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The Charleston daily news. (Charleston, S.C.) 1865-1873, September 02, 1865, Image 1

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VOL. I....NO. 18.
CHARLESTON, S. C, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER >,i, 18G5.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
THE
CHARLESTON DAILY NEWS,
1CATHCART, ?cHUXAH & MORTON,
PBOPR1ETOBS,
.No. 18 HAYNE-STBEET.
TE It.- "IS?CASH.
DAILY?ONE ?BAR.' &10-00
DAILY?SIX MONTHS.?-00
?AILY?THREH MONTHS.3?'0
/OS- Single Copies FIVE CENTS.
JUS" News Dealers snppUed at a liberal ?discount.
ADVERTISING.
One Scjuare, Tcia Lines, one insertion, ONE DOL
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Each continuation, SEVENTY-FIVE CENTS.
Less than a square, FIFTEEN CENTS PEU LINE for
first insertion ; HALF PRICE for each continuation.
The "following arc the Agents for this paper:
JOSEPH H. SEARS, "New South," Hilton Head.
H. L. DARR, Sumtcr, S. C.
J. T. HERSHMAN, "Journaloffice," Camdcn, S. C.
J. W. BROWN, "Southerner office," Darlington, 3. C
O. L. PRATT, Columbia.
M. M. QUTNN & BBO., Augusta. Ga.
H. ESTELL, Savancah, Ga.
Mr. AUG. BRENTANO, NO. 708 Broadway. New York,
bas always the latest dates of the Daily News, as ho
docs of all the other principal journals of the country.
THE MEXICAN QUESTION.
(Cori-wpontiVaic?: jVeio York Herald.)
"Washington, August 25.?The Mexican question
begin? to acquire a degree of importance hero next
only to that of tho restoration of the Southern
States. While tho Government -wan intently occu
pieu with subduing tho gigantic Southern rebel
lion it rather avoided .the inimciliat?! consideration
of nny-other troublesome matter? not requiring
instant attention; and although it never ?wcrvea
from tlit- traditional asid well-established policy of
the country with regard to what is understood as
the Monroe doctrine, it was not anxious to precipi
tate a discussion ab? ?ut European intervention in
Mexico before our own domestic troubles were in a
jgooil way of being settled. It did n?it permit its
.apparent dignilicd reservo to be misunderstood,
Jiowcvcr, and baa in no way tolerated such inter
vention on this continent. And the language of
? he presa, the pcoplo and Congress has been so
decided and emphatic that no one could help see
ing what was tho universal sentiment of tho coun
try.
But while onr Government has held this ?ligni
ficd attitude and was disposed to allow the Empe
ror Napoleon and his protege, the Emperor Maxi
milian, to get ont of their Mexican difhculty with
out subjecting them to tho unpleasantness and
humiliation or a formal warning to leave, events
are occurring that may bring this question to an
issue sooner than anticipated. It is evident that
both Emperors arc uaeasy, like a person who feels
the vibrations of an earthquake beneath his feet,
for they have become impatient and restless.
Thoy socm unable to enduro* suspense anv longer,
and have made a desperate eflort to obtain tho
?lightest semblance of recognition or toleration cf
the Mexican Empire from the United States.
The well-informed correspondent of the Herald
ju Mexico, writing under date of July 23, states
that the Chamberlain of the Kmnsmr Maximilian,
Mr. Degollado, has been sent to the United States
on ? sort of guar? private mission for tho Empe
ror, in order to feel tho pulse of the government
at Washington. He was instructed, it is said, to
ash an interview from th?; Secretary of Stato or
the President, through the French Minister, to de
liver a letter from Maximilian. This was simply
an autograph letter of condolenco upon the aiiaus
uination of President Lincoln, and of congratula
tion to Mr. Johnson on Ii?h elevation to tho Presi
dency?a polite noto only, having no roferenco to
ofticial or international matters. This was an
adroit movement, for the informal recognition of
there being such a person as the Emperor of Mex
ico, woidd nave been a crumb of comfort to his
Majesty in his uneasy scat.
It appears further that Maximilian contemplat
ed at first eending Ramirez, his Secretary of State,
and, perhaps, General Bazainc with him; but this
was deemed too bold a move, and as looking too
much like open, official recognition to succeed.
These diplomatic managers concluded that the
Americans were too smart to be fooled in that way,
an*d finally concluded to send in a very private
manner and character Mr. DegollaJo. It was
thought that this gentleman, a son of tho late
General Degollado, was a most suitable person for
the mission. He, like his father, had bolongcd to
the Juarez party, waa several years in Washing
tori as an attache to Mr. Main, the Minister of
Juarez, had married only two yoors ago a Wash
ington lady, and is a quiet, unassuming person,
whom no one woidd bo likely to suspect as being
engaged in any deep diplomatic game.
Before the news of Mr. Degollado having been
sent on this mission was published, tho gentleman
himself, with his wife, arrived in Washington.
After having tho way nicely prepared for him, and
every point carefully surveyed, while tho French,
English, Spanish and other ministers were watch
ing the result with the greatest interest, particu
larly the French Minister, Mr. Degollado made a
rcspoctful application for permission to present to
President Johnson the nice little autograph infor
mal note of condolenco and congratulation from
the Emperor Maximilian. Everything went on
-very smoothly to this point, but then thero waa
doubt and trepidation. An empire might hang on
tho answer to this seeming modest application.
"Would the government fall into tho trap? Or,
seeing it, if kindly disposed towards Maximilian,
ivonld it not take advantage of such an admirable
arrangement to givo him something of a quasi
recognition, without shocking public, sentiment?
These questions undoubtedly agitated the minds
of several of the diplomats.
Well, the answer to Mr. Degollado'e application
came at last, and it was not long in coming, for
thero was nothing to hesitate about. Tho saga
cious Secretary of State and our clcar-hoadcd
President did not ovado tho matter when submit
ted to them, out of courtesy or compliment. Thoy
wore asked to receive a letter from the Emperor
of Mexico. They knew no such person, and would
not receive the letter. That was the answer. This
in no imaginary scene or event, hut a fact, full of
mgniflcancc, and important in the history of this
country.
. This declaration had to como so on or or later,
end, while the Government was not disposed to
embarrass the Emperor Napoleon and Maximilian
earlier than necessary, or not at all. if thoy woidd
gracefully withdraw from Mexico, it mot the issue
fairly and firmly when brought before it by tho
?iartics themselves. No amount of diplomatic
rimming or ingenious explanation can destroy the
force of this fact; and its full meaning is that, not
only does the Government of tho United States not
know such a person as the Emperor of Mexico, but
never can know such a person.
In this attitude of the United Stales what should
he the pohcyof Napoleon and Maximilian ? Clearly
*2#ft# ?u- exlco- The? c*nnot hold it against the
will of this country. Europe combined could not.
It is hardly necessary to refer to our resources, to
the million of men we could raise at tho tap of tho
drnm, to the fighting qualities of onr veteran he
roes, and to the commmmato ability of our gene
rals. All this is understood in Europe now. A
war in defence of republican institutions in tho
.adjoining republic and to maintain tho Monroo
doctrine wonld bo most popular; and if tho isauo
is forced upon us we shall accept it at any cost
But we do not want to go .to war. Wo want peace
nnd tli?! most enlarged, commerce with all nations*
and for thiB we wonld forget oven the insidious
Attempts that have been made bv European Pow
ers to destroy opr instituions and power,
How, then, aro wo to avoid war? How can the
Emperor Napoleon :mcl Maximilian get out of the
elileiiima they are in with as, little; discredit n:ul
danger uh possible V A congress of nations, seems
to be the most feasible, if not the only way. Let
tho Empor ur Napoleon weigh well thin proposition.
Let the United States, as ono of the first Power?
of tho world, be invited to this Congress. To an
ticipate the future, to avoid war and complica
tions hereafter, to save Europe from revolutions
which must inevitably follow a war with this coun
try, and to establish a lasting peace, let the Euro
pe?an Powers withdraw from the American conti
nent. In a word, hit a congress of the great Pow
er? develare that henceforth America shall belong
only to the Americana.
? > -
Improvements at Hie Capitol.
TUE DOME AND TETE LIBRABA*.
Tho Washington correspondent of the Portland
Paily Pi'tss thus describes recent improvements
in theCapitol at Washington:
On the 18th September, 1793, General WaBhimr
lon laid tho corner-stone of the CapitoL Tho ctb
licc ha:< passed through variouB mutations sinoe
then, having been partially built, then sacked ami
burned, 80 far as it waB combustible, then rebuilt
and linitiheel, and now in later years so enlarged
and remodelled aB to change essentially it? archi
tectural character, and almost obliterate the orig
inal design. Only now at length, when our politi
cal institutions seem grounding themselves more
fully thnn ever before upon the everlasting and
immovable principles of justice and right, and so
approximating assured stability and permanence,
is the Capitol at last approaching completion.
THE DOME.
The dome, its geandesl f?atnre, is now finished
externally, and stands in its graceful majesty
against the sky, a monument of modern architec
tural skill. So symmetrical and beautiful is it,
that you hardly realise its magnitude, but when
you climb its giddy height, and clamber among
the network of iron bars and beams between its
outer and inner Bhells, you aro not surprised to
learn that eight thousand tons of iron, and one
million dollars, have been used in its erection. The
great fresco that is to ornament the upper sec
tion of its interior Burface, forming the vaulted
ceiling over the centro of the rotunda, ono hun
dred and cightv-six feet above the floor, is now
progressing in the hands of Mr. Constantino Bru
nn ch.
THE rOJITICOES.
The eastern porticoes of both extensions are
now complete except a few blocks yet to be added
to the one upon the southern or Iteprcsontatives'
end of the building. The tympanum of this por
tico, moreover, has not yet received any statuary
like those groups which* form so pleasing a feat
ure of its follows. Both arc supported by double
rows of Corinthian columns, and present, now
that thev are completed, a front of rare magnifi
cence, tour more porticoes, smeller thnn these,
and to be supported by single columns, yet remain
to bo built, viz.: one on the northern and another
on the southern end or face of the Capitol, and
one on the western front of each extension. The
amount of marble already used in these works is
truly astonishing, and still the Capitol is musical
with the clink of hammer and chisel, while huge
blocks on every hand are slowly assuming the
forms of pedestal and base, shall and capital,
frieze and cornice. The time necessary to com
plete the. exterior of the Capitol will, cif course, '
depend upon the force employed. At past rates
of progress, two or even three years will be hardly
more than sufficient.
THE LmnAKY.
A very extensive enlargement of the Congres
sional Library is now in progress. A number tad
small rooms adjacent to the Library, formerly
used for the meetings of committees and for other
purposes, arc being demolished, so as to form two
spacious nails, one on the north and tho other on
tnc south of the Library room, and connected with
it so as to form two le. The apartment at present
occupied by the Library is ninety-four feet in
length by "thirty-three in width, and the new
rooms are of the same width and nearly as long.
Since, however, they will contain three galleries,
whereas the old part has but two, they will each
bo about equal to it in capacity. The new rooms
are to be finished in all respects like the other,
that is to say in rich and tasteful style, and per
fectly tire-proof. The iron shelves and other cast
ing, necessary to fit these spacious halls for their
intended purpose, are to be furnished by the archi
tectural iron works of New York. The north
room is to be finished, according to contract, by
tho first of January, and the south by tho first of
Julv, 18C6. The coBt of tho enlargement is esti
malcd to be tlGO.OOO. When completed the Libra
ry will occupy the entire central part of tho west
ern front of the Old Capitol, will contain 150,000
volumes, and will bo worthy of our capital and
nation. The enlargement is going forward upon
plans made by Mr. T. TJ. Walters, lato Capitol
Architect.
?? t
FVars of Negro Insurrection.
[From the Neu York Commercial Advertiser.']
Wo have received, of late, frequent accounts of
mtrages perpetrated in North Carotina upon the
?lacks by the native inhabitants. How much truth
here may bo in these reports we are unprepared
;o say. Whatever may bo the situation of affairs
n North Carolina, it is very evident that in South
Carolina the tables are turned, and that the
vhites are now afraid of the blacks, instead of the
?lacks being afraid of the whites. We have before
is a private letter from a citizen of Camden, in
vhicli lie cxpreeses much alarm lest tho freed
llaves may make a most unwarrantable use of
heir liberty, and commit wholesale atrocities upon
heir late masters. He writes :
"Aa all the negroes are to ho turned loose upon
he country on the 1st day of January next, the
inestion is : How are they to live ? Poor creat
?rcB. their doom is sealed. They or the white race
nust periBh. Which will it bo ? Will the North
stand by and see their own flesh and blood perish
it the hands of the negeoes ? I fear for the 1st of
lanuary to come. We are sure to have a difficulty
?vith the blacks. I think they aro preparing for
the crisis. They are arming themselves now, and
[ think thoy have more weapons than tho whiten.
(Vo have but few arms to defend oursolvca with,
is for myself. I have none. Sherman got my shot
run and revolver. I intend, however, to send for
i pair of army revolvers, with fixed cartridges to
It. If not too much trouble, toll me the cost of a
jair of them. I want good ones, for I am eure I
?hall need them."
The whirligig of time works wondrous changes.
3ould there be a more terriblo retribution than
hat which has transformed, m a short four years,
he wealthy South Carolinians from the owners of
llaves, confident in their faithfulness and devotion,
nto humble supplicants for protection against
lioso samo "hewers of wood and drawers of vva
er"?
We think, however, that there is no occasion for
he alarm and uneasiness of our correspondent,
vho asserts himself to bo a Union man. These
lame fears were entertained and expressed by the
vhites in the British West Indies when the negroes
?ore set free. Brt no trouble occurred. The
reedmen became peaceful and quiet citizens,
rithout the intervention of soldiers or the addition
if a single countable to tho civil force.
The submission and docility of the slaves during
he wholo period of the conflict argues that they
?ave no taBte for bloodshed and slaughter. When
ill tire Southerners were absent in the field thoy
ould, had they been so disposed, have rison en
nasse and inaugurated a second St. Domingo.
"rom one end of tho South to the othor tho ne
groes had come to look upon "Massa Linkum" as
heir deliverer, and believed that the war was bo
ng prosecuted by tho North expressly for their
lenefit. If, under these circumstances", the slaves
emainca in quiet subjection, refusing to strike
me blow for freedom, it is not reasonable to sup
?oee that thoy will now attempt an insurrection
rhen their freedom has been secured to them,
nd tho return homo of the Confederate soldiers
roald render an uprising dangerous in the ex
reme.
Admitting, however, thr.t tho freed negroes were
deposed to wreak an intliecriminato vengeance
ipon their late whit? owners, which we do not be
ovc; there arc Federal fjyl&era posto^ at 2RUQ0
rou.s points iu Sooth Carolina and other State*,
rwidy to ?jin-11 any outbreak, be it inaugurated by
black? or whites. Our restored countrymen can
therefore rest iissuroil that so long as they remain
in quiet subjection, obeying the constituted au
thorities of the land, they will be guaranteed peace
ami personal safety.
VARIOUS ITEMS.
CO?ir-ili-D ESPBESSLY FOR THE DAILY NEWS.
There are 314,022 Indians in this country.
The figs weigh 5J ounces in San Francisco.
Victor Hugo is writing a five act eomedy.
Jeff. Davis' mother-in-law is in New York.
A dozen detectives are on young Ketchum'e
trail.
Ottowa will next month become tho capital of
Canada.
The English have completed thrco thousand
miles of railways in India.
Ketchum is well named. He did catch 'em ex
tensively.
The probability is that tho great cable has "gone
under. ?Tauntou Gaz.
Gen. Banks is named for Mr. Gooch's seat in
Congress.
The Richmond Times reports large quantities of
tobacco on the Danville rr.ilroad.
The Charleston, S. C, ladies continue very un
amiablc towards our soldiers?Boston Post.
The lamented Zollicofler's daughters have taken
the oath in Nashville.
Tho N. Y. Tribune is printed on bamboo paper,
and very handsomely it looks.
Bombay waa recovering from its commercial
crisie.
The State prisoners at Fortress Monroe arc now
allowed the daily papers.
A man of much decision?the Commissioner of
Internal llcvenue.
North Carolina exports 100,000 bushels of pea
nuts per annum.
Vauderbilt and Stewart are building the new ho
tel at Saratoga. It will be a palace.
A brutal parent in New York attempted to hang
his daughter with the clothes line.
The grape crop in Ohio will fall short this year
in eonaccpjcncc of mildew.
The Newburyport Herald reports lively business
in the ship-yards there.
Gen. Hooker is going to St. Louis to marry a
prcity and wealthy widow. ?Ex.
Lord Derby is preparing a fifth edition of his
translation ox Homer.
There arc in Chicago seventeen grain warehouses
with a total capacity of ?Ki5,000 bushels.
The N. Y. Saturday Prest says never confide se
crets to your relatives; bloo?l will tell.
Trenticc says the negroes as a body stand hol
low-footed against all Idea of work.
Mine host "Main, of tho Dallard House, Richmond,
Va., is about to marry a niece of Jenny Lind.
The Fulton and Arago will again run on the New
York and Havre steamship line.
Maretzok says the price of the N. Y. Herald's
friendship for the opera is 120,000 a season.
A man actually died in his bed in New York
day or two since. Street murders are decreasing.
A correspondent of the Anti-Slavery Standard
suggests tho impeachment of President Johnson.
Lady Gwendoline St. Maur is married. London
was in a nutter about it.
The tobacco crop in Missouri and Kentucky i?
suffering.
There are in the oil regions a elass of men calletl
"oil smellers," who for $10 indicate the placo for
boring.
Gen. Baker has gone "West to investigate frauds
upon government. It will be the largest batch any
baker ever kneaded.
There is an editor named Silver-thorn. We ven
ture to say thero is more silver in his name than
in his pocket.
Mr. Quilp says that most men who complain
that they have nothing to do, are just about equal
to the task.
Our neighbor of the Democrat couldn't wash
himself without losing a good deal of ground.
Louisville Journal.
A returned soldier in Philadelphia cowhided hia
former captain for tying him up by tho thumbs
while in the army.
Barnnm's late property in New York has gone
into the hands of Bennett, of tho Herald?passed
from a big humbug to a bigger one.?IjOu. Journal.
A lady at tho Saratoga races wore (28,000 worth
if diamonds in her hair. Her husband hired a
policeman to watch her against thieves.
Among the prizes offered at the great shooting
"estival in Germany are a Waltham watch, a
3pringfield rifle, and an American buggy.
"Brick" Pomcrov says President Johnson is like
a young widow. Ho don't stick to black long after
;he death of his "better half."
Tho radicals have failed in their efforts to rule
President Johnson. Now they will try to ruin
lim?and again fail.?Ix>uisoil?e Journal.
Colonel Forney calls Wade Hampton ono of the
wear, checaliers of tho South?in some respects the
lattern knight and gentleman of tho Carolinas.
Not a nyin in New York to-day could be fonnd
vho had ever had the least faith in tho Atlantic
table. All "knew it would fail, and had always
laid so."
The citizens of St. Louis have collected $30,000,
rat it in the bank to the credit of Gen. Sherman,
nul informed the General to use it in selecting a
touse to his taste.
No one in New York has stolen over one hun
Ired thousand up to 10 o'clock P. M. yesterday,
herefore no account of theft, forgery or embezzle
ncnt was mentioned.
Tho editor of the De ser et News says his object
n publishing his paper has been to " benefit Is
acl and do good to mankind." This is what wo
Irivo at in printin / the News.
Blond?n isporf -ming tho most perilous feats in
-aris on a wire cable. His agent having cheated
dm out of a fortune, ho is nightly hazarding his
tfe to gain another.
Marshal Bazaine arrested six editors in Mexico
or certain editorial strictures upon his course,
,nd sentenced ?them all to fines' and imprisonment,
""ho Emperor pardoned them.
The Springfield Republican tells tho story that
no of tho pastors of that city war recently waited
ipon by a loving conplo whom he duly joined in
redlock, whon the bridegroom asked him if there
r-aa anything to pay. The parson stammcringly
aid ho always took what parties chose to give
dm, though the legal .feo was $1.25. Tho bride
TO?m then took him out of doors and said, conll
leutially, he had nothing with him, bnt ho would
ako his address and send him down $i?.60 on the
taget
Tho other day, a lady was examining tho fino
hawls and cloaks upon the life-size frames
n a store in Hartford, and finally found a silk
loak that pleased her vory much, and she raised
t up, examined it carefully and freely, and was at
he conclusion very much astonishod to find that
he had been making free with tho dress of a lady
ustomor who very qnietly stood as still as a stay
gure, till all of tue trimmings of her dress had
een well examined.
A young lady moving in tho nppor circlos at
ihicago waa betrothed, at tho beginning of the
rar, to a lientonant in tho army. He was killed in
attlo and his body taken home and buried by his
earest friend ana comrade, who was with him
rhcn he fell. To this young man tho lady's affec
lons wero very naturally transferred in time, and
ho engaged to marry him. When tho happy day
rrivod, and just as tho clergyman was about to
ronounco them man and wife, tho lady suddenly
ilnted, and being revived, forbid any further pro
oduro, as eho said she had seen tho spirit of hor
inner lover, and ho was opposed to the'match,
ho persisted in hor decision..ondhae eiaco retired
> % c-ravent, "" 9m
Jj?v POR. LIVERPOOL?TUB BRITISH !
ViV^liiiil; MELBOURNE, Captain losa, having ?i I
cR^af1 portion ol Ucr cargo ready, will have dispatch ?
HBEsfor tin- above- port.
Apply to ?IHRES ?: CO., AtlRrr's Wharf,
n't)- ;riit> Columbia l'heunix anil Darliticton New Ura
Will copy tbn-e- times, and seutl bills to Uibbes & Co.
auch ht no
FOR L.IVERPOOL.-TIIE BRITISH
'luiejuc IRMA, (;iipt. .Itihn Cliiiiiinius. will re
' reive Freight on the ?till instant for the above
port, mu? sail with dispatch. Porongssamsnta
apply to WILLIS k CU1SOLM, Mills House.
Av.KKsl_23_
FOR BALT1HIORE.-TIIE AI SCHH.
FLYING MOUD," 3. T- MoNamar master,
>wiu leave- with dispatch. For Freight engage.
-Illrl.ts, apply to
WILLIS & CHISOLM.Agent?.
Aiifrust 31 Mills House
FOR BOSTON.?THE SCHOONER
FRANKLIN will have quick dispatch for the
labor? port. For Freight apply to
UEO. W. CLARK k CO.,
Angust 21 No. 145 Meeting street
NEW YORK & CHARLESTON STEAMSHIPS
LEAEY LINE.
FOR NEW YORK DIRECT.
THE NEW AND FIRST-CLASS STEAMSHIPS
QUAKER 41 TV. Side Wheel,
W. H. WEST.COMMANDER,
GRANADA, Propeller,
R. BAXTER.Comma?uieii.
ALHAMBRA, Propeller,
R. B. BENSON.Commatoek
THE SPLENDID
GRANADA,
WILL LEAVE BROWN'S WHARF, ON SATURDAY,
the 2el September, at holf-past Two o'clock. P. If., l>re
cisely.
For Freight or Fasaaffc, having HANDSOME AC
COMMODATIONS, apply to
THADDEUH STREET, No. 74 East Bav.
?B~ Tho ALHAMBRA will foUovv on the 9th inst. "
August :n
NOTICE TO TRAVELERS.
MRfeh
CHANOS OF SCHEDULE.
Orr:e-i; Okneiul Suc't W. and M. R. R.,1
WlunseTOt?, N. C, August 21, 1KC."?. I
ON AND AFTER SUNDAY, AUGUST 27, DAILY
TRAINS will be run over the Wilmington anil Man
cbester Railroad, between Wilmington aiui KiugviUe.
Leave Wilmington daily at.0:(K) A. U,
Leave Kiugvillo daily at.7::in r. M.
Arrive ut Wilmington elaUy at.a :05 P. M.
Arrive ut Kingville daily at.1:25 A. M.
There is daily coimnuuieatiou North from Wilmington
by Rail. Tbess TrainM eonucct with Tratos on the
NortlK-asterii Railroad, Choraw nnel Darlington Railroad,
and Wilmington and Wcldon Railror.d. They also ceiu
neet at KiugviUe with a hue of Stages for Columbia, auel
at Susutcr with a bne for Cowdeu.
HENRY M. DRANE,
August 21 Imo Oeneral Superintendent.
NORTHEASTERN RAILROAD.
OFFICE NORTHEASTERN RAILROAD. 1
Chahlf.stc?.-;, Align?t 25,1805. I
ON AND AFTER MONDAY NEXT, AUGUST 28TH,
the PASSENGER TRAINS wiR arrive and depart
as follows :
Leave Charleston. 9.30 A. IX.
Arrive at Charleston.11.00 A. M.
The Tri-Weekly Trains will continue until Friday, 1st
September, when doily tripe will be resumed.
H. 3. SOLOMON8, Superintendent
August 25 10
C. E. CHICHESTER,
REAL ESTATE BROKER,
No. 18 BROAD-STREET,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
AGENT FOR THE PURCHASE AND SALE OF
REAL ESTATE in any of Uie Southern States.
ALSO AGENT FOR THE SALE, RENTING, RE
PAIRING, kc, OF CITY PROPERTY. August 22
ADVANCES MADE ON
WATCHES, DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, DRY
GOODS AND PERSONAL PROPERTY OF
EVERY DESCRIPTION.
WILLIAM H. DEVLIN,
NO. 10 COMING, CORNER WENTWORTH-8T.
August 36_Imo?
0. P. PANKN?N,
CHEMIST & APOTHECARY,
NO. 123 MEETING STREET.
A FULL ASSORTMENT OF IMPORTED AND DO
VIESTIC DRUG8 AND CHEMICALS constantly on hand.
August 14 lmo
?AI?I'IJRNISHING GOODS,
JUST RECEIVED,
'ER RECENT ARRIVALS, A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF
?BOOMS
WOOD AND WILLOW WARE
BRUSHES, CORDAGE, TWESES, Ac.
Attention of Retailers especially called.
WM. M. BIRD A CO.,
No. 203 East Bay,
August M One door North Cumberland-street,
rORRE'S STEAM SAW MILL,
TUPPEB & FREER.
AngustjW_._i*;
A. C. SCHAEFER, ) JAB E. BROWN A CO., )
GEO. Y. BARKER, 5 No. 83 8. Front Street, }
New York. ) Philadelphia.)
A. O. SCHAEFER, Jr.,
COIWKB I.IOHT AND I'llATT BTOKETfl,
Baltimore.
Vdolplrus C. Schaeier & Co.,
(FORMERLY OF BALTIMORE,)
Jener al Shipping & Commission
MERCHANTS,
NO. Ill WATER-ST., NEW YORK.
?WEVERY FACILITY OFFERFJLf^afcjSSSS
tEUTS and execution of ord";">??* vj?, ?nuaaei
bla, ar Baltbnor. *- -^VfhOnn?
hta, or n_althur-w ? -. *???? ftOO*
/
V
(INTIMI ICE (?RM BARDEN,
.Yo. 7 tiEONOF.-r.rnEET. BETWEEN KINO ANO
HEETINO.STUEETS. ,
THE PUBLIC ARS ItERl'LCl FULLY INFORMED
that the GARDEN will i-hi.rtly he closed for tha
BcasiMI. A (irand I-ronji-naile Concert will lie givi-a on
Mondan Bvcniug, 4th ?nnt., commencing at 1 o'clock.
Programme on Monday. ]* Heptcmher ?.
PAPER.
ALL KINDS AND SIZES OP PAPER AND FAPEB*
BAGS. BsamletW, Oruiu and Floor Dag?, kc.
For sale at New York priitt'S, by
H. M. JAMES k ERO.,
Agents for Nassau Matte, N. Y.
No. 4 Hayne-Pireet, Charlcst?)n, B. C.
AngUKt .11 thetuS*
HOLDERS O?FmERCHAND?S?"
WHO WISH TO REALIZE IMMEDIATELY, WTX2?
consult their interests by consigning tho same to
JAS. B. CAH1XL.
('cm ml Commission Merchant.
September 1 :t Augusta, On.
8C?THEBK DRUG HOUSE."
KING &~C?SSIDEY,
Wholesale Druggists,
No. 151 MKK'l i\<;-S'iiti;i.'r,
OPPOSITE CHARLESTON HOTEL,
Charleston, S. C.
E D. KING, M. D., 1 r v? _
JESSE J. CAS8IDEY, J ol >0' LB'
R?!ptemlicr 1
HERIOT MOTHERS,
General Commission Merchants,.
CHARLESTON, S. C,
Will give their attention to the purchase an?l sale of Mtr
cbaudJHo an?l Produco of every description.
CONSIGNMENTS OF COTTON SOLICITED.
J. 11. HERIOT, Jn.B. M, HERIOT.
BKFEIIKNCKH:
W.U. B. HERIOT .V CO., Charleston, S. C.
HAKMOND HULL & CO., New York.
DKMEREHT k WYGANT, New York.
.1NO. SLEIGHT, Poughkeepsic, N. Y.
September l lma
JAS. B. CAHILL,
GENER \i?
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
AND DEALER IN
Groceries, Provisions, Wines & Liquors,
No. 171 Broad-street,
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA.
CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED.
September i ?Jmos
JAMES M. STOCKER & SON,
Commission & Forwarding Merchants,
URANGEBURG, S. C.
PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO THE PURCHASE.
OF COTTON and other Produce, also to forwarding off
Cotton and Merchandise generally,
JAMEU M. STOCKER.SAM'L. H. STOCKEE,
August 29 O
BOWERS & SILCOX,
Brokers, -A_\actioneer.s5.
AND
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS*
?WWILL ATTEND TO THE PURCHASE AND SALB'.
OF COTTON, RICE, DRY GOODS AND GROCERIES
Also, their attention will he given to SALES OF Fi; T?.
NITURE, REAL ESTATE, Ac.
Office for the present, at No. 238 KING-STREET.
August 30 Imo
WILLIS & CHISOLM,
FACTORS, COMMISSION MERCHANTS*
AND
SHIPPING AGENTS,
OFFICE, MILLS HOUSE, ?
CHARLESTON, S. C.
C. WILLI8.A. R. CBISOL3?
WILL ATTEND TO THE PURCHASE, SALE AXkv
SHIPMENT (to Foreign and Domestic Portel c?
COTTON, RICE, LUMBER, NAVAL STORES; to tin,.
Collection of Drafts, Purchase and Sole of all SecuritiM..
Jonsignintnta of vessels solicited.
REFKBS to:
Messrs. JOHN FRASER k CO., Charleston. 8. C.
Messrs. GEO. W. WILLIAMS k CO., Charleston. 8. fi
Mesars. PENDERGAST, BR08. & CO., New York.
GEO. SCHI EY, Esq., Auguste, Ga.
T. 8. METCALF, Esq., Augusta, Go.
Messrs. CLARK, DODGE k CO., New York.
Messrs. MURRAY k NEPHEW, New York.
Messrs. E. W. CLARK k CO., Phlladelplda, Penn.
Messrs. FENDERGAST, FENWICK & CO., Baltimore,.
?Id.
Messrs. BAM'L HARRI8 A 80N8, Baltimore, M?I.
OUT The Columbia Phoenix will publish every othtr
luy for one month, and other South Carolina paper*,
weekly for the samo period of time, and send billa to this.
Bee. August I?
HOWE, DOUCIN & CO.,
Commission Mercliaiitsr
Ship Chandlers and Grocers,
NO. 161 EAST BAY, CHARLESTON, 8. C
. HOWE, JB.T. M. DOPCIH.B. C. BOTTt
c. & ?Th?we,
Commission Merchants?,
No. 71 BROADWAY, NEW YORK
. HOWE, JB.B. C. MW.
Consignments solicited. Prompt attention given Uiv
?lea of Merchandise. Produce purchased on Com?ate
ion, and liberal advances mode.
Refer by permission to Messrs. Henby Swift & Co...
o. 116 Broadway; Jko. M. Smtth's 8om A Co., No. 123:
road-st.; Kkmp, Day A Co., No. 11? WaU-at.; Tiiosiu.
Benham.No. 108Broad-st.,N. Y. 6mo* August M
kTcH?R? ALLISON,
?OMMISSION MERCHANT^
No. 90 BEEKMAN-STREET,
NEW YORK.
COTTON AND OTHER PRODUCE BOLD ON COW
j MISSION. General Merchandlso purchaaed aun?,
rwarded to order._???0* Auguat it
~?XO-NEILL & SONS"
MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS INI
IOOTS AND SHOES.
No. 375 King-Street,
CHARLESTON, S. O.
CONSTANTLY ON HAND A LARGE STOCK OF
INE FUE AND WOOL HATS
FOR MEN .AND BOYS.
.ugurtm -two-*.

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