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The Charleston daily news. (Charleston, S.C.) 1865-1873, November 02, 1865, Image 1

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Witiv
VOL. I....NO. 70.
CHARLESTON, S. C, THURSDAY,! NOVEMBER 3, 1865
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
BY TELEGRAPH.
e*e
NEW YORK COTTON MARKET.
GOLD 4=S 3-4.
Nkw York, October 30.?The mlM of Cotton hero thia
-day havo amounted to 1200 balea. With a dull market.
Middlings D7(?ir.ec. per pound.
Gold is quoted hero this day at 45?i.
THE STATE LEGISLATURE
[FROM OUR SPECIAL GOURESPOXOEKT.]
Col.UHBtt, October 30.?Tho returns received up to
the present time, aud nearly all have 'come to band,
would indteate that Col. Oiui has bcou elected Governor
-of tho State by a very small majority. Gen. Hampton
will bo delighted if this bo true. He has been much in
jured by the war In his peounlary affairs, nnd ho declin
ed to become a candidate for the oinee, because he
thought that his own privutc business required bis per
sonal supervision. Apart from this, it is said by those
who aro best informed, that at the time of his nomina
tion Col. Orr toltl him that ho (Col. Orr) would withdrnw
if be (Gen. Hampton) was a candidate, and Gon. Hamp
ton told bim that ho was not. Under thoso circum
stances there is uo mau in tho Stato who will so gladly
congratulate Col. Orr n8 the gallant general who con
stantly led our brothers to victory, and whose position
in tho hearts of his fellow-clt?sons is even higher than
will bo tho exalted place that he must occupy in history.
All who know anything of his high tone, gentle bearing
and chlvalric bravery, whether citizens of the South or
of the North, whether lato companions iu arms or for
mer foes?all men of every party, will be pleased to know
that tho President lias Informed Governor Perry, by tele
gram, that the pardon of tho B:iyard of South Carolina
will bu granted.
Tho two Houses of the General Assembly met to-day
at the College?the House of Representatives in the hall
of the Clariosophic Society and tho 8enate iu the Lecture
Room of Professor LeComte. Your readers ore too
familiar with the CoUege and the grounds to require any
descriptiou. The room In which the House meets is a
little too Binall, and for a little while to-day your corres
pondent feared that ho would be obliged to remain
standing. The kindness of Mr. Boatright, the Messen
ger, found him a table and chair, and relieved him from
the necessity of watching and noting the proceedings in
an upright position.
Business lias at last really bogun, and from present
appearances it is likely to continue for some time to
come. Some ?if the members dev ire to adjourn after the
elections uutil the regular session, but their number is
becoming every day smullor and smallor. Many desire
to go down to Charleston, but, as I wrote to you before,
to do this would require n. two-thirds vote, which it wiU
be impossible to get, and which, if gotten, would require
all of the offices to be moved to Charleston ; as the only
way in which the Legislature could at prcsont constitu
tionally go there would bo by making that city the seat
of govorninout. This interpretation of the Constitution
may not be correct, but it is tho one which seems so to
your correspondent. The majority of tho members at
present scorn determined to ?nish all work on band be
fore adjourning, and work enough will be found to keep
them for some weeks, if they urc disposed to wait so
long.
In tho Senate, to-day, Mr. Hcncrcy offered a resolution
to provide for the recovery of the Free Schools of
Charleston, which have been seized by the United ?States
Officers as abandoned lands, for tho purpose of recom
mencing our system of free school education.
The Senate scut a message to tho House, informing
it of a resolution to refer to tho Solicitor, to inquire in
~to the legal right of the South Carolina Railroad to de
stroy the Onmden Branch, and to instruct him to take
such measures as may be necessary to protect the rights
aud interests of the public. As a similar resolution bad
been already referred by tho House to tho Committee
on Railroads, this resolution was referred to the same
Committee..
Col. Wagoner, the able Chairman of our delegation,
?;avo notice in the House of his intention to introduce, on
o-morrow, a bill to encourago emigration from Europe.
No man, in either house, Is better able than Is Col. Wag
encr, to prepare such a oil. The subject of emigration
bas already been considered by him, and ho is tho fa
ther of the flourishing German settlement in Piekous
district. The subject is one of deep interest to this
State, as much of her future prosperity may depend on a
large influx of honest, hard-working sober farmers and
artisans from tho over-crowded population of Europe.
Mr. Milligan, another of our representatives, intro
duced resolutions to refer to the Committee on the Judi
ciary, to inquiro and report on the propriety of exempt
ing from execution a homestead and the tools of me
chanics and artisans; which resolution waa referred.
He also introduced a resolution to inquire into the
expediency of adjourning on Saturday, and of meeting
in Charleston at the first regular session. The House
refused to take up this resolution, and it was ordered
for consid?ration to-morrow.
Ho was followed by Major Barker, who gave notice
of his intention to Introduce a bill to abolish the usury
laws, and also a bill to abolish impurlances; after which
Mr. Simonton offered a resolution to appoint an editor
for Petigrn'8 Code.
Mr. Lettner then offered resolutions that a commit
tee be required to report what means can be adopted to
restoro the arms and ammunition in tho hands of the
free negroes to the proper authorities, and to punish
persona hereafter selling them arms.
The only othor matters of importance which took
place to-day In cither House were?notice 1; Mr. Talloy,
of intention to Introduce a bill to amend the law in rela
tion to test?no?y; resolutions by Mr. Bfrhardson, to
inquire into the condition of the records ef those parts
of the State invaded by tho enemy; and resolutions by
Mr. Lucas?aU offered in the House?to inquire what ac
tion it may be noceBsary to take to cause the records of
Charleston to bo returned to tho city.
With regard to the lost of thoso matters, it may be un
known to many of your readers that these records were
removed to Colombia earl}* in the war, and that they
were opened there by ordor of the Legislature. There
tboy remained until the approach of Gen. Sherman,
wben they were removed by tho custodian and his as
sistant tc York, whero those of them which could be
transported by the railroads?nnd fortunately they wero
?loso of actual Importance?are still stored.
You are already informed by telegraph of tho result of
the eloction for United States Senator. The election of
Gov, Perry is tui endorsement, by the Legislature, of his
hind and conciliatory course as Provisional Governor.
It is "an earnest well-dono" accorded to him for having
ailed, creditably to himself, and benefit?ally to the
State, the most trying position in which any citizen of
South Carolina has ever been placed.
The telegraph has also given you the result of the
vote for the Senator whoso term is to expire in 1807,
Who is to bo elected no one can predict. Your readers
will bo informed of the result as soon os a choice is
made.
. Com i mm a, October 31.? The Legislature scorns to
have fully determined to prolong the extra into the re
gular eesslon, and for very good reasons, as will bo seen
by reference to the debate today with regard to Mr.
Millioan'b resolution, to adjourn on Saturday, to moot
in Charleston on tho fourth Monday in Novomber.
When the resolutions wore taken up, Mr. Davj_inb
mado a speech opposing an adjournment on the ground
that at this timo it is necessary for us to go on with tho
work and secure, or endeavor to secure, our rehabilita'
tiou In tho Union. Another reason, he said, is that in
the present condition of the negroes, it is necessary for
every man to be at homo during the month of Decem
ber. Not to be there then will bo dangorous, if not
fatal. Tho chango of condition of tho negro in January
oauses sorlous apprehension, and tho chango will begin
In Docomber. Tho blUs boforo tho Honso will tako four
or flvo wooks.
With regard to tho second part of tho resolution, ho
said that Columbia, is the propor place?the Capital of
the State?and tho placo at which tho members can moBt
easily coinmunicato with tholr constituents
Mi-iFa? B?*1k th.at *?otn?.reason for proceeding with
work la, that the situation of white and black demands
-??. _-*"--_? W_3f3% uu1w"?4 onr relations
with each othor. Many of tho ncgroen bollovo that tboy
, are subject to no laws but thoso of tho military, and the
I * passage of a code of lawa will act bonoflclally on thorn.
The resolution of Mr. MUllgan was ordered to Ue on
the labio, and tho voto may be fairly regarded as a full
sotUomont of tho question of adjournment or no adjourn
ment. ^
Tho othor matters of importance, attended to by the
Hoiiro of Representatives, were numerous though tho
session was not a very lengthy one?occupying only
about four hours, including tho time taken up in voting
for a United States Souator. Tho result of that vote I
have already given you by tolograph. Governor Man
ning gained twenty-throo votes on tb-> voto of yeator
day; Mr. Campbell gained four votes; Mr. Trcscot lost
one vote; Chancellor Dunkin lost all except ono vote;
Mr. Boyco lost strength; Govornor Pickons was with
drawn, and Governor Bonham substituted In his place.
What will bo the result of tho voto of to-morrow, your
correspondent docs not pretend to predict. He endeav
ors to keep both oyes and ears open, to Bee and to hear;
but In tho midst of tho electioneering, button-holing,
log-rolling and engineering, ho does not protend to play
tho part of prophet. -Tho friands ol Governor Manning
arc jubilant, and claim that ho will bo elected on tho
first voto of to-morrow; but tho friends of others of the
candidates aro not yet despairing, and soino havo oven
gone so far as to predict that the seventeen vot?-? of
Governor Bonham will finally swell Into the majority of
the votes cast.
Colonel Wagoner introduced a bill for the promotion
of foreign emigration and tho appointment of a Commis
sioner.
Mr. Sicgling offorcd resolutions to instruct the Com
mittee on Privilogos and Eloctions to report a bill to
give the election of President aud Vice-President to the
people.
Mr. Lord offered resolutions to refer to the Committeo
on the Judiciary, with instructions to roport as to tho
propriety of making parties witnesses In suits. Reso
lutions were also offered to Instruct tho Judiciary Com
mittee to Inqulro and roport what changes, if any, aro
necessary to bo made In the law of evidence caused by
the destruction of public records in tho passage of the
enemy through the State.
A resolution to exempt from taxation property of per
sona who had suffered seriously by the war, for two
years, was laid on the table.
Mr. Talloy introduced a bill to amend the Act of 1838
with regard to wills.
Owing to tho changed condition of our relations with
the negro, the old road taws of the State will require
great modifications, and it is not improbable that any
system other than the ono proposed by Mr. Preaa
ley to-day would work to tho serious disadvantage of tho
State. Ho proposes, in his resolution, to refer to a com
mittee to report as to the expediency of*changing the
law so as to have the public roads and bridges kept in
order by contract.
The report of the Committee on Federal Relations,
with regard to the negro troops now in the State, merits
attention. That committee, through its chairman, Mr.
Mu? lins, reports ros?lations instructing the Provisional
Governor to reproseul to tho President tho necessity of
removing the negro troops from tho State, and thus re
move a causo of antagonism between tho blacks and tho
whites, and an element of mischief and disaffection
among the negroes.
Mr. Keitt offered resolutions that the Judiciary Com
mittee bo instruct?;?! to inquire into the expediency of
preventing any person from hiring a servant unless he
or she has a discharge from the former master or the
Judge of the District Court, under a penalty of six
months' imprisonment and one hundred dollars fine.
It was to be suppose?! that the case of tho scat of Gen.
Garliugtou would have been allowed to rest, as the
House had already ordered a writ of election to fill the
vacancy; but tho matter was brought up again to-day,
an?! produced - long discussion?Mr. Trcscut having
moved to declare the office of Adjutant and Inspector
General vat?ut, and that A.C. Gurlington was entitled
to a seat in the lions-?. Mr. Trcscot, Mr. Barker, Mr.
Simoutou, and Mr. Youmaus participated in the debate
The motion of Mr. Trcscot was finally laid on the table.
In the Senate to-day tho only matters that specially in
terests your readers, arc the introduction of a bill to In
corporate tho Elmore Insurance Company, and a resolu
tion by Mr. Dozier to appoint an editor of Petigru's
Code, similar to the resolution introduced a day or two
ago by Mr. Simonton in the House.
If tlio reports which have been received arc correct,
aud which will be published iu to-morrow's paper, as I
um informed, no doubt can any longer existas to the tact
that Col. Orr has been elected Governor by a very small
majority. No one, even among his political enemies, can
doubt that the affairs of tho Stato will be ? ell admin is
tercd by the first Govornor elected by the penpolo of
South Carolina?himself ono of the people, and identified
with their interests, and having filled with honor, to
himself aud his State, the highest public positions in the
United aud former Confederate States.
-< -?<?
LETTER FROM NEW YORK.
[FROM OOB OWN CORRESPONDENT.]
Nkw York, October 27.?I clip from tho N. I*. Trib
une of 21st inst., this noble letter from a Southern lady;
and, whilst doing so, must express my respect for the
course of that paper in publishing it. The Tribune has
been most earnest in its raid against what it honestly be
lieves to be the sin of slavery, and advocated the war
with all its might; but, when victory ivas achieved, it
became the advocate for conciliation ; whilst the Herald,
which professed to be the greatest friend of the South
up to the breaking out of the war, has shown the most
hitter hatred and vindictive feeling ever since It was
compelled, by the fear of mob violence, to espouse the
war party's cry. I will venturo to say that no auch let
ter as the subjoined would have found its way to the
public ear through the columns of the N. Y. Herald:
A SOUTHERN WOMAN TO TUE NORTH.
To the Editor of the N. Y. Tribune. ?
Sir :?In various Northern and Southern newspapers
I have read, with feelings of Ill-suppressed indignation,
most pathetic accounts of tho terriblo sufferings and
horrid brutalities practiced upon the Union prisoners at
AndersonviUe, Ga., and woudored if that wero the only
prison in tho broad United States that "could a tale un
fold" which would shock outraged humanity. Have
any of the keepors of Fort Delaware, Camp Chase, John
son's Island, and other baa tiles of the North, been yet
tried for cruelties practiced upon Southern soldiers ?
Thousands of haggard, emaciated wrecks of humani
ty, mado so by starvation and cold ondured uuder their
treatment, could testify against them, to say nothing of
that "cloud of witnesses" whoso wearied spirits are
now enjoying eternal rest, and whoso bodies lie sleeping
in a strange land, but whose voices speak evon from
their graves.
Looking at our returned prisoners, with their long,
bony fingers, hollow cheeks, and gaunt, attenuated
forma, and listening to the mournful stories of their
dungeon life, told In hoarse whispers, broken by hollow
coughs, which, with tho bright hectic flush and preter
naturally brilliant eye, tell a talo sadder than their
words; and finding that no one bad as yet demanded re
dress for their wrongs, I could no ?enger keep silent, es
pecially as, in those Northern prisons, all that extreme
harshness was entirely unnecessary.
That the prisoners of AndarsonvlUo suffered, is rea
sonable, to suppose, and I expect thoy do look back with
horror upon the portion of their life spent there. I do
not know that prisons, at best, have ever boon regarded
aa very charming places of abode. But whoso fault was
it that they suffered at all! The Confederate authori
ties? I should think not. Time and timo again did Mr.
Davis offer to exobango, and in tho rejection of those
offers lay all the blame. What means had tho South of
providing for such a largo surplus population? Did not
"tho best Governmont the world ever saw" blockade all
our porta, proscribe medicines, wines and comforts of
all kinds, as contraband? Did not "the best Govern
ment tho world over saw" send its armies, worso than
any swarm of Egyptian locusts, through our land with
flro and sword, destroying everything tho eye could rost
upon? And, even if this sunny South had been the per
fect El Dorado they seem to Imagino, from their oagor
noaa to come in and possess It, and furnished threo
erops a year, the fearful ravagos of a General Shorman
an?f a Gen. Hunter, which wore on such an extensivo
scale as to oxcite evon their own admiration (vide Gen.
Sherman's report of his Georgia campaign), would have
completely exhausted It. Like tho Pharoahs of old,
thoy demanded the samo tale of bricks, yet withheld
the straw. More people in this Southern land beside
tho prisoners at AndersonvUle sufferod for the want of
the luxuri?s and oven the comforts of this Ufe. It was a
matter of nocosslty. Then let tho blame rest whore it
belongs?on tho Governmont which had the power to
rescue Its soldiers from sharing thoeo evils, yot failed to
use It
Tho idea of implicating Mr. Davis, who, before the
war, and since, in ovory enlightened community has oc
cupied tho position of a noblo Christian gentleman, with
complicity In anything that savored of barbarity, or of
accusing him of promoting officers for thou? proficlenoy
in starving prisoners, 1b too absurd. That ho was the
President ot'an unsuccessful Republic, and Buffers for
its failure?though no moro culpablo titan ovory man
who voted for him?is simply the fate of war, and no
reason why he should bo assailed with tho foulest aspor
bIc.ih by every little editor or correspondent, desirous
of currying favor -frith tho "powers that bo."
True to Yankee nature, nothing can bo done without a
sensation?flaming, exaggerated articles must appear in
their papers?photographs of their prison Ufo, for which
the public la indebted chiefly to the imagination of tho
artist?everything is resorted to, to Inflame tho mind of
the Northern people to avengo wrongs that never exist*
ed; whUe, It would soom, that Just 'no opposite courao
should be adopted, If thoy really wish to establish peace
and good will betweon tho two feottoaa. In one breath,
thoy cry "Peace?, peace, reconstruction and frifnilshlp,"
and In tho other "Bloodl blood! Avenge hit wrongs.
Tho blood of our murdoired meen calla for vengeance."
But havo wo no wrongs to avenge'; Arc not Mme rights
duo the defeated? That wo failed to establish a separat??
Republic Hooms to bavo boon the will of (tod, ami wo
tho peoplo bow with humble submission ax the only
courtio loft us. Perhaps tho futuro may show that It is
for the boat; but thin it la glvon us to feel now, that all
the insults and oppressions of thoso in powor are very
grievous to boar. And now that "grim-visaged war has
smoothed his wrinkled front." aud justice aud civil
law protend to rulo tho land, whore Is the sense
or justice of punishing au act committed by ei South
ern man in tho service- of what he thou;;'ht was his
country, whllo tho same act is jeintii'n-1 and approved
In a Federal, simply hrcaitue success has crowned tho
armu of tho bettor? Must success cover every crime?
Heaven knows wo have had tho worst of this fight In
ovcry way I Whllo tho war lusted, v.-o expecte?! ho rights,
and certainly received none ; but now th"J'c ts no need
to plead "military nocosslly." It ?ce??s \^uic tho ir.o.t
abject cowardico to yso thv military t?r".ast ft people
who havo shown that thoy possessed at*s .i?t one cle
ment of grcatnoss in such a high degree-?that of sub
mission to tho Inevitable?. Never havo a proeid people,
preserving the semblance o? freedom, been so humil
iated. Every characteristic of the South has been swept
away. The wealthy Southern planter, tha: beau-Ideal of
a gentlemen, where Is ho? Numbered with the things
of the past; and wo tvlvc a sad, regretful bow to his
shade as it vanishes forever, for ho was a very pleasant
institution, If not ?five??*. No more Southern planters !
And you Northern maidens who, for years pai>t at Now
port and Saratoga, practiced your fascinating wiles, lei
tho hope of spending your wlntors on a Southern plan
tation, "woop. weep, and rond yoeir hair," for they never
will return. No, no; they are delving In mother earth
with their own hands, and with a strong, brave heart,
earning tholr bread by the swoat of their brow. Tho
delicate and tenderly nurtured Southern lady, where do
you find her? Dabbling her Hoft. white hands, In the
wash-tub, or browning her fair face over a rooking
stovo. Thin, at loaHt, es one- connotation to the heart of
many a Northern woman, that wo el? our owu chord)
now.
And must all thoso sufferings go for nothing?loss of
property, Iobs of honor, loss of every thing dear to tho
hoart? Are fresh sacrilice.-i demanded every ?lay? I,
for ono, proteat against this ono-flldcd justice, awl call
upon all cairn, unprejudiced Northern people to put
down this unnatural crwlng for excitement and blood.
You may put n ball in motion which you may not bo
able to stop. Remembor the French Revolution. Those
who instituted the horrors and iiroscriptioua were them
selves tho victims before it ended. We hnve suffereel
enoeigb. Now is tho timo to stop. If we ran forget,
surely gou can. The spirit of the time should be, "Let
tho dead Past bury its dead."
Each sido has hud gri-jvous wrongs to bear, and mem
oiies to recall; but "Timo will bo the best expiation."
You havo accomplished what yon attempted. You
have abolished slavery, and, I suppose, you will not be
c.ontonted till you havo made tho negro your equal. I
give you Oud-spccd in your work. Mako Cuffoe a gen
tleman?though I fear tho groen grass will grow over
most of us before that desirable result ?a attained. You
have humiliated tho South; and, surely, you can afford
to rest upon your victorious laurels and be just, at least,
if not magnanimous. Root satisfied with confiscation?,
but sliA'el no more blood. \ Southern Woman.
Lafayette, ?\la.
I am not an admirer of tho course of the extreme radi
cals who havo brought upon our country the calamities
of civil war?but I can give my meed of admiration for
consistency wherever I find It. I would, therefore, fur
rather see the TWbune than such papers as the Herald
patronized by the South, however ably conducted the
latter paper is.
From the signs of the times, I inclino to think that if
sense and moderation rule tho day, the Deroocmtio
party may regain their former position of strength?but
by keeping up wrangling and the rich names which have
been applied to tho different shades of opinion in the
Democratic party during the past few years, the Repub
licans will continue to bold what they have gained by tho
dissensions oi their opponents. On the question of negro
suffrage, I think that New York will show llsflf Bound,
and that tho number of those who would plaoe the negro
on a level with tbc whlto man is by no means sufficient
to create any reasonable alarm In the minds of those who
lovo the Constitution as it was.
One hears very littlo said now about tho Ketchum
frauds and forgeries; in fact, rather a sympathy seems
to have grown up for him. Tho fart is that the times
have created such on army of parties who arc, in some
measure, partakors in his guilt, by their gambling trans
actions in stocks, that they hardly feel as if there wore
any so "without sin" as to be ablo "to cast the first
stone at him." I incline, therefore, to the belief that he
will, in the end, escape any heavy penalty for his
guilt.
King Sol gave us quito a sensation, In bis eclipse, the
other day. On all sides we saw smutty faces upturned
towards tho skies, from the steady-going merchant to
the fashionable bello.
Henry Ward Beccher has been delivering a very elo
quent sermon on behalf of tho South, whloh docs him
groat credit. Pity that he should ever have turned his
talents to other use than those of appeals in favor of
suffering humanity.
We have quite a musical sensation here at present In
the shape of Blind Tom, tho negro pianist. It Is really a
wonder, and even tho puffing of the Herald can hardly
detract from his merit, both as performer and composer.
Carl Forms and his two brothers give a grand concert
next week. Of bis brothers.rcport speaks most highly.
Ho himself is well known to all for his splendid organ,
and, alas I that I should say so, for his poor singing.
Now brooms sweep clean, and ander tho pr?sent re
gime the Now York Custom House is becoming a well
regulated ande fflclont office. To be a clerk there la now no
sinecure; and the public are being protected against tho
frauds and mismanagement which too frequently have
disgraced that Department. I will venture to say that
Undo Sam will derive a much greater Incomo than
heretofore from that Department.
We are suffering much from tho long and continued
drought, which has rendered it necessary for the Cro.
ton Commissioners to appeal to the public to be as sav
ing as possible of water, as tho reservoirs are extremely
low. Fortunately we have had but few large fires of
late, or tho consequences might have been very serious,
There has boon a good eleal of sickness in our city of
lato, owing to tho rapid changes of temporature. I
trust that sottled winter weather, which cannot bo Car
distant, will not matters right again.
Huntingdon, our great artist in portrait, has painted a
very fine picture of tho Court of Washington. It will
doubtless bo engraved and become very popular. <
Wo had a slight frost yesterday morning, and winter
promises to set in early. It soems probable that fuel
will be very dear aU winter. Ood help the poor.
SPRIO.
[roa Tas qB4_E_iton daily news.]
Ridoevtlle, 8. C. R. R., October 31, 18*36.
Meurt. Editors: About two weeks since, the atore of Mr.
LtviNosTONE, of this place, was broken open about two
o'clock at night, while he slept In the store, and evi
dently by partios who were wall acquainted with the
promises. Mr. L. himself was assaulted by the robbers,
and his money drawer carried off, b oforo assistance could
be rondored to him by the oltiaens.
Last night, about one o'clock, seven Minie or m%ukat
balls were fired into the said store, and tho direction of the
holes made by the balls provo conclusively that pretty
accurate aim was mado at tho point where, thoy evidently
knew be slept.
There is only ono way, Messrs. Editors, to put a stop
to such outrages. Lot Governor Pkobt order tho militia
to be organised immcdiaUlf%sa? noient volent, and we can
tako care of ourselves. Let those who are entitled or com
pelled to do militia duty be alone aUowod to bear arms?
at least, let a careful discrimination of character bo
made, whon you allow a certain class to bear arms. At
present, I am sorry to inform you, we are in an unpro
tected condition horo. We havo very little elefenao
against the midnight assassin and robber. It la woll our
Stale authorities should know this. A CITIZEN.
- os?
Clkiiekt 0. Clay.?Tho delegates to tho late SUto
Convention of Alabama united in memorialistng Presi
dent Johnson to ordor a ape?dy trial of Clement 0. Clay,
and In tho meantime to roloaao him on parolo from tho
rigorous confinement to which he has been subjected
since his arrest. Tho memoriaUsts state that thoy have
not made this application from any mo ire of sympathy
with tho past political courso of Mr. Clay, or for the part
ho took In tho late rebeulion, but that, on the contrary,
many of them have uniformly condemned his efforts to
incito re bullion and seenro success to tbo revolutionary
movement. Thoy ask this on hla behalf because bis im
plication in tho unparalleled and atrocious assassination
of Mr. Lincoln Is rogardod as utterly lmpossiblo and un
supported by a shadow of credlblo testimony. The
President baa tho matter under advisement. The prob
abilities ore that tho prayers of the memorialists will bo
granted.
? - - - .
A
Exchange on New York,
T SIGHT, IN AMOUNTS TO SUIT.
A?=0,
REFINED SUGARS, FLOUR AND BACON.
For sale by R. M. BUTLER,
Eart Bay. coruor of K?rr's Wharf.
November 2 1
Gold for Sale.
()k?i.f\I~\?~\ GOLD FOR SALE. APPLY TO
tTOOvJv/vJ L. GAMBIULL,
Novombor 2 I Banker, No. 7 Broad-stroct.
Exchange for Sale.
EXCHANGE ON NEW YORK, IN SUMS TO SUIT,
for sale. Apply to L. GAMBRILL.
November 2 I Baukor, No. 7 Broad-street.
Exchange ami Collection Office.
nriLLiAii o. wnn.D-N-- co. have Tins day
v T assoriati'd with Ihem in the above business Mr.
Vf. GEORGE GIBBS.
Gold and Silvor Colu and Drafts ou Now York b?*>ught
and sold.
COLLECTIONS entrusted to us will have attention,
and remittnu'j->s promptly made.
WANTED.?Georgia and South Carolina State Bpntls.
November 1 thml
B
Exchange on England
OUGHT AND SOLD BY
MARSHALL, BEACH ? CO..
Novembor 1 6 No. 24 Broad-street.
O
Sight Exchange on New York,
IN SUMS TO SUIT.
MA-SHALE, BEACH - CO..
October 1 C No. 24 Broad-street.
Wanted.
(*1 REENVILLE AND COLUMBIA RAILROAD BOND?.
T MARSHALL, BEAt?H A- CO.,
November I 6 No. 24 Broad-street.
Wanted.
1ITT OF SAVANNAH COUPONS.
J MARSHALL. BEACH k CO.,
_N.*ivemlj-T l C No. 24 Broad-street.
FOR SAL?T "
EXCHANGE ON NEW YORK, PHILADELPHIA AND
BOSTON, in sums to suit, by
P. H. KEGLER,
November 1_Corner of Kiu?; and Hosel-strects.
QUARTERMASTER'S TOCHERS
BOUGHT BY
P. H. KEGLER,
CORNER OF KIM G ?fc IIASEL-STREETS.
Novembor I
WANTED.
BANK NOTES, GOLD AND GOVERNMENT SECU
RITIES. Also, BONDS AND COUPONS.
Apply to L. GAMBRILL. Banker,
Octobor 24 Imo No. 7 Br'oad-strcct.
Banking House of L. Oambrill.
CHARLESTON, 8. C, October 24. 18G5.
THE UNDERSIGNED IS PREPARED TO DO A
GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS, and having se
cured one of LUliee' Patent Chillod Iron Fire and Bur
glar Proof Safes, is now prepared to roccivo Deposits, to
bo chocked for at the will of the depositor. Interest of
five per cent, per annum, however, will be allowed on
balancea of one thousand dollars and upwards. Check
Books wlU be furnished customers. I have appointed
Mr. EDWARD M. MOREL AND my Attorney and Cashier.
He will assist mo in that capacity In carrying on my bu
siness. A portion of the business of the community is
solicited. L. GAMBRILL.
Octobor 24 lmo
HATS! HATS! HATS!
U
THE SUBSCRIBER RESPECTFULLY INFORMS THE
cittzona of Charleston that he has just opened a
fine assortmont of HATS AND CAPS FOR GENTS AND
BOYS.
A?BO,
A weU selected stock of HATS FOR MISSES AND
CHILDREN. Tho goods have been selected with groat
cjiro for this establishment, and will be offered at tho
lowest market prlcos.
The public ere invited to call and oramine my stock
before purchasing olsewhere.
C. H. JOHNSON,
No. 269 Ring-street, opposito Hasel-st.
8. N. BROWN, formorly of Williams A Brown, wil1 be
pleased to see his friends at this establishment.
November 2 thatuO*
WILLIAM MATTHIEMN,
AGENT,
No. 219 King-street, West Side,
NE DOOR SOUTH OF ?ARKET,
HAS OPENED A FULL ASSORTMENT OF
PALL AND WINTER CLOTHING,
WHICH HE OFFERS AT MODERATE PRICES.
THE TAILORING DEPARTMENT SUPPLIED WITH
CLOTHS. CASSIMERES AND VE8TING8, which
will be made up to order in the best manner.
November 2 6
V?RY~FINE photographs
(CARTES DE VISITE),
OF BISHOPS QUINTARD AND ATKINSON, FROM
life, can bo had, wholesale and retail, at
F. GUTEKUNST'S.
No. 704 Arc'.-stroet, Philadelphia.
fl-y- Single copies sent by mail on recolpt of 25 cents
and stamp. Also, OARTES OF GEN. GRANT.
November a_12_
NOTICE.
Brass Moulding Shop at Florence, S. C.
PERSONS WISHING WORK IN O?B LINE ,OF
Bus?less, can have their orders filled with neat
ness and dispatch. AU manner of CAB, STEAMBOAT
and MILL BRASSES done at the shortest notice.
JOHN F. CORDES.
RIOHARD W. NOWELL.
Terms for oil Casting must bo paid In Cash, or Pro
duoe, on dolivory lmo* October 18
SLATE! SLATE! SLATE
JOHN GALT,
WHOLESALE SLATE DEALER,
AND
Sole Agent for the Following Celebrated
Companies:
EAGLE SLATE CO., VERMONT.
IiBHIOH HI. ATE CO., I-ISIWHYLV A ?VIA.
CHAPMAN SLiATE CO., PENN8YI/VANIA.
DEPOTS :
OOBHEB lOrn AVBNUE AHD 12T_-BT_B_r, NEW
York Ornr.
T_nnAKOE Squab-, Boffa-O, N. Y.
OOBNBB FbANK-IN AND WAflHINOTON - STBEKTfl,
Obioaoo, I__.
Orders may be addressed to the -new
YORK AGENOY, or left at the Hiato Yard of DEM
AREST - RUMI.Y. on East Bay, between Wentwortb
and Haaol-stroete, who aro the only Agonts In Charleston
authorised to receive ordors for Slate from tho above
named Quarries._amos? September 20
FRENCH WINDOW GLASS, ETC.
THE CHEAPEST. LARGEST, AND BEST ASSORT
MENT of FRENCH WINDOW GLASS, Oils,
Loads and Painto, also a fine assortment of Wooden
Ware, Cotton, -pirita -Turpentine and Rosin, reoelved in
?oha__o for good.. ^__ fc ^
October 10 lmo No. 43 Maraot-B-oet.
Reliable Southern Insurance.
National Marine and Fire Insurance
Company,
OF NEW 0 R L _ A N .S ,
CAPITAL..95r,r,,oiM>.
THE UNDERSIGNED BEG LEAVE TO INFejRal
TUE INSURING PUBLIC that thoy have been legaUy
appointed Agouti of tier above named Company, and aro
now ready to tuko FIRE, MARINE, AND RIVKR RISK8
AT CUSTOMARY RATES. Thia Company was organ
Izoil In January. 1803, and Its nssnts are th-3 most secure
lo* the cOQQtry.
H EMI Y COBIA ft CO, Agente.
November 2 tlistuin
A CARD.
KLIlM, WICKENBERG & CO.,
IIAVF. RESCUED THEM rOBHEIl DO?HESS AT
The Old Stand,
Northeast cor. Broad and Church-streets.
A RE NOW RECEIVING A WELL ASSORTED AND
_ _ carefully selected stock of FAMILY ?ROCERIE8,
PURE WINES and LIQUORS, which they offor at Wholn
salc or Retail, at lowest possible rates. Special caro will
be givtue to neat and careful packing.
They most respectfully solicit a call from their old cus
tP_l_f?_? _ November 2
" Pumariegu."
a*T let 8BOABS OF THIS CHOICE BRAND. THE
t? cheapest and belt ever brought to this market.
For sale by HILTON" ?Si CO.,
October 2f? thstuG No. 1C7 MEETING-STREET.
200 Tons Goal
1 ?~\ f\ TONS STOVE AND GRATE RED ASH COAL,
1UU ?SB size?
100 tons Steamboat and Foundry COAL. Expected
?lailv per brig G. T. Geerv.
IN STORE.
100 tons BLACKSMITH'S COAL. For salo low iu lots
to suit purchasers, by
CAMERON, BARKLEY A CO.,
No. 150 Meeting-street, corner Wentworth.
October 30_ m tilths*,
150 tons Assorted Iron,
NOW LANDING PER St'llli, SUSANNAH.
CONSISTING OF ROUND, FLAT, SQUARE. HORSE
SHOE and PLOW IRON; also, n large assortment
of NAILS and SPIKES. For salo by
CAMERON BARKLEY k CO.,
No. 150 Meeting-street, corner Wentworth-strcpt.
October 30 2 ths2
RAILWAYS?PPLIES.
THE UNDERSIGNED, MANUFAOTUnDn or CAST
and siviiiJiiu ejTi-ur v i. i, i rr l o RAILWAY
SPRINGS. Hydrai?le Jacks, Steam and Hydraulio
Gauges, Water Gauges and Low Water Signals, Llmbora
k Justice's Patent Bridge Joint Chair Fastening, Shaw's
Patent Cork Railway Springs; and sole importer of
Butcher's Solid Cast Steel Tyre, Cast Steel RaUs and
Frogs, Cyclop's Cast and Spring Stool Filos, Ac, and
Davy Bro. Steam Hammers?offers for sale to Railway
Compaales any articles of his make or thoso under hla
control, on tho most liberal terms.
PHILIP S. JUSTICE,
No. 14 North nth-street, Philadelphia,*
No. 42 CUff-street, Now York,
Or through his Agents,
CAMERON, BARKLEY k CO., Mooting-atreet,
September 7 thstu3mo Charleston. 8. C-B
CROCKERY ATWHOL?S?L?;
AT No. 11 HAYNE-STHEKT,
BY
I.WILLIAM G. WHILDEN & CO.
October 12
NOTICE
THE SUBSCRIBER HAVING RETURNED TO LHE
City, will contract for all kinds of HOUSE-BUILD
ING AND REPAIRING. W. H. GRUVKR,
No. 144Wentworth-Btreef,
Or at Dawson k Blackmah'k, No. 17 Broad-street.
September 7 tnths
?_- NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE FOL
LOWING described CERTIFICATES OF STOCK in the
Great Western Insurance Company of Now York have
been lost, and that after the usual period application
will be made, as usual, for now Certificates, viz : No. 379,
17th May, 1858, 26 Shares; No. 389, 11th Juno, 1858, 20
Shares. Both In name of E. L. Treuholm, in trust for
Eliza B. Trenholm. thG* September 14
. ?.
HEADQUARTER8, FIRST 8UB-DWTRICT, )
Militai?v District or Cuabz?ston, S
Charleston S. C, Novomborl, 1806. )
[HriiciAL Onus?i, No. 154.]
L OAPT. H. C. INWOOD IS HEREBY RELIEVED
from duty as Provost Judge of First Sub-District, Mili
tary District of Charleston.
II. Col. J. P. SHINGLEGOBIN, 47th Penn. Vet. Vola.,
is horoby announced as Provost Judge of the Superior
Provost Court of the First Sub-District, Military Dis
trict of Charleston, and will bo obeyed and respected
accordingly.
By order of Brovet Briaadior-Oon. W. T. Behhk-r.
Commanding Post and First Sub-District.
GEOROE S. BURGER,
First Lieut. 64th N. Y. V. V. and A. A. A. G.
November 2 _ 3
.-?* -
OS- A GROWN OF OLORY.?EVERY MAN, WOMAN
AND CHILD WHO HAS USED
STERLING'S AMBROSIA
is willing to recommond it. Throo years of rapidly in
creasing aalo have made tho AMBROSIA famous all over
the world.
IT IS WARRANTED TO PLEASE.
It Cures Itching of tho Head.
It Makes Now Hair Grow on Bald Heads.
It Prevonts the Hair from Falling Out
It Renders the Hair Soft and Olossy.
Cleanses tho Scalp. Cools tho Hooted Brow. Romovoa
Dandruff. Cures Nervous Heeftlacho. Cures Baldness.
Insures Luxuriant Locks. Inclino? Hair to Ourl. Super
sedes Wigs. Kills Hair Eaters. Good offoct apparent
at once. _q ___ -ADrES ^ 8Ay>
the AMBROSIA will suit you to a T. Elegantly put op.
Dollcately Perfumed. Patronized by Opera Singors and
Actressos. Sold In splendid boxes or cartons, contain
ing two largo bottles: No. 2 for morning?No. 1 for ovev
Dlng* THERE IS NO MISTAKE ABOUT IT,
BTERLINa'S AMBROSIA is tho best, most agreeable
and effective toilet article in the world. To prove this,
try a carton.
Sold by Druggists.
STERLING'S
AMBROSIA MANUFACTURING COMPANY,
?15 FoKon-street, lt. _
September 23 3mo?

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