OCR Interpretation


The Charleston daily news. (Charleston, S.C.) 1865-1873, September 08, 1865, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026994/1865-09-08/ed-2/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

CHABLESTOX DAILY KEWS....DECEMBEB 9, 1865. _"
MARLESTON'!fei NEWS
CATHCART, MCMILLAN & MORTON,
%t ' 7 HOPBIETOKS.
Kb. 18 KAYNE-STEEET.
TERMS- CASH. \
tDAILT-ONE YEAR.S?O.OO
DAILY-SIX MONTHS.3.00
lUJLY-THREE MONTHS.?.5<i
JCS" Wagle Copies FIVE CENTS.
jjgy News Dealers supplied at a liberal discount
- ADVERTISING.
Ono Square, Ten Lines, ca? insertion, ONE SK)L
XAR AND FIFTY CENTS.
Each continaalien, SEYENTY-FIVE'CENTS.
?Les? thaa a sqaare, FUT ESN COBS FER MEE for
first insertion ; HALF PKICS for each continuaron.
The following are the Atvs ct s for a. i 3 paper :
-JOSEPH H. SEARS, "?fow South," Halton Head,
fi. L. DARB, Sumter, 'S. C.
J. T. HERSHMAN, " tournai office," Camden, S. C.
.J. W. BROWN, "Southerner office," Darlington, 8. C.
.G. L. PRATT, Columbia.
M. M. OFINN k BRO., Augusta, Ga.
fi. ESTELL, Savannah, Ga.
Mr. AUS BRENTAjjO, NO. 70S Broadna, Now York,
las alwey* the latent 'datya d' the DAILY KEW?, as be
?loes of all tho other principSyounmld of thc country.
A PU."! TO PJSjOaiOTE IMMIGRATION.
- *
The Jiichmond Whig, of the 2d, publishes the
following interesting &itcr on tho subject of tho
above heading, with these remarks :
The subjoined paper was prepared with refer?
ence to a wiegle Stoic, but the plan proposed
<wbieh we think bas valuable features and sugges?
tions) may bo applied to any part of tho South.
As an aid to those who are considering the vitally
important subject discussed, wc lay thc plan of
Mr. Marshall before the public. HU name will
ensure the perusal of his communication, and
command, respect for his suggestions :
To the Ikiitor of the Wkly:
SIR-The following o'ntlinc contain? some of thc
leading features of a plan for the encouragement
of the immigration of population into thc ?tate i.f
Mississippi, and tho sale and bestowment of land
for that ohicct. In compliance with my promise I
uend voa thc notes, otc. :
1. ?et thc landholders of any county unite and
subscribe their lands to as to obtain a .sufficient
extent of good tillable soil on which a colony could
be easily indnoed to settle. Emigrauta "always
want to Kettle in coloniea for thc sake Of language,
religion, schools and social relations. Several (
thousand families should be gotten into a colony. 1
2. Let commissioners be elected by tho compa?
ny to estimate the value of each eoparate tract of
land, and let each subscriber receive certificates of i
the number of shares the vukio of his lands enti- ..
tie him to. The company, and all similar onet..
be incorporated, of course. . !
? -3. Sui-.cy thc entire body orland, nr/T lav?toffM
into lots of .all desirablo sizes, to snit all SOTTB of j
comers, with roads and lanes running through
ami rendering acceptable tho entire property so ,
- - laid off. Furnish water privileges for mills, site*
' for villages, lots for churches, and eligible ground ?
. for institutions of learning, and farms ranging .
from ten to throe hundred acres.
f. Lithograph the plats and publish a pamphlet ?
describing the advantages of climate, soil, pro
ducts, and their market Values, together with all
the necessary information, hi varions languages,
for Europeans who may desire to remove to this
favored cime.
5. Send agents to Europe; open offices there;
charter your steamers, anti send forward thc peo- (
pie. Have agents on this sido of thc ocean ready
lo receive them and send them to their new
... JUomes. The Legislature ought to advance the
means for the purchase of two or three steamers, ,
if necessary, to facilitate the object of the comps- (
nies. 1 4
t?. Houses, cabins, or comfortable quarters
should bc furnished on tho lands for immediate
occupation. Thew; thc emigrant would pay for at
once, or us might be agreed on with tho company. .
These would be of a very cheap stylo, to serve till ]
the occupant could build to his taute. 1
7. Seli the alternater lots and fa rms at a low .
figure, on condition of remaining on and cultiv?t- 1
ing.the grounds for five year?, paying the taxes t
and the interest on thepurchaso pri?e, etc., otc. j
. In many caeca it will be tho inter?s?of the com?
pany to gi ve away lots and small farms to settlers,
indeed, it were better, and would pay immensely, J
if one-half of all the stock-land were donated to *
tillers of the soil, who remained for live years on 1
it, rather than that tho enterprise should fail or
be long delayed. *
Besides, on fair and reasonable terms, the rcei- *
dent landholders could continue to cultivate their j
lands for one, two or more years, till required by 1
an emigrant or needed by a purchaser.
8. Make the stock transferable. Capitalists t
would invest large-lv, and at once, au soon as a j
groat body cf scperb plantations and rich lands ,
belonged to thc Company, and it could show a 1
?olid basis for energetic aud business-like opera- 1
tiODS.
Lands for raising hope in thc Mohawk Vollev, J
New York, are worth $300, $400, $500 and $600 per J
acre. The same quality of laud on which the *
hops, ic castor bean, cotton, sorghum, rice, to?
bacco, corn, wheat, barley, potatoes, peaches, ap- j
pies, pears, plums, and numerous other things t
grow to perfection, can now be purchased in Mis?
sissippi at $10 and $12 per acre. J
But, with such emigrant organizations and land 1
companies, those lands, in ten years, ought to be J1
worth hund? eds of dollars per acre, and compen- 1
sate all thc tin une ?al losses of this transition state. 8
Have we the energy, unwavering purpose, patience
and faith for thc performance of th?H work? It *
must be done: and if we fail, somebody will do it, 1
and reap the compensation. v
A few Mississippians arc solicitous to promote
thc public good, and deem this the great lever *
with which to,raise,the fallen fortunes of our [
State. Wc believe in a few years thc population 11
off the State may he swelled from 400,000 whites .
to several n?llio?a. Emigration and cheap homes :
will do the work. I am asked, do you want 1
THE NOETF1M.YN ? 0
Why not ? He fought against yon. Yes, and so
did many Southmen-not m the open field-rot in
the manly measurement of Bwords-but in the J
cowardly "and money-making offices of spice, in?
formers, extortioners, croakers, deserters and de- i<
tractors. 4. v
I take the Northman, who fought mc as a brave
man, a thousand times sooner .than the base South s
Iwrn pretender and parasite* ?and yet the latter
elass are here, and here they%vi live and die and p
rot in Southern soil. No bravcrrmen defended the I
flag of the Confederacy than" thousands boru out- j ti
side of its boundaries. Yes ; come from the four ?
winds of heaven-people these beautiful valleys, ' ti
and make the desert blossom as the rose. No true ? w
man breathes the Southern air. kneels to pray on j
Southern soil, or consents to harmonize with South-! ci
ern society 1er ten years, who docs not' feel iudis- si
solubly wedded to the fortunen of fj'e South, and |
his heart fi daily psalm is, "Thy people shall bo my , n
people, and tby God my C?oTl." Then open the g
gates of Europe and let them come from over the |
seas-our forefathers came over the scas? Yes, i si
let the Northman come also. j b
CAN WHITE HEN MAKE COTTON ? I _
They always have made it. What is thc reason j C
that cotton cannot bc made by white men now. j ta
after having done it for near a hundred years? 1
In all thc leas fertile and less affluent districts of ? tr
the cotton r?pons, the whites moko ninetcen
tTfcntjeths ol all the cotton that is made. J baye < U
known Germans, Italian?. Irishman, Yankees, to
make crops without n", . labor at all. Thousands
aro doing it to-day, ??A will oantinue to do :t. If
Sambo, Cursar and Pompey refuse tc make cotton,
George, William and Thomas will do it.
WHAT IS TO EECOITT. ?or THE NEGROES ?
If they perish in ten years to come in anvthing
like thc ratio, or within many degree of it, a?
they aro perishing now in tho banda of their
frie&ds, no one need bo troubled to find aplace for
thc remnant of the-race.
,'Ats Boon aa Congress me<jts they must appro?
priate three or five hundred million of dollaT to
help take care of thc freedmen. But that Saide.
? The old master ana old citizen must not cease
fy regard, honor, esteem and encourage the col?
ored people. Their good deportment during four
years of droadfal war will always command the
admiration and gratitude of all good people among
ne. Wc roust fee hie beet friends now, as always
heretofore. Wc know his nature and capabilities;
havoodncatcd him out of barbarism np to what
the Northman graciously regards as his equal ;
taught him to eat bread, cook his food; to waar,
clothes; ?peak tho English" and French tungucs
bettor than they are spoken by the laboring classes
of either Prance or England, and thereby paid him.
the largest compensation that waa ever paid a la?
boring peasantry for thc work he has performed.
Now, if wc are trne to ourselves; the country, and
the freedmen, we shall Dover allow a stranger to
come in and alienate tho colored race from their
old friends. Northern journals tell ns, "thc freed?
man .prefers to work for thc Yankee rather .than
hie oki master." Doubtless in.some cases that is
trne, for some of those old masters abused the re?
lationship formerly existing1 almost as much as
hundreds of thousands of the people North abuse
the marriage relation.
Besides, the new-comer brings money, eats at
the same table, and of tens remains to breakfast,
and the negro ie, for awhile, dazzled with the new
state of things. But the rulo holds good, he loves
best his old friends. This is a matter of great
moment. The most malignant agencies are now
at work in the South to nil the negro mind with
doubt, jealousy, sAmicion and hatred of his for?
mer friends. ?oi?^e must furnish farm labor for
thc negro-Ret the emigrant to hire him-cheer
him np-stand by him-treat him as heretofore,
gtntly and generously. Ho did not change the
former relation. New fields will open to ?jim, and
Ave can help bim reap them. Governor Cumniin??,_i
just appointed Governor of Colorado, will need J
one million of them to dig thc lately discovered
manses of gold and silver in that Territory. I sec
ten and twelve dollars per day is offered for labor.
Here is a marvellous field for him. I mentioned
the matter to that distinguished gentleman, and
he means to encourago the plan. So, with, cher?
ishing and encouraging the colored race un the
one hand, and the emigration of white people on
the oilier, why should we not prosper and gl ow as
rich as it is eafc to be, and find, m a higher and
stronger future, the defences of Gou'6 dark provi?
dence of to-day, and a" recompense for all our
losses and wro?ge. .
Rcsnectfnlly, C. K. MARSHALL.
Jtidimond, August 29, 1665,
THE LATE RA I LAVA Y SMASH-UPS I Bi
THE NORTH.
Tho following summary of the late railway acci?
dents in thc North, and thc comments upon them,
is from thc N. Y Evening ros! of tho 21 bt ult.:
On the 29th of October, 18W, nearly a year ago.
we narrated a conversation which an accomplished
;nginccr once had with us, predicting the terrible
?ra of railroad massacres which eecnis at last to i j
nave .arrived. Lo^ ?i,,nin wlinulie eai'd'tn-j-j
rv
"Within ten years.*' said thc engineer, "you will1 c
iicar of frequent and fatal accidents on our Ameri?
can railways. They will increase to an extent
trhich (viii be absolutely appalling. The wood and
?ron on which the wheels of thc trains runs (ran
last but a certaiu time. At present they are mostly
new, and the danger of wnich I sneak dues not
:xiat; but they will continue to look sound to the
?ye until their texture has been changed by thc
constant hammering of the heavily loaded wnecls,
md then they will suddenly give way. The first
earning which thc companies have of their un
wundness, with the exception of the length of ?15
imo that they have been in use, will be some ac- j
::dent to the trains that pass over them. But the : a
:ime which has elapsed since they were laid will j '
10t be regarded. Tbe^desire of profit will induce j .
be raiiway companies to leave them on thc track 1 J
is long as the superintendent lindi 110 defect in I *
bern apparent to the eye, and thus the disaster j1
md the discovery of their defective condition will j J1
iccur at the same moment." 11
Kow trac this forecast of the future was, we ! B
enow from the dreadful record of the past year, j f
buring the two months of October and November, [ *
n 186M, we gathered from our own columns alone !/|(
he followin g register of "accidents," as they are j g
acetiously called : i a
OCTOBER. 10.-New Haven cars thrown from theft(
rack and broken when running on the track of
he Harlem Railroad, at Seventy-seventh-street, in
his city. Many passengers injured; one died.
OCTOBER 12.-Hudson River Railroad traiu ran
nto a mass of rock and earth ou thc track, at One
lunched and Fifty-ninth-street, in this city. Thc
ngine and three cars thrown off; engineer and 1 li
irerann bruised. Passengers escaped.
OCTOBER 15.-Shore Line (New York and Bos- ? I'
on) Railroad train, having on board two hundred
ind seventy-five sick ana wounded soldier*, was
brown from the track. Nine soldiers and two
irakemen instantly killed. Other soldiers seri
lusly injured.
OCTOBEK 24.-Two trains came into collision on
ho baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The engineer,
irenmn and one soldier were instantly killed:
ifteen persons wounded.
OCTOBER 29_Collidion on the Chattanooga and
Ltlanta Railroad. live soldiers were killed and
ifteen wounded.
NOVEMBER 1. - Collision between a passenger
raiu and a live-stock train on thc Lafayette aud j
ndianapolis Railroad. Twenty-eight dead bodies
rere taken out of thc wreck of the passenger 1 ?
rain; from twenty to thirty persons wounded:
omc of them died.
NOVEMBER 6.-Eric Railroad train ran off the
rack at Calicoon-some of the ears going into
he Delaware river. Four persons killed; many
rounded.
NOVEMBER 8.-Casualty on the Baltimore and ? si
'hiladelpbia Railroad. Two engines and seven V
ars hurled into the Susquehanna river. No lives 1 ni
ast; one person injured. I T
NOVEMBER 8. - The Washington ?-xpress train ! h
rom New York thrown from the tri ck of the Bal- j ai
?more and Philadelphia Railroad. Six cars dc- i 0!
iiolished; three persons killed a.id several seri- ! w
nely injured. ? ni
In the months of January and February of this ; ,
ear-1805-there were the following: ! \y
JANUARY 5.-Morris and Essex Railroad-collis- si
ju in Bergen Tunnel; one killed and several se- j SI
erely injured. ' i ti
JANUARY 9.-Morris and Essex Railroad-pas- j tl
enger tram ran off nt Summit. lc
JANCARY 13.-Cleveland and Toledo Railroad- ; tl
assenger train ran oft' near Norwalk. j ai
JANUARY 19.-Hudson River Railroad-passenger j si
rain thrown into the river near Yonkers. i fi
JANUARY 2.-New Jersey Railroad-passenger jv
rain thrown oft' bv a broken rail near New Bruns- j
ick. t<
JANUARY 30.-Galena Railroad-five passenger ? ni
irs thrown down an embankment; several per- ! el
nus injured. j e<
JANUARY 80.-Pennsylvania Railroad-collision . ai
ear Conemaugh, caused by a disconnected en- ai
ine: one man severely injured. 1 lc
JANUARY 31.-Hudson River Railroad-five pas- . Iii
niger cars thrown oft'near New Hamburg: a h
rakeman injured. : *
FEBRUARY 4-Marietta and Cincinnati Railroad ci
-passenger train fell through a bridge at Deer H
reek: several person? burned to death by ear? :u
iking fire. tc
FEBRUARY. 4.-Central Ohio Railroad-passenger el
ain thrown down au embankment at Newark. ; 111
FEBRUARY 4.-Pennsylvania Railroad-passenger
aia tin-own oft'j several persons jnjureu. ' hi
- . ..- -.^,
FEBftTJAnY 15.-New H?ven ??ilroad-three p
songer cara thrown off by ab] ??.a rail near We
port. "? -
How many there have beei ?ince, we have :
'to-day the leisure to coniputofTpt in casually r:
ning our eyes over our filcjiinco July last,
note thc subjoined: rt
JULY 4.-Northern Central Jiilroad-misplac
switch. President's car ran oi (into sidetrack
Bolton; hit a freight train staining there, inji
ing several. Among them w i Benor ?CST.
ChiUan Minister, Colonel Hal to, Colonel Sin
son, F. It. Milton, and L. L. Cat?se.
JULY 31-An accident to tb&?roy and Saratc
Railroad. Baggage car destroyed ; no one
jared.
JOLY 20-Mississippi and 0?*j Railroad-Brid
Rwcpt away near Duisboroughlhirty miles fri
Cincinnati; Engine ran into ?!h"e gap and cn
neer killed. .*w
JULY 21.-Central C??io Ra?lWid-"y^el of 1
engine broke, throwing passfopp^y?ffi qff J
Iraclf.-Eight SST tiers "Tnxi^jjv-^"ii?aLs i?u.i
twenty-1-wo badly injured. ^xi'x> '? ,..'". ...
JULY 31-Mississippi and X^P^oe-'^Ram?^t
Bridge over Hickahahy river, lyn .miles from f
natobia, gave way, and train ?ll sixty feet ii
the river. Fireman lulled; conductor and" en,
ncer badly hurt.
AUGUST 9.-The "Norwich ?Xine Steamhx
Train" for Boston ran off eefen miles north
New London. Ftinr cars .prctipitated into t
river. Cause-broken rail. ^?lhree pae?eng?
killed, twelve badly ' injured, shd fifteen slighl
burt. Great pains taken to scrpress infhrmatic
AUGUST 15.-Housatonic Kulroad-Passeng
train run into by locomotive-|?n killed and fot
teen badly irjur?d. ,'
AUGUST 23.-Old Colony Raihpad-Collision wi
a hand-car-Excursion train tarown down an el
bankment. Several patBengeih' buri; cars sin
tercd.
AUGUST 24.-Oil Creek Railrsad, near Titnsvill
Penn. Passenger train ran ?ito a freight trai
Nine killed and twelve badly Mri.
AUGUST 25.-Tennessee ?nd j Alabama Railroi
passenger train ran off at Richland Creek, ne
Rcvnolds' Station, into the, Water; twenty-sevi
bodies already recovered; terr-tiore missing; fro
Bfty to sixty wounded.
AUGUST 2?.-Weldon Railro.^tTtrain ran off tl
track near Petereburg, Virginia;'two killed.
?. AUOUST 29.-Long Island Railroad-Collision
two passenger trains near Jamaica, Queens, cou
ty; four killed; three LadJv?hcrt; about twen
more injured. * ..
With the exception of the^jrest of tho office:
nf thc Housatonic Road, nc: a singh; step h:
lieen taken by the authorities rr the public to pu;
BII the guilty authors of alibis suffering HI
leath. They H rc allowed to jjo in utter impnnit;
Sometimes a small pecuniary compensation
nade to the family of a victim or to one of tl
mounded, but that'is no nnnishment. The rai
.oad :orporations a re rich* a"$individual feels tl
oss, and no one is made mon? prudent or card'
ay its infliction. Pretadents/directors. engineer
inductors go cn just as reckfesly and just as di
iantly as before. I: used to ?pc considered a sal
.imo io travel just after one of fliese terrible disa;
ers, but it is not so any Jong^x; we have got casi
lardened to calamity, ?Ind tb** occurrence of on
iccideur is no safeguard agai?Stthc speedy occui
.ence of another. gr
Thc Jacobin,, and Huir .'juina! Of Civil ?
zu?'OTA
Thc Harpers arc very resj>f table printers, fou
if them in u row, and iii! versions-so p.ons tba
vhen thov go in .it the gt .iC heaven Mary Mag
lalene will fall down and Vr\r?h?D them. The
lave money, and can buy ?J indifferent kind c
iff and *ff~**ii- nf ??lil irvt?Taifrv<r|f/,lir...t ?,v,
.moo uivv nsc ni me pmntcSuuii GI I^TCur??K? o
ivilization."' By this they mean nigger civiliza
ion. That Uley propose to uphold and develo]
it any,and every expense tothc country. Prc
ending to care for thc nuti^pl credit, they wonk
loublc thc national debt Tallier than nut (rivi
ivory nigger a vote: ridiculing thc notion tua
hey ure Jacobins, they would carry the eonntrj
o any extreme of political anarchy rather thai
five np their tittle idea. That is, they care not ;
?in for white civilization, for thc tranquility oi
>ol:*ieal welfare of the country, whenever thc "na
ional tranquility und welfare "arc put in corapari
on with the all-important topic of nigger suffrage,
This journal of civilization declares that then
.rc no fixed rules of political right and justice that
ie ure bound to observe except those that apply
o thc nigger. Nigger suffrage is definite; everyt?
hing else "depends upon circumstances." It say?
hat the President has no policy, and that, there
ore, there is no party opposed* to his policy and
io Jacobinism; and in the next breath it indicates
hat lt holds the very policy that we have dc
lounccd as Jacobinism, and intends to resist thc
ettlement and pacification of thc country by every
actions means if that settlement does not crush
he Southern white man out of existence and put
he nigger in his place. Wc have not waged war
o put down rebellion and re-establish peace in thc
outhern States, but to put down the white man
nd set up thc nigger; not to abolish slavery, but
a abolish the slaveholder; not to wipe out the
olitical errors of a people, but to wipe out the
hole vast society that held those errors, unless
kat society will go down on its knees and humble
self beforo thc radicals in general and these foul?
ions printers in particular.
These are the views of thc Journal of Civiliza
Vn. It is curious to observe thc accompaniments
lat this kind of civilization has on- the other
ages. One of thc illustrations of this same issue
icludcs a view in a Broadway concert Baloon, and
uothcr iu an elegant brothel, in which the wo
icn rival one another in the display of their
liarms-the very class of pictures that is most
emoralizing in the yellow covered literature-the
erv prints that, iii their yellow covert*, might
love the lofty indignation" of tho four pions
linters all in a row. Since such civilization has
ICU accompaniments, we do not wonder at thc
reference of the public for Bonner's Ledger,
h ich sells to three times the extent of all the
[arper publications together.-A*. Y. HeraUl.
Pei xena 1 Appcar?nf( of U In.
No description of Winz, the jailor, has yet ap?
paled more graphic than this from the Chicago
'epubltMu correspondence:
Wirz is a man apparently about forty-two or
irty-three years of age. live feet nine inches in
eight, and' weighing not far from one hundred
nd thirty-five pounds. He is somewhat round
?oulder?d and never walks or stands in an erect
i?rturc. so that he appears scarcely taller than
icu who measure but rive feet six or ?even inches,
here is no elasticity or springiness in his step,
ut he shuffles along as if slimming observation; j
rid ho sometimes looks out from under thc brim
f his old silk hat as if he feared the crowd through
idell he passes to and from the place of contine
ient.
He wears a cheap black cloth coat, which is
Iways buttoned, an old dark vest, and reddish
rown pants of sonic ribbed or barred stuff. His
iocs are such as are called herc office slippers,
[ovenlinciw and general untidiness seem natural
) him, though he is not specially repulsive on
lat score. His hands are long, bony and Hesli?
ps. He is much given to using the right with
ic first two fingers extended, and the last two
nd the thumb shut into thc palm-giving him a
?rt of prim and precise air that no other mani
.station of character he has yet made seems lo
istify. j
The general angularity of the man may be due ?
> confinement without exercise, or may be his
attirai condition: but thc brown and leathery !
ia rac ter ofilia skin its clearly enough its normal ;
Midition, and makes his face noticeable on this ;
tenant if for no other. Ho wears a full whisker i
ml monatliche, cut to about half an inch in ?
ngth, ami so trained as to conceal the contour of :
is mouth. His hair is of dark brown color. His,
ead is lung and narrow-high over the ears, ,
anting in the upper forehead, noticeably doti- ?
eut behind, and full about thc outstanding ears. ;
c begins to be hold ill front. His face is thin, :
iigular and fleshless-high and narrow in the !
irehead, full over the eyes and hollow in the ?
leeks, with uplifted eyebrows, small and sharp !
isr. and keen brown foreign eyes.
The man attracts in spite of* himself. Meeting:
ui carelessly on tb.c streets, ou,e would evt mr'l '
down as a tinker of watches and clocks-a man
without mental capacity but of mechanical skill.
Moreover I can take you into thc rooms of thc
Coa*;; Burley, and match you his air and manner
and some of his peculiarities of action, among the
engravers employed there. Boeing his peculiar
eve at a moment when ho would naturally be
stirred by some feeling, and you would say he
worshinpe-d the violin and waa in thc orchestra of
a theatre; where bc played with passionate self
absorptio?.
He looks like a man without conscience and un?
troubled with remorse. I doubt not ho. was am?
bitious of the ?ood will and tho fellowship of the
Winders-father, son and newphow, who were bih
snperiore at the post. They aro of the class called
"Southern gentlemen." He had no special love for
tho BO-C?Uca Confederacy. There is nothing about
him to show that he loved murder as ?orne men
have. He was simply the ready, supple tool of
slavery.
THE TURPENTINE CROP IN Nonni CAROLINA.
.J?nnajbcpnversation with a gentleman who has
bat? long t-TTtT^wwifc.jn the, mannfacturgoif tur?
pentine, we learn that a .\acy_ umaOHyieTcl is lookad
for'tnic yean- Ho infoime us'that theifmo for
cutting new boxes is pant,'this being:;dono in the'
first of the year, and thnt tho old boxes are of very
little, if any, account, and che amount made de
{lends entirely upon the boxes opened within the
ast two years, what will bo made will bo gotten
to market with a great deal of difficulty for the
want of railroad transportation, very littlo coming
here by tho river. Pretty much all the Btills used
in its manufacture wer o taken by the rebel au?
thorities to make artic] ;s by which to carry on thc
war, or at least such was thc case hereabouts.
Under such circumatt .neos as these, wc cannot
hope for much. Many persons, however, arc mak?
ing preparations, hoping to be ready for the sea?
son after the next.- Wilmington Herald.
During her recent tour, thc Princess of Walpa
was habited in a simple and bocoming yacht drees,
with a straw_hat and l?faP ribbon-the only orna?
ments risible about he r being an exceedingly pret?
ty pair of crystal ear-ring9?n thc form of bells,
in Cornwall, th? royal party c$ptoi;od a mine, a
really formidable pit, 180 fathoms Heep, and ex?
tending more than 300 fathoms under the bed of
tho Atlantic, into which, in some parts, the c-ld
minera have actually worked, so that the holes
through tho rock have to bo plugged. Says a cor?
respondent: "Fancy Wales and wifo-thc first in a
snit.of criekcter-like white flannel, a stiff billy-cook
and a candle (-tuck in front of it; the latter in ;i
long, white flannel cloak, daintily trimmed with
blue, and a jaunty little hat, fashioned somewhat
on the miner's model-deep down in trio bowels of
tho earth, listening to tho thnndcrons swash of
the rolling waves and tho grinding and crashing
of tb'.: stones and boulders overhead."
Sfven revengeful br'lcts finished tho guerrilla
Jim Smith, near Nashville, a few days since.
J. M. RASON,
COMMISSION AGENT,
No. 9 EX(!HAXCIE-STEEET,
CHARLESTON. S. C.
September s ino
GBAESER & SMITH;
COTTON FACTORS,
Commission and Forwarding Merchants,
(OFFICE FOR THE PRESENT AT No. 80 EAST>*}Y.!
T''.!"
wi] or purchase un : tommin..ion COTTON ,-rfA VA L
STORES, AND PRODUCE MENEBALLY.
Orders for Good? extMSltad ut lowest prices. Advance?
m?i<le on consi^meiibiforHuluiji thisorforcign markt ts.
C. A. GRABBER.A. SYDNEY SMITH.
RKPRRKSCEH.
Meran. G. W. WILLIAMS fe CO.; Messrs. JOHN
FRASER ii CO. 12* September K
T. A. JEFFORDS.UF.NKY ?II?CX.
T. A. JEFFOSDS & CO.,
Commission and Forwarding Merchants,
Cor. Main-street and the Railroad,
ORANGEBURG, S. C.
T. A. .IEFFORD8, for main yearn connected with the
house of .7J:FFOIU)9 k Co., would solkit from hi? friends
in the City and Country, part of the Forwarding busi?
ness. He premises lo give all business entnisted to his
care Iiis personal attention ; and, having a large Store?
house within three yards ul tl.e depot, can always (when
wagons aro not present) store the goods at small expense
to thc owners. wfm 2(5 September 0
DAVID BARROW,
Wholesale Commission Merchant
AND
FACTOR,
iN"o. 153 East 33ay,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
4B-COSIGNMENTS SOLICITED.-?&
August U niwf Imo
W. T BURGE Sc CO.,
WHOLESALE sr.ALEns IN
Staple and Fancy Dry doods,
YANKEE NOTIONS,
No. 41 Hayne-street,
ARE NOW RECEIVING THEIR FALL AND WIN?
TER STOCK, to which they invite the attention of
Deniers. Imo September 7
E. M. M4ESHALL,
BROKER, AUCTIONEER
AND
GENERAL COMMISSION AfcKNT,
HAS RESUMED BUSINESS AT HIS OLD STAND,
No. 33 Browl-strcct. Attends to the BUYING
\ND SELLING OF REAL ESTATE, FURNITURE, kc,
fcc. Also to the RENTING nf HOUSES. September fl
JEFFERS & CO.,
FORMERLY COTHRAN, JEFFERS & CO.,
GENERAL
('oniinissiou,R4'Celvirig ii Forwarding Agents,
ORANGEBURG, S. C.
Special attention given to Receiving and Forwarding
Cotton and Mer-handise.
September t 12*
JAS. B. CAHILL,
GE V ERAL.
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
AND DEALER IN
Groceries, Fro visions, Hines & Liquors,
No. 171 Broad-street,
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA.
CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED.
September 1 Hme-s
T.. W. ?PRATT,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
OFFICE OVEE M'KAT i CAXTEEXL, H.VEJ.-STnEET,
NEXT DOOR 70 POST-OFFICE
Ile will r.et as Agent in procaring FARDONS asd ad
nsting CLAIMS on Treasury Department.
Anenst IC
STYLES & CARTER, gp?
SHIPPIXOAIVD \
COMMISSION'MEECHI
.AGENTS FOR .
Orleans Line of Southern Packet?..?
SO. 19. T?inderhortf TV-i-rf, *
j L. c. srr...cs, i . CHARLESTON, S. CV
T. P. CAB'.'LK. )
WM. H. ROBSON & CO., AGENTS IN NEW TOKE.-.
Advances made on consignments.
September 4 last?
P. H. KEGLER,
WHOLESALE DEALER IN
GENERAL 'AGENT m
? ? : FOR" -j I
PHILADELPHIA STOCK ALES.
173 East Bay.
September 4
WILLIS & CHISOLM,
FACTORS, COMMISSION MERCELAS^
AND
SHIPPING AGENTS,
OFFICE, .HILLS HOUSE,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
E WILLIS...-.A. ii. CHXS0X3SS
WILL ATTEND TO THE PURCHASE, SALE AB*.
SHIPMENT (to Foreh.ro and' Domestic Pert?)??;
COTTON, RICE, LUMBER, NAVAL STORES; to th*
Coliection nt Dr.iitR, Purchase and Sale o? all Secaritysa. .
Cutisiimuieots ot' vessels solicited. .
REFERS TO: \
Mef srs. .TOEN FRASER & CO., Charleston. 8. C.
Meian. GEO. W. WILLIAMS ii CO., Charleston, a CV
Vd am PENDERGAST, BROS. & CO., New Ycrft
GF.a SCH LEY, ERO., Augusta. Ga.
X. ll. METCALF, Esq., Au santo, Ga.
Mettam. CLARK, DODGE i CO., New York
' Mciism MURRAY * NEPHEW, New York.
Messrs. E. V/. CLARK & CO.. Philadelphia, Penn.
Messrs. PENDERGAST, FENWICK 4 CO., BsJtimait*.
Md. .
Messrs. SAM'L HARRIS '< SONS, Baltimore, Md.
?5- The Coli imbin Phreuix will publish cverr ofltex
day for one mouth, and other South Carolina pactar
weekly tor thu sani? period ot time, and send bills tot?t?a?
&c>: Angustia
TOWBS fr SILCOI, R~
Brokers, -Aiictioneers^
AND '?- . .
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS,,
flSrWHiL ATTEND TO THE PURCHASE AND SAUL
OF COTTON, RICE, DRY GOODSAND GROCERIES.
Also, their uttcution will bc given to SALES OF FT3&
? NIT'JRE, HEAL ESTATE, ic.
OfScc for the present, at No. 238 KING-STREET
Angnst?O Imo
General Commission Merchants^
CHARLESTON, S. C.,
Will give their attention to thc purchase and sal? ci 3TiO>
chondlse and Produco ol' every descriptioa
C0NSIGNJI?SNT8 OF COTTON SOLICITE!}
J. E. HERIOT, Jn.B. M, HEEIfCt
HJSI-EREHCES:
WM. B. HERIOT ii CO., Charleston, S. C.
HARMOND HULL tt CO., Nrw York.
DEMEKEST i' WYGAXT, New York.
J Nt). SLEIGHT, Poughkeepsie, N. Y.
September 1 Imo
C. ?. CHICHESTER,
REAL ESTATE BROKER
No. 18 BROAD-STREET,
CHABLESTON, S. C.
A GENT FOR THE PURCHASE AND SALE Of"
JY REAL ESTATE in any of the Souther? Staten.
?LSO AGENT FOR THE SHLE. RENTING.
TA [RCSG, fcc. OF CITY PROPERTY^_Augra? ^
?BOHIJALD GETTY & CO..
SHIP & STEAMBOAT AGENTS
AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Noe. 12C AND 128 MEETING-STREET.
{'harlesto.il, S. C.
3CDMUND A. SOUDER k CO., Philadelphia. Ttxn.
IJVTNGSTON, FOX & CO., Agent?, New York.
F. A. WLLCOXSOS, Agent, Orangeburg, S. C.
UBERAL ADVANCES MADE ON CONSIGXMEKm.
August 10 _
HOWE/D0?C?N~&"CO.,
Commission Merchants
Ship Chandlers and Grocers.
No. 151 EAST BAY, CHARLESTONS.C
c. HOWE, JR.r. M. nocen?.E. C.;
C. & E. HOWE,
Commission Merchante.
No. 71 BROADWAY, NEW YORX.
c. HOWE, jn.F.. c. em.
CousigniuentK solicited. Prompt attention givtej
sali s of Morchanilisc. JYodive purchased cn ct.Uizu?
sion. and liberal advance* rua ile.
Refer by permission to Messrs. HEXBI Swirr & Ca^.
No. IM Broadway; JNO. M. SMITH'S SOS a C?>."No_X?
B:road-Rt. : KKMI\ DAY * Co., No. 116 Wall-sL.; TBoaca?
ft BKSHAM. NO. 108 Broad-st., N. Y. Gmo^Aufrart ??_
A. C. SCHAEFER, ) JAS E. BROWN k CO.,)
GEO. Y. BARKER, J No. 33 S. Front Street, J
New York. ) Philadelphia, j
A. C. SCHAEFER, Ja.,
COnsi-Ul LIUHT AND MUTT STREETS,
Baltimore.
Adolphus C. Schaefer & Go?
(FORMERLY OF BALTIMORE,!
General Shipping & Commission
MEKCHA>TTS,
NO. Ill WA TE HST., NEW YOT.Z^
ft^EVERY FACILITY OFFERED FOR CONSIGN?
MENTS and execution ot r-rders in Nrw York, Pl/:3wWi
j Lia. cr Baltimore, by either house*
Av.cust H <Ira0"..._
RICHARD ALLISON,
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
No. DC BEEKMAX-STREET;
NEW YORE..
COTTON AND OTHER PRODUCE SOLD OX ftOK?
MISSION. M?nerai Merchandise parcha ?ed tcuoL
forwarded to order. Imo* Anjrsvl VC
W. BROOKBANKS,
PRACTICAL GAS FITTER & PLIJIBE??
ITo. 238 Eing-street,
NEJl DOOIi TO rOI?TEX? LD
Augudt 14

xml | txt