OCR Interpretation


The Charleston daily news. (Charleston, S.C.) 1865-1873, September 20, 1865, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026994/1865-09-20/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

mW 1 ?? a/a
1
I t^ W ?#*W
IIS 9 ?
w ha M / ^
/% %.
m / n
?* "v r_rV
+
CVtAKLI-STOX, S. C, W1S.OX&SDAY, SEl'Ti-M??HV? W, 18(?r>.
jm?ici: fiv?; cI'?nts.
CMBiESTOi^MILY NEWS,!
C.V.?:Hi!ART, PIcHiLLAN i; MOUTON,
PROl'KIETORS,
EKo. 18 HAY1STE-STREET. '
Traois-cash.
DAILY?ONE YF.AK.SIO.O?
DAILY? SIX MONTHS.BMO
DAILY?THRE-B MONTHS.?.r.O
/zrr single Hopsen five ce??s.
.C3?f" News Dealer? ?-.ipplit ?1 ?t .1 liberal discount.
ADVERTISING.
One Square, Ten Line?, one insertion, ONE DOL
LAR AND 17 I'TY CENTS.
Each etniU anation, suvr.NTY-FiVE cents.
Less thai? a scjuare, FUTEEN CENTS I'ER LINE for
firfit inser? .?ou . HA?F PH1CE for each continuation.
/
The f *?"ilowing aro the Agent? for this paper:
308E.VB H. SEAltS, New South," Hilton Heath
XI. C DARR, Sumlcr, S. C.
J.T. HERSHMAN, "Journal office," Camden, 8. O.
J. M. BROWN, "Southerner office," Darhngton, S. C.
O. L. PRATT, Columbia.
_T.>C. QUINN .V: BRO., Augusta, Ga.
H. ESTELL, Savannah, Ga.
DAVEGA .t OTTOLENGUI. Agent? in New York.
3Ir. AUG. BRENTANO, NO. 708 Broadway, New York,
lias always the latest dates of the Daily New?, as he
?loes of all the other principal Journal? Of tho country.
BY TELEGRAPH.
The South Carolina Convention.
Goi.r?tr.i.\, September 18.
The Convention lints ?Minted a resolution appoint
ing an agent to visit Washington and attend to
pardons ami the lands seized by tho Frecdmen's
liureau.
Tho Committee reported favorably on oxtondlng
to four years tho period for which the Govornor
jnay be elected, and against dividing l'ickcns into
tlTO Districts. _
COLUMBIA CORRESPONDENCE.
[Fltoai OU? OWN COERESPOSDEST.]
Coiajm?U, Beptombor IG.
To-day hns been devoted entirely to InuiiuoBs by
ihc Convention. Report followed Report from tlur
permanent Committees, and Resolution after Res
olution was referred to them for consideration.
There was no wasting of time. booansQ nothing
came before the body over which time could he
Tras tod. There was no speech-making, bocanso
there was no business before the Convention on
which the orators could expend their wit, show
their eloquence, or even talk to their dlfibrout con
stituencies. No question came up in a shape in
-which any member could make capital for the Le
gislature, for Congress, or for the United States
Senate; and the consequence was, that the day
was spent in work. It is true, that the considera
tion that it was Saturday, and that tho members,
from a time-honond custom, desired to get away
early on that day, may have had something to do
-with the matter.
On the resolution of Mr. Macbeth, that negroes
be enabled to testify in the courts, there is neces
sarily differences of opinion, and it will probably
give rise to much debate whenever reported hack
-from the committee. All right-minded men feel
that tho negro is not to bo blamed for ihc position
into which he' has been suddenly thrown by the
rapid events of a revolution; and I am sure that
every one will agree that pome method should be
adopted to protect him in his newly acquired po
sition. But what that method should be, is a
proper matter for wide differences of opinion. The
negro, from a protected and weaker class, has
heen mado a competitor?still retaining his phys
ical and mental inferiority?with the white man in
the struggle for bread, and unless a wise and be
neficent systcni of legislation is adopted, lie must
sink under the competition, and the country will
bo deprived of four millions of peasants, whose la
hor is necessary for the present welfare of the
Southern States, and the proportion of loss in this
State will bo greater than in any other. To our
prosperity two things are at present necessary :
that each man should labor sufficiently to provent
pauperism, and that until white babor can be in
troduced from abroad, that tho negro should bo
protected in the enjoyment of the fruits of his la
lior, so that ho may labor with pleasure. I do not
Lelicvo that tho negro can stand long beforo tho
competition with the white man, and I believe that
he must eventually either die out or emigrate.
The Banatory rules adopted and practised by the
United States army in its passage through the
Southern States, ancf tho remarkable health of
that army, seem to hare demonstrated that the
white man can live and labor in malarious dis
tricts.
If this bo true, it will not take many yoars?at
least many in tho life of a nation?to substitute
white labor for black; and as emigration pours in
the negro, like the Indian, must disappear beforo
the white man. This, it seems, must ovontnally
be liia fate; but while ho is with us, justice, hu
manity and self-interest demand that he shonld be
protected in his newly-acquired rights. In what
mannor this can be most wisely* done, is a matter
that demands the gravest consideration. Ho is i
ignorant, stupid, a liar, and not unfrequcntly a 1
thiof, and it may well bo doubted whether bis
ability to givo testimony would servo us much in
arriving at tho truth of the statements of a class
liabitually regardless, if not ignorant, of tho obli
gations of an oath. As betweon themselves, it
would be well that in all civil cases both plaintiff
and defendant should bo hoard as woll as other
witnesses; but as between the negro and tho white
man it m difficult to say what course should bo
adopted. This Govornmont, by tho abolition of
slavery, has bocomo entirely the goTcrnment of the
white man, and tho delegate? of tho peoplo of this
State, in protecting the negro, are bound to take
such mooBures as will not place tho white man in
tho powor of thoBO who have reoently become his
antagonists and competitors in tho atrugglo for
doily support.
If your correspondent reads tho signs correctly
the Senatorial and Congressional cue is being
ground on the grindstone called "tho ' parishes,"
and on the other grindstone colled "popular elec
tions." The chango generally desired through
?befitste could bo effected by .a Constitutional
Cwfojotion; but before euch body c-puhi moot,
Itapresciitativ.* and Senator? tu Congreso would .
have l>ccn elected, ?uni those ou the "auxiotw j
neat" woa?tl ::<?t have shown "their record lo llic i
country." Your correspondent doca uolimpoarhj
the conduct of any gentleman who is a member "!' ;
I bai Convention. Each man has a right to mal:? I
tip liia rooord when ho pleases, and no ono eau '
<l ?bt tho conscientious sincerity of liio opinion*
of those advocating the changes to bo made; lint I
from what your correspondent has soon of Ihr j
members of Uiat Convention, ho would like lo neo j
-mac noch men a? Chancellor Inoi.is ami Judge
W_an__w .sent to tho Sonate, us ho bcllovca that
! the Intercala of tho Ktnle would not only bo nato
?!i their hands, but lie is also credibly informed !
? that tho President, who i.s anxious to restore tho
| Southern States to tlieir political rights, is desi
nnis?to use a. fashionable phrase in politics?of
taking the wind out of the Radical nails, and wishes
tlie .Southern States to aid liim by sending now
men to Washington.
Your fellow-townsman, Jami:s Conner, shows in
the Convention tho same clear head that he lias
always shown at tho bar, and evidences tho briiic
manhood as he has done on previous occasions on
the field of battle. If the North wanted proof of
the sincerity of this State, it could have none
higher than that of a General of tins Confederate
army, who liad lost a leg in tho defence of wlia t
he helicvcd the right, standing with a mutilated
limb, reminding bitu constantly of the baptism of
blood through which we havo passed, and earnest
ly and honestly accepting the result of the war,
and working for the restoration of the State to
bar place in the Federal Union.
-0 * -
Trade in New York.
The following, from the Independent, tells some
facts which will open the eyes of our country
couina:
New York merchants in old limes used to enjoy
two business seasons, one in the spring and the
other in fall, mid-suinmor and mid-winter being
devoted to running about, Mottling up accounts,
ami making preparations for the next season.
Hut the facility O? communication with all parta of
the country has changed the whole business rela
tions of the city and the country, and the busy
svoeon now extends from January to January, i
Out-of-town customers buy moro sparingly, but
liqjroftcner, and the now system is immensely bet
ter lor all parties. Credit is curtailed by it, and
Mu danger of laying in too largo a slock is avoided.
Tor the past two or three years our merchants
have had a busy season all the year round; but
business bas never liefore been so lively in what
used to be the dullest heason of the year, in July
an-l August, as daring the pant two months. The
opening of trade with the South ha? given an im- !
petit? to business which is a surprise to the most
sanguine. The great difficulty with importers and I
jolliers is to keep up their stocks. Most of tho j
goiids imported are sold before they arrive. Extra
steamers are sent out by the Cnnarders to bring !
owr the piles of freight that accumulate in the
warehouses in Liverpool wailing for transporta
tion.
The Bremen, ITamburg and Havre, steamers
stun at Southampton, to ?lick up the freight sent
there from various points of tho continent, and :
frota Manchester, Birmingham, and other inland
manufacturing towns, which cannot bo taken by
the regular lines from Liverpool, while extra
steamers are sent across the Atlantic with cargoes i
from Glasgow. The increase of traffic with the ?
Smith is still more remarkable. There is now
three times the amount of steam tonnage employ- i
cd in the carrying trade between New York aiid '
the South that there was before tho rebellion.
The business of our railways is proportionately
large; there is now more cotton stored in Now
York than was at any time before tho rebellion:
our manufacturera are all fully employed, ana
several new establishments are unable to increase
their business from a lack of labor. An agent for
a Southern house, one day last wool;, went to a
certain jobbing dry goods houso to lili an order,
ami was told that no more goods could be sold
that day, as they had already sold, ninco morning,
three hundred thousand dollars worth, and they
could take no moro orders untij they had packcil
and shipped what they had already sold*. And
this was to a cash customer. Tho order of the
-?resident removing all restrictions from trade
with tho South after tho 1st of September, ha6
given a atill greater impotus to business, for there
were a great many contraband articles which
were greatly needed at tho South that are now
going forward rapidly. So, busy as our merchants
have all been, they arc likely to bo still moro eo
during the next two or three months.
The Western Corn Cnop?Extraordinary
Yield.?An extensive dealer of Illinois informs us
that the corn crop of that State promises an ex
traordinary yield. It is his opinion that tho new
?iroducts will not bring over 25c. per bnehol in the
icld. Tho result is that there in a great demand
for stock hogs, and so scarce are these now that,
apparently, there are none in the country. Yet it
is nia opinion that the next hog crop will bo much
larger than is generally anticipated. Hogs are now
commanding $12 net for butchers' uso. This is
equal to $25 a $30 per head. Tho prico that pork
maintains now would justify $12 net for hogs in
the packing season. High priced hogs and low
priced corn havo raroly failed to result in a full
supply of the former, and it is the opinion of our
informant that this will be realized this season.
Cattlo aro also being bought up in tho same way.
Pastures aro excellent, and stock will require no
feeding until snow comes. Then feed will be
abundant, and the farmers regard it moro profita
bly to fatten cattle than rely upon a market for
grain. In Ohio and Indiana the corn crop also
promises an extraordinary yield, and tho remarks
in regard to Illinois apply, in tho main, to thoso
States. There is very little, doubt that nogs will
open next fall at a liigh figure. Upon this farmer?
rely, and the policy they havo adopted eeoms to
be a wiso ono. It? effect on the interests of the
pork packers is another question.?Cincinnati
Gazette.
-? ? ?
Lahor.?It is really pleaeant to note that ovory
day add? tu the li?t, in this city, of those who are
getting employment of ono kind or other. Build
ings are going up rapidly, and foundations are
being cleared for moro. Tho prospect is bright
ening for the poor whito man, and wo don't know
ono of them who is not anxious to be at work, not
one. Under a broiling sun, with the thermometer
over 100 degrees, this class work high up on walls,
or down deep in foundations, and strive with all
ihetr might to make something wherQwH" to sup
port their families; and yet, some ono in a lecture
dcUvcrcd _nmrn snmn ??National Education Con
vention" in Pennsylvania, aays "the poor whites of
the South arc moro debased and leas diapoaed to
labor than before the war." This ia a miser able
slander, and is in keeping with certain corroapon
dcuco from this city, which wo' aee occasionally,
tho whole aim and object of which is vengeance.
We Touch for it, that what are called "tho poor
whitos of the South" are as industrious and virtu
ous as tho poor whites any where, if not more so.
'^ichrnond Whig.
?.-?* ? .i
Co__rEncrALlirr_noouB8E?Thero ia now an un
broken lino of railroad from here to tho Qnlf,
striking it at St. Marks. The railroad oompaniea
havo sent agents to the North to arrange with
aomo ateamanip company to run two steamers di
rect from New York to connect here with the rail
road to St. Marks, thence by two more ateamers
to Now Orleana. Mr. Niblack, President of tho
Florida Central Railroad, haa been very active in
hia efforts to effect this arrangement. The depot
accommodations need much enlarging. Large
shipments of cotton daily arrive from the interior.
There is considerable reported to he ready to he
?hipped at the different points on the railroad.
Salty are, however, dull; moat of the owners pre
ferring to ?hip on consignment and bold for an ad
vance. There is considerable scattered through
tho country unginned and unpacked partiv for
jMt^of bagging apd rope_Jack?onvm {Flo.)
Virginia X* vv*.
TUIAEOl" :- ". " - : > ''i:v.
The AlexandriaCotuityt ourl lms ronden tla d? -
cisii-i involving an entire . lian in :!. proe<-, .1
iii";-; atraitiKl uogroes charged v-:il criminal of-1
:'. !'. '.-. Un Thursday last a n< ro iiamed Wstoi -
wuH trictl bi'f'Mrc tliti Court >n the charge < :' grand
laii> ::*.-. convietod and ft? uu-n '. two yoars' Im
iirisunineut in tin \? -nit-. ?ii'un-y. Tho Court triWl j
lihn .-. ' ? ding to the pruvi ?i'.iw of the Code :'
Virgini.-:. ami of course without ?i jury?Waier*' i
counsel.'F. J? Smith and S. V. beach. Bsqs., re
serving all pleas relativo *. > thej iri-diction,
Tii" couukcI iiumodiatoly upon tho announce* ;
mem of tho sentence moved : < arns*! th< judg
ment of the Court. Tln-y eoiitutidcd that tho ac
cused, lieiug a frcw man, was ii'.i'.l--;!, under the j
Bill of [tight* <>!' Virginia, to n fair ;*:.*1 by a jury. :
that freu noi;roes had been ho tried upon the
origin of the Commonwealth, until IW2, from the I
low was changed, so as to nine? fren negroes and
slave? npon in?- same footing ?:i *.:i;.s rcfpcct.
Mr. Wttloughby, E*q., Cwmrn? iwcallh's Attor
ney? opposed tho motion, urgir>,; that tho sain? ,
law whi'-h made tho live gciiilmii?.: on the bench :".
court, proscribed ihc method by which that Court
should try free negro? ?. 'i "'.? right '?(' the Leg:.?-;
laturo of Virginia thus t> creati- Courts of Oy?
and Terminer had bei :i acknowlodccd by tho Ju- |
dieial tribunals of the whoio COnuit'Y, :<'A lie> !
bien questioned until now.
Mr. taiith urged In '- "-my, that whatever may !
have been the form? r practice "i* former deci-don*, !
the case before the Court was thi-t : Ihc law of f.1:- ;
Legislature was in contravention ni ; . higher law. j
the bill of rights, which had been made part ><l :
the Constitution.
The Court (Justiccfi MoKoiudo, Daw, Harmon,
C'arlton and Taylor) decid'.1 that Judgment i
should be arrestou, in ac-ord-inec- with 111?- motion |
of Waters' counsel?Justice Colton dissenting nud
declaring he was opposed to tho decision.
The Commonwealth's Attorney s.ml the decision
had placed him in a singular posilion. Under I! ?
decision of the Court ho was without the means ;,i ,
bringing one class of of fenders to justice.
In responso to questions of the Presiding Jus
tice, many members of tho bar expressed the
O]iiuiou that under the ruling of the Court ?n law
existed by which negroes could bo tried at all for
offence? not honuchla or punishable with death.
others expivssod adverse views.
The Presiding Justice thought that, ni least, |
they could keen the negroes in jail until a law was i
made to suit their ease.
The counsel for Water? waived their right to de- I
mand hi* discharge at this time, with th.- under- !
standing that If Ibero was un further action before I
tho Court closed bo should be then discharged.
Rent?_A Richmond letter in the New York ?
Journal of C ?uinioroe, from a --commercial trnv- ?
cUor/'sara that the hi*'h routs for business houses I
in this city is caused l>? "tho anxiety on the part !
of persons to establish Uiomsclvos in business
hero from the West and North," und illiudratcshbi I
view of tho matter by tho following incident, of
which he was a witness:
A gentleman from Chicago called upon a citizen
here who owns a number of dwellings and some
stores. Tho Western mou, aller the customary
courtesies of introduction, smd be hail sc-cn one ;
of his stores which he wnnkl like ici rent. Tho
cltiy.cn asked him what he thought it to lie worth. ;
lie replied, about SWIM) to f2"-0fl a. year. The prop
arty-holder, thinking tho man was joking (ho hav- '
ing rented it previously for $800), said Imi must !
have t'JOOO?to which the Western man replied, '
"I'll take it," and requested a written instrument r
on the spot to bind the agr? emont. i
Tho writer says: "It ni p'*-.-- ibis thai some one
will lind fault with this aet of the landlord, and
may say he was not justified, npon any principle
of morality, to ask more for his property than he
believed it to bo worth. lint, until tho millennium
is ushered in, 1 am inclined to the belief that the"
golden maxim, 'Do unto others as you would la
done unto,' will not be rigidly observed at the
present day."
A Richmond correspondent, dating his letter on
the 23d, says: "Yesterday six Swedes arrived here
by way of New York. They intend starting for
Goochland County, in tho Upper James Vulley.
In tho month of May last, a great number of emi
grants from that country settled in Goochland
County, and they sent to their friends in Europo
such glowing accounts of their present condition
ami future prospects, that those distant Swedes
became infected with the mania of emigration,
sold out their ice-bound farms, and aro on their
way to the land of promise, the Virginia paradise.
The lands they havo "squatted" on have boon
sold on the most favorablo terms to these hard
working men. They pay for the land by instal
ments running over a term of several years, so
that even tho poorest can ultimately become the
proprietors of the land they cultivate."
< ??
TnE Newfoundland Fisheries.? Tho Boston
Journal of yesterday says:
Our latest dates from Newfoundland spoak of
improvements in tho fishery prospects of tho isl
and and Labrador, tho accounts recoivod from the
latter place being especially encouraging. Tho
screw steamer Wolf, the pioneer vessel engaged in
the Greenland whale fishery, froni St. Johns, has
returned after an absence of about two months,
with a full fare, roughly valued at eight thousand
pounds. Tho Wolf was engaged in the spring seal
fishery, and was successful at that, and it is
thought that the success that has attended the
first venturo in tho now enterprise will givo her
many companions noxt year. Tho failure for yoars
back of the shore fishery of tho island has caused
merchants to turn their attention to tho bank
fishery, several vcsbcIs having been fitted out for
ite prosecution this year.
> .
The Savannah and Gulf Railroad.?Tho public
will bo gratified to learn that those energotio con
tractors, Messrs. Spratt, Callahan Se Co., having
completed their engagements on tho Central Rail
road, are now employing their entire force on the
Une of the Savannah and Gulf Railroad botween
this city and tho Altamaha. The timber for all
tho destroyed bridges and trestle work is rapidly
being got out on tho line of road, and will bo
brought down as needed. Tho contractors havo
now about five hundred hands employed on the
whole Une of road, and wiU shortly increase their
force to somo eight hundred or a thousand. The
work is being pressed forward as rapidly as possi
ble, and it is expected that the road will certainly
bo completed by tho first of December next.
- .?a ... -
The Subit of the Sooth.?Wo como very near
being run over some days ago by the driver of s\
bread carL On looking up wo recognized in tho
man who "held the ribbons" a former well-to-do
citizen, who lived at his oaso in the city, occasion
ally rusticating on a fine plantation on our lower
coast. With truo independence, ho earns his bread
by providing it for others. Such is tho spirit that
will resuscitate tho South and give it a worthy and
lasting independence.?N. 0, Times,
-?*tt?
The Drought,??The drought is severoly felt on
the Une of tho Albany and Susequuhanna Railroad.
Tho conn try is parched, the fields havo an un
wholesomo 'brown appearance, and tho smaller
st reams arc nearly all dried up. As a consequence
tho later crops aro severely suffering; tho pastur
ogo is poor, and tho cows obstinately refuse to
yield their usual quantum of milk.?Albany Jour
nal.
Tub Hop Cnop.?Tho "lico" have played the
mischief with tho hops of Otsogo county. In many
sections the crop will not bo moro than one-fourth
the average. Largo yields on the Une of tho Sus
qcchonna Jrhiilroad are entirely destroyed by the
aovastating insect?the vinos looking wilted and
tho loaves having a black and blasted appearanoo.
[Albany Journal.
.11 >
Memphis and Charleston Railroad.?We learn
that the Memphis and Oh arlen ton Railroad will be
open from this city to ?Corinth* Miss., in the course
of a week or ten days, and from thenoe to Steven
son, Als., by the lot of November. Speed the day
when railroads shall give us moil and traveling
facilities as before the war.?-Memphis Argue.
The French Government is about to send out an
engineer to Japan, to establish an arsenal at Yo
ko? amo, on the ground ceded ta ftsooe.
To Housekeepers ! ?
rpilK i n; ' ' > :>;: !. has Jl -T ItEiTIVKB, l?KH
I. ?U.~_: r '-: : -...' - . . ' ?ilkiv i:.g Invoice of I
TIN WARE,
v. !, iiK??i-*i'r:ns \t v<u:i:at iiaroaiv.
"?' ' ' Kl?l-.U 'I !N Hill liK'lS (aitsortctl sized)
' ' ' -. im (??sol.I s'zi-)
.: v" ' : ( . ?is
" ' >:iVu rats, % I and S quarts
i :. ; . ?- llolltrs
: . !l !' ; . <
n ' ?. n > .. h Hit Kim
I " ! \\.:.. s:ruln<:rfl
:;! i - Milk 1_:ih
1 |i .. ! .!: l'ails, (> t? ir. rpjarts
' .: -. 1 ? .i Pols
1?. ?:.i.ip'ini!"(l Camllratieka
: . ?ci Nu. a Mated (.-'.ulbMttoka
."> ', . : . rubbing Uninliut
: :. . . .-.! Shovels
3 ilt>_i :i i IirA's Lanterns
1. .-. a .->.! ;-l:ii?sortril sizes)
a il? . ; !... ! ;
-, j~-.u< ;i;i Pinner and J.'ic Plates
1 ,;...-. || OnVq-UttM
2 ni N* ?. io Spoona
?i :i Spdoil*
? .' -.-i n Turks (auaortctl)
- u:?'.-s Knives and Forks
1 :?. K? Padlocks
i :.;:- Tea Spoons
i ?:i\ us I'nnnels
r? ! .'.':i T.a Krttlea
1 art?? Camila Mouldfl
i lii.z-n Dish Pans DAVTI) HARROW,
KepUniibcr M f. Ko. 103 Baal Bay,
t. a. lEFponna.iiskhy aines.
T. A. JEFFORDS & CO.,
Commission ?and Forwarding Merchants,
Cor. Stain-street and the Railroad,
ORANUEHUKG, s. C.
T. A. JEFroi?DS. Tor many years connected with ihr
lionne of-l-wonue U Co., would seiicit from his friends
il the ('::;. :mrl Country, pjrt of the Forwarding l'iisi
:;! <>'. II- promhwH to give all business entrusted to his
careliiapei-oual attention: and, having a large store
Rfiiira within three yarda of the depot, ean always (when
wngoun ave ,,ot present) atore the Rooda at small uxpeuse
to Ui" owners. wl'ii! _'.; September ('
NATHAN & OTTOLENGUI.
A ? CT ION E G R S,
Brokers and Commission Merchant:*,
S< 'UTUWKST CORKER
MEKTIXt; AXnWKXTWOKTH-STIiEETi?,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
PARTICULAR ATTENTION PAID TO AXA BUSI
NK>S entrusted to _.- , eitherst Publia or Privat? Sale.
M. II. NATHAN.
ISRAEL OTToLENOn.
Reptemher 11 ? il, M. 17, .*, ?o, 'j_
.1. M?AVTON FORD,
BROKER, AUCTIONEER
AN II
INSU I?A_\C:i: AGENT,
HAVIXG RESUMED His BUSINESS, WILL PUR
CHASE AND SKI.1. REAL ESTATE, RONDS,
STOCKS, mu? ail other kind? of property on Couimia*
.-ion. Also, will take ItlrtKM <>K INSURANCE AGAINST
riiiK mi Cotton, Buildings, St kri of Good*. .'; .. in
Klr.t Ohoa Coliipanlci*. OOJee No. 69 HASEL-STRKKT,
next to KitiK- ftnwl- September lf?
R. M. MARSHALL,
BROKER, AUCTIONEER,
AND
GENERAL COMMISSION AGENT,
HAS RESUMED BUSINESS AT HIS OLD STAND.
No. n:i Broa-Hrtreet AUeuda to the BUYING
AND SELLING OF REAL ESTATE, FURNITURE, ice.,
ke. Also to the RENTING of HOUSES. Septcmhcr 0
ZIMMERMAN ?AVIS,
(LATE OF THE FUtU OF iVDAMS, FItOST &. CO. )
Has resumed the
FACTORAGE & COMMISSION BUSINESS,
OFFICE FOR THE PRESENT
Cor. Accommodation Wharf and East Bay.
Will uttend to the Bale of COTTON, RICE, or any other
PRODUCE, in thiH or any forel?ii market. AIho, to tho
PURCHASE AND SHIPPING OF COTTON. Will aluo
RECEIVE AND FORWARD GOODS.
September 9 Imo*
TROUT & AMESBURyT
T. n. Trout.Oliver Amabury,
DEAI.ER8 IN LIME AND DUILDING MATERI
ALS GENERALLY, Also, HAY AND PRODUCE,
CON8IGNMENS OF VESSELS AND MERCHANDISE
arc respectfully solicited, and the utmost attention paid
to all businees entrusted to our care. Office at
No. 20 CUMBERLAND,
September 16_Imo NEAR CHURCH-STREET.
HOWE, DOUCIN & CO.,
Commission ?Merchants
Ship 4 handlers and Grocers,
No. 151 EAST BAY, CHARLESTON, S. C.
c. i:owe, jR.r. it. nouciN.k. c. nowz.
c. & ?Th?we,
Comi?iission Merchants,
No. 71 BROADWAY, NEW YORK.
C. HOWE, JR.K. C. HOWE.
Consignment*! solicited. Prompt attention given to
salea of Merchandise. Produce purchased on Commis,
al?n, and liberal advances made.
Refer by perm lesion to Messrs. nEKir? Swift k Co.,
No. 116 Broadway; Jno. If. Smith'? Son k Co., No. 122
Iiroad-Kt. ; Kemp, Day k Co., No. 11C Wall-st. ; Thomas
k Benham. No. 108 Broad-st, N. Y. Orno* August 24
ARCHIBALD GETTY & CO.,
SHIP k STEAMBOAT AGENTS,
AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Nob. 12C AND 128 MEETINQ-STREET,
Charleston, 8. C.
LIBERAL ADVANCES MADE ON CONSIGNMENTS.
August 15 _
C. E. CHICHESTEE,
REALESTATE BROKER,
No. 18 BROAD-STREET,
CHARLESTON, 8. 0.
AGENT FOB THE PURCHASE AND SALE OP
REAL ESTATE in any of tho Southern State?.
ALSO AGENT FOB THE SALE, RENTING, BE
PAIRING, &c.. OF CITY PROPERTY. August 22
HERI0T BROTHERS,
General Commission Merchants,
CHARLESTON, S. C,
Will & vn their attention to the pnrch-Ae and sale of Mer
chandise and Produce of every description.
CONSIGNMENTS OF COTTON SOLICITER
J. B, HEllIOT, Jn.B. M, HERIOa
__r__j_?c_R:
WM. B. HEBIOT k CO., Charleston, B. C.
HABMOND HULL k CO., New York.
DEHEBEST k WYGANT, New York.
JNO. SLEIGHT, Poughkeepale, N. Y.
September 1 . _lm0
W NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN THAT APPLICA
TTON '?111 he made at the next Soasion 6f tho Legislature
for an AMENDMENT OX* THE CHARTER OF THE
CHARLESTON GAS LIGHT COMPANY.
Aufootai tufa
STYLES & CARTER,
C0MMI??'?T1??R(IIIA?VTS,
AGENTS 1 OU
Orleans Line o?* SoiiUivra Packets?
NO. !? Viuidcrbor?f Wharf,
L?S| ClIAK__STON.8.C.
WST. H. RODHON k ('?).. AOENTH IN NEW VOltK.
Ailvouci s mude nu i'vnpigniuentR.
s*'"l'icmb(-r 4 lino
JAS. B. CAKILL,
("EX?liAli -
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
AND DEALER JN
Groceries, Provisions, Wines & Liquors,
No. 171 Broad-street,
A.UOUHTA, OBOROIAa
CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED.
September 1 3itton
W. T. B?RGE & CO,,
WHOLESALE DEALEUS IX
Staple and Fancy Dry Goods,
Y A N 3v E E NOTIONS,
No. 41 Hayne-street,
VRE NOW RECEIVING THEIR FALL AND WIN
TER STOCK, to which they invite ?IOattention of
ri-'iili-rs. lino Sejitemlior 7
GRA?SEK & \SMITH~
COTTON FACTORS,
Commission and Forwarding Mcrcliants,
(OFFICE FOR THE PRESENT AT No. Sii EAST HAY.)
m HE UNDERSIGNED HAVE RESUMED THEIRBU
L SINESS i'i'!HH'r?;<.:i, UM above llldlcalcd, mill will
s.-ll mr imrcbaite t n Commission COTTON, NAVAL
STOKES, ASI) PRODUCE GENERALLY.
Order? Cor Goods execute*-?! a! lowest price?. Advances
maili' mi con_snmeut4 tur rate bi Oil* or furi?lgD markets,
G A. GKAESEE.A. SYDNEY S5I1TII.
HEPERKXCK?.
Messrs. (!. AV. WILLIAMS ,v CO.; .Messie. JOHN
EKASEit k ?*". 12* SScpter.ilier?
J. M. E?SOM",
COMMISSION AGENT,
>"o. 9 EXCHANGE-STREET,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
September -S lino
WILLIS & CHISOLM,
FACTORS, COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
AND
SHIPPING AGENTS,
?? p-flC-K!, MILLS HOI'S/-"*?.
CUAJiLE&TON, 8. C
E. WILLIS.A. R. Om.SOLM,
\trir.L ATTEND TO THE PURCHASE, SALE AN1>
?T SHIPMENT ?to Eon ??ii ami Dnniostl" Porto) o?
COTTON, RICE, LUMBER, NAVAL STORES; to tin?
Collection of Draft?, Purvliasc and Sale o? all Securlttta.
Consignments ol VCBffvl? solicited.
REFERS to:
Messrs. JOHN FRASER _ CO., Charleston, ?. C
Messr?. (4EO. W. WILLIAMS A: CO., Charleston, S. C.
Messrs. PENDEROAST, RISOS, .t CO., New York.
GEO. SCHLEY. Esij., Augusta, Ga.
T. S. METCALF, Em;., Atl-msta, Gn.
Messrs. CLARK, DODGE A: CO., New York.
Messrs. MURRAY K NEPHEW. New York.
Messrs. E. \V. CLARK k CO.. Philadelphia, Penil.
Messrs. PENDEROAST, FENWICK _ CO., Bultiinoro,
Mil.
Messrs. SAM'L HARRIS k SONS, Baltimore, aid.
?si~ Tho Columbia Pbetnlx will publish e.vcry other
day for one.month, aud other South Carolina papers
weekly for the sanio period of time, aud send bills to this
fllco._August 14
BOWERS & SILCOX,
Brokers, -A-xictioneers,
AND
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
?tTWILL ATTEND TO TnE PURCHASE AND RALE
OF COTTON, RICE, DRY GOODS AND GROCERIES.
Also, their attention will bo given to SALES OF FUR
NITURE, REAL ESTATE, kc
Office for the present, at No. 2:18 KING-STREET.
Au?iist'JO lino
L. W. SPEATT,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
OFFICE OVER" il'KAY & CAMPBELL, ?ASEL-8THEET,
NEXT DOOR TO POST-OFFICE.
Ho will act as Agent in procuring PARDONS and ad
ustlng CLAIMS on Treasury Department.
August 10
SOUTHEEN DRUG HOUSE.
KING iToSSIDEY,
Wholesale Druggists,
NO. 151 MEETING-STREET,
OPP08ITE CHARLESTON HOTEL,
Charleston, 8. C.
E. D. KINO. M. D.. 1 of No g.
JES8E J. CA88IDEY, } OI KO' UB
Bcptember 1_Imo*
F. B. Chldester....K. I?I- Prttcliavrd.
JERSEY CITY
PLANING^MILLS.
CHIDESTER &. CO.
WOOD MOULDINGS, ARCHITRAVES?
HAND RAILS, BRACKETS, TRUSSES
AND
Inside Trimmings
Of overy description on band and made to order.
SCROLL SAWINO & WOOD T?JRNIN?,
No?. 1? & 1* WAYNE.BTBEET,
COBNEB GREENE, JERSEY CITY.
September 8 Jn>?>
SCHENCK'S MACHINERY DEPOT*
JACOB II. SCIIENCK, Agent,
NO. 70 MAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK.
WOODWORTR PLANING, TONGUTNG AND OROV
INO MACHINES; Kann and Blind Machinery;
Portablo and Stationary Steam Engines and Boilers;
Page's Circular Saw Mills of the most approved con
struction, of all eizeH, and all kinds of Machinery for
working wood and iron. Also a superior quality of
LEATHER BELTING, BUBBER BELTING, PACKING, .
kc, Ac.
Order? respectfully solicited, which will receive
prompt attention. amo September 14
SOUTHERN
ADVERTISING AGENCY:.
ADVERTISEMENTS RECEIVED ON THE. MOST
reasonable terms for the LEADING NEWSPAPERS
la tho South. Specimen copies can be seen by applying
to HORACE P. SUGG,
P.O. Box Hi. No. 109 Maxket-etrcet
Ai-fB-rtlsmwmdowcttftpn. ?eptcsubcrl^

xml | txt