inferior grades, which
in tho good times anterior to tho robellion Rich
mond mills would not havo had at any price, is
readily sold at >1 80. Tlio great scarcity of monoy
in the country, with theso fine prices, is halving,
as might wolf be anticipated, the effect of induc
ing fainioia to hurry forward their crops.
TOBACCO.
; The qn?ntity of tobacco that will bo raised this
year in Virginia and North Carolina?tho country
chiefly tributary to Richmond?is, I And upon pro
longed and patient inquiry, too small to bo taken
into serious consideration. Tlio Stato laws during
tho re hellion discouraged its planting, with a viow
to fostering the production of gram exclusively.
The rebellion collapsed quite too late in the sea
son for warranting the pitching of a crop. Hero
ant} thoro a planter hau contrived to wftKc ft few
thousand hills, all of which aggregate will make:
but an insignificant item in any futuro mercantile
transaction?. Xberafor. , in considering tho ce?ui
mercial prospects of tlu'.s region, of which Rich
mond i? tho centre anil ? ?nil?, for the period cov
ering tho nest twelve ntontbu, rogare! muet bo had
only for the tobacco noiv in tho country and ready
for market, und tobaci ?o made before and during
tho iirat years of the i -eb-llion and kept here by
tho blockaele. Thus, t .ftcr <Vue examination of the
subject, I am satisfied. that the stock of tobacco in
Virginia and North Cu roiina ranges between thirty
ilvi. thousand and f? ?rty-fivo nnel lifiy thousand
hogBiic?*. About a uc-half of this has been in
spected and ffw-oi .. --joliouBcu situated at dif
ferent points In tho C wo Stafeu. Ir (J _ , , ,
anee it is, of course!, still on the ji unf'tJoMK t
have as yet no repor t of tho quantity brough, ?..it
Lynchbnrg, Petersl? urg, Danville or other towns,
b?t take it for grant oel that the dearth of aioney
has stimulateel plan ters to send it in a_ rapi?ly'as
tho means of trail aportatioa at their command
would allow.
STATE OF THE TltADE IN B-CQSC-Xb.
Of the receipts and state of tb?l trade in thie
city 1 can speak ?with accuracy. Th-:? staple, to
bacco, is pouring in briskly by the different line?
of railroad, the. ames river and Kanawha canal,
which last public work runs through the tincHt to
bacco-egrowing region in Virginia. By the 1st oi
next-October it muy bo safely said the whole stock
will .have found its way to market.
SE-DROOR'S warehouse,
the only tobacce warehouso of auy capacity worth
considering loft by tho great evacuation fire, wan
opened for inspection on June 28. Between that
time and ycBtenlay, including yesterday morning,
tho "breaks" foot up six hundred hogsheads,' the
greater portion of which were made during the
latter portion of July and thus far on the current
month. Until Oao midello of July transportation
could not he obi since!, owing to tho disrupted con
dition of the publie lines of communication.
Hitherto I am fold that two "break?" a week have
sufficed, but the largely increasing quantity oi
tobacco coming in has made three each week nec
essary, and hereafter they will be mado each Mon
day, Wednesday, and Friday. About ono hundred
and twenty hogshcadB are broken each day.
CHAJiACTEJl OP THE TOBACCO.
The most of the tobacco coining in, and toc?me
in. is of the grado known as "snipping," nearly
all the tobacco for manufacturing purposes having
been worked up since tho rebellion, and since
consumed.
THE COSrStAKDrKO TRICES.
Tho prices commanded by tobacco aro equally
satisfactory to the planters and merchants, as
those obtained for wheat, and referred to sdiovo.
I append the recent quotations : Flug, S?b?SIO;
common leaf, ?12<_:$1_; good leaf, $16%$18]?linc
English shipping leaf, $20@$36.
THE VmOENIA CORN CROP.
The corn crop of this State will bo a good one
for the area of ground planted, which, if may he
added, is not a fourth of that of the year 1860. In
the most prosperous times no com was raised here
for exportation, and for this reason tho crop does
not come properly under present consideration.
From tho estimate matlc of tho resources of the
cemntry I am permitted to conclude there may be
barely tTade euongh the approaching fall anel"win
ter to keep the market alive, but certainly nothing
like sufficient to meet the "great expectation-"
the merchant? are indulging, or to Justify the
enormous rents they aro obliging themselves to
Sav for their Kichinond etorc?, warehouses anu
Witlings. k>
_??_! XEBCHANTS OF THIS _t_TR0I>0LJ8.
It is true ?bat tho number of llichmond mer
chants has bee.'i reduced fully one-half since the
year 18G0; but it mu'5t bo remembered tho bases
for trade, the resources of ti_o country, in fact,
have hven l'v<Jy?c<i in ft JBUCh B?*?VttT proportion.
In addition to this, many Nortuorn ?cf chonta aro
opening houses, and others may reasoiia-..v be ex
pected to follow. In what I have herowith wr.?-ten
you have the results of brief though close observa- i
lions and investigations.
-?-?-?
Den tli of Prof. Ay toan, Editor of Black
aa'oooV? magazine.
We copy from the Scotsman a brief notice of Pro
fessor William E. A?too??, the well-known editor
of Blacktrood's Magazine, and son-in-law of Pro
fessor Wilson (Christopher North), tho preced
ing editor. Ho died on the 4th inst. Tho Scots
man says :
The death of Prof. Aytoun, which we havo this
morning to record, will excite regard and awaken
a sense of loss far beyond the umita of this his
native city, with which his life and its labors have
beon so intimately associated. For a number of
years his state of health had been unsatisfactory.
No acute or local disease? had laid his band upon
him; he was rather, aa ho has himself on occasion
expressed it, uneasy, than unwell, and he hoped
and sought, by change- of air and keen entrance,
so far as his duties allowed, into tho enjoyment of
a country life, to repair tho breaches of the past,
and preparo a store of health against the future.
For a year or two ho had retired, for at least part
of tho summer recess, to Blackhills, near Elgin, a
residence which he had leased for the sake of tho
shooting and fishing, and tho other country
recreations of which he was eo fond; and it was
there that, early on Friday morning, be died, at
the too early ago of 62. Win. Eelmondstoune Ay
toun was born m 1818, of an old Fifesbiro family.
He received his education at Edinburgh Universi
ty?being distinguished among his class-fellows at
the former by the elegance and excellence of his
English and Latin compositions. In 1831 ho gave
to the public his first work?a poem on "Poland,"
the inspiration of which his impulsive and roman
tic spirit had doubtless' drawn from the stirring
event s of the Polish Be volution; but the poem met
with no very cordial reception. In 1840 ho was
admitted as an advocate. At the bar he did not
maleo any marked figure, though he had some
little reputation in criminal business. His genial
ity and ready wit, however, mado him a favorito
among hia fellows of the robe. In 1846 ho was
fortunate enough to bo appointed to the chair of
Literature and Bolles Lettr?e in the University of
Edinburgh, and in 1862 the Conservative govern
ment further advanced him by making him Sheriff
of Orkney and Shotland. Shortly after his ap
pointment to the chair, we believe, be married tho
youngest daughter of Prof. Wilson. From Oxford
university he received, a year or two later, tho
degreo of D.O.L. The "Laya of Scottish Cava
liers" was Mr. Aytonn's most ambitious, and
it has been hia most successful work; it has run
through seventeen oditiona? at the rate of one per
annum, and, from its subjeot and spirit, it bid?
fair to hold ft good place in popular favor. Many
of tho bcBt of tho "Bon Gualtior" ballads,
too, we owe to Mr. Aytoun'a fancy and humor.
" Firm Hi an, a spasmodic Tragedy," whioh he pub
lished in 1864, under the paoudonym of " T. Percy
Jones," was unquoutionnbly Mr. Aytoun'a moat ef
fective and beneficent work. Provoked by an in
telligible and praiseworthy irritation against the
inflated, excited and unprincipled productions ol
certain youthful poets, whoso neroee were always/
like Bottom, calling out for "apart to tear a. caf
In, to make all split"?" Firmihan," almost with?
out the author intending it, mado an end of th
" spasmodic school." ,i:BothweU, a Poem," tbJ
plot of which was taken from the tanglod hie tor
of Mary Queen of Scots, was published in 186
and has paused through three editions; but thong
tho author spent considorablo pain? on it both h
fore and after it saw the light, it was not through
out nearly of oven the aamo merit aa tho "Lays
In 1868, Mr. Aytoun edited a collection of the Ba
lads of Scotland; and in the aamo year appear?:
the graceful and classical translation? of ti i
Poems and. Ballads of Goethe, oxocntod in con
mon by Aytoun and Theodore Martin. In 18<
waa republished from Blackwood the novel of No
man Sinclair, whioh waa corttir.lv tf-o least met
toriona and successful of all Vio literary efforts
Mr. Aytoun. Since then, excepting a "nupti
odo," on tho marriago of tho Prince of Wales, 1
has published nothing with hia -name. .
Tho Parisiana wore very urioasy about the chb
era.
-?-<_?- ?
Chang and Eng each gayo ft eon to the reb
army.
WM. ATv?^, agKNT,
NEWBERR1' C "^B^nt of cottoi
TSnLL ATTEND TO THE HinrMlftU'??uj|"Hl""'
TV kc, to Oriingcburg Depot, ur^j feHto?
Cniinfennicnt? noli?*it?xl. ^\^^*
UcKhaudis? wiU bo received in CliarloRton for annzr
lir'ts ?m the Greenville Railroad, at ?i fuir r.itc of troiia
uarUttoB? to iiK-htile drayago. railroad freight?, wajion
hire, ami all forwarding charge*.
Sliivrt-r? will Niecivi? further information on applica
tion t5>ir. H; B. OLNEY. Ho. ? Vendu?; Range, Charles
ton, 8, C. or to me. at Nowberry, S. C.
Augur* ?iO_?_
F RE E COLLATION
SERyED eveky evening at
Wmm EXCH? BAR,
Corner King and Society-Streets.
AUguBt 20
MERCHANTS' HOTEL,
CORNER KING x^d SOCIETY-STS.
THE ABOVE HOTEL HAS bv:L\ COMPLETEL-*
renovated and refurnished, and is novr ojen for the ptv
tronage of the public, under an entirely ?cw manage,
ment.
A BAR, fitted up with the latent and most mou?m jni
provements, is atta?-hed to Um House, where may ?Ways
be found LIQUORS of the mont superior quality ia tho
City.
LIQCOR can be obtained at the table, and will vJso
be furnished in the rooms at all hours and all ?laysol
the week, if desired.
Mr. H. H. PARSONS, formerly connected with tic
Pavilion Hotel, is attached to the Hotel, and would bo
gratified te met? any of his old friends.
LORING & BEKHETT, Proprietors.
August24 _ 3mo
OTW NOVELS*
JUST RECEIVED BY
H. I*. RUGG,
AT THE
CHEAP BOOK AND PERIODICAL
STORE,
No. 108 Market-street.
CARRY'S CONFESSION, BY THE ATJTHOR OF
Mat tic Astray.price.. 7;>c
DENNIS DONNE, by Annie Thomas.price. .50c
MOTHEIiS AND DAUGHTERS, by Mr?, floro..?..
.price.. COe
ONLY A CLOD, by Mrs. Braddon.price..75c
LOVE ME, LEAVE ME NOT, by Egun.price. .50c
LIONEL JOCELYN, by Egan.price. .Mc
LATELY PUBLISHED,
VERY HARD CASH, niustrated, by Chas. Rende....
.price.. |1.60
MY DLVRY NORTH AND SOUTH.by Russell, price.. COo
Any of the above Books 6ent post-paid by Mail, on re
Ci-jy" of the above prices.
PHOTOGRAPHS.
Just received a large assortment of PHOTOGRAPHB,
incluibng Mr. LINCOLN, Mr. JOHNSON, GRANT,
SHERMAN, MEADE, McCLELLAN, GILLMORI,
CHASE, BLUR, BATES, SEWARD, 8TANTON, FARRV
GDT, DAHLGREN, DUPONT, WINSLOW, kc, kc.
ALSO,
LEE, JACKSON, BEAUREGABD, LONG8TREET,
JOHNSTON, HARDEE, MORGAN, HILL, 8EMMES,
BRAGG. Mr. DAVIS, Mr. STEPHENS, &c, kc. Price
25 cents each, or five for ono dollar. Sent post-paid by
mail, on receipt of the price.
JOS- Postoflicc Box No. 241. -ffi?
?ST FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC NF.WSPA
PERS AND PERIODICALS roceived by every
steamer.
REMEMBER
No. 108 Market-street.
August 24 8
JAMES M. STOCKER & SON,
Commission & Forwarding Merchants,
ORANOEBVRO, S. C.
PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO THE PURCHASE
OF COTfON and other Produce, also to forwarding of
Cotton and Merchandise generally,
JAMES M. 8TOCKER.8AM'L. H. STOCKER.
August 20 5
S. G. COURTENAY,
BOOK m STATIONERY DEPOT,
No. 9
BROAD-STREET,
August 14 CHARLESTON, 8. C.
RICHARD ALLISON,
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
; No. 06 BEEKMAN-STREET,
HBW YORK.
COTTON AND OTHER PRODUCE BOLD ON COM
MISSION. General Merchandise- purchased and
forwarded to order. lmo* August 10
LOUIS J. BARB0T,
ABOHITECT,
CIVIL ENGINEER AND SURVEYOR.
OFFICE:
Nor tli west Corner Meeting and Tradd-st reets.
August 24 10?
GREAT WESTERN
MRU INSURANCE MPJiW,
"tSrE"VV_YOBK:.
milE SUBSCRIBERS, AGENTS FOR VARIOUS IN
X 8URANCE COMPANIES, ''?ill take Risks for tho
ahc-'O .named - cil known Company, upon Cotton and
Merchandise generally, from jxirts and places In the Uni
ted States to port? and places in tho United 8Ut?a and
Eu rone, ami vice versa, 'on favorablo terms, on Steamers,
Hailing Vessels and Inland Conveyance. < . -
ALSO,
FIRE RISKS ON BUILDINGS. MERCHANDISE AND
COTTON, bi various well known Fire Insurance Compa
nies. GEO. W. WILLIAM8 ft CO.,
Angus.' ?4 rawiIJ flo?, i ana 3 "Jsyuc-strcct,
___^5? _f^S_p!S
2j?t___?UA'^^B ____H___R_______- _
3C--i_G_jiort, uuelsair^till ____________
apply to wn.i.is IWHHB _l____
AllgUBt 23 _ ^^^^H fefe
FOR I>IVERPO?l.~t7iiP
?Bark EXCHANGE in now rei-tivin?! Fn^SB|
>S(iuii) Atlantic Wharf, und will leave? -.ah t!?5^M
'?.?atoll. For Freight npplv lo -^^Hagj
WILLIS fe CUIfc-LM, Mills Ho_3D.
Anglist 22
s FOR. NEW YOUK?THEf I R S 'jpZ.
CLASS Schooner FLYING SCUD. .!. T. Mn.
??amar iiiat?tor, will ?ill with iliMpat?;- tor the
??ahovc port. For Freight apply to
WILLIS k CHISOLM, Agents,
August 20 Milla Houpe.
s FOR BOSTON.?THE stHUOKEIt
FRANKLIN will have quick dispatch for tha
iabovo port. For Freight apply to
o GEO. tV. CLARK k CO.,
AuguRt 21 No. 145 Meeting-street.
FOR NEW YORK DIRECT.
THE FIRST CLASS UNITED STATES MAEQ
STEAMSHIP
MONEEA.
CHAS. P. MAR8HMAN.Commands.
THE NEW, FAST, ELEGANT AND FAVORITE STEAM
SHIP
M O N E K A
"lI/TU?fLEAVE ACCOMMODATION WHARF OH
TT To-ffarrow, August 3lBt, at ? o'clock, precisely.
For Freight or Passugc, having superior accommoda?
lions, apply to ARCHIBALD OETTY A: CO.,
Nos. 190 aud 128 Meeting-street.
August 30
NEW YORK & CHARLESTON STEAMSHIPS
LEAHY LINE.
FOR NEW YORK DIRECT,
THE NEW AND FIRST-CLASS STEAMSHIPS
QUAKER CITF, Side Wheel,
W. H. WEST.COMMAND-?,
?KANADA, Propeller,
R. BAXTER.Commandes?
AMiA.tll.R_. Propeller,
R. B. BENSON.Command**.
THE SPLENDID
QUAKER CITY
will LEAVE BROWN'S WHARF, THIS DAY. TEUT
30th instant, at ? o'clock, precisely.
For Freight or Passage, having MAGNIFICENT AC
COMMODATIONS, apply to
THADDEU8 STREET, No. 74 East Bay.
?3* The GRANADA will follow, on Saturday, the 23
Septemher._ _August 30
NOTICE TO TRAVELERS,
tit?
CHANGE OF BCH?DULE.
Office Genekax. 8up't W. and M. R. R., >
Wii.ifiNiiTos, N. C, August 'il, 18C5. I
ON AND AFTER SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, DALLY
TRAINS will be run over tho Wilmington and Maa.
cheater Railroad, between Wilmington and Kingville.
Leave Wilmington daily at.C:00 A. M*.
Leave Kingvillo daily at.7:35 P. 1_V
Arrive at Wilmington daily at.3:05 P. M?.
Arrive at Kingville daily at.1:25 A. M
There is daily communication North from Wilmingtou
by Rail. These Trains connect with Trains on tho
Northeastern Railroad, Cheraw and Darlington Railroad?,
and Wilmington and Weldon Railroad. They also con
nect at Kingville with a lino of Stages for Columbia, ami
at Sumtcr with a lino fcr Camden.
HENRY M. DRAKE,
August 21 lmo_General Superintendent.
s NORTHEASTERN RMI.HOM).
OFFICE NORTHEASTERN RAILROAD. I
Ohablekton. 'August 25,1865. f
ON AND AFTER MONDAY NEXT, AUGUST -STR..
the PASSENGER TRAINS wlU arrive and deparT
as follows :
Leave Charleston..0.30 A. M.
Arrive at Charleston... I.11.00 A. M.
Tho Tri-Weekly Trains will continue until Friday, 1st
September, when daily triUB will be resumed.
a. 8. SOLOMONS. Superintendent.
August g_ ____;_10_m
LEATHER AND SHOE FIDI?S.
C. VOIGT,
No. 79 MAEKET-ST,
OFFER8.FOR HALE
OAK AND HEMLOCK 80LE LMATHER
FRENCH AND AMERICAN CALF SKINS
MOROCCO, PATENT LEATHER ANI>?
LINING 8KINS
3HOE FINDING8 AND SHOEMAKER'S TOOLS.
ALSO,
HARNESS LEATHER, TANNEB'8 OIL
AND
SILK, THREAD AND NEEDLES, FOR SINGERS ANX>'
OTH EU SEWING MACHINE?.
August 14_inwf 10*
A. C. SCHARFER, ) JAS E. BROWN k CO.,)
GEO. Y. BARKER. I No. 33 8. Front Street, I
New York. ) Philadelphia. >
A. O. SOHAEFEB, Jb..
COBXSB UOBT AND H-VTT bTEEETS,
Baltimore.
Adolphns C Schaefer & Go^
(FORMERLY OF BALTIMORE,)
Greneral Shipping & Commissi?HL
MERCHANTS,
NO. Ill WATER-ST.', NEW YORE*.
?ar-EVERY FACILITY OFFERED FOR. COXS-OS?
iI?NTH and execution of orders in Now- York, Philadeir
ilif?, ?r Baltimore, by cither house?
August li 0XB0?

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