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The Charleston daily news. (Charleston, S.C.) 1865-1873, September 09, 1865, Image 1

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VOL. I....NO. 34.
CHARLESTON, S. C, SATURDAY, HEP'IKMBEH 0, 18G5.
PRICE FIVE CENTSL
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The following arc the Agents for this paper:
JOSEPH H. SEARS, "New South," Uilt.m Head.
H. L. DARR, Sumter, S. C.
J. T. HEIJSUMAN, "Journal office," Caradcn, S. C.
J. W. BROWN, "Southerner office," Darlington, S. C.
G. L. PRATT. Columbia.
M. M. QUINN ,t URO., Augusta, Ga.
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Mr. AUG. BRENTANO. NO. 708 Broadway, New York,
has always the latest dates of the Daily News, as he
does of all the other principal journals of the country
INTERESTING PROM NEW ORLEANS.
[Correspondence of L'<e Xno l'ork Times.]
New Orleans, August 25.
TttTDNlOHT SEARCH OF OEN. l?EAUREUAUD's HOUSE.
I havo to relato to you a most extraordinary af
fair which took place in this city on the night of
Wcdncsda-' lost, about 1 P. M., at tho r?sidence of
General O. T. Beauregard, on Esplanade-street.
About the hour indicated, the family, ioufading
tlic brother of General Beauregard and a number
of guests, were wrapped in profound dumber,
wlion an extraordinary noise wan beard in tbe
court-yard of the house below. The ladies were
first aroused, and were suspicions that a burglari
one entry wan about to be made, und accordingly
ibcy awoke the general and bis friends, who went
down to tlie back-doors and into the yard, where
they found some men in citizens' clothes, of whom
they demanded their business and errand.
The replv was the seizure of the persons of the
general and his friends, declaring them under ar
rest, and the opening of the gates and doors, let
ting in a small body of United States soldiers, un
der whose custody tho prisoners were placed, scp
aratod from one another so as not to be obis to
communicate. The apparent civilians and their
military assistants then commenced a HOorck of
tbe premisos, invading every spot, ever so sacred,
fron? garret to ground, not forgetting tbe coal
hole, and indicting bayonet etabs in tlie mattres
ses, pillows, sofas, etc.
- Of course General Beauregard protested against
this mode of treating an Officer and a gentleman,
who had given his parole of honor to the United
States, and liad not been charged with a violation
?fit; but no attention was paid to this, except to
make tho manner and style of treatment oven
more rude and moulting. The search went on,
but revealed nothing which could bring disereilit
upon the distinguished object of their attentions,
nnd some time after daylight it waH completed,
and its failure to reveal anything improper made
manifest.
RUDENESS TO THE LADIES.
At the time of the alarm the. ladies had como
.down and were mute spectators of the singular
arrest of their relative and host. Observing one
of them, the general, who was standing under
guard in the corner, snoke to her in French, and
.advised her to go to lier room and complote her
toilet. The chief of the invading party followed
lier into her room and pushed into it after her.
.Upon her remonstrating with him at this intru
sion, ho Pindc an insulting remark, and threatened
her with violence if she repeated what she had
said, which she nevertheless did, without his ven
turing to carry his unmanly threat into execution.
At last morning came, and day brought with it
an end to this singular domiciliary -visitation; the
search was given up, and the apparent civilians
and their soldier aids departed, leaving their
?irisoncrs weary and wan, but at liberty. Before
hey left General Beauregard asked their leader
- his name, and it "vas given him as Colonel Young.
GEN. BEAUREUARD AND OEN. SHERIDAN.
. At the proper hour General Beauregard repaired
to tho headquarters of Major-General Sheridan,
to whose presence he was at once admitted, and
by whom lie was treated with the greatest consid
"oration and conrtesy. General Sheridan aesured
I him that ho had not directed, nor was he aware of
any intention, to make any such search or to in
flict any such insult upon the former, and assured
him that he would take particular pains to see
m that hone such should take place in the future.
These particulars have been furnished by eye
witnesses and subjects of this very singular and
most reprehensible piece of espionage, and are, I
, presume, altogether correct. But whether strictly
true or not, I think all right-minded persons, not
. war-preachers, will admit that neither the time
nor tlie place, nor the objects of this search, were
rightfully chosen.
General Bcanrcgard, when released on his
parole, was guaranteed tho privilege of remaining
nt his home, unmolested, and his private effects
were freo from surrender or capture. If there
-were suspicions that he had public property in
his possession, or had entered into any subae
2uent combination, in violation of his parole, the
rst act should have been to arrest him, and not
*o search his premises without arrest; if there
were only suspicious of a violation of his parole,
no indignity should have been offered him, not
based on probable cause. Tho search could nave
been made as easily in the day as in the night, and
a city full of soldiers, detectives, and policemen,
-. cannot easily he fled from, had there been a fear
. of his escape, by one so well-known as is G. T.
- Beauregard.
But the whole thing was without authority, as
?>nr chief military commander has declared, and I
. ?lonbt whether any other officer wearing stars will
he found to have been mixed up in it. I am sure
that General Canby could not have been. It is
presumablo that Ulis singular affair will be
thoroughly investigated. Whether any one will
he punished for it or not, I am not so certain.
THE LOUISIANA STATE (lOVERNMEKT.
We are quite at sea as to our existing fitato Gov
ernment. It is "understood" that Governor Wells
is recognized by Prosident Johnson as the Pro
visional Governor of Louisiana, hut no direct inti
mation of this has boon received by him, as far as
lean learn, an 1 assuredly no proclamation has
been issued which nominates him to such an office
and instrncts him to organize tho Stato as one
not yet properly furnished with* loyal govern
ment or an anti-slavery constitution of its own
??hoosing.
ABOUT A NEW STATE COXVKNTIOX AND CONfiTITOTION.
The negro suffrage question being that upon
which the subject of reorganization is mostly ex
pected to hang, his remarks on this subject are
pertinent to tbe matter under consideration, espe
cially Bince tho "Banks-Halm" constitution hail a
clause which authorized the Legislature to confer
tho elective franchise on others than whito per
sons, and this wonld bo dropped if a convention
were called.
Certain it is, that if the constitution of last year
wore submitted to-dnv to the popular vote, as con
trasted with one simply abolishing slavorv, it would
not receive five hundred votes within the State. If it
were not for the expense of assembling a new con
. vontion, that under Banks having cost six hundred
thousand ?lollurs, liiere would bo uu universal |
clnmor for it.
Every new Ihing in the constitution now left us I
as n legacy hy Haulm is made odioiiH by tho fact I
that it tviiB imposed upon tho peon?a by him; that !
tho convention was composed of foreign ailvon
tnrers and tho dreg? of our ?twn population, ami
that it was accepted by tho voles of soldiers ?p.ia:
icred oniong uu, and ol'men whoso transitory stay
hero was only in search of pltiuder. Ittj ?irigin
alone suillooa to make it odious to all classics of
or.r people.
Political organizations are quite chaotic here.
The radical faction hua become so utterly insigni
ficant in numbers, though well Bupplied in the
possession of such men as Hanke, Dunint, Hahn,
and sonio others, with managing and even with a
higher order of talent, that the great majority
finds itself compelled to split up into factions iu
?>rder to have what every American seems to think
the only object in an election?a party contest.
1 wrote to you the other ?lay, inclosing the ad
dress ?if tho State Central Executive Committee,
signed by our respectable old fellow-citizen, Judgo
Dnvigimaud. Liko most ctherH, I supposed that
this organization was a whim of all the elcinonta
opposed to radiealiam, and, probably, it was so
intended: but its ?all for war?! and parish organi
zation wus met by tho lingering remains Of the
late most dctentablo convention and legislature,
who met together and voted themselves delegates.
It was thereby found that the tax-payiug and
not-spending voters, the rcnlly conservative men.
must seek some othur aBeoci?tion, or they would
have put in nomination for their votes the very
ereaturcB who wero barely recovering from thoir
debauch over the life-blood of Louisiana. "While
men were debating what they should do, out comes
the following notice :
DEMOCRATIC STATE CONVENTION.
The undersigned, for two yoars past, mombers
of the Democratic and Conservative State Execu
tive Committee, duly constituted, after full con
sultation with the Democratic and Conservative
citizens of New Orleans and the Stato at largo,
would rcspectfuliy recommend a thorough and
prompt organization Uttder the broad banner of
the National Democratic party, as offering the best
promise for the preservation of our rights and lib
erties.
To effect this wo recommend that a Democratic
State Convention bo held at the Mechanics^ Insti
tute. r*n Tlrvades-Btrcet. near Canal-street, in New
Orleans, on Monday, 2d Octobor, 1865, at 12, M.
The representations amongst the several par
ishi?H shall be on the basis of tho total number of
voteB cast in each parish at the Presidential elec
tion held in 18C0.
,T. AD. ROZIER, President.
IV. W. PUGH.
J. L. RIDDELL.
R. J. KERR.
F, H. KNAPP.
JULIAN NEVILLE.
WILLIAMSON SMITH.
H. M. VAN SOLINGEN.
JOHN GAUCHE.
(1EOKGE CIIONAN.
W. IL MIELS.
Messrs. Laecy and -, of the Committee,
absent.
P. CRONAN, Jr., Secretary.
Tills seems to settle tho matter as to who com
pose and what is tho conservative party. 11 is
those who opposed the elections ordered hy Uanka,
who voted against the infamous constitution of
1804, and who supported MoClellau in that year.
The blank in this list of committee-men is J. Q. A.
Follows, who was the candidate of the conserva
tives eighteen montliB ago for governor. Mr. Ho
lder was the leading opponent of accession in the
convention which tried to curry Louisiana out of
the Union; ami the others are well known citizens,
who have acted consistently during the whole of
these trials and trouble?, iu opposition to ull forms
of radicalism.
FROa RED RIVER.
There was n. vero foolish story afloat at Clarlte
ville. Bod River county, Texas, on the 5th, that
that there had been an engagement near Browns
ville between tho laipcriahsts and General Steelc,
and that the latter lost seven thousand men. It
was brought there from Tyler, Texas, and declar
ed to bo official. It wa? fishy, nevertheless, for
we have news from tho Rio Grande four ?lays later
than the rumor, and then all was peace, and likely
so to continue.
Tyler, in Smith county, Texas, is an ambitious
little "city." It ha? as yet not had troops quar
tered upon its inhabitants, and it consequently
Ents forth, through its Reporter, the following
oast of itself :
-4 Good Community.?Not atl exchange reflect
us, it says, from any of our ?ist?r i?\fm and cities
where troops aro stationed, without accounts o"
theft?, robberies, and even murders. We are with
out law of any description in our city, and have
been for two month? ; notwithstanding, we have
not a single act of lawlessness to chronicle. Alto
gether, we believe we may claim one of the bcBt
communities in tho Stato.
THE UNITED STATES ANE? THE MONROE
DOCTRINE.
A POPTJLAB ENGLISH VIEW OP THE RECENT "WAR"?
SPEECH OF GENERAL SHERIDAN.
[From the London Telegraph, August 11]
The incontinence of speech in which American
public men freely indulge is very apt to mislead
European opinion. Wo are startled to read that a
leading minister has accused a power in alliance
with his government, or that a renowned general
has expressed his eagerneBB for war. Wero M. do
Lavalette to declare that Austria should be ex
pelled from Venice, or> ?were Sir George Grey to
denounce the French^ oAspation of Mexico,- wo
should foresee that .war-whs a question not of
weeks, but of days. , Tlio .leading officials of tho
United States, however, assume the rights without
the reticence of office, und all do not foel that sonso
of mutual responsibility which binds the English
Cabinet together. In the United States there is
no Cabinet properly so called. Tho President is
the real ruler, with so many head clerks to execute
his orders. He may consult them separately or in
assembly, but none of tho secretaries holds him
self answerable for what is done beyond his own
department. Wo saw this abundantly exemplified
during the hite war; on the negro question, on the
beet mode of weakening tho South, on the per
sonal merits of tho leading generals, the ministers
freely differed and freely expressed their dissent
ing sentiments; nntil the divergency attained it?
largest limits, when the Secretary of the Navy for
mally defended that seizure of the Trent, which,
a few weeks afterwards, was formally repudiated
by the Secretary of State.
If, therefore, wo must raako ampio allowance for
the habitual unrestraint even of statesmen in
America, when they meet their country men, we must
be still more careful to minimise the important.?
of anything uttered by a military chief unaccus
tomed to politic? ami writing with a free pen.
General Sheridan, who commands the Federal
troops on the Rio Grande, is the author of a letter
which was read ata recent banquet of Mexican Re
publicans enduring exile at New York; and here he
writes : "It ia of no uso to beat ?round the bush
in this Mexican matter; wo should give a perma
nent government to that Republic. The advent of
Maximilian was a portion of the rebellion, and his
fall should belong to its history." The choleric
word? of tho distinguished captain are utarthng
enough as a programme, yet they indicate noth
ing bot a I'ampaign in air projected by his very
hot ?nd vigorous Irish brain. We must speak of
the man?militarily?with great respect: ho was
the Dosaix of tho civil war, one of the Sow gene
rals iu history who, joining an army defeated, re
won tho lost battle on tho ?pot by leading beaten
troops to a victorious charge. But stout and able
warriors are not always good politicians, and the
Washington reply to this irresponsible rhodomon
tado is un order to General Sheridan to muster out
of service all his available troop?. So ends his
mad dream of crossing the Rio Grande.
fllWo can quit? understand tho-obvions motive?
of the Federal authorities in leaning the new or
der. In tho first place, it is -the interest of tho
-United States to reduce, ?t once, tho great expense
of their still large military force. ~ In the second
place, wo do not beliovo that a single statesman
at Washington*entertains even tho most remote
idea of executing an intervention in Mexico. Mr.
Howard. fcnowe Yery well?ho had boon told so dim
tinctly by the Einperr Napoleon's envoy?tltail
war with Mexico metis w?r with Franco, nodi
President Johnson is t>t mad enough to bring on|
bis barniz a very serio? foreign war before be lias
closed t!io accounts o the great internal strife.
Will, wo can unite undrstand that the presence
of the new Emperor s thoroughly hateful to all
true Americans; we On quito believe that Mr.
Beward would not disfmbh) his joy if, some day,
Juarez were to riso wain Into power and send
back to Jiiramar a (bcomlltcd and discrowned
Emperor. We can nip understand that if, with
out open breach of loutrality, some thousand
Americana cross tho lio Grande and helped the
Mexican malcontents u expel the new EmporOf,
Mr. Howard would licitily rejoice, however be
might express dipIomoJo regret at this violation
of American laws and htornational obligations.
Tho question is whepor the " mustering out"
in Texas will not help on unauthorized raids across
Uio river boundary. !A largo army actually on
rolled can lio held* in'hand, out how can General
Sheridan or Mr. Howard oeswor for disbanded
soldiers paid out the di y before? The dispersed
Confederatoa havo BWarmod across the line to help
tho now emperor, taking his Bide simply beeaum
they feel that Maximilianos anti-Yankee by inter
est if not by feeling; :"'-'--dispersed Federals may
to hoiuo catwait fo'?ow ti;, :?" iniok, taking of course
tbe opposite su-.,. But th'to is this difference?
tho disbanded FsOmml BOhiwrs havo homes and
friends, have offers of enj -jment elsewhere, and
affection and Interest drnw'.tlem North. So that
Juarez must be very tempthf, indeed, before he
can keep tho blue coats from he " Bweet ombraccs
of their wives" and swcctheaijs, or from tho glory
and comfort awaiting returnci.braves, made much
of in the welcoming cities of tyo Northern States.
Of course it is hard to tell hovfur the lovo of ad
venture, ami threo or four yetrs' habitude hi tho
wild ways of war, may mako ion scorn those do
mestic delights signified ondbymbobzod by one
wifo and two or three cups of pa; but wo are, at
all events, convinced that whoever troubles may
arise on tllO Rio Grande will wing from reckless
individuals, aud not from an] action authorized
by tho United Htatcs.
But then there is the Monroitloctrine. True, we
had forgotten Mr. Monroe; onrpnly excuse is that
tho Amcricnns themselves had bigotten him first.
In 1823 that gentleman wan ?President of the
Uuited Slates, and Spain was ten trying to re
conquer her rovollcd colonies it the New World.
England, led by Canning, ackpwlodgcd the in
dependence of the colonies?"filing a new world
into existence," as that ministr luugniloquently
said?and tho United .States did(ho same. At that
time Mr. Monroe declared thatjattempts on tho
part of the European powcrs'to extend "their
system" to any portion of thl American hemis
phere would be considered by th United Htstoa as
dangerous to their peace anoVafcty. This was
rather ambiguous; but the Promeut wont on to
say thai if any European powtr interposed "for
tho purposo of oppressing" the ?W States recog
nized by tho Government at Wellington, or inter
posed "to control their destiny i any other miin
uer," tho United States would?re-lure war? no?
would consider the act "tho maifestation of an
unfriendly disposition towards tie United States."
Yet at that very time such ajase had actually
arisen, and was in course of translation. Spain was
trying to reconquer and "oppress States whose in
dependence had heen acknuwlodjt'd by the United
States, and yet In the next sent dee Mr. Monroe
avows his neutrality in tli current war.
What, then, does this Monroe tdrK:U*ino moan Y
It is, i?o helicve. the poetry of A?ftrielui politics?
the glurionu, blue, arching, bulinaceeasibla sky
to the brown, bare earth of Vanlpe f.lcts.. Every
notion has in its polities somofli|ig impracticable,
some outlook beyond the probabe anductusl work
of tbe day. France dreams d the Rhine: Ger
many of a fleet; Russia of Samboul; Italy of
Home and reni?e: Hungary <f a Magyar king.
Tho Monroe doc.truic, as now ktcrprcted, mean's
that every true American would if he could, plant
a republic in Canuda, in Hexip, in Brazil, even
until tho whole continent shoud be republican,
without one traco of the mourchical clement.
This, howovcr, goes beyond tbi original doctrine
of tho estimable Monroe. Hu s?d: " With the ex
isting colonies or dependencies of any European
power wo have not interfered, aid shall not inter
fore." In this present August he Now York Ilor
ald extends tho wings of the apijad eagle to touch
Canada aud Cuba. But why nrgie the point? \Vo
ore always liable to the stern and crushing re
tort that tho Amcricau is " a jhild of freedom,"
aud that "his bright home is il the setting bud."
In very close, wot weather like ?his, when tho at
mosphere is simply ono big tejjd bath, nono but
an Irishman woul'l ?rguo agiiiuil logic so irresist
ible and a repartee so suo!?2?c. '
The Russian Tcl<graph.
The following interesting artigo on the Rneeo
American Telegraph, wo take frpii the St. Louis
Republican :
Now that failure has followed the last attempt
to connect Europo and America by a telegraphic
wiro laid acrosB tho bed of the Alantic Ocean, in
creased interest will be felt li the enterprise
known as tho Russia-American Telegraph. This
telegraph will connect London riih New York via
St. Petersburg in Russia and Sin Francisco and
St. Lou?h in tho United States. ?The work upon it
has been prosecuted with dugence for some
months; and will be completed next year. From
San Francisco tho fine will b* carried through
British Columbia or New Caledonia into the
Rosso-American Possessions ai tho Northwest
coast of the American continent The communi
cation between tho opposite stores of Asia and
America will be established in latitude 62. Tbe
distance across is 400 miles, hut an intervening
island reduces the distance to which it will be
necessary to oxtend the submerged portion
of tho cable to only 250 miles for the longest
interval In Asia the lino wul be taken up by
Russian officers and completed so as to con
nect it with Bt. Petersburg through the mouth of
tho river Amoor, in latitude 52 30. From New
Westminster, at the month of Frazcr river, in
British America, to Nicolaieffsk, near the Amoor,
is 4000 miles. Tlie lino will be completed through a
large part of tbe Frazer river valley the present
season. Since February last, 250 men have buen
at work upon this section of it. Next spring there
will bo on the ground tho wire and all materials
hocesBary for tho prosecution of tho work for the
remainder of the route on tail continent. The ma
terials will include 200 miles of submarine wire.
The California Alta, from wlich we collect these
facts, mentions tho clearing from tho port of
8>*n Francisco on the 10th ultimo of tho bark
Golden Gate, the flag-ahip of tho telegraph
squadron, which was bouifl for tho Gulf of
Anadir and the shores of Bdiring's Straits, with
Col. Bnlkley, Snperintendcn), and his staff on
hoard. A propeller, the Geoige 8. Wright, was a
consort of tlie Golden Gate. The barks Clara Bell
and Falmotto, and schooner ililton Badger, were
up the coast. The five vesicle mentioned form
the telegraphic squadron, ?ongress authorized
the Secretary of the Navy to Retail cither a steam
or sailing vessel to make sSundinge, transport
material, and assist in laung the submarine
cable, but that official has 'iersistently refused
to furnish a vessol, or to assit tho enterprise in
any way. Tho Secretary of the Treasury, how
ever, placed tho revenue cutter Shubrick at Col.
Bulklev's command, and has il many ways extend
ed favors, and bo also bus tlie Collector of the
Fort of San Francisco. The Golden Gate, as she
proceeds northward, will stop at tbo mouth of the
Kvichpak (pronounced Vik-pak), yhich is a great
river, with a delta 100 miles widd reaching from
Gl dog. 31 min. to 63 dog. Hero M?. Kennicott ami
party will disembark. It will bo ticir duty to as
cond tho river and oxploro its coirso?somothiiiu
which has never boeu done herenforc, although
some Russians attempted it flf tcctaor twenty yeim
ago. It is supposed that the Kviclpak is the same
stream as the Yonken, into w ich tho Pell)
river of British America empties Mr. Kcnicotl
spent four years on tho Yonkti river, about
latitudo 65 dsg. in the service of t ie Smithsoniai
Institute, and thereforo tho prest it enterprise it
not altogether novel to him. while
up the Kvichpak, Major Fopo wi
zur river and down the Felly and
him. Major Pope started in May hst. Col. Bulk
ley will also land a party at the im nth of the Ana
dir river, at latitude G5*dog. in Bit ria, and it wit
bo their duty to ascend that streai , and they wll
bo mot by another party to bo pea oui by Slajoi
kennicott gocf
go up the Fra
Loukcu to meet
m
?asa, a Rundan nobleman, who, after having i I
?tidied the t?l?graphia business in the Ihiihil j
":it?-M for sivernl years, hau taken part in the un- ;
?ertulviug. Wo niuy bo pndty sure that this en
orprisa will bu a success in every point <>f view. I
Whether it will ever be Bnporsodod in part or whole
by an Atlantic cabio, ia a question which it may
yet take many yoars'and rejieated experinients to
answer.
a distiuet organisation, frowning upon every effort
to make its ministers the pimps of a partv, re
solved to be true to its ?ridegroom, ami guilty of
no adulterous intimacy with Mammon.
[iV. Y. AVa?.
STYLES & CARTER,
SHIPPING AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
AGENTS FOU
Orleans Line of Southern Packets,
NO. 1? Yar.derhorst Wiiar?,
\: r. o^rrsat ! charleston, b, c.
WM. H. ROBSON ?: CO., AGENTS IN NEW YORK.
Advances made on consignments.
September 4 ]Illo
ZIMMFJiMAN DAVIS,
(LATE OF THE FIRM OF ADAMS, FROST 4C0.)
Hum resumed the
FACTORAGE & COMMISSION BUSINESS,
OFFICE FOX THE PRESENT
Cor. Ac < ommoilai ion Wlinrf iintl i-'.n,? liny.
Will atli-nil to the hoIo of COTTON, RICE, or un.v other
PRODUOE, in this or any l'ore.ign market. Also, to the
PURCHASE AN)) SHIPPING OF COTTON. Will also
RECEIVE AND FORWARD WOODS.
September a lmo*
DOWN TOWN "AUCTION ROOMS.
SPENCER & BIKER,
Auctlonct-r? and Commixtiion Mt-rvltnnts, I
HAVING ROOMY ACCOMMODATIONS, WILL AT- |
TEND TO TUE SALE OF REAL ESTATE, FUR- j
MTURR. and all other deacrintiona of PERSONAL
PROPERTY.
Connlgninentfl solicited. No. i .STATE-STREET.
September 6 i-.;bsi ChaiWtnn. s. c.
JAS. B. CAHILL,
UENEKAL
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
AND DEALER IN
Groceries, Provisions, Wines & Liquors,
No. 171 Broad-stjreet,
* AUGUSTA, GEORGIA.
.- ..- - ..--..*
CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED.
September 1 Dinos
JEFFERS & COT,
FORMERLY COT H RAN, JEFFERS St CO.,
GENERAL
Co!iniiission,Rpcciving & Forwarding Agents,
OEANGEEURG, S. C.
Spt'cinl attention given to Receiving and Forwarding
Cotton und Merchandise.
S?'ptembcr C 12*
R.M. MARSHALL^
BROKER, AUCTIONEER,
AND
GENERAL COMMISSION AGENT,
HAS RESUMED BUSINESS AT HIS OLD STAND,
No. :i:l Droad-Htrti-t. Attends to the BUYING
AND SELLING OF REAL ESTATE, FURNITURE, Ac, I
kc. Also U> the RENTING of BOOTES. Reptejntffr ?
W. T. BUBGE k CO.,
WHOLESALE DEALERS IM
Staple and Fancy Dry Goods,
YANKEE NOTIONS,
No. 41 Hayne-street,
ARE NOW RECEIVING THEIR FALL AND WIN
TER STOCK, to which they invite the attention of
Dealers. lmo September 7
T. A. JEKFORDH.HENBY KIBCK.
T. A. JEFFORDS & CO.,
Commission and Forwarding Merchants,
Cor. Main-street and the Railroad,
OKANGEDURO, 8. C.
T. A. JEFFORDS, for many yearn conuccte?l with the
house ofJeffords k Co., would solicit from hi? friend h
In the City und Country, part of the Forwarding busi
ness. He promises to give alt business entrusted to his
care his pcrsoual attention ; and, having a large Store
house within three yard? of the depot, ran always (when
wagons are not present) store the goods at small expense
to the owners. wfin 20 September 6
GKAESEK & SMITH.
COTTON FACTORS,
Commission and Forwarding Merchants,
(OFFICE FOR THE PRESENT AT No. 8C EAST BAY.)
THE UNDERSIGNED HAVE RESUMED THEIR BU
SINESS connection, as above. Indicated, and will
sell or purchaso on Commission COTTON, NAVAL
STORES. AND PRODUCE GENERALLY.
Onlers for Good? executed at lowest prices. Advances
mode on consignment? for sale in this or foreign markets.
C. A. ORAESER.A. SYDNEY SMITH.
BKMUUUfOSa,
Messrs. G. W. WILLIAMS ft CO.; Messrs. JOHN
FRASER k CO_13? _ September 8
J. M. EASON,
COMMISSION AGENT,
No. ? EXCHANGE-STREET,
CHARLESTON, 8. C.
September 8 ..' ,.?,., 3 lmo
m?m silver,
BOUOIIT AND SOLD.
Drafts on New York, Boston and Philadelphia,
AT
P. H. KEGLER'S
BANKING OFFICE, No. 235 KING-STREET,
August 18 Corner of Beaufhln.
?,: W~ 8PB?TT,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
OFFICE OVEn K'KAT A CAMPBELL-, IIA8EL-STBEET,
NEXT POOR TC FOST-OFFIOE.
no wlU act an Agent In procuring PARDONS and ad
natlng CLAIMS on Treasury Department,
August 10
t. E. Screw II.DnuuIitK VlhbcJi...
SC1IEVEN & NISBET,
PRODUCE BROKERS,.,
WILL ATTEND TO THE PURCHASE C2:
[OTTON, RICE, NAVAL ST0RE8, &&..
And Sr.mplc, Clans, ?U.-nU ami Ship the sa.:,!..
OFFICE, FOI? THF. tttBSBXTa
N"o. C8 Bi*oacl-st., ii]> ^?.ntr'?r^.
NEXT TO Till: CllAUl.l-.STON LIBBABT IIUtLZ'CKt)}
(Tlie present Ctitiloin HotUe.)
September ? ?r-tnltu^
HOWE, BOUCIN & CO.,
Coiiimissiori jVX ^rc?iarits?
Ship C!ia..tl!ers and grocers.
No. 151 EAST RAY. CHARLESTON; aV.lL.*.
C. HOWE, .III.P. M. 1HUICIN.R. C. -HOWS
c. & ?Th?we,
Commission jMereliaintira^,.
Nu. 71 BROADWAY, NEW V?l??.
t. now?, JK.K. C. ??OTJtV.
Consignments solicited. Prompt attention gr?**i tat?
sali-8 of Mi-rrbandisir. Produce purchased ?mi l'?n-.iaK
al?n, anil lib?:riil advances mud?1.
Refer by permission l?i Messrs. IlKxnT Swtft ft 5Ptj_ .
No. nr? Broadway; .Jso. M. Smith's sum & ( <>.. *f?n.X9B
Rroad-st. ; KEMP, Day & Co., No. 110 Wills',.; Tuc^cm*..
ft Uenham. No. luitBroad-at, N. Y. Gui?y a-j.^h i?*
ARCHIBALD GETTY & CO.,"
SHIP k STEAM BOAT AGENTS
AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Sob. 12C AND 128 MEETING-STBl?i:T,3
Charleston, S. C.
EDMUND A. SOUPER A CO., Philadelphia. Prraa.
LIVINGSTON. FOX k CO., Agents. New York.
F. a. wilcoxson, Agent; Orangelmrg, s. c.
LIBERAL ADVANCES MADE ON CONSlGNMJEXTS
AutniHt 15
C. E. CHICHEST?R7
REAL ESTATE BRO^EK,
No. 18 RROAD-STIVi?ET.
(??ARLESTOy,, S. C.
A GENT FOR THE PPECHASE AND BALS ?Or"
J\. REAL ESTATE in any of the Southern ??aiv-r.
ALSO AGENT FOB THE BALE, UBNTCCS, FJEi
PAIRING, ftc, OF CITY PROPERTY. An&ust ii:
HERI?T .BROTHERS',
; General Commission Merchaiitfi^
CHARLESTON, S. C%.
Will give th?-ir attention to the pnivh.ixeand Knie t<r. 3Lr/u.t
? haiidii-c and Produce of every duacrinliou.
CONSIGNMENTS OF COTTON SOLICIT?S?
J. R. KERIOT, Jn.U. |f, HFIKZAB?
liKKtnr.Ni-Ks:
WM. B. HERIOT & CO., Charleston t?. C.
HARMOND HULL tf CO., Xow Vorlc.
DEMUREST k WYUANT. New York.
.1NO. SLEIOHT, Poughkeepsio, N. Y.
September 1 luO>
BOWERS & SILCOX,
Brokers, .A-Iictioneexis^'.
AND
GENERAL COMMISSION B RCIU?VE?..
ff?fr-WILL ATTEND TO THE PURCHASE ANI? KiSaC:
! OF COTTON, RICE, DRY GOODS AND OBOCEatOBK.
Also, their attention will be given to SALEd OF TZILW
j NITURE, REAL ESTATE, &c.
Office for the present, at No. 233 KING-STREEJ:."
August 30 IrtsK*
WILLIS & OHISOfSiT"
FACTORS, COMMISSION MERCIIASTf^
AND
SHIPPING AGENTS*
OFFICE, MILLS HOUSE,.
CHARLESTON, S. C.
E. WILLIS.A. R. CH??J?lMO<
WILL ATTEND TO THE PURCHASE, SALK AS*.
SHIPMENT (to Foreign sud Domestic- lVKifiauB
COTTON, RICE, LUMBER, NAVAL STORES; ?k> ***..
Collection of Drafts, Purchase and Salo of all ?u??rictau_
Consignments ol vessels solicited.
HKKKHS TO!
Messrs. JOHN FRASER k CO., Charleston. 8. C
Messrs. GEO. W. WILLIAMS A- CO.. Ouarle*f??n, S-??.
Messrs. PENDERGaST, BROS, k CO.. N?W Y<?rlt.
GEO. SCHLEY, Esq., Augusta. Ga.
T. 8. METCALF, Em?i., Augusta, Ga.
Messrs. CLARK, DODGE ft CO., New York.
Messrs. MURRAY ft NEPHEW. New York.
Messrs. E. W. CLARK & CO.. Philadelphia, Tn-m/.
Bleaara, pendergast, fEnwick ? co.. vnsumae^,
Md.
Messrs. SAM'L HARRIS k SONS Bnltimow. ??
4QF"The Columbia Phu-nix will publish <-r?if; ?fl?aV
day for nun month, and other South Carolina ratjum
weckly for the samw period of time, atid send bill? &> *&*&.
tticc._AagaieCKS
F\ B. Clildeater.E. Bf. PritcfeaKittkV
JERSEY CITY
LANING^MILLSL
CHIDESTER & CO.
WOOD MOULDINGS, ARCHITRAVES*
HAND RAILS, BRACKETS, TRUSSES
AND
Inside Trimmings
Of every description on hand and made to ordi-zr..
SCROLL KA WIM j k WOOD TURNl!W*y.
K<M. 1? Si 1* WAYNE-STREET,
CORNER GREENE, JER8EY C1IY.
September 8 _i_ ___
A. C. SCHAKFER, ) JAS E. BItOWK Av CO, S
GEO. Y. MARKER, J No. 33 ?. Front Streea.2
New York. ) PniUuloIpbSaw.5
A. C. SCHARFER, Jb.,
COBKEit i.miiT akd pRA-rr sthkktr,
Baltimore.
Adolphus C. Scliae/ex* & Oca?
(FORMERLY OF BALTIMORE.!;
General Shipping & Conunisswrii
MERCHANTS,
NO. Ill WATEH-ST., NEW YOUjK
?? EVERY FACILITY OFFERED FOR C?XSSGER
MENTS and execution ol orders III New York, Vi?htt3??
pblu or Daltlmore, by either house
Aiurusti*^_<na?<>'_
RICHARD ALLISON^
COMMISSION ME&CHAir^
Xo. 00 IIEEKHAN-STRGET?.
NEW YOBX&.
/~10TTON AND OTHER PRODUCE SOLD COdCXUO
KJ MISSION. Gem-rul Merchandise purc-JtaenS'
forwarded to order. ,m<** ?HH?IOB>
W. BROOKBA?KSC
PRACTICAL GAS FITTER & PLVMHH??
No. 288 King-street,
NEN7 J)00Ji TO rORTERb U> SZAS2V>
August l?

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