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The Charleston daily news. (Charleston, S.C.) 1865-1873, September 13, 1865, Image 1

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VOL. I....NO. ?7.
CHARLESTON, S.O., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1805.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
THE
CHARLESTON DAILY NEWS,
CATllCAJRT, Mc-IILLAN & MORTON,
PROPRIETORS,'
No. 18 HAYNE-STREET.
TERMS?CASK.
?ATL??OWE YEAR.S1O.O0
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Eich continuation, SEVENTY-FIVE CENTS.
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first iusortion ; HALF Pl'.lCE for each continuation.
Tho following arc the Agents for this rapcr:
JOSEPH H. 8EARS,-'New South," Hilton Head.
H. L. DARK, Suinter, S. C.
J. T. HHHSUMAN, " Journal office," Camdcn, S. <J.
J. M. BROWN, "Southerner office," Darlington, S. C.
G. L. PRATT, Columbia.
M. M. QUINN k BRO., Augusta, Ga.
H. ESTELL, Savannah, Ga.
Mr. AUG. BRENTANO, NO. 708 Broadway, New York,
lias always tho latest dates of the Daily News,-as ho
docs of ail the other principal journals of the country.
__CCX.ESIAST_?CAI. REOEGAMZATIUN.
"We tako the following interesting article on
^Ecclesiastical Itcor-gunizationfrom ft New York ex
change ef a recent date :
Tho Episcopal Church, the grand bulwark
Against radical diee-ont and New England fanati
cism, is about to bo subjected to a trying ordeal
which, will test its Ancient character for fraternal
unity. The late war, ruthloaa liko tho scyth;- of
Time, eovored the sacred associations and commu
nion which existed between the churchmen, North
and South, and the great Episcopal body was divi
ded, in obedienco to the inexorable necessities of
the insurrection. But there are well grounded
jkopes that, in the words of Moore, euch
"Hearts that had been long estranged,
And friends that had grown cold.
Should meet again like parted Kticams,
Aud triumph a_ at old ! "
There arc, however, prospective obstacles lo the
Unity of the Episcopal Church, which may bo in
creased by a lack oi charity among Northern di
vines, who in the exercise of intense "loyalty,"
may not only ho desirous of forgetting th? over
ruling ties of common brethren, hut may seek to
crush tho broken reed, and triumph over a fallen
foe. Happily the Church has but few of this class
wit bin her fold. Tho small number of churchmen
who, in tho language of Becoher. desired the an
nihilation of tho South, have but little Influence.
Some of them have relations holding positions in
-various Federal departments, and an odd war
blast from their pulpits have helped their rela
tives considerably to retain their sinecures under
the late administration. But the grand period of
peaeo has come when loyalty must be gratuitous.
- The wind and tide of Episcopacy is against their
craft now, and they cannot work against them.
Ecclesiastical fawnings aro at a discount, and an
athemas arc as powerless as hull? against comets.
The great mass of churchmen heartily yearn for
unity with their, brethren of tho South, and those
' who oppose it on nny vindictive or political plea
will become as degraded in orders as if they liud
been stripped in a chancel of then? surplices by
tho edict of their bishop. This feeling prevails
among churchmen everywhere. It is echoed in
iiicir journals ; it is now the engrossing topic of
all their discussions. There is a genoral desire
to forget and forgive the course of Southern
churchmen during the war, when tho rebel picket
linen and great armies cut oil' all communication
with the North, thus exposing them to the prepon
derating elements in their niidst. In order to ef
fect tliis oblivion of the past, it is determined by
many to discai-d everything which will revive the
circumstances which led to the briof schism iu
tho church.
THE TRIENNIAL EPISCOPAL CONVENTION.
Thc80 facts invest tho approaching triennial
convention with more than ordinary importance.
Jt had not, in its memorable history, such a bur
den of ecclesiastical legislation au will fall on its
?shoulders in October, when its sessions will be held
in tho Quaker City. All church councils, during
past centuricB, have been shocked by schism, and
?ven days when great conclaves of prolatcs had
the power to command, and the civil law to sus
tain them in enforcing unity, they have sought to
effect it, wherever possible, by unimportant com
promises. TIi?b lesson of history will not be loBt
on the convention, who will have to make no doc
trinal or disciplinary compromiso, but simply to
veceive again their Southern brethren in the pa
rent-fold.
THE FOWEJIS OF THE CONVENTION.
The convention is composed of the House of
Bishops, which embraces tho diocesan and mis
sionary prelates throughout the United StateB,
and of the House of Lay and Clerical Deputies,
consisting of four laymen and four clergymen
Trom each diocese. Its powers are limited, and
its lato sessions have been principally devoted to
the progress of the church. It can make no al
teration in the constitution or in the liturgy and
c&iceB, unless they have been adopted in ono con
vention, submitted to the diocese and, afterwards,
adopted by another convention?a work which
would occupy at least four years.
THE HOUSE OF BISHOPS
is cojnposcd of tho following prelates, which we
give in the order of their consecration :
-Bishop Hopkins.Vermont.consecrated 1832
Bishop B. Smith.Kentucky.consecrated 1832
--Bishop Mcllvciue_Ohio.consecrated 1832
Bishop Koinp?r.Wisconsin.consecrated 1836
Blflhop McCoeky.Michigan.consecrated 1830
Bishop Whittingham. Mary land.consecrated 1840
Blflhop Elliott.Georgia.consecrated 1841
Bishop Lee.Delaware.consecrated 1841
Bishop Johns.Virginia.consecrated 1842
Bishop Eaatburu.Massachusetts.. .consecrated 1842
BiBhop Chase.New Hampshire.consecrated 1844
.Bishop Hawks.Missouri.consecrated 1844
Blahop Southgate-(No See).consecrated 1844
Bishop Burgess.Maine.consecrated 1847
Bishop Upfold.Indiana.consecrated 1849
Bishop Green.MiMhtelppi.consecrated 1860
Bishop Payne.C. l'aimas, Afr'a. .consecrated 1861
Bishop Rutledge.Florida.ooneecrated 18B1
.Bishop Williams.Connecticut.consecrated 1831
Blflhop Whitehouso.. .Illinois..consecrated 1861
Bishop Davis.South Carolina.. .consecrated 1863
"Bishop Atkinson.North Carolina.. .consecrated 1863
Bishop Kipp.California.consecrated la1?)
Binhop Scott.Oregon.consecrated 1864
Bishop Potter.New York.consecrated 1854
Binhop Gregg.Texas.consecrated 1869
-.Bishop Odcnhoimer..New Jersey.consecrated 1869
Bishop Bedell.Ohio.consecrated 1859
Bishop Wbipple.Minnesota.consecrated 1859
-Bishop Lay.Arkansas.consecrated 1869
Bishop Talbot.Northwest.consecrated 1859
B shop Rteveiis.......Pennsylvania_consecrated 1802
ljisliop winner.Alabama.consecrated 18C2
______ y.M.Kanaan.consecrated 1804
Bishop Coxe.w. New York... .consecrated 1805
It will be thus Been that tho House of Bishops
is composed of thirty-five prelates. The war, how
ever, prevented tho Southern Bishops being pres
ent at the last triennial convention.
THE HOUSE OF LAY AND CI__aiCA_ DEPUTIES
is composed of nearly three hundred members,
who aro Bent to represent each diocese. Tho de
jare for unity among New York Churchmen is am
ply shown in tho selection of Governor Seymour
as a delegate. Ho and kindred gentlemen will
_ead tho houso against any attempt the radicals
may make to prevent the admission of the South
ern church. The mere orison for tho President of
tho Confederate StateB, which superseded for the
timo being the prayer for tho lawful President of
tho United State?, is, happily, no part of the disci
JiHno or worship of Son t hern churchmen: and it is
usUy agreed that the civil authorities alono have
tho right to toko cognizr.nco of such au innova
tion. ThiB question will, however, create; doubt
less, a lengthy debate, if tho presiding divine docs
not rulo tho subject, as is anticipated.
THE SOUTH 1?BN ErlSCOMXl CONVENTION.
In tho second year there was an independent
convention of Win Southern Episcopal Church. It
was then resolved to mcot trionnially, and by
luianimous MTOOment the next sessions wero to
bo held next November in Mobile. Tho triumph of
tho national arms, however, have so disarranged
tho ptuns of the convention, that no preparations
arc being made to moot at the time stated. An
anticipation, that the convention to assemble in
Philadelphia will deal uncharitably with Southern
churchmen, had led Mme of tho Southern bishops
to revive the agreement to hold another indepen
dent convention in Mobile. By this strategy they
will be enabled to know tho temper of the Phila
delphia body, before agreeing to any terms of
union. In order to effect this plan, a mischievous
euggoijtion has been made that all Southerners
should keep away from the Triennial Convention.
This premature opposition can be overcome by
ratifying the two main acts of the Southern Con
vention sinco the war?the creation of Arkansas
as .a new diocese, and the consecration of the
Bight Bcv. Dr. Wihncr as Bishop of South Caro
lina.
FnATERNITT WITH OTnEU DENOMINATIONS.
Varions other subjects will call forth the atten
tion of the convention. The pastoral of Bishop
Patter against the fraternity proposed to be estab
lished between Low Church* minist?re and thoso
or other d?nominations will doubtless create an
animated debate. It is stated that a new canon
w?l bo presented in favor of allowing the prac
tices of which BiBhop Potter complained; and thoso
who know both Houses sufficiently to estimate
their aggregate views on all questions declare that
Bishop Potter's action will be sustained. Tho
bishop is a favorite with the upper House, who
will doubtless support his action. The majority of
tho convention may be classed as partially Low
Churchmen, but they have no sympathy with the
alleged "doctrinal''"radicalism of the denomina
tions.
COMMUNION WITH THE RUflSO-OKEEE CHUHCH.
This will be another subject of great contention,
among the house of clerical and lay deputies. The
Greek services which took place in"Trinity Chapel
somo time since created considerable excitement
in the Low Church branch of Episcopacy. Some
of the divines of that branch have maintained that
the Greek service is, virtually, the Raman Catho
lic masa, and that trne fellowship with the Greek
Church cannot be effected, except at the expense
of the leading doctrines of the Episcopal Church.
Tho committee who have been charged with the
duty of considering the feasibility of communion
between tho Episcopal and Rnseo-Greek Churches,
will present a report ou the subject to the conven
tion. The committee consists of Bishops Williams
and Whitehnune, Rev. I?rs. Thrall and Mahan,
Rev. Dr. J. F. Young, and Messrs. Samuel B. Bug
gies and S. Elliott.
These are Ihe principal questions to be decided
by the convention.
? ?
Letter from General Henry A. Wise to
General Cirant,
"Wo take the following from n Bk'hmond cot cm
porary?the 2'inies?of the 5th. It is among the
most remarkable of the productions of a most re
markable man :
Our readers will remember that General Wise
reccutly made application to General Terry for
permission to return to his home in Princess Anne
county, as under the terms of his parole. General
Terry (through General Mann) refused, for speci
fied reasons.
Under date of September 1st, General Wise has
written a letter to General Grant, forwarded
through General Terry, from which we make ex
tracts. Hcreplies in succession to the points made
in the letter of refusal, and after declaring that he
never "abandoned *his homo" except in going to
camp to defend it against invasion, with the full
determination to return to it as soon as tho
chances of war should permit, he says : "I found
no new home for my family; they were simply
refugees from the old." He then writes as follows:
"If General Terry was governed by earnest and
honest convictions of duty, of right and authority
in all he did?so was I. if he was a. patriot?so
was I. If he gave proof of his devotion?so did I.
If he thought he had the shield of constitutional
law and political sovereignty to protect liim
against the charge of rebellion and treason?so I
thought I had. If ho loved and cherished tho
Union of these St ates, I loved and cherished it so
cordially that I never from choice would have se
ceded from it, but prepared tot?sdit 'in the Union;'
aud if ho wonders how I now can truly declare
these sentiments, after voting for secession and
taking up arniB against the acta of tho Federal
Executive and Congress, I must beg him to re
member that he and I have been taught in diff?r
ent schools of politics; and that will account for
our differences of opinion, and ought to allow a
large margin for charity at least, if not toleration.
If Tic was trained in tho school of Hamilton and
tho elder Adams, I was in that of Jefferson and
Madison; and he would boldly expose himself to
the charge of bigotry and presumption who would
charge either scliool with teaching rebellion and
treason. It is dangerous to either to adopt the
dogmas of treason and rebellion against the other,
alternating in domination as they havo dono so
often already in our history. Each might shoot
and hang the other by turns in the course of half
a century.
"If General Terry behoved in consolidation. I be
lieved in States' rights and powers. If he believed
that the Federal Executive and Congress and the
judiciary possessed absolute, I believed they had
only relative and delegated sovereignty. If he be
lieved that they wero unchecked and unbalanced
bv other powers, I behoved that tho whole system
of the United States, State and Federal, wsb com
posed of reciprocal checks and balances, and that
the sovereign States were the basis, checks and
balances of the Federal Government. I was taught
that the States were not unum, but e pluritus
unum, and this many in one, one in many. When
called a rebel, I shall point to tho-of Vir
ginia's buckler, and claim that my sovereign State
is solo sponsor for tho acts of her own citizens and
subjects. I am no rebel or traitor, and never was,
ana my State cannot bo either. She has still a
sovereignty by the Constitution of the United
States, and by tho original authority before it ever
existed, unless she is now utterly demolished by
subjugation, and unless that is destroyed by any
force which has demolished her.
"Theso are still the tenets of my faith, and I bo
liovo these truths will perpotually revive and pre
vail to preserve tho republican freedom of ihe
people of the United States. When the civil liberty
for which I devoutly pray really comes again, I
can, without hindrance, fall on tho bosom of my
country and weep with hor "for any wrongs we
havo ?one." I am now a prisoner on parolo. I
daro not note ask of her any favor, great or small.
I claim only of her ??ood faith, tho precious privi
lege, promised mo by her highest agents, to go to
my homo and bo at peace. * * *
"So far from my being opposed to tho namo
'freedmen* as indicating tho condition of slavos
freed by the war, tho chief consolation I have in
tho result of tho war is that slavery is forovor
abolished?that not only tho slaves are in fact, at
least, freed from bondage, but that I am freed
from them. Long before tho war, indeed, I had
definitely made up my mind actively to advocate
emancipation throughout the South. I had deter
mined, if I could help it, my descendants should
never bo subject to the humiliation I huvo beon
subject to by tho weakness, if not the wickedness.
of slavery; and while I cannot recognize as lawful
and humane tho violent and shocking mode in
which it has been abolished, yet I accept the fact
most heartily as an accomplished ono, and am de
termined not onlv to abide by it and acquiesce in
it, hut to strive, by all the moans in my power, to
make it beneficent to both races and a blessing
especially to our country. I nnfeigncdly rejoice
at the fact, and am reconciled to many of tho
worst calamities of tho war, because I am now
convinced that tho war was a special providenco
of God, un avoidable by the nations at either ex
treme, to tear loose from us a black idol from
which we could never havo been separated by any
other means than thoso of 0ro and blood, sword
Und sacrifice,"
4
The Citolera in Turkey.
Const ant] Norm., August 11.?Thorn is no Ion:* ?
J.ny doubt na to tho nalim? of the epidemic which .
?H ravaging this motrnpoUt. and its neighboring i
village?. Cholera in its woist form is now rag-ir^l
carrying ofl" daily, with scarcely any Warning, ?' i <
hundreds of victimo, und Hitch is tho panic among |
the residents that it is fcnrfnl to contempla'e tliti i
ctmHmp-.cn.es if it contimics much longer. I'.u^i-i
lices of all kinds is almost entirely nut?]?? oded;
hundred- aro Hying in all dirct?tioiiH;'an?l it in es- ?
t?mutcd that oh many as 150,000 persons lmvo left ;
Goustantinoplo, principally tiamals (postiini) ami '
domestic scrvnntH. It is chiclly.??i?oiig tho poorer i
classes that this dreadful scourge has, up to the j
prchent timo, committed such havoc. In the
crowded and lilthy habitations of the Jews, nm.v.:^
tho Qalata porters, and now in the crowded qnor
ters of Stamboul, thoy uro dying faster than they
can bury thnm. Nor can tlie hitherto considered
salubrious villages of the lissphoruB escape; on?i
after another, they arc swept by tho pestiferous
malady. Thorapia, tho summer rcsidouco of tin;
elite oi our society, liusbcen bo particularly altli?:.
ed that it is now quilo deserted; many who have
fled there for safety have rushed to other places,
to be again driven forth, aB one after another the
different villages become infected. In fact, such a
cowardly panic exists that wer? it not so serions in
its consequences it would he ridiculous. At Thora
pia tho dead and dying were left by their affrighted
1'rieuds, who lied as soon a? tho* poor creatures
were attacked; and tho noble courage displayed
by some of the gentlemen of tho English ?111
baBBy, who, amid the panic, searched out and
attended the dying and tho dead, is beyond all
praise, ministering with their own hands to the
wants of tho dying ones, and searching out thoso
left unburicd. As many as fifty bodies were
found thus deserted. In -timo cases tho doctors
have refused to visit the pationts afllicled with
cholera, but I must give the rest credit for Ihe
noble devotion they have displayed in this trying
emergoncy. Many have succumbed to the disease
and the fatigue entailed upon them. T?i the gov
ernment, also, great praise is due for the Ktrenu
0U8.efforts it is making to arrest the malady and
assist the afflicted; in some cases nobly supported
by public charity?tho Free Masons especially,
having, at their own expense, established nmbii
lunces, hospitals, and free dispensaries; but with
all these efforts many districts arc entirely without
medical assistance of any eort. In the* crowded
haunts of Scutari they are dying in hundreds, en
tirely uncaied for, with no medicines, and no
doctors to help then. Among our small English
community wo have to deplore the less of many a
wflH-romombered face, wnich is not surprising,
considering tho place most of the engineers in
habit (a dirty village near the Arsenal and Cas
sini Pasha), in which place the disease first de
clared itself.
All the Government works are suspended ami
d.Horganir.ed. The arsenal, Tophana, tie., are
quite deserted. The public office. are also almost
entirely closed, the custom lions?? being only opoa
two hours a ?lav. In fact, such is the scarcity of
labor caused by the destruction of the hitnutls
(porters) thai t-'iips huve great difficulty in un
loiuling and taking in cargoes. Tho oiico busy
streets of Qalata are quite d'.serted, shops and of
fices closed, and bindnOM of all kinds quite sus
ponded. I have no doubt the epidemic has been
much aggravated hv the abject fear of the in
habitants, ?'oinbine?. with the too free use of
ardent spirits (of the worst description) which
many indulge in at the present time, and the
nnnsiia) heat which now prevails. At Smyrna,
the nialadv still continues its ravages, arid, if
possible, tlie disorganisation of that place is
worse than Constantinople. At Eeyront, also,
and most of the towns i:i the Levant, tho disease
is committing fearful ravage??; in fact, to such an
extent that Die wh??lc of tho empire is perfectly
demoralized. In Wattacbia and Moldavia the. pan
ic is spreading, although by the last accounts tho
?lisease had not declared itself; tho inhabitants
were all ready for a bolt on its first appearance.
At Soulina ? few cases havo occurred, entirely
shutting up all business; ships are detained wait
ing for their cargoes, which the lighters refuse to
bring ?town the river. With all this excitomout
you will readily understand that very little atten
tion is paid to politics or speculations. The noisy
Bourse, with its crowd of eager gamesters, is
quite deserted; even the conversion scheme is
Eostpoued sine die*. I am happy to say there has
cen a diminution in the number of deaths the
last two days, and it is hoped that we havo scon
the worst of this terrible affliction.
- ?
The Cotton Girt.
According to statistics furnished by tho last
census, it appears that tho manufacturo of this
article has heretofore been principally confined to
the Soutlieru States. In lHoO it amounted in value
to $1,077,315; and out of fifty-livo establishments,
all but three were Southern?sixteen in Alabama,
twelve in Georgia, three in Mississippi, and four
in Texas.
In 1792, the year preceding its introduction, tho
cotton exported from the Southern States Amount
ed to only 138,328 pounds, the total domestic con
sumption being about 500,000 lbs. The exports
the following year were 600,000 pounds. In 1794
they had increased to 1,601,700 pounds, and in 1795
to 5,276,300. In 1860 tho production of ginned
cotton amounted to 2,097,230,800 pounds, boing
seven-eighths of tho total production of the whole
globe, of which 1,765,115,735 pounds were ex
ported.
The cotton gin which produced such vast conse
quences to the world, waa invented, as is well
known, by Eli Whitney, of Worcester, Massachu
setts. His attention was called to the subject
while temporarily residing in Savannah, being on
gaged in teaching a select school. The work was
commenced under the auspices of Mrs. Greene,
widow of General Greene, and under the most fa
vorable circumstances. The history of Mr. Whit
ney is, as is too often the case with men of genius,
a sad one. The benefits of his invention were felt
in every portion of tho globe, but to him was re
served no reward, in a pecuniary point of view, for
his labors. The importance of the invention was
felt to be so great, that the machine was actually
seized and curried off by force from tho shed in
which it was constructed. And although ho se
cured a patent, it was infringed on with impunity,
and such was tho pressure against him, that be
found it impossible to obtain redress in courts.
After spending the best portion of his life in en
deavoring to seenro those rights to which ho was
so justly entitled, ho finally received an appropria
tion from Congress which enabled him barely to
cancel those obligations contracted through a
protracted carenr of litigation. At an advanced
period in lifo Mr. Whitney may bo said to have
commenced the world anew, by engaging in the
manufacture of guns in Connecticut, which enter
prise proved ultimately quito successful.?luou-.?.
Chronicle. ?
-? ?
St. Lot'ih, 8epteml865.?Pieb ,or6 rre Choutoau,
Jr., for many years at the head of the American
Fur Company, and ono of the first settlers and
oldest citizens of tho city, died to-day.
?OLD AND SILVER,
BOUGHT AND SOLD.
Drafts on New York, Boston and Fhila ph I ?i,
AT
P. H. KEGLER'S
BANKING OFFICE, No. 2*55 KINO-STBEET,
Angnst 18__Corner of Boaufaln.
MfsT STATE OF SOUTH CAKOIJNA?CHABLE8TON
DI8TEI0T?By OEOROE BUIST, Eeouiro, Ordinary.?
Whereas, MOSES LEVY, of Charleston, Police Officer,
made suit to mo to grant him Leiters of Administration
of the Estate and Effects of ?TANE STEWART, Ute of
Charleston, Spinster: Thcso aro therefore to cite and ad
monish all and singular the kindred and creditor?! of tlie
said Jane Stewaht, deceased, tint they be and appear
before me, in the Court of Ordinary, to bo held at
Charleston,(at No. S Hntle-gc-strect, on the 30th day o
September, after publication hereof, at 11 o'clock in tho
forenoon, to show cause, If any they have, why tho sold
Administration ?-.hoiild not be granted.
Olven under my hand, tbii? fifth day of S?. tambor,
Anno Domini 1808. OEOllOE BUIST,
September ft w2 Judge of Probates.
I >< > CO I-ASS & M11^ ! A ; J {,
Jiotise, Siicn and Steamboat Painters,
(i It A SI K It S, ?fee,
.Yo. M .s/.iT?'..v.'7,'/V/;r, .YK.IA' CHALMERS.
TTISTIMATES GIVEN n )1: ALT, KINDS I >F PAINTING.
_ _ si?;n paint'Nc ??; the ?hortest notice. Binldiu?-?
Itestazetl. All work jin>niptiy attended t ?, and dime In
I'm? I.? -I manner .?; the 1 r.\> ut poiw?ile r.i??.-K f.?r rxsh.
\?.\?. DOUGLASS.WM. C. MILLER.
Lata with Cartualt & r.rir--?'.
K< pteiuui r 13 la?o
il. J^. JEFFERS & CO.,
< HAULESTOX.
OFFICE NOIiTU 1 TLA NTIC WH A II F,
bung kiioHii us (he Firm of Cotliran, .T<r
r??i?s o.. Co.,
OFFER THEn SERVICES TO RECETTE AM) SELL
Cotton and other Merchandlio? receive mid forward
{? khN. sad buy supplies for Farmer? und Merchant?.
Hnpteinber 19 fiT
t. a. .lurroi.i?.--..USURY -inen.
T. A. JEFFORDS & CO.,
(Join miss i o h and Forwarding .Here liants.
Cor. -Iain-street and the Railroad,
OEANGEBL'RG, S. C.
T. A. JEFFORDS, for many yoprs connected witb tlie
IioiiHO Of J-Fi-onns k Co., would solicit from his iriemls
is tbo City and Country, part of tin? Forwarding hurt
ncs.i. He promises to give all business entrust?'?! t?> bis
care his personal attention : and, having a large Store
bouse within three yards of the depot, can always (when
wagons aro not present) store tbo goods nt mau ?xponsc
to the owners. wl'm'.U Beptemberd
d?vTjd babrow,
Wholesale Commission Mercliant
AND
FACTOR,
No. 153 East 33ay,
charleston, s. c.
a?t-cosignaients solicited.-<?&
AuriikI 14 mwflmo
BOWERS to SILCOX,
Brokers, _A-\ictioi_.eers,
AND
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
JK?-WILL ATTEND TO THE PURCHASE AND SALE
OP COTTON, RICE, DRY GOODS AND GROCERIES.
Also, thrir attention will ho given to SALES OF FUR
NITURE, REAL ESTATE, Ac.
Offlco for the present, at No. 238 KING-STREET.
August :I0 lmo
WILLIS & GHISOLM,
FACTORS, COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
AND
SHIPPING AGENTS,
OFFICE, MILLS HOUSF.
CHARLESTON, S. C.
E. WILLIS.A. R. r-mSOLM
WILL ATTEND TO THE PURCHASE. SALE AND
SHIPMENT (to Foreign and Domestic Port?) of
COTTON, RICE, LUMBER, NAVAL STOKES; to tup
Collection of Drafts, Purchase anil Salo of all Securities.
Consignment? ol vessels solii-ited.
IIKFEIIS to:
Messrs. JOHN FRASliR fc CO.. Charleston. S. C.
Messrs. GEO. Vf. WILLIAMS k CO., Charleston, 8. C.
Messrs. PENDEROAST, BROS. .. CO., New York.
GEO. SCHLEY, Esq., Augusta. Ga.
T. 8. METCALF, Esij., Augusta, Gn.
Messrs. CLARK, DODGE ?V CO., New York.
Messrs. MURRAY k NEPHEW, Now York.
Messrs. E. W. CLARK & CO., Phlludclphfu, Pcnn.
Messrs. PENDEROAST, FENWICK & CO., Baltimore,
Md.
Messrs. 8AM'L HARR18 k SONS, Baltimore, Md.
/}_- The Columbia Phconix will publish every other
day for one mouth, and other South CaroUna papers
weekly for the same period of time, and send bills to this
fllce. August 14
~jTm. EAS?Nr
COMMISSION AGENT,
No. 9 EXCHANGE-STREET,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
September 8 lmo
GEAESER & SMITH,
COTTON FACTORS,
Commission and Forwarding Merchants,
(OFFICE FOR THE PRESENT AT No. 80 EA8T BAY.)
THE UNDERSIGNED HAVE RESUMED THEIR BU
SINESS connection, as abovo indicated, and will
Hull or purchase on Commission COTTON, NAVAL
STORES, AND PRODUCE GENERALLY.
Order? for Goods executed at lowest prices. Advances
made on consignments for sole in this or foreign markets.
C. A. GRAE8ER.A. SYDNEY SMITH.
n_F&n_NCKs.
Messrs. G. W. WILLIAMS k CO.; Moshts. JOHN
FRA8ER k CO._12*_ _Boptcmber B
?, T. B?RGE & CO,,
WHOLESALE D-ALEUS IN
Staple and Fancy Dry Good-,
YANKEE NOTIONS,
No. 41 Hayne-street,
ARE NOW RECEIVING THEIR FALL AND WIN
TER STOCK, to which thoy invito the attention of
Dealers. lmo September 7
~?tT m.^aes?___?l"
BROKER, AUCTIONEER,
AND
GENERAL COMMISSION AGENT,
HAS RESUMED BUSINESS AT HIS OLD STAND,
No. 33 Broad-street. Attends to the BUYING
AND SELLING OF REAL ESTATE, FURNITURE, kc,
kc Also to tbo RENTING of HOUSES. September 0
JEFFERS & CO.,
FORMERLY COTHRAN, JEPPER8 A CO.,
GENERAL
(JonnniKsion.ltccci v ing & Forwarding Agents,
ORANGEBURG, 8. C.
Special attention piven to Receiving and Forwarding
Cotton and Merchandise.
September 0_si*
JAS. B. C?HILL,
GENERAL
COMMISSION . MERCHANT,
AND DEALER IN
Groceries, Provisions, Wines & Liquors,
No. 171 Broad-street,
AV GUSTA, OEOHOIA.
CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED.
September 1_Smoa
ZIMMERMAN DAVIS,
(LATE OF THE FIRM OF ADAMS, FROST & CO.)
Has resumed the
FACTORAGE & COMMISSION BUSINESS,
OFFICE FOR THE PRESENT
Cor. Accommodation Wharf and _Caat Bay.
Will attend to tho aale of COTTON, RICE, or any other
PRODUCE, in this or any foreign market. Also, to tho
PURCHASE AND SHIPPING OF COTTON. Will also
RECEIVE AND FORWARD GOODS.
geptember 0 Jpao*
STYLES & CARTER,
KUIPFINC A?lD
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
AGENTS lou
Orleans Line of Southern Packets,
NO. 10 Vaud.rhorst Wharf,
Tj";) Charleston, s. o.
L. C. 8TTLEH
I. ?V. CAS
\VM. n. FtOBSON .*. CO.. AGENTS IN NEW YORK.
Advances made on couRlgnmeats.
September . lino
_P? H. KEGLE-Ri?,
WHOLESALE DEALER IN
BRANDIES, WINES & WHISKIES,
AND
GENERAL AGENT
FOR
PHILADELPHIA STOCK ALES.
173 East Bay.
September 4
80UTHEENDEUG HOUSE.
KING & CASSIDEY,
W holesale Druggists,
No. 131 MEETI-VG-STUEET,
OPPOSITE CHARLESTON HOTEL,
Charleston, H. C.
E. D. KING, M. D., 1 _. ,-_ -_
.lESSE... CASSIDEY, J 0t >0' -*1*
Septembcr 1 ltno*
a p.~panie?tn7
CHEMIST & APOTHECARY,
NO. 123 MEETING STREET.
A FULL ASSORTMENT OF IMPORTED AND DO.
MESTICDRU.'S AND CHEMICALS constantly on hand
Antraut 14 -,?
HERIOT BROTHERS,
General Commission Merchants,
CHARLESTON, S. C,
Will give their attention to the parchtm and sale of Mer
ehandtM mid l'roduco of stery ?leseriiition.
CONSIGNMENTS OF COTTON SOLICITED
3. R. HERIOT, .In.B. M, HER101
IlKFEHKN.-EK:
WM. B. HERIOT fc CO.. Charleston. S. C.
HARMON!) HULL k CO.. New York.
DEMUREST & WYOANT, New Yorlt.
-NO. SLEIUIIT, Pouglikccpci?., N. Y.
September l _mo
C. E7 CHICHEST?R,
REAL ESTATE BROKER,
No. 18 BROAD-STREET,
CHARLESTON, 8. C.
AGENT FOR THE PURCHASE AND SALE OF
REAL ESTATE In any of the Southern Stute?.
ALSO AGENT FOR THE SALE, RENTING, RE
PAIRING, kc, OF CITY PROPERTY. August 22
"ARCHIBALD GETTY & CO.,
SHIP & STEAMBOAT AGENTS,
AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Noe. 126 AND 128 MEETINO-STHEET,
Charleston, S. C.
EDMUND A. SOUDER .- CO., FhH-delpbla. Pcnn.
LIVINGSTON, FOX k CO., Agents, New York.
F. A. WILCOXSON, Agent, Orangebiirg, S. C.
LIBERAL ADVANCES MADE ON CONSIGNMENTS.
August 16 ^_^^
HbWE,???CIN ft 00.,
Commission J\?-^rchai_.ts
Ship Chandlers and urocers,
No. 151 EA8T BAY, CHARLESTON, S. C.
C. -IOWL, Jli.I?. M. DOUCIK.E. C. BOWK.
c. & ?Thowe,
Commission Merchants,
No. 71 BROADWAY, NEW YORK.
C. HOITE, Jit.E. C. H(.W)-:.
Consignments solicited. Prompt attention given to
sales of Merchandise. Produce purchased on Commis
sion, ami liberal advances made.
Refer by permission to Messrs. Heniiv Swift k Co..
N<?. lir. Broadway, Jno. M. Smith's So? fc Co., No. 122
Broad-st. ; Kf.mt, Day k Co., No. 110 Wall-st. ; Thomas
t. Benham. No. 108Broad-Bt., N. \*. _Cmo* August 24
""rich a?r-O Allison,
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
No. 00 BEEKMAN-STREET,
NEW YORK.
COTTON AND OTHER PRODUCE 80LD ON COM
MI?"HlON. General Merchandise purchased and
forwarded to order. lnio* August 10
A. C. 8CHAEFER, ) JAS E. BROWN k CO., )
GEO. Y. BARKER. 5 No. 33 8. Front Street,}
New York.) Philadelphia.)
A. C. SCHAEFER, Jb.,
COENEM LIGHT AND PBATT STIIEETS,
Baltimore.
Adolplms C. Schaefer & Co.,
(FORMERLY OF BALTIMORE,)
General Shipping & Commission
MEKCHANTS,
NO. Ill WATER-ST., NEW YORK.
4S-EVEKY FACILITY OFFERED FOR CONSIGN
MENTS and execution of orders In New York, Philadel
phia, or Baltimore, by either house
August 1._tasa?_
P. B. Chldesfer.B. M. Prltclmrd.
JERSEY CITY
PLANING^MILLS.
CHIDESTER & CO.
WOOD MOULDINGS, ARCHITRAVES,
HAND BAILS, BRACKETS, TRUSSES
AND
Inside Trimmings
Of every description on hand and niado to order.
SCROLL SAWINtt & WOOD TURNING,
No?, 1? Si 14 WAVKK.STIIKET,
CORNER GREENE, JERSEY CirY.
Septembers_ _.I_u__
iL. W. SPBATT,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
OFFICE OVEn M'KA. * CAMPB-Xl-, BASEL-STREET,
NEXT DOOR TO POST-OFFICE.
Ho wUl act as Agent in proc_rln(r PARDONS and ad
asttng CLAIM8 on Trcaaury Department.
August 10

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