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The Charleston daily news. (Charleston, S.C.) 1865-1873, September 08, 1865, Image 1

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VOL. I....NO. <?3.
CHARLESTON, S, C, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1SG5.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
THE
CHARLESTON DULY NEWS,
CATiicAiiT, McMillan & mouton,
proprietors,
No. 18 HAYNE-STEEET..
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? ADVERTISING,
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Lcsn than a *quaro, FIFTEEN CEST8 PEU LINE for
first insertion ; HALF PRICE for ?teh continuation.
Tiro following are the Agents for tbls paper:
JOSEPH H. SEARS, " New South," Hilton Head.
? L DARR, Hum ter, S. C.
J. T. HER9HMAN, "Journal-office," Carmlen, S. C.
?. W. BROWN, "Southerner office," Darlington, S. C.
O. L. PRATT, Columbia.
M. M. QDINN & BRO., Augusta, (?a.
H. ESTELE, Savannah, Ga,
Mr. AUG. BRENTANO, NO. 708 Broadway, New York,
lias always the latest dates of the Daily News, an he
does of all the other principal journals of the country.
A PLAN TO PROMOTE IMMIGRATION.
The Richmond Whig, of the 2d, publishes the
following interesting letter on the subject of the
above heading, with these remarin :
The subjoined paper was prepared with refer
ence to ft Ringle State, but the plan proponed
(which wo think has valuable feature? and sugges
tions) may be applied to any part of the Smith.
Ab an aid "to those who are considering the vitally
important subject diBenssed, we lay the plan ?if
Mr. Marshall before the public. 31 in name will
?name the perusal of hin communication, and
command respect for his suggestions :
2b (he Editor of tttc Wito:
Sut?The followiug outline contains some of the
Jea?ling features of a plan for the encouragement
of the immigration o? population into the State of
Mississippi and the sale and bestowment of land
forthat object. In compliance with my promise I
?end you the notes, etc. :
1. Let the landholders of any county unite and
subscribe their landu so as to obtain a sufficient
extent of good tillable soil on which a colony could
be easily induced to 6ett!e. Emigraste always
want to settle hi colonies for the sake of lungnagc.
religion, schools and social relations. Several
thousand families bhould 1)0 gotten into a colony.
2. Let commissioners he elected by the compa
ny to estimate t!ie value of each scpiirate tract of
land, and let each subscriber receive certificates of
the number of shares the value of hiB lands enti
tle him to. The company, and all similar ones, to
bo incorporated, of course.
3. Kurvev the entire body of land, and lay it cfT
into lots of nil desirable sizes, to suit all sorts of
comers, with roads- and lanes running through
and rendering acceptable the entire property su
laid off. Furnish water privuVges for mills, ??tes
for villages, lots for churches, and eligible ground
for institutions of learning, and farms ranging
from ten to tluoe hundred acres.
4. Lithograph the plats and publish a pamphlet
describing the advantages of climate, soil, pro
ducts, and their market values, together with all
the necessary information, in various languages,
for Europeans who may desire to remove to tins
favored clime.
5. Send agonts to Europe; open ofiices there;
charter your steamers, and send forward tho peo
ple. Have agents on this side of the ocean ready
to receive them and Bend them to their new
homes. The Legislature ought to advance the
means for the purchase of two or three steamers,
if necessary, to facilitate the object of the compa
nies.
6. Houses, cabins, or comfortable quarters
.should be furnished on the lands for immediate
occupation. These tho emigrant would pay for at
once, or a? might he agreed on with the company.
These would he of a very cheap style, to serve till
the occupant could build to his taste.
7. Sell the alternate lots and farms at a low
figure, on condition of remaining on and cultivat
ing the grounds for five years, paying the taxes
and the interest on the purchase price, etc., etc.
In many cases it will bo the interest of the com
pany to give away lots and small farms to settlers.
Indeed, it were better, and would pay immensely,
if one-half of all tho stock-land were donated to
tillers of the soil, who remained for tivc vears on
it, rather than that the enterprise should fail or
bo long delayed.
Besides, on fair and reasonable terms, tho resi
dent landholders could continuo to cultivate their
lands for one, two or more years, till required by
an emigrant or needed by a purchaser.
8. Make the stock transferable. Capitalists
would invest largely, and at once, as soon as a
treat body of superb plantations and rich lands
elonged to tho Company, and it could show a
solid basis for energetic and business-like opera
tions.
Lands for raising hops in the Mohawk Valley,
Now York, are worth $300, ?00, $500 and $600 per
acre. The same quality of land on which the
hops, tho castor bean, cotton, sorghum, rice, to
bacco, corn, wheat, barley, potatoes, poaches, ap
ples, pears, plums, and numerous other things
grow to perfection, can now be purchased in Mis
sissippi at $10 and $12 per acre.
But, with stich emigrant organizations and land
companies, those lands, in ten years, ought to be
^worth hundreds of dollars per acre, and compon
?\te all the financial losses of this transition state,
re we the energy, unwavering purpose, patience
ana faith for the performance of this work ? It
mutt be done; and if we fail, somebody will do it,
andfreap the compensation.
Mfcw Mississippians are solicitous to promote
tin* public good, and deem this tho great lever
with which to raise the fallen fortunes of our
State. We believe in a few years the population
of the State may be swelled from 400,000 whites
to several millions. Emigration and cheap homos
will do the work. I am asked, do yon want
THr. NOBTHMAN?
Why not ? He fought against you. Ye?, and so
?lid many Bouthmen? not hi the "open field?not in
the manly measurement of swords?hut in the
cowardly and money-making offices of spies, in
formers^ extortioners, croakers, deserters and de
tractors.
I take tho Northman, who fought me as a brave
man, a thousand times sooner than tho base South
Imrn pretender and par?sito ; and jet the latter
class are here, and here they will live and die and
rot in Southern soil. No braver men defended the
flag of the Confederacy than thousands born out
side of its boundaries* Yes ; come from the four
winds of heaven?people these beautiful valleys,
and make the desert blossom as the rose. No true
man breathes the Southern air, kneels to pray on
Southern soil, or consents to harmonize with South
ern society for ten years, who does not feel indis
soluhly wedded to the fortunes of the South, and
his heart's daily psalm is, "Thy pooplo shall be mv
people, and thy God my God.'* Then opon th?
gates of Europe and let them come from over the
seas?our forefathers came over the seas. Yes,
let the Northman come also.
CAN WHITE MEN ?ARE COTTON ?
They always have made it. What is tho reason
that cotton cannot bo made by whit? men now,
after having done it for near a hundred years''
In all tho less fertile and less affluent districts of
tho cotton regions, tho whites mako nineteen
iweotivths of all the cotton tha^ ja m^e, ? hayo
known Gi'riD'anH, Italians. Irishmen. Yankees, to
miiko cropii without negro labor at all. Thousands '.
aro doir.g it to-day, niul will continuo to do it. \{
Kambo, CiCHiir and'Pompcy rcfuso to make cotton, |
Ucorgi-, William and Thomas will do it.
WHAT IS TO BECOME OK THE NEOROE8 ?
If they periHh in ten years to come in anything
iikt-. the ratio, or witlim many degrees ot it, au
they aro perishing now in tho hands of their
friends, no one need ho troubled to find aplace for
the remnant of tho race.
As soon as Congress meets they must appro
Iiriatc three or live hundred million of dollars to
lclp toko care of the frccdmcu. Bnt that aside.
The old master r.n.l old citizen must not cease
to regard, honor, esteem and eneourago the col
ored people. Their good deportment during four
years of dreadful war will always command the
admiration and gratitude of all good pcoplo among
?b. "Wo must he his best friends now, as always
heretofore. We know his nature and capabilities;
have educated him oat of barbarism up to what
tho Northman graciously regards as his. equal ;
taught him to eat bread, cook his food, to wear
clothes, speak tho English and French tongues
better than they are spoken by the laboring classes
of either France or England, and thereby paid him
the largest compensation that was ever paid a la
boring peasantry for tho work ho has performed.
Now, if we are true to ourselves, the country, and
tho frecdmeu, we shall never allow a stranger to
eome in and alienate tho colored race from their
old friend?. Northern Journals toll us, "the frecd
man prefers to work for tho Yankee rather than
his old matter." Doubtless in Borne cases that is
true, for some of thoso old masters abused the re
lationsliip formerly existing almost as much as
hundreds of thousands of the people North abuBe
tho marriage relation.
Besides, the new-comer brings money, eats at
tho same table, and oftens remains to breakfast,
and the negro is, for awhilo, dazzled with the new
state of things. But the rulo holds good, he loves
best his old friends. This is a matter of great
moment. The most malignant agoncicB arc now
at work in the South to till the negro mind with
doubt, jealousy, suspicion and hatred of his for
mer friends. Now, wo must furnish farm labor for
the negro?got tho emigrant to hire him?cheer
him up?stand by him?treat him as heretofore,
gently and generously. He did not change the
former relation. New fields will open to him, and
we can help him reap them. Governor Cuminings,
just appointed Governor of Colorado, will need
one million of them to dig tho lately discovered
masses of gold and silver in that Territory. I sec
ten and twelve dollars per day is offered for labor.
Here is a marvellous held for him. I mentioned
the matter to that distinguished gentleman, and
lie means to encourage tho plan. So, with cher
ishing and encouraging the adored race on the
one hand, and the emigration of white people on
the other, why should we not prosper and grow as
rich as it is safe to bo, and find, m a higher and
stronger future, the defences of God's dark provi
dence of to-day, and a recompense for all our
losses and wrotigt?.
Respectfully, C. K. MARSHALL.
liichmoit'l, Augiift 29, 16C5,
-m ? ?
THE LATE K/IIIAV.W SMASH-UPS IN
THE NORTH.
The following summary of the late railway acci
dents in the North, and the comments upon them,
is from the N. Y. Evening Pest of the 21st ult.:
Ou the 29th of October, 18G4, nearly a year ago,
we narrated a conversation which an accomplished
engineer once had with us, predicting the terrible
era of railroad massacres which seems at la6t to
have arrived. Let us givo again what he said to
us :
' Within ten yenrs." eaid the engineer, "you will
hear of frequent and fatal accident? on our Ameri
can railwave. They will incrcaHC to an extent
which will be absolutely appalling. Tho wood and
iron on which the wheels of the trains runs can
lest but a certain time. At present they are mostly
new, and the danger of which I sneak docs not
exist; but they will continue to look sound to tho
eye until their texture has been changed by the
constant hammering of the heavily loaded wheels,
and then they will suddeidy give way. The first
warning which the companies have of their un
soundness, with the exception of the length of
time that they iiave been m use, will be some ac
cident to the trains that pass over them, lint the
time wliich has elapsed since they were laid will
not be regarded. The desire of profit will induce
the railway companies to leave tnem on the track
as long as the superintendent finds no defect in
them apparent to the eye, and thus tho disaster
and tho discovery of their defective condition will
occur at the same moment."
How true this forecast of the future was, we
know from the dreadful record of the past year.
During the two months of October and November,
in 18C4, wo gathered from our own columns alone
the following regiater of "accidents," as they are
facetiously called :
Octoueu 10.?New Haven cars thrown from the
track and broken when running on the track of
the Harlem Railroad, at Seventy-'seventh-street, in
this city. Many passengers injured ; one died.
October 12.?Hudson River Railroad train ran
into a mass of rock and earth on tho track, at One
Hundred and Fifty-ninth-street, in this city. The
engine and three cars thrown off ; engineer and
firemnn bruised. Passengers escaped.
OcTODEit 15.?Shore Line (New York and Bos
ton) Railroad train, having on board two hundred
and seventy-five sick and wounded soldiers, was
thrown from the track. Nine soldiers and two
brnkemen instantly killed. Other soldiers seri
ously injured.
October 24.?Two trains came into collision on
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The engineer,
fireman and one soldier were instantly /killed;
fifteen persone wounded.
Octobeu 29.?Collision on the Chattanooga and
Atlanta Railroad. Five soldiers were killed and
fifteen wounded.
November 1.?Collision between a passenger
train and a.live-stock train on the Lafayette and
Indianapolis Railroad. Twenty-eight dead bodies
were taken out of the wreck of the passenger
train; from twenty to thirty persons wounded;
some of them died.
November 6.?Erie Railroad train ran off the
track at Calicoon?somo of the cars going into
the Delaware river. Four persons killed; many
wounded.
November 8.?Casualty on the ' Baltimore and
Philadelphia Railroad. Two engines and seven
cars hurled into the Susqnehanna river. No lives
lost; one person injured.
NovEMBEn 8. ? The Washington express train
from New York thrown from the track of the Bal
timore and Philadelphia Railroad. Six cars de
molished; three persons killed and several seri
ously injured.
In tho months of January and February of this
year?1865?there were the following:
January 5.?Morris and Essex Railroad?collis
ion in Bergen Tunnel; ono killed and several se
verely injured.
January 9.?Morris and Essex Railroad?pas
senger train ran off at Summit.
January" 18?Cleveland and Toledo Railroad
passenger train ran off near Norwalk.
Jan i'Any ID.?Hudson River Railioad?passenger
train thrown into the river near Yonkers.
January 2?New Jersey Railroad?passenger
train thrown off by a broken rail near New Bruns
wick.
January 80.?Galena Railroad?five passenger
car? thrown down an embankment; several per
sons injured. . i
January 30?Pennsylvania Bailroad?collision
near Conemangh, caused by a disconnected en
gine; one man severely injured.
January 31.?Hudson River Railroad?ftvo pas
senger cars thrown off near New Hamburg: a
hrakeman injured.
February 4.?Marietta and Cincinnati Railroad
?passenger train fell through a bridge at Deer
Creek; several persons burned to death by cars
taking fire.
February 4>.?Central Ohio Railroad?passenger
train thrown down an embankment at Newark.
February 4.?Pennsylvania Railroad?passcbgor
frajn, JUrown, off; wyextd person* injured,
Er.imuAnY 15.?New Haven liaQroad?Uiroo pas
senger cars thrown off by a broken rail near V\ cst
port.
How many there have been since, we have uot
to-day tho leisure to compute, but in casually run
ning our eyes over our files since July last, we
note the subjoined:
July 4.?Northern Central Railroad?misplaced
switch. President's car ran oft" into side track at
Bultnn; hit a freight train standing there, injur
ing several. Among them were Sonor Bewuxo,
Chilian Minister, Colonel Hatpin, Colonel Simp
Bon, P. It. Milton, and L. L. Croante.
July 11.?An accident to th? Troy and Saratoga
Kailroad. Baggage car destroyed; no ono in
jured.
July 20.?Mississippi and Ohio Kailroad?Bridge
wept away near Dillsborough, thirty indes from
Cincinnati. Engiue ran into tho gap and engi
neer killed.
July 21.?Central Ohio Railroad?Wheel of the
engine broke, throwing passenger cara off the
track. Eight soldiers' and two civiliana killod ;
twenty-two badly injured.
July 31.?Mississippi and TonncBsco Railroad?
Bridge over Hickahally rivor, two miles from So
natobia, gave way, and train fell sixty feet into
tho river. Fireman killed; conductor and engi
neer badly hurt.
Auour.T 9.?Tho "Norwich Lino Steamboat
Train" for Boston ran off seven miles north of
New London. Four cars precipitated into tho
river. Causo?broken rail. Three passengers
killed, twelve badly injured, and liftcen slightly
hurt. Great pains' taken to suppress information.
August l?.?Housatonie lfadroad?Passengor
train run into by locomotive?ten killed and four
teen badly injnrod.
August 23.?Old Colony Railroad?Collision with
a hand-car?Excursion train thrown down an em
bankment. Soveral passengers hurt; cars shat
tered.
August 24.?Oil Creek Railroad, near Titusville,
Tenn. Passongor train ran into a freight train.
Nine killed aud twclvo badly hurt.
Augtikt 25.?Tennessee and Alabama Railroad
?>as?onger train ran off at Richland Creek, near
levnolds' Station, into tho water; twenty-seven
bodies already recovered; ten more missing; from
fifty to sixty wounded.
August 2G.?Wcldon Railroad train ran off the
track near Petersburg, Virginia; two killed.
August 2!).?Long Island Railroad?Collision of
two passenger trains near Jamaica, Queens coun
ty; four killed; three badly hurt; about twenty
more injured.
With the exception of tho arrest of tho officers
of the Housatonie Road, not a singlo step has
been taken by Uio authorities or tho public to pun
ish the guilty authors of all this suffering and
death. They are allowed to go in utter impunity.
Sometimes a small pecuniary compensation is
made to tho family of a victim or to one of tho
wounded, bat that is no punishment. The rail
road corporations a ro rich, no individual feels tho
loss, and uo ono is made moro prudent or careful
by its infliction. Presidents, directors, engineers,
conductors go on just as recklessly anrl just as de
fiantly as before. It used to bo considered a safe
timo t.) travel just after ono of these tcrriblo disas
ters, but it is not so any longer; wo havo got case
hardened io calamity, and the occurrence of one
accident is no safeguard against tho speedy occur
rence of another.
The Jacobins and their Journal of Civili
sation.
Tho Harpers aro very respectable printer?, four
of them in a row, aud all very pious?bo i> ous that
when they go in at tho gato of heaven Mary Mag
daleno will fall down antf worship thoni. Thoy
havo money, and cau buy an indifforeut kind of
art aud a species of milk and watery intellect, and
these they uso in the publication of a "journal of
civilization." By this they mean nigger civilisa
tion. That they propose to uphold and develop
at any and every expenso t<> tho country. Pro
tending to caro for the national credit, thoy would
double tho national debt rather than not givo
every nigger a vote; ridiculing the notion that
they are Jacobins, thoy would carry tho country
to any extreme of political anarchy rather than
give up their little idea. That js, they caro not a
phi for whito civilization, for tho tranquility or
political wolfare of tho country, whenever tho na
tional tranquility and wolfare aro put in compari
son with tho all-important topic of nigger suffrage.
This journal of civilization declares that there
are no lixod rules of political right and justice that
wo are bound to observo except those that apply
to tho nigger. Nigger suffrage is definite; every
thing elso "depends upon circumstances." It says
that tho President has no policy, and that, there
fore, there is no party oppoBcd to his policy and
no Jacobinism; and in the next breath it indicates
that It holds the very policy that wo have de
nounced as Jacobinism, and intends to resist tho
settlement and pacification of the country by every
factions means if that settlement does not crush
tho Southern white man out of existence and put
tho nigger in his place. Wo have not waged war
to pnt down rebellion and re-establish pence in tho
Southern States, but to put down tho white man
and sot up tho nigger; not to abolish slavery, but
to abolish tho slaveholder; not to wipe out tho
political errors of a people, but to wipe out the
whole vast society that held those errors, unless
that society will go down on its knees and hnmblo
itself before the radicals in general and these four
pious printers in particular.
These arc the views of the Journal of Civihza
tiyn. It is curious to observe the accompaniments
that this kind of civilization has on the other
pages. One of the illustrations of this same issue
includes a view in a Broadway concert saloon, and
another in an elegant brothel, in which tho wo
men rival one another in the display of their
charms?tho very class of pictures that is most
demoralizing in the yellow covered literature?t he
very prints that, in their yellow covert?, might
move the lofty indignation of the four pious
printers all in a row. Since such civilization has
such accompaniment?, we do not wonder at tho
preference of the pnblio for Bonner'? ledger,
which sells to throe times the extent of all the
Harper publications together.?N. Y. Jlerald.
-!-? ??
Personal Appearance of Wlrz.
No description of Wmz, the jailor, has yet ap
peared more graphic than this from the Chicago
RepiibUcar. correspondence:
Wirz is a man apparently abtut forty-two or
forty-three years of ago, ?ve f\.et nine inches in
height, and weighing not for from ono hundred
and thirty-five pounds. He is somewhat round
shouldered and never walks or stands in an eroct
posture, so that he appears scarcely tailor than
men who measure but five feet six or seven inches.
There is no elasticity or springiness in his step,
but he shuffles along as if shunning observation;
and he sometimes looks out from under the brim
of his old silk hat as if he fesred the crowd through
which ho passes to and from the place of confine
ment.
He wears a cheap black cloth coat, which is
always buttoned, an old dark vest, and reddish
brown pants of somo ribbed or barred stuff. His
shoes are ench as are called here office slippers.
Slovenliness and general untidiness seem natural
to him, though ho is not specially repulsivo on
that score. His hands are long, bony and flesh
less. He is much given to using the right with
the first two fingers extended, and the last two
and the thumb shut into the palm?giving him a
sort of prim and precise air that no other mani
festation of character ho has yet mado seems to
justify.
Tho general angularity of tho man may bo duo
to confinement without exercise, or may bo his
natural condition; but tho brown and leathery
character of his skin its clearly enough its normal
condition, and makes his face noticcablo on this
account if for no other. He wears a full wldskcr
and moustache, eut to about half ah inch hi
length, and so trained as to conceal tho contour of
his month. His hair is of dark brown color. His
head is long and narrow?high over the oars,
wanting in the upper forehead, noticeably defi
cient behind, and full about the outstanding ears.
He begins to bo bald in front. His face is thin,
angular and fleshless?high and narrow in tho
forohoad, full ovor the eyes and hollow in tho
cheeks, with uplifted eyebrows, small and sharp
none, and keen Drown foreign eyes.
Tho man attracts in spite of himself. Meeting
hjnj ?ar?jesely on tho Btreets, ?no wopW.wt him,
down as a tinker of watches ami clocks?a man
without mental capacity but of mechanical skill.
Moreover I can take you into the roams of the
Coast Survey, and match you his air and manner
ami some of his peculiarities of action, among the
engravers employed there. Seeing his peculiar
eve at a moment when ho would naturully bo
stirred by some feeling, and you would Hay he
worshipped the violin and was in tho orchestra of
a theatre, where he played with passionate self
absorntion.
He looks like a man without conscience and un
troubled with remorse. I doubt not ho wns am
bitious of the good will and the fellowship of the
Winders?father, son and nuwphew. who trero his
superiors at the post. They aro of the class called
"?Southern gentlemen." He hud no special love for
tho so-called Confederacy. There is nothing about
him to show that he h-vcd murder as some men
havo. He was simply the ready, supple tool of
slavery.
- ?--<
Tun Timi'ENTixE Cnor in North Carolina.?
From a conversation with a gentleman who has
had long oxnerfenco in the manufacture, of tnr
ftontine, wo learn that a very email yield is looked
or this year. Ho informs ub that tho timo for
cutting new boxes is past, this being done in the
first or the year, and that tho old boxes ore of very
little, if any, account, and the amount made dc
{>ends entirely upon the boxes opened within the
ast two yours. What will be made, will be gotten
to market with a great deal of difficulty for the
want of railroad transportation, very little coming
here by tho river. Pretty much all the stills used
in its manufacturo were taken bv the rebel au
thorities to make articles by which to carry on the
war, or at least such was the case hereabouts.
Under such circumstances an these, wo cannot
hopo for much. Many persons, however, are mak
ing preparations, hoping to be roady for the sea
son after the next.? Wilmington Herald.
-? ? ? ?
During her recent tour, tho Princess of Wales
was habited in a simple and becoming yacht dress,
with a straw hat and bino ribbon?the only orna
ments visiblo about her being an exceedingly pret
ty pair of crystal ear-rings in tho form of" bells.
in Cornwall, tho royal party explored a mine, a
really ibrmidablo pit, 180 fathoms deep, and ex- i
tending moro than 300 fathoms under the bed of j
the Atlantic, into which, in some parts, the old >
miners have actually worked, so that the holen |
through the rock have to be plugged. Says a cor
respondent: "Faney Wales and wrfo?the first in a I
suit of cricketer-like white, flannel, a stiff billy-cook I
and a candle, stuck in front of it; the latter in u I
long, white flannel cloak, duintily trimmed with
bine, and a jaunty little hat, fashioned somewhat
on the miner's model?deep down in the bowels of I
the earth, listening to the thunderous swash of
the rolling waves and the grinding and crashing
of the stones and boulders overhead."
Seven revengeful bullets finished tho guerrilla
Jim Smith, near Nashville, a few days since.
J. M. E?SON,
COMMISSION AGENT,
No. 9 EXCHANGE-STREET,
CHARLESTON, 8. C.
Bcptember r lmo
GRAESER & SMITHS
COTTON FACTORS,
Commission and Forwarding Merchants,
(OFFICE FOR THE PRESENT AT No. 8G EAST BAY.)
frtlIE UNDERSIGNED HAVE RESUMED THEUt Uf
_1_ 8INES8 connection, as above indicated, ami will
?fill or purchase on Couiraissiou COTTON, NAVAL
STORES, AND PRODUCE GENERALLY.
Orders for floods axeouicd at lowest price?. Advances
made, on couxigemenin for sale iu this or foreign market?.
c. a. graeser.a. sydney smith.
reference*.
Mcasrn. C4. W. WILLIAMS k CO.; Messrs. JOHN
FRASER k CO. Ri? September fi
T. A. JEFFORDS.II F.N 11V 1URCK.
T. A. JEFFORDS & CO.,
Commission and Forwarding Merchants,
Cor. Main-street and the Railroad,
ORANGEBURG, S. C.
T. A. JEFFORDS, for man; years connected with the
house of Jeffords & Co., would solicit from hi? friends
in the City and Country, part of tho Forwarding busi
ness. He promises to give all business entrusted to his
care bis personal attention ; and, having a large Store
house withm three yards of the depot, can always (when
wagons arc not present) store the goods at small expense
to tho owners. wfm 23 September 0
DAVID BARROW,
Wholesale Commission Merchant
AND
FACTOR,
No. 153 East Bay,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
4S-OOSIGNMENTS SOLICITED.???
August 14 mwflrno
W. T. B?RGE k CO,,
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Staple and Fancy Dry Goods,
YANKEE NOTIONS,
No. 41 Hayne-street,
ARE NOW RECEIVING THETR FALL AND WIN
TER BTOCK, to which they invite the attention, oi
Dealer*. Uno ReplennSer 7
" SrArFAESHALL,"
BROKER, AUCTIONEER,
AND
GENERAL COMMISSION AGENT,
HAS RE8UMED BUSINESS AT HIS OLD STAND.
No. 33 Broad-fltreet. Attends to the BUYING
AND SELLING OF REAL ESTATE, FURNITURE. Ac,
he. Also to the RENTING of HOUSES. September 6
JEFFERS & CO.,
FORMERLY COTHRAN, JEFPER8 & CO.,
GENERAL
Commissiou,Heeelrlu-f& Forwarding: Agents,
ORANGEBURO, S. C.
Special attention given to Receiving and Forwarding
Cotton and Merchandise.
September 6__._M*
JAS. B. CAHILL,
GENERAL
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
AND DEALER IN
Groceries? Pro visions, Wines & Liquors,
No. 171 Broad-street,
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA.
CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED.
September 1 ?lmos
L. W. SPBATT,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
orncE OVER m'kay ? campbeix, hasel-btoeet,
NEXT DOOR TO POST-OFFICE.
Ho will act as Agent in procuring i'ARDONS and nil
nstlng CLAIMS on Treasury Department.
August 19
STYLES & CARTER,
COMMISSION 'MERCHANTS,
AGENTS FOK
Orleans Line of Southern Packets?
NO. 19 Vaudcrhorst Wharf,
' } CHARLESTON, 8. C.
r.. r. styj.ek
I. f. CAIITK1I
\VM. H. ROBSON ft CO.. AGENTS IN NEW YORK.
Advances made ou consignments
September 4 lmo
P. H. KEGLER,"
WHOLESALE DEALER IN
BRANDIES, WINES & WHISKIES,
ANO
GENERAL AGENT
FOB
PHILADELPHIA STOCK ALES.
173 East Bay.
September 4
WILLIS & CHISOLM,
FACTORS, COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
AND
SHIPPING AGENTS,
office:, hulls hoise,
CHARLESTON, & C.
E. WILLIS.A. n. cnrsoLif.
WILL ATTEND TO THE PURCHASE, SALE AND
SHIPMENT (to Foreign and Domestic. Ports) of
COTTON, RICE. LUMBER, NAVAL STORES ; to the
Collection at Units, Purchase and Sale of all Securities.
CouxiyuinentH ol vessels ?elicited.
REFEits to:
McHKrp. JOHN ERASER ft CO.. Charleston. 8. C.
McKflr*. UEO. W. WILLIAMS & CO., Charleston, S. C. .
Messrs'. PENDERGAST. EROS, ft CO., New York.
OEO. BOHLET, Em;., Augusta, Ga.
T. S. METCALF. Esq., Augusta, G a.
UeSOS. CLARK, LODGE ft CO., New Yorlf.
Messrs. MURRAY ft NEPHEW. New York.
Messrs. E. W. CLARK * CO.. Philadelphia, Penn.
Messrs. PENDERGAST, FENWICK A: CO., Baltimore,
Md.
Messrs. SAMT- HARRIS ft SONS, Baltimore, lid.
fifS* Th? Columbia Phu'uix will publiai) every other
day for one month, and other South Carolina papers
weekly for the saiati period of time, and send bills to this
tllcc. AiiKUFt 14
"bowers' & siLCOxr
Brokers, -Auctioneers,
AND
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
ITS-WILL ATTEND TO THE PURCHASE AND SALE
| OF COTTON, RICE, DRY (JOODS AND GROCERIES.
Also, their attention Will be given to SALES OF FUR
NITURE, REAL ESTATE, ftc.
Otllcc for the present, at ho. 2.18 KINO-STREET.
August 30 lmo
HERIOT BROTHERS,
General Commission Merchants,
CHARLESTON, S. C,
Will give their attention to the purchase and salo of Mer
chandiec and Produce of every description.
CONSIGNMENTS OF COTTON SOLICITED*
J. R. HERIOT. Jn.B. M, HERIOX
IIEFEIVT.NCES:
WM. B. HERIOT ft CO., Charleston, S. C.
HARMOND HULL k CO., New York.
DEMEREST ft WYGANT. Now Yortr.
JNO. SLEIGHT, Poughkecpsle, N. Y.
September 1 lmo
C. E. CHICHEST?E,
REAL ESTATE BROKER,
No. IS BROAD-STREET,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
AGENT FOR THE PURCHASE AND SALE OF
REAL ESTATE in any of the Southern States.
ALSO AGENT FOR THE SALE, RENTING, RE
PAIRING, ftc. OF CITY PROPERTY. August 23
ARCHIBALD GETTY & CO.,
SHIP k STEAMBOAT AGENTS.
AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Nos. 12C AND 128 MEETING-STREET?
Charleston, S. C.
EDMUND A. 80UDER ft CO., Philadelphia, Twin.
LIVINGSTON, FOX ft CO.. Agents, New York.
F. A. WILCOXSON, Agent, Oraugeburg, S. C.
LIBERAL ADVANCE8 MADE ON CONSIGNMENTS,
August 15_
HOWE, D0UC?N &~C0.,
Commission Merchants
Ship Chandlers and Grocers,
No. 151 EAST BAY, CHARLESTON, 8. C.
C. Rows, jn.p. m. norcix.T.. c. no we.
c. & ?Th?we,
Commission Merchants*,.
No. 71 BROADWAY', NEW YORK.
C. nowE, jn.K. c. howi.
Consignment? solicited. Prompt attention given to
sales of Merchaiidlne. Produce purchased on Commis
sion, and liberal advances made.
Refer by permission to Messrs. Henby 8wtft ft Co.,
No. 115 Broadway: Jno. M. Smith's Son ft Co., No. 122
Broad-st. : Kemp. Day ft Co., No. 116 Wall-st.; Thomas
A: Bf.hham. No. 108 Broad-it.. N.J?. too? August 24
A. O. ROHAEFER. 1 JAS E. BROWN ft CO., )
GEO. Y. BARKER, J No. Si S. Front 8treet, V
N?w York.) Philadelphia. J
A. C. SCHAFFET., Jb.,
CORSF.B I.KtllT AND PIIATT ?BEETS.
Baltimore.
Adolplms C. Schaefer & Co.?.
(FORMERLY OF BALTIMORE,)
General Shipping & Commission
MERCHANTS,
NO. Ill WATER-ST., NEW YORK,
AT "t'EBY FACILITY OFFERED FOR CON8IQK
MEN" .?ml execution ol orders in New York, Philartcl?
phia, ?r Baltimore, by cither house
August 14_too?
RICHARD ALLISON,
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
No. 90 BEEKMANSTREET,
NEW YORK?
COTTON AND OTHER PRODUCE SOLD ON COM.
MISSION. General Merchandise purchased ainl
forwarded to order. lmo* August 16
W. BROOKBANKS,
PRACTICAL GAS FITTER & PLUMBER,
No. 288 King-street,
NEXl DOOR TO PORTERS ID STAXJ>
Aturtutli

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