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The Charleston daily news. (Charleston, S.C.) 1865-1873, January 07, 1867, Image 4

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MONDAY MORNING, JANUARY 7,18C7.
A Tisit to Columbia;
Tho long rows of ruined houses, and tho un-,
nightly piles of chimneys that s ill cover a largo
portion of our once beautiful Capital, ore sad monu?
ments of rm invader's triumph. Although poaco
has smiled npou tho land for somo timo, yet tho
chango of circumstances and tho impoverished
state of the country render it impossible for tho
real estate owners to improve thoir property. In
addition to thia, tho city finances aro so embar?
rassed that it is impossiblo for the present to do
more than watch and wait.
Tho lamps in tho different storos gleam brightly
through the gloom, and are tho only rays that
cheer tho bonighted tra voller. All beyond thoso
favored localities is black as* Erebus, and un?
less tho topography of the place is understood,
there is no little danger attending a stroll at night.
Bv a recent act of the Legislature, the City Coun?
cil aro empowered to issue and put in circulation a
number of change bills, which will tend to relieve
?rasent embarrassments and form a nucleus fund
br future o orations and improvements.
While the Legislature is in session, Columbia is
certainly a gay place, and the galleries of tho
House and the fashionable promenades aro fre
" quented by the beauty and elito of tho city. To a
casual observer the chimney city would seem to
be especially favored in this respect, as tho fair
uex are the most prominent of its attractions, aud
it is probably owiug more to them than to any ex?
ternal influence that it acquired tho name of the
beautiful city. But although Columbia was thor?
oughly ^berman zed, it ?till retains nany of its
attractions.
MAIN STREET
is being rapidly rebuilt, and for the most part in a
substantial and ornamental manner. Several
ranges of three story buildings havo been erected,
principally with flue iron fronts, the latter being of
Columbia manufacture, and from the foundry of
Mesara. GOLDSMITH & Co. BEDELL'S fine building
looms up at the corner of 'Pain and Main streets;
and its glistening appearance renders it an admi?
rable landmark for travellers and strangers. Higher
np the street, in the neighborhood of Cotton
'j own, tho improvements are scarce; but with tho
advance of time, the unsightly piles of rubbish
that now obstruct the streets will disaupear, and
the large warehouses be again rel/iilt. The Execu?
tive Office stands about midway in this street,
almost opposite to the ruins of the Court House,
and ?within easy access to all visitors. When Co
lambhvwas burnt the people went to work with a
Rill, and numbers of wooden shanties were has td ..
thrown up on Main, Plain, Assembly, and the other
business thoroughfares. These have been gradu?
ally replaced on Main street by brick structures,
aniline work of reconstruction will no doubt soon
extend to the other localities. Fortunately the
mechanics of Columbia were not addicted to the
use of mortar, but substituted the red clay, which
is so abundant in thia section. Although this did
not tend to moke the buildings stronger, and in
order to prevent the action of the weather, they
had to be finished on the outside with the genu?
ine mortar, vet it has saved an immense amount
of labor in rebuilding, as the mud-mortar is very
easily detached from the brick, and a house built
with burnt bricks can be finished in a compora
ti.-e y short time.
THE HOTELS
of Columbia were all burnt, but others have sprung
up or been improvised for the emergency. The
National Hotel, near the Sout.1. Carolina Railroad,
is a fine wooden building, admirably adapted for
the purposes of entertainment, and is kept by the
Los t. Mr. JOTKER, in a manner that recommends it
to all who have ever felt its genial influences.
NICKERBON, so long known as the able host of the
Mills House, has leased the Methodist Female
College, on Plein street, and has hung his ban?
ner on the outer walls. NICKERSON bae lost nono
cf his popularity by the move, and the College,
though not as attractive now as when the home of
young ladies, still offers inducements sufficient to
cause its rooms to be always filled. Besides these,
the Shiver House, on Plain street, between Main
and Assembly, and some two or three others, ore
ready to provide entertainment for tho travelling
pnbhe.
THE NEW STATE HOUSE,
at the foot of Main street, is a grand monument of
.the past, for it will be many long years before the
Treasury of the State can aflora to appropriate
enough money to complete it in the style originally
intended. All the wrath of SHERMAN'S burners
vas inflicted on the unoffending pile. Not content
with, the destruction of the wooden State House,
the soldiers deliberately fired the sheds under
which were stored immense amounts of granite
and marble, most of which had been carved and
was ready for use. Some of tho marble pillars
were brought from Tennessee, and were of a beau?
tiful color-red, variegated with white. Polished
white marble Blabs for the flooring and the caps of
the pillars, which were elaborately carved, met
with the same fate, and are now but crumbling
masses of stone, hardly fit to macadamize the
streets. Although the finest and most expensive
portions of the work mot with this fa to, there is
?till much that can be ultimately used. The heavy
blocks of granite and some few of the stone pil?
lars escaped, but it would require an immense out?
lay to res toro that which was destroyed pr make
the remainder available. From tho plan of tho
architects, this State House, whon finished, would
be by far finer than tho capitol of any other State,
and was thought hy many would compare favora?
bly with that at Washington, .' ho front of the
budding is ornamented by the medallions of Me?
ll UFTTE and HAYNS, and the fluted pillars and their
ornamental caps give the building an imposing ap?
pearance even in its present unfinished state. It
was intended to be entirely fire-proof, and conse?
quently no wood was used in its construction-the
walls being of great thickness, and in placo of
rafters strong iron girders were used, which were
tb support a marble floor. ,
At the last session of thc Legislature $12.000
were appropriated to cover the building with a
tin roof, and if possible, to make somo of the
rooms available for public pm poses. This will
prevent any further action of the weather, and will
nt least preserve it until the State can afford to
advance funds sufficient for its completion.
THE PALMETTO TREE,
in the rear of the building is an ingenious monu?
ment, and reflecte great credit upon that descend?
ant of TUBAL CAIN, whose quondam sign is still to
be seen in Cumberland street. None but Mr.
WERNER could have fashioned snch a striking re?
semblance to the palmetto from iron, and tho
State paid a worthy tribute to his powers when
she purchased it as an ornament to tho Capitol
grounds. Tho base of the tree, which is a square
pedestal, was inscribed with the names of officers
and men, who, as members of the Palmetto Regi?
ment, fell fighting for their country. But not even
this, a national monument, could escape the spirit
of vandalism ; the raised letters were in many cases
broken of *nd one side of tho square completely
removed, i jrtunately the tree was untouched,
and still rears its proud head aloft,. a glorious
emblem of a once glorious State, teaching us that
although now. downtrodden, we yet may rise, and,
like our own palmetto, survive the ruins of our
hopes.
THE UNIVERSITY.
occupies an entire square, but being composed
mostly of detached buddings, it can boast of no
architectural beauty. In common with most puB
lio buildings, it Buffered greajj^Ldaring the war,
being used by the Confederate Government os a
hospital, and subsequently as barracks for the
United States troops. The Campus is a large plat
of ground covering several' acres, and in Bummer
presents a beautiful appearance, but the leafless
trees and dilapidated' houses that are now to be
seen make-it Jpok rather desolate. On either side
are the houses of the professors, which aie well
built, and being mostly ivy clad, relieve the gloomy
air of the premises in a measure.
As the Alma Mater of the State, tho South Caro?
lina College has always been a cherished institu?
tion, and her graduates have risen to the highest
esition in the land. - The change from a College
a University was actuated by the same foster?
ing care as ii was hoped the transformation would
Tender it more attractive and cause it to regain
ijcme of its former glories. The experiment, for
as yet it is hardly more, promises to he a success,
and the veneration and respect with which this
institution of learning is regarded by all will be
incrcaaod with its improved facilities. At present
the, Faculty consists of eleven professors, who
have charge of the various branches; the addition
of Law, Medicine and Theology not being yet com
-- "plated.
During the last session of the Legislature tho
House occupied, the old Chapel and the Library
Hall, but it is expected that the new Chapel will
he arranged for their temporary uso while the
State House romains uncompleted. Although the
n um ber of students is now small, they aro con?
stantly increasing, and the day is not far diataut
when the University will be again the people's
pride. . _
THE nmXZKTIABT,
"so-called," or rather its prospective foundation,
can be seen on the banks of the Saluda River,
about one mile and a half from the city. Those
who had the matter in charge certainly were gov?
erned at least by the picturesque in their choice of
a location, for the river at this point brawls finely
over a bea of stone, making the air musical with
the sound of many waters, and effectually pre?
venting either ingress or egress by the rocky bar
, rj rier that nature has reared. Tho Penitentiary
proper is yet in embryo, and those who expect tb
seo the cells finished in one months time will be
sorely disappointed. At present, all that is to be
seen is about a few thousand burnt brick and a
small excavation; but as they havo commenced
operations, we may hope for something iu tho fu?
ture, however far off that may be.
The bank of the river at this point is composed
of an under strata of granite, and the workmen
are busy excavating this and piling tho superin?
cumbent earth upon the river bank to form a
levee, which will prevent any future overflow. Thc
granite removed will be used in tho constrncti-n
cf the Penitentiary, and will save tho labor of
bringing it from the State quarry at Granby, some
three miles distant. Between the Penitentiary
wad the river runs the Saluda Canal-this has
bera neglected for some time, but a small outlav
weald restore it to its farmer usefulness. Few
canals havo the flow of water enjovod by thia and
it3 sides are carefully guarded from overflow or de?
si vy by strong stone banks. It was offered for sale
by the State, but no bids being made it ia still
Government oroperty.
Near the Penitentiary are the remains of tho
Powder Works, scarcely inferior to those in
Augusta. These wero all destroyed by SHERMAN'S
orders, bnt the massive stone walls ?till remain
and some of the buildings have been repaired to
to used as ejtore houses. At the last session of
the Legislature; $45,000 was appropriated towards
building and perfecting the Penitentiary; but it ?H
doubtful if it can be made available for a year or
two yet. By a walk further up the river, at a de?
tour td the right may be seen tho
WATES WORKS.
These aro situated a short distance from Arsenal
Hill, and, strange to say, the water is not taken
from the neighboring river, but from numerous
spnng8 that bubble up through the earth. These
springs are widely scattered, but iron tubes lead?
ing from each conduct the water to the works,
where. rt is pumped into a huge reservoir, from
which the city is supplied. This reservoir is situ?
ated on the top of a mil, and hoing of great capaci?
ty, is able to supply water both for public antfpri
yate use. The clayey soil of Colombia rendors
the water in theso springs peculiarly sweet, and.
os it is pumped from the fountain head, noth
~ng can be moro palatable. At prosent, owing to
tho want of fbiaucos, many of the hydrants aro out
of repair, and tho water-works of tbo city aro com?
paratively useless ; bnt thc private houses appreci?
ate tho benefit derived from this BOurce, and usc it
accordingly, Bolow tho reservoir, and at thc foot
of Araenai Hill, is
TUX FABE.
Thia contains about f> or 8 acres, aud is at pres?
ent almost in i-ata'o of nature. Tho undulating
character of Die ground renders it admirably
adapted for the purposes intended. It is now
diversified with a few scraggy trees and a few de?
funct fountains; but still amid its desolation and
min presents attractions sufficient to inako it thc
rendezvous for lovers, and many hearts havo boon
lost and won within ita grounds. A'woodon fence
encircles it, aud bevoud that is a fine carnage
drivo. which is, or rather wns, extensively patron?
ized by gav equestriennes, carriages and fast mon
and bones. \Vh n SHERMAN took possession of
tho citv ho impressed everything eatablo in
the a'ock lino that ho could lind and turned
his half-starved cattle iuto this park to feed
tho famished and homeless citizens. His phil?
anthropic measures wcro eminently successful, for
tho cattle ato tho bark from tho troes and were en?
tirely too poor themselves for any one to oat. The
Park" ia now but a Bhadow of itself, and though
cattio aro now excluded, it will be long oro :t re-,
sumes its pristine splendor.
THE LUNATIO ASYLUM
is a noblo charity, for at present it is almost solely
a charity, tho few pay patients being BO much im?
poverished that their friends cannot continue their
maintenance. This institution was fortunately
spared from the Hames that devastated Columbia,
and afforded refuge lo many o' the houseless and
homeloss, whom the droadfr milagration sent
into thc street5!. Dr. J. W. PAUPER, the able and
efficient superintendent, has hold thc same position
for mmy years, and has succeeded in securing the
affection of his patients to such au extent that
they almost look upon him as a father. There are
fow'institntious in the United States that aro bet?
tor managed, or whoso annual reports can BIIOW
better arraur. ementa for tho entertainment, in?
struction or health of thoir inmates than the ono
undor tho superintendence of Dr. PARKER. It is
to hint alone that the credit is duo of saving the
Asylum, which would, but for hi? dignified inter?
position, havo fallen a prey to the torches of SHER?
MAN'S grand army. From amon? tho number of
patients admitted, manv have boen discharged
cured, while the remainder seem perfectly attach?
ed to their new sphere of lifo, and manifest no dis?
position to change their abode.
Among the principal points of attraction now
loft in tho city are tho
PRIVATE RESIDENCES, ?C.
From the peculiar manner in which Columbia is
built, many families were enabled to secure largo
lots for their residences. These have, in almost
overv instance, been converted into fine gardons,
which, for artistic beauty, cannot be excelled.
Tho most prominent of theso is that of General
JOHN PRESTON. T??B occupies a wholo square,
and ia enclosod on ali sides but the front with a
high brick wall. On the premises are fine hot?
houses, which formerly contained many rare
exotics, but, in common with tho remainder of the
garden, have now been destroyed and neglected.
The absonce of tho family from the State hua pre?
vented that care being taken which is absolutely
necessary to preserve a garden, and the premises
are now fast growing up into a wilderness. Other
proprietors have bestowed equal caro upon their
grounds, and a drive around the city shows on
every side, in thj neat and Bhowy houses and well
kept gardens, the best evidence that Columbia is
not despondent, but is only gathering breath for a
progressive leap, that will soon restore her to her
pristine splendor.
Columbia ia the centre of several railroads, all of
which bring traffic to her market, and although
her facilities are Bomewhat cramped at present,
vet there is no danger, that she win be left behind
in the march of time. The Columbia and Augusta
Railroad, which is now in course of construction,
it is anticipated will do much for the city, and will
add to ita resources in tho future. Other projects
aro also entertained which are to shore the benefi?
cial result of bringing increased trade and activity
to the city, and thus afford the means of rebuild?
ing her ruined streets. This ii no Bip Van Winkleish
age. and Columbia is well aware that she must ex?
ert herself in order to prosper. Her merchants are
energetic thorough busirosa men, and with her fu?
ture in their bands, our Capital will soon be re?
juvenated, and become once more the pride and
boast of the people.
Sketches of Travol.
LETTER NUMBER XXVI.
BRUSSELS, BELGIUM, 18G6.-Brussels is tho Capi?
tal of Belgium, and is itt the centre of the most
highly cultivated country in Europe. It has a
thriving population of 180,000. Brussels is one of
tho finest cities on the Continent; the houses arc
substantially built of stone; the broad, clean
streets in tho upper part of the city are magnifi?
cent. The grand Park is the admiration of every
traveller-it is laid out into a kind of public gar?
den, intersected by beautiful walks, bordered with
trees, and ornamented with handsome atarnos of
white marble, and filled with numerous fountains,
which aro quite refreshing of a hot summer day.
Brussels is celebrated for its world-ronowned car?
pets, and manufactures of tapestry and lace.
Several thousand female operatives are omplojed
in the manufacture of lace-the most of thia deli?
cate work is done by the needle, which is very fry?
ing to tho oyes. In a public square is tho old
Spanish palaces, with gorgeous tropical adorn?
ments and gobelin tapestry. Those palaces wore
occupied by the Spanish Governors, when Belgium
was under Spanish rule. The museum in tho halls
of the palace contains some uno pictures, statues,
etc. The Museum of Natural Histor}' ia quito
interesting and very complete.
An hour's ride in on open carriage from Brus?
sels, and I lind myself at Waterloo, celebrated as
the scene of the great battle of 18th June, 1815,
which completed the downfall of Napoleon. An
unconfrolablo ambition took possession of ?apo
I loon in his youthful military career. It would
seom he had won for himself and his empire a
nomo and reputation that would have satisfied au
Alexander or a Ciesar, but not so. Joseph-no-v/ho
had ever been bia guardian angel, and to whi m it
ia said ho was devotedly attached-failed to fur?
nish him with an heir for his mighty empire. In
an evil hour Napoleon permitted ambition to over?
ride love, humanity and justice. The true and
faithful Josephine waa abandoned, and Napoleon
demanded in marriage the hand of Maria Louisa,
a young Austrian girl not out of hor teenB, who
waa the daughter of Emperor Francia, of Austria.
Thia unwarrantable conduct of Napoleon found no
favor, not even in the oyes of tho French nation;
they felt that tho warm-hearted Josephine was
cruelly wronged by one who had sworn to bo her
protector, and that tho French had gained nothing
by the alliance with tho proud race of Hapsburg.
From tho date of Napoleon's desertion of Jos?ph?
ine, Fate turned against him. New that ho was
allied by marriage with the strong power
of Austria, his ambition know no bounds.
He decided to make war upon the pow?
erful empire of Russia.
In the summer of 1812, Napoleon placod himself
at the head of the fineat army ever raised in Franco.
Nearly half a million of mon marched out of thc
?nanny ?vine-clad hills of France, destined for the
City of Moscow. Many of bia wiaeat military coun?
sellors warned him against an attempt to invade
the ancient Capital of Russia in the winter months.
"Peace," ho exclaimed, "awaiti us bon oat h the
walls ot Moscow." Fatal delusion I Thia immense
army waa to be marched twenty-five hundvcd milos,
one thousand of which was through thc barron
plains of Kusaia. Thia sandy desert furnishes food
for neither man nor beast. In tho month of Sep?
tember a terrible battle was fought. The French
fained a partial victory at tho cost of 32,000 men.
he Russians lost 50,000. The Bussions retirod in
food ordor, pursued by the victorious and confi?
ent French. The Buss?an commander decided not
to hazard his army in tho defence of Moscow. He
well knew tho French were advancing to their omi
destruction, aa thc rigors of a Russian winter waa
near at hand, and the impossibility of tho enemv
subsisting snob an army in the heart of a hostile
country. Moscow was at that timo ono of the
richest and largest cities in Europe, being twenty
mile? in circumference. It was in the autumn of
1819 that Napoleon onterod the ancient City of tho
Czars. "MoscowI Moscow!" shouted the oxcitod
and:exultant soldiers. They vainly thought their
'sufferings were at un end, as they quartorod
thcm8olvca in tho gorgeous palaces, splendidly
furnished with everything requisite to mako a
weary soldier comfortable. Napoleon and etaff
established themselves in tho palace of the Krem?
lin, which was the imperial soat of tho ancient
Russian Monarchs. When tho Emperor discovered
that the inhabitants had deserted their homos, ho
had forebodings of evil. Soldiers wore stationod in
ah portions of tho city to guard against fire or
sudden surprise. Tho Emperor Alexandor had
turned loose 15,000 desperadoes from tho prisons,
who wcro stealthily preparing to convert the splen?
did metropolis into an . infernal machine, for tho
deafruction of tho invading arm v. Immense maga?
zines of powder, Bhells, and 'other destructivo
onginea of war, were placed under tho palace
occupied by Napoleon, and scattered beneath tho
houses which were crowded with the French sol?
diers. The water pipea were cut, fountains and
fire enginea destroyed; nothing was left undone to
render tho destruction of the city complete; even
tho elements came to the aid of tho demons in
their work of desolation, for about night an equi?
noctial gale swept over "tho city. A protracted
drought had prepared tho wooden houses for the
j torch. At midnight Napoleon threw himself, ex?
hausted, on his bed, but he waB ill at ease; his
conscience wus torturing him; ho had deeply
wronged tho bosom companion of his youth; tho
cry of "fire" resounded through the streets, the
Heavens were illuminated by the volumes of
llames, aa they burst forth in various sections uf
the city.
Tremendous explosions of abolis and magazines
of powder ahook tho doomed city like an earth?
quake. The Imperial Guard of 20,000 men were
ordered out. Theso bravo soldiors, who wcro
never known to falter, could not stand before tho
terrible fiery foe. Tho French soldiers shot, bay?
oneted, and throw the incendiaries into tho burn?
ing lake of fire, but it (fid not atop thom in their
work of desolation. Thonsands of nu n, women
and children wore buried beneath tho falling
houses aud timbers that had been hurled iuto the
air. Napoleon found tho palace in which he was j
quartered surrounded by llames, ?md carno near
hoing swallowed in tho roaring soa of lire. Such
an event would have saved him vears of pain and
anguish. Perhaps bis life was" spared, that ho
might have time to repent in sorrow of his cruel
treatment of Josephine. The fire kindled by tho
llends ia all portions of the citv, waa swept for
three days by a terrible galo, untif Moscow, twenty
miles in circumference, was reduced to a heap <>f
ruins. The burning of Moscow saved the Russian
Lmpirc, and banished Napoleon to the Island of
Elba.
oK?urm? **U8H>an campaign the French lost
350,000 bravo soldiers. Ncarlv one-half perished
from cold, hunger and fatigue'in their disastrous
retreat aftor tho destruction of Moscow. The loss
of tho Russians, including those who perished for
the want of food and shelter, was greater than
that of thc French. Seven hundred thousand lives
sacrificed in a 8ix months'campaign ! and thia to
gratify the ambition of ono man. Such is war!
It involves in ita mad career every conceivable
crime, poisoning tho minds and morale of a nation,
reducing thc people to want, sorrow and misery.
And yet there aro MiniBtcra of tho Gospel who do
fond tho shedding of a brother's blood, and ap?
peals to the Bible to sustain thom in their argu?
ments. In my humblo opinion, war?is tho work of
tho dovil; God mavponnit it,, but he does not
justify it. When CAIN mado war upon ABEL, God
said unto him: "And now art thou cursed from tho
earth which hath oponed her mouth to receive thy
brother's blood from thy hand. When thou tillest
tho ground it shall not henceforth yield unto theo
her strongth; a fugitivo and a vagabond shalt thou
be on tho earth.' God showed his displeasure by
cursing thc grotmd CAIN was to till, and making
him n fugitivo and a vagabond. G. W. W.
COMMERCIAL.
Exports.
NEW YORK-Per steamship Granada-262 bolos Upland
and 202 hales SI Cotton. 130 tierces Rice, 10 bales
Tarn, 7 bbl? Dried Fruit, 100 packages Sundries.
BOSTON-Per steamship Geo B Uptou-107 tierces Rice,
C bales SI and 903 balos Upland Cotton, 0 casks Clay,
100 packages lirais, Iran, Hope, Rags aud Sundries.
BALTIMORE-Por sehr E J Palmer-120,000 foot Lum?
ber aud Flooring BoardB.
Tltc Charleston Cotton Market.
OFFICE OF THE DAILY NEWS, )
CHARLESTON, Saturday Evening, January 5. J
Thc market waa rather weak, factors in many cases ac?
cepting price3 previously refused, and showing a Btronger
disposition to sell. Tho transactions amounted to about
500 bales, viz: 17 at 27; 2 at 28; 69 at 31 ; 33 at 32; 63 at
33; 35 at 33?; 1C0 at 34; 12 at 34,',' ; 71 at 35; and 30 bales
at 35? cents. We quote:
Ordinary.....32?
Low Middling.33?34
Middling.-@35
Augusta Market.
AUGUSTA, January 4.-GoLn-The Brokers are buy?
ing at 132 and selling at 135.
SILVEB-Brokers aro buying ai 128 aud selling at 132.
COTTON-The market opened this morning with a good
demand, but towards evoning thom was a decrease in
the demand. Sales were readily offected at yesterday's
figures. We quote :
Middling.33
Strict Middling.34
Good Middling.35
Sales of thc day foot up 340 bales, as follows: 1 at 28, 7
at 30, 4 at 31, 14 at 32. 9 at 32 ?, 35 at 33, 29 at 33 V;, 80 at
34, 36 at 34?. 184 at 35,14 at 35,'?', and 30 at 35?. The
receipts arc 91 balos.
Mold le Market.
MOBILE, January 2.-COTTON-Notwithstanding tho
New Year's holiday, 050 bales changed bands yesterday,
on a basis of 31a32c for Middling.
To-day, a fair demand has existed, with rather better
stock offering. Prices were rather unsettled in conse?
quence of the unsettled condition and apparent down?
ward tendency of gold in New York. Sales reached 1500
bales, thc market closing quiet at 32c for Middling.
MOKETAKV AND FLVANCLVL-The supply of Domestic
bills continues in excess of the demand, although bank?
ers and dealers report a good day's business. Checking
rate ?a?, and buying at ?al per cent discount, accord?
ing to amount and quality of paper. At the close tho
fallowing quotations were reported:
Gold 132al34.
Sterling 139al4Z
New Orleans Sight par to ? premium.
New Orleans Market.
NEW ORLEANS, December 3L-COTTON-The year
closos upon a very active aud firm market The market
bas been unusually buoyant from the opening to tho
close of business. Offerings, which at first wore rather
light, wore augmented during tho day nuder steadily ad?
vancing prices, and os the demand was activo and gen?
eral throughout, nearly every list was taken before tho
close of business. The total sales for thc day amounted
to 9500 bales, and tho markot closed at an irregular ad
'ance of laic $ lb, thc heaviest improvement having'
been in ordinary to Liverpool low middling grades,
which appeared to be lu most general request. Wc havo
revised our figures, and uow quote as follows, viz: Ordi?
nary, 28a29c; good ordinary, 30a31c; low middling, 32a
33c, and middling, 34c.
COTTON STATEMENT.
Stock on hand Sept 1st I860.bales. 102,082
Received to-day.'.-. 8,140
Received previously.346,135-354,276
456,357
Exported to-day. 15,078
Exported previously.230,200-261,278
Slock on bend. 205,079
The exports Include 11,844 bales tor Liverpool, 2956
bales for Havre, and 278 bales tor Boston.
seo AB AND MOLASSES.-The receipts since. Saturday
include 473 h h da Sugar, 1447 bbls and 99 half bbls Mo?
lasses. Tho markot to-day exhibits considerable activity,
both in Sugar and Molasses, with advance of fully ?c for
higher gradea of Sugar, but iu Molasses we notice no
change in prices, although rates were firmer. Sales
comprise 450 hhda of Sugar and 982 bbls of Molasses;
alto, 22 half bbls prime at 70c, and CO half bbls from
sdtonds at 68c %4 gal.
Wilmington Market.
WILMINGTON, January 4.-TURPENTINE-Has de?
clined a shade, and we quote sales of 380 bbls at S4 25 for
yellow dip. and 1212? for hard, por 280 lbs.
SPIRITS TURPENTINE-Only 17 bbls changed hands to?
day at 61 cents per gallon-a declino of one cont.
KosTNASalcs of 89 bbls Common at $3 25 per 280 lbs,
and 56 do No 1 at SO 25.
TAB-Market finner, and price advanced. Solos of 103
bbls at $1 65 per bbl.
COTTON-Market firm. Sales of 48 bales at 33 cents for
middling.
New York Market.
MONET MARKET.
The New York Herald, of Thursday, January 3d,
says :
The gold market has been fairly steady. Hie opening
price was 132?, followed by a decline to 132?, and a re?
covery to 132? jvt three o'clock. . Afterwards, however,
there was a relapse, and the closing quotation wss 132?a
?. There was a brisk borrowing demand for coin, and
loans wore made without interest and at l-32al-16 per
oent per diem in favor of the lendor.
The foreign exchange markot is firm, and there is a
disposition on the part of loading brokera to advance
thc rates for sterling. Bankers' bills on England at sixty
days wore quoted at thc close at 109?al09? ; at threo
days, llOall??i: commercial bills, 108al09; Franca, at six?
ty days. C 15f a 5 20f; at three days. ff 12?f a C 15f; bills
ou Berlin, 72a72?; on Bremon, 78?a79; on Frankfort,
41?a41?; on Amsterdam, 41?a41?; on Hamburg, 36?a
36?; on Antwerp, 6 17?a616?.
PRODUCE MARKET.
NEW YORK, January 2-6 P. M.-BREADSTUFFS.-In?
creased activity prevailed in tho market for State and
Wes te ni flour, and the prices obtained indicated an ad?
vance of ScalOc per' bbl. tho market closing firm at this
improvement. Thc s ales comprised 8200 bbls. at our re?
vised quotations, appended. Southern flour, though
still quiet ruled steady and finn at our quotations, of
which sales were effected of 35? bbls. Of Canada flour
sales were reported of 500 bbls, in bond, at $10 7 >. For
Corn meal there was an improved demand at unchanged
prices. Sales 1000 bbl*, ln?-luding Brandywine, at S6 25,
caloric at $5 15, and Western at SC. Of rye flour sales
were made to the extent of 600 bbls, at 33 6ua7 85-indi?
cating an advance. We quote:
Superfine and Western.?8 80a$10 25
Extra State...i.10 70a ll 25
Choice State.ll 30a li 25
Common to Medium Extra Western. 9 70a ll 35
Extra round-hoop Ohio.ll 20a 12 40
Western trade brands.12 30a 13 70
Common Southern..11 10a 13 30
fancy and extra do.:...13 40a 17 00
Bye Flour (superfine). 0 60a 7 85
Corn Meal, Jersey. 5 00a 6 03
Corn Meal, Brandywine.2 5Ca 5 00
Although tho markot for wheat ruled very quiet tho
demand being con Unod to tho Immediate requirements of
millo rs, an advance of nilly 2c ft bushel was established,
thc market closing firm at tho improvement Thc sales
were limited to 25,0ti<) bushels, including amber Slate at
$3 15, No 2 Milwaukee at $2 37o2 4u, and white Western
at $3 12 J.J 25. In tho corn marie t there was an increased
business consummated, tho demand being chiefly for ex?
port, and prices advanced lc bushel, with thc sales
aggregating 150,000 bushels at SI Mal 14? afloat and
Si 12? in store for mixed Western; SI 13? for old yellow
Southern, and $110 for new do. Oats wero without ma?
terial variation; sains 30.000?buRhcls at 68aG9cfor State, 64
aG5c for Chicago and Milwaukee, and f'6c tor Canada East
Rye was in moderate demand and scarcely as finn, with
sales of 12,000 bushels at $126 for Canada and $1 23 for
Western. Barley and malt were dull and nominal in tho
absente of business.
COFFEE-Thero was a limited demand only, and no
sales were effected that wc were advised of.
COTTON-Waa in fairly active demand at full prices.
The sales reach 2?60 bales at the following quotations :
N. Orleans
Upland. Florida. Mobilo. and Texas.
Ordinary.2!) 30 81 31
Low Middling.S3 33 34 ;m3
Middling.34? 85 85 an'
Good Middling....37 37 37 38
Neill's Cotton Circular, of December 31, gives thc fol?
lowing statement of the receipts, exports and stock Of
cotton at all the porta for tho wcok compared with those
of last year and those of tho late crop year 1857-8, tho
total of which crop amounted to 3,114,000 bales.
,-RECEIPTS-. /-EXPORTS FD? TUE W'K_>
Week. Since Sopt 1. Gt. Brit France. Olh.F.P.
1866-7..82.000 CC5.000 a 1.000 6,600 3,300
1865- 6..46,000 798,000 23,000 2,000 1,000
1857-8.U7.000 949,(00 18,000 22,000 17,000
i--EXPORTS BXS CE 1ST BEPTEMOER-.
Gt. Britain. France. Otb. F. P. Total. Stock.
1866- 7.197.000 20.000 16.000 239,000 512,000
1865-0.344,000 27,000 12,000 333.000 465,000
1857-8.301,000 102,000 77,000 480,000 477.000
FREIGHTS wore decidedly firmer under freo offerings of
cotton. The engagements were: To Livorpool 1200 halos
cotton at ?d a 9-32d. 15,000 bushels corn at 3d in bulk;
22 hhds tobacco at 26s, and por steamer 7500 bushels
corn at 4?d, 800 bales colton at 9-1 Od. To London 600
bbls rosin at 2s (id per 280 lbs, and 380 hilda sugar ut 20s.
To Bremen 75 eases tobacco at 17s Oil, und per steamer
200 bolea cotton ot. l?c, and 700 bales tobacco at ls.
MOLABBES-Wo heard of no sales. Tbc inquiry was
nearly all tor common kinds. Prices were nominal. Wo
quote : Centrifugal and mixod 38a40c, clayed 40a42c,
Muscovado 42u55c, Porto Rico 48a65c, New Orleans C5a
85c.
NAVAL STORES-In the market for spirits turpent?no
nothing of moment transpired and prices were entirely
uoniinal at 66a67c. Rosins also ruled duh; the only
transactions we heard of were 100 bbls common at S4 31,
300 do common strained on private terms, 100 do strain,
cd at $4 37?a4 87?, and 250 do low No 1 at SC 50. Of tar
we beard of no sales.
PROVISIONS.-Thu pork market ruled very irregular,
though quite an active demand prevailed, the market
closing at $19?, cash, for old moss, tho sales for imme?
diate delivery comprising 6000 Ubis at SlOoltt 25 for old
meas, S20 63021 SO for new do, aud 516 90nl7 60 for prime
I do; also, for future delivery, 4000 bblu now meas for
January and February at SSlaSl 50. Beef waa in good
demond und steady, with nales of louo bbls at $10 50a21
for new extra mesa, and $J2al8 for new p'ain do. Of
beef hann soles were made of 500 bbla at $29a35. Dress?
ed hugs wore more active and fitmcr at S?a9c for Western
and cit?. Cut meats, though quiet, ruled steady at IO??.
12?c for hams, and OalOc fur shoulders, with salea of 150
pkgs within Hie range. Bacon wan dull und nominal.
Lard was moro active and firmer; anica 700 bbla at ll?a
13c for old aud uow. Butler and cheese were steady and
firm at our inst quotations.
SUOMI-A moderate demand prevailed and full prices
wcru realized. Thu sides comprise -15u linds Cuba, in?
cluding common refining ut 8?a9?e, uud grocery grades
atl0?ull?e; 2." hhda Nosv Orleans realized 12';al8?c.
The stock in estimated: 34,248 lihds, 43,590 boxes, 117,872
bags, and in Melado. The closing quot al ions aro nomi?
nally ns follows: Muscovado .Sugar-Inlerior to common
refining U?a9?c; mir to good refining 9?aI0c; fair to
?nod grocery I0?al0?c; prime grocery liuii?c; Port?
Rico 9?al3?: Melado 5?a7c. Clayed Sugar-No Call.
!??al0?;No 12, 10?al(J?; No 13315, llal2Uc; No 10a2d
13al5c.
WHISKEY ruled extremely quiet nud we hear of no
transactions. Prices we oulirelv nominal.
Consignees uer Koala Carolina Katlroad,
.Jim nary 5.
724 bulea Cotton, ll bales Dimicafics and Sundries To
J Fraser* C<>. .1 I* Earle, IC lt ?gcnt? E Edwards, J M
Fredaluirp. A.I Wliito. H T Peake, J O Miliinr ,t Co Mrs
.1 P Alston. W K Byan. S Cullen, M Israel, (j W Williams
A: Co, M Marka, Dr P O Donnelly; Brown ,v Sch Inner H
L Jeffers *: < A E J WISH ic Cu, Willis Cliisiihu, Adams
Frost \ ( o,E H Rodgers A: Cu. .1 B E Sloan. W W Smith
C TieffetiUiall.
Passengers.
Per steamship Granada, for J?cw York-M \V Heath
Mrs H Heath, and 2 in thc steerage.
Per steamer Fannie, from Georgetown. S C-G T
Jones, Mr Buck. J J Alston, Miss S Alston. J La bruce, 4
Misses LuBruce, J T Uazier, D itislcv, J W Ford, and *30
on deck.
PORT CALENDAR.
00BBE0TEO WEEKLY. -..
PHASES OP THE KOON*
New M. 5th, 7b. 10m. even I Full M.. 20th, 2b. 10m. oven
First Q. 13th.llh.llm.morn Last Q. 27th, jjL Om. mom
SUN.
BISES. I SETS.
HOOK
BISES.
Monday_
Tuesday....
Wednesday.
Thursday...
Friday.
Saturday...
Sunday.
7.. 0
7.. 5
7:. 5
7.. 5
7.. 6
7.. G
7.. 6
6.. 8
S.. 9
6.. 10
5..U
Cil
5. .12
5. .13
e.. et
7. .39
8..30
9..4T
10..40
ll..41
Morn.
MARINE NEWS.
PORT OF CHARLESTON.
Arrived Saturday.
Steamship Lodoua, Eovey, Qalvoston-sailed Dec 27.
Cotton. To the Master. Bouud to New Yore and put
into this port in consequence of deranged machinery, jj
Brig Abby Watson, Watson, New York, .6 days.. Gu?
ano and Paving Stones. To W Bench, Adams, Frost &
Co, B M Butler, P O'Donnell, and Order..
Sehr B Caldwell; Mccormack, New York-sailed Dec
29. Mdze. To W Roach, J ? Adger ?Go, OW Aimer,
Bined k Co, H Bisch off ii Co, Vf il Bird k Co, C D Braho
k Co, T M Bristol!, A Canalc, JOH Cl aussen, B k A P
Caldwell, A W Eckel k Co, Cameron, Barkley k Co, R W
Galo k Co, P L Gudlemin, J H Hillen, Hart k Co, Klinck,
Sickenberg & Co, Little k Marshall, Mikel], Boyle k
Co, S R Marshall, J H k D Muller, R R Agent, Shepherd
Si Cohen, J W Sprague & Bro, Terry k Nolan, Ufferbardt,
Campsen k Co, J Walker, Wagencr, death k Monacos,
Muller k Nimitz, T Murphy, S La Torre, Gen R O Tyler,
Q M, Order, and others. . Jan 2, was lying to off the light
Boat, wind NN E, with rain and tightening weather. At
l P M, seeing no pilot, and looking like blowing a gale
from the eastward, crossed thc Bar with plenty of water
and anchored inside. At 9 A M, Jan 3, was boarded by a
pilot, who, at 2 P M, got under way with tho flood tide.
Having made toro and mainsail, hove on tho anchor,
dragged before it was. abort, and standing to. tho east?
ward boforcvtho jibs wero set and anchor wp, tho vessel
neared thc break ora, and having to tack ship, the anchor
not being off tho bottom, would not go around. After
two attempts, kept off and heeded for the South Chan?
nel, when tho vessel pounded heavily, and straining,'
knocked tho shoe off and carried away the rudder pin
d.es, causing the schooner to leak, and doing other dam?
age. Tho pilot seeing no chance of getting in over tho
Bar again, the weather not permitting, at G P-M anchor?
ed off the Light Ship.
Steamer Gen Hooker, Boyle, Coopor River.' Maze. To
C L Guillcaume.
Sehr Ann S Deas, from West Point Mill. 90 bbl? Rice.
To Street Bros k Co, Curt, Kopff k Jervey, J A Ene.ow k
Co.
Sloop Julia, from Cooper River. I860 bushel* Rough
Rice. To Cart, Kopff k Jervey.
Arrived Yesterday.
Steamer Fannie, Davis, Georgetown, S C. 49 tierces
and 2 bois Rice, and Mdze. To Ferguson k Holmes,
Shockolford k Fraser, Thurston k Holmes, W K Ryan,
Evans k Godbold, Col J P Law, and others.
Cleared Saturday.
Steamship Granada, Weat, New York-Ravenel k Co.
Sehr E J Palmer, Palmer, Baltimore-P P Locke.
Went to Sea Saturday.
Bark Modena, Ryder, Wilmington, N C.
Sehr N W Smith. Tooker, New York.
Sehr Monawa, Dissoway, Georgetown, S C.
Went to Sea Yesterday.
Steamship Granada, West, New York.
Steamship E B Sonder, Lockwood. New York.
Steamship Lodona, Hovoy, Now York.
Brig Poinsett, Anderson, Boston. Lri?
Sehr E J Palmer, Palmer, Baltimore.
From this Fort.
Ship Southern Rights, Ros?, Liverpool, Dec 18.
\ Sailed for this Port.
Steamship Saragossa, Crowell from New York, Jan 0.
The Gladstone, from Liverpool, Dec 20. ,
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, ETC.
SOUTHERN DRUG HOUSE.
DOWIE & MOISE,
(BUCCEBBOBS IO EECO .1 C?ES ID ET),
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS,
No. 151 Meeting street,
OPPOSITE CHARLESTON^ HOTEL.,
Charleston, S. C. v '
GEO. DO WIE, lato of SMONDS, Borr k Co., and Ron
k DOWIE.
B. F. MOISE, late with ECKO k CASSTDEY.
tig- The attention of Druggists, Merchants and Phys!
clans is respectfully called to the above, and their Orden
solicited. su-mwflmo January 7
DRUGS iDJIEDIMS.
JUST RECEIVED,
A Large aud carefully selected Stock
OF
?BUGS, MEDICINES,
CHEMICALS,
AND
Fancy Articles,
WHICH IS OFFERED TO THE PUBLIC
AT REDUCED PRICES.
OUR MEDICINES AND CHEMICALS ARE IMPORT
ED directly from Manufactories, under the super
vision of experienced Chemists, which enables us to re?
commend them as pure and reliable in skr^tgth.
We keep on band all srtiolce to be found'i??? a flrat-cLip?
Drug Store. Fresh additions axe received by every
steamer.
<3S- PRESCRIPTIONS carefully put up.
E. H. KELLERS & CO.,
NO. 131 MEETING STREET,
North of Market.
E. H. KELLERS, M. D.IL BAER, M. D.
December 3
A FEW WORDS OF COMMON
SENSE.
How few there aro who are not subject to some affection
of tho lungs or respiratory organs, who, by neglecting
premonitory symptoms, aggravate tho complaint, until
disease strikes its shafts, cauoing Inexpressible torture
of the patient; and anxiety and distross to friends. "Only
a cold I" "A slight soi? throat 1" is the heedless remark
of many when so affected. Toa ; "Only a cold," wes the
thoughtless expression of thousands whom Death hae
marked for his prey.
Forewarned-Forearmod I should be tho motto forever
in the minds of all subject to Coughs, Colds, Catarrh, ot
Influenza. Words of advice should bu heeded by all Buf?
fering from Asthma, Bronchitis, Consumption. Relief is
within their reach; and, if neglected, fatal consequence*
ensue-a Ufo of misery-a daily, hourly struggle for ex?
istence A contest in which there can be but.one vlctor
-Death I
Docs it uot appal the strongest mind, to thin-t ' ? the
result caused by noglect? Then why dolay? l at ex?
cuse con bo offered, wheu timely warning U j >undcd Ul
your ears? When tho danger is pointed > it] whynot
avoid lt? MARSDEN'H PECTORAL BALK ni been used
with Rucces? in nearly a million of case l, nd ls endorsed
by tho Medical Faculty os the most wompi and effica?
cious remedy that scientific roncar.; n has discovered, to
relieve and euro all casos of Co i^hs, Colds, Influenza,
and Consumption, if the casa is not bayoud all hope.
Even when the sufferer is 1 J the last stages, he will find
relict'by using this prop rrntion. One bottle will con?
vince tho most incr?dulo.is, that tho merits of this prepa?
ration are by no means exaggerated; in fact, fall far short
of the oulogles bestowed upon it by thousands who have
been cured by it-> I moly usc. A guarantee accompanier
each bottle and dealers arc instructed in every Instance
to refund tho money when this preparation fails to re?
lieve.
Troparcd by T. W. MARSDEN, No. 487 Broadway, Now
York.
Price, GO cent-: amall bottle; $1 large size.
1UNG k CA ?3UL EY,
Wholesale Agenta, Charleston,
GOODRICH, WINEMAN k CO..
Wholesale Agents, Charleston.
And all Retail Druggists. 3m J December 4
No. 153 MEETING STREET,
(FOKMERL.Y JOHN ASilUUKST A NI) CO.)
GEOBGE C. GOODRICH, )
PHILIP WINEMAN, > SOUTH CAROLINA.
JOHN ASHH?RST, )
ID Pt XT Q- S,
MEDICINES AND CHEMICALS,
ALL OF WHICH HAS BEEN SELECTED WITH
CARE, AND WILL BE 80LD TO FIRST-CLASS BUY
EUS AT LOWEST PRICES.
October 97 | August 1] 6m08
SHIPPING.
-V FOR LIVBRPOOI-THE Al
American ship "NEREUS," H. N. Nicklee Mas
nifiH^ter, haas portion of Let- cargo engaged, and
aBBC will have quick dispatch for the above port.
For further Freigut ^W^W}**^^
january 1 North Atlantic Wharf.
' KOR LTVERPOO?.-THE NEW
.fcffS^and strictly Al American Bark TUSCANO,
rWl% Charles N. Delano Master, of Emili capacity.
afisaRhaR a largo portion of bor cargo ongaged, and
wUl have dispatch for the above port
For balance ^^8^, CO.,
December 29_No. 7* East Bay.
_ FOR l,IVERFOOL.-THE BPLEN
JSrSa?>prD fast sailing ship "SCREAMER," S. Young
jjCSj? master, has a large portion of her cargo cngag
SlBSBS ed and going aboard.
For further Freight engagement* ?PPjTW ? ^
December 21 Union Bank Building.
FOR NEW YORK-MERCHANTS'
UNE.-To sah Monday, 7th inst, tho fast saU
lng pocket schooner CHARLES DENNIS, Wm.
Hughes MaBter. having three-fourths of her
cargo on board. Wants 200 to 250 bales cotton and light
^LTOTOFL11 ?*? ' QUlCk ^WILLIAM ROACH.
- FOR NEW YORK-TO SAIL WITH
fe???> DK3PATCH.-The new A 1 Schooner LOVET
PEACOCK, ,T J Reagan, Master, will have quick
BBBEE dispatch for tho above port
For Freight engag^encsapp^ &
December 29 North Atlantic Wharf.
?irvftv: FOR BOSTON.-THE FINE NEW
#0, schooner RALPH CARLETON, Capt Horring.
Zjftvffiwton, wanta the bnlk of 200 bales of Cotton to nil
3Sra5ficup, and will sail thifl week.
For engagements apply to OLNEY ti CO.
Jannary 7_
. FOR BOSTON-T O SAIL WITH
i/QA DISPATCH.-The new Al brig LIZZIE M.
ZjK^MERBILL, S. R. ULHEB master, will have quick
?E?&dlspotch for the above port For Freight on
gagements apply to WILLIS & CHISOLM,
8 December ll _North Atlantic Wharf.
JT-^ WANTED.-A SLOOP OF ABOUT 15
JSKV v cords capacity wanted to go up Cooper Bivor for
/_l Elwood. Apply at DAILY. NEWS office, or at +
SSS C. N. AVERELL A SON'S?,
November 2 No. 70 East Bay.
FOR NORTH AND SOUTH EDIS
TO AND ROCKVILLE.
THE STEAMER
W- "W- FBAZIER,
CAPT. JOS. F. TOBBENT.
WILL LEAVE ATLANTIC WHARF AS ABOVE, ON
To-Morrow, 8th inst, at 7 o'clock, A. M.
For Freight or Passage, apply to
^ ^* C. L. GUILLEAUME,
Corner East Bey and Atlantic Wharf.
AU Freight payable on wharf. 1 Jannary 7
FOR COOPER RIYER.
EA STE RN;AND WESTERN BRANCH, MID
DIEBURG, COMINGTEE, AND WAY
LANDINGS.
THE STEAMER
OE3ST- KOOKED,
CAPTAIN D. BOYLE,
IS NOW BECKI VINO FREIGHT, AND WILL PO SI
T1VELY leave Atlantic Wharf on Tuesday Morning
8th January, at 8 o'clock precisely. Returning, wil
leave Comingtce Wednesday Morning.
For Freight or Passage, apply to
CHAS. L. GU?LLFAUME,
Corner East Bay and Atlantic Wharf.
N. B.-All Freight payable on the wharf,
january 7 2
FOR FLORIDA,
VIA SAVANNAH, BRUNSWICK, ST
MARY'S, FERNANDINA, JACKSONVILLE, AND ALI
THE LANDINGS ON TBH? ST. JOHN'S BITER AS
FAR AS PALATE A.
THE FINE STEAMER
KATE,
CAPTAIN T. J. LOCKWOOD,
WILL LEAVE NORTH ATLANTIC WHARF Ol
every Wednesday Morning, at 8 o'clock precisely
j8Sp"Freight recelvod daily and stored free of charge.
For Freight or Passage apply on board, or at tho ol
Bee bf . JOHN MAHONEY, Jn., 48 Eaat Bay,
November 18_Above Craig, Toomey A Co's.
CHARLESTON & GEORGETOWN
STEAM PACKET LINE.
SEMI-WEEKLY.
TOUCHING AT SOUTH ISLAND, WA VERL!
DULLS, AND LANDINGS ON THE WAC
CAMAW AND BLACK RIVERS.
STEAMER FANNIE.Capt ISAAC DAVI
YT7"ILL LEAVE ACCOMMODATION WHARP EVER
W TUESDAY AND FRIDAY MOANING, ot 7 o'clocl
Returning, will leavo Georgetown every THUH3DA
aud SUNDAY MORNING, at 7. o'clock.
Freight received daily, and stored free of charge.
For Freight and Paaaago, apply to
FERGUSON 4 HOLMES, Agents,
Januarys . . Accommodation Wharf.
CHARLESTON AND CAMDEN
REGULAR LINE STEAMERS
THE NEW SPLENDID LRCN 8TEAMEB
issi
m
Z. 33- VANCE,
CAPT. CHAS. McGAREY,
AND STEAMER
VOLUNTEER,
CAPT. W. T. GARBISSON.
rjTHE ABOVE SPLENDID STEAMERS WILL RUI
JL regularly between Charleston and Camdon; th
"Z. B. VANCE" from Charleston to Wright's Bluff, an
the "VOLUNTEER" from Wright's Bluff to Cannier
Freight for oh landings on tho Santco and Watcrc
Rivers will be received at ah times, and stored tree c
charge at No. ll Exchango street All freight shippe<
by this Uno H covnrcd by insurance.
For further information or freight engogomonls, appl;
to the undersigned. JAMES BROWNE,
Exchange street, Charleston,
BROCK A BENBOW, Wright's Bluff.
October 30 C. BELL, Camden.
Charleston aud Savannah- Steam
Packet Line.
VIA BEAUFORT AND HILTON HEAD.,
Steamer PILOT BOY.Captain W. T. MCNELTI
Steamer ELIZA HANCOX....Captam J. K. RICJIARDSO
LEAVE ACCOMMODATION WHARF, CHARLESTON
and Charleston Wharf, Savannah, Monday, Wednec
day, Friday and Saturday mornings, at 7 o'clock.
Thc PILOT BOY leaves Charleston every Monday an
Friday, and Savannah every Wednesday and Saturday.
The ELIZA HANCOX leaves Charleston every Wednet
day and Saturday, and Savannah every Monday and Fri
day.
Tho Pilot Doy trill touch at Bluffton on hor Monda;
trip from Charlostou, and her Wednesday trip from Sa
vannah.
Freight received daily and stored free of charge.
For Freight or Passage, apply to
FEBGUSON & HOLMES, Agents,
Chorloston, S. C.
C1AGHOBN k CU NINGHAM, Agontfl .
Savannah, Ga.
N. B.-The Steamers of this Lino connect at Ch aries toi
with South Carolina and Northeastern Railroads, and a
Savannah with Central and Albany and Gulf Railroads ant
Florida steamers. January 2
FOE WM^^MmMm
THE STEAMER
"DICTATOR,"
10(H) TONS BURTHEN,
CAPTAIN L. M. COXETTEB,
TT7TLL LEAVE MIDDLE ATLANTIC WHARF EVER?
W FRIDAY NIGHT, at 10 o'clock, for this port.
For Freight or Passage, apply on board, or to office ol
J. D. AIKEN k CO., Agents,
Nove?vlv?r i S -utb Atlantic Wuarf.
FOR PALATKA, FLA.,
FERNANDINA, JACKSONVILLE, AND ALL THE
LANDINGS ON THE ST. JOHN'S RIVER.
VIA
SAVANNAH, GA.,
THE NEW AND SPLENDID STEAMSHIP
??ICT-A.TO IR, 99
1000 TONS BURDEN.
CAPTAIN LOUIS M. COXETTEB.
ON AND AFTER THE 2CTH OCTOBER, THIS FINE
SHIP will sail from Middle Atlantic Wharf, every
Friday Night, at 10 o'clock, for thc above places.
All freight must be paid here by shippers.
Gangs of Negroes wil be tiken to the abo<?e points on
tho St John's River at $5 each. Children under ten
years of age free. Horses and Mules at roduced rates,
i5"Country papers advertising "the DICTATOR" will
please copy.
For Freight or Passage apply on board, or to the
Agency, S?uth Atlantic Whari. Dec .-meer 12 I
G?ORGE w. m??mm^p:m^
WHOLESALE
GROCERS AND BANKERS,
HAINE STREET, CHARLESTON, S. C.
GEO. W. WILLIAMS & CO., WILLIAMS, TAYLOR k CO.,
COTTON FACTORS, COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Church-street, Charleston, S. C. No. 147 Maiden Lane, New York. *
GEO. W. WILLIAMS. E. C. WILLIAMS. J. H. TAYLOR. WM. BIRNIE, JH. EDWIN PLATT.
HAYING ESTABLISHED OUR HOUSES AS ABOVE, WE OFFER YOU OUR SERVICESJFOR
THE TRANSACTION OF YOUR BUSINESS IN CHARLESTON AND NEW YORK.
November 14 ? _wfm3mo
s,
ALLAN & SIDDONS,
No 307 KING STREET.
m HE SUBSCRIBERS WOULD RESPECTFULLY CALL ATTENTION TO THEIR HANDSOME A8
X BOBTMENT OF GOODS, CONSISTING OF:
FINE WATCHES. IN GOLD AND SILVER CASES, .with the best quality movements of ENG?
LISH, SWISS, and AMERICAN MANUFACTURE.
CLOCKS OF FRENCH, SWISS, and AMERICAN MAKE, variety of patterns.
An elegant assortment of JEWELRY, in sete, half seta, ??c.
RINGS IN GREAT VARIETY, STUDS, SLEEVE BUTTONS, SILVER WARE, FLATED WABE.
Besides maur useful cn? ornamental articles amiable for presents.
Tho PROPRIETORS being practical WORKMEN, the purchasers may rely on the quality of their
GOODS being what they are represented. ?
SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO REPAIRING
"WA.TOJEIES, 0".T??"WJpL?lrr, ETC
OLD GOLD AND SILVER bought or taken in exchange.
ALLAN & SIDDONS.
Mo. 307 King street.
November !<> . ?. m .Sm o
WILLIAM G. WHILDENJ?? CO.,
CORNER OF KING- AND BE AUPA? STREETS.
STEPHEN THOMAS, JR. . . . . WILLIAM 8. LANNEAU.
J J WINO RJECEXVED A WELL SELECTED STOCK OF L API KS AND GENTLEMEN'S*
WATCHES, IM, SILVER WMiE il FM GOODS,
Invite their customers aod the public generally to an Inspection of the same.
They have also on hand a full assortment of
SPECTACLES AND EYE GLASSES
PLATED WARE
CUT AND PRESSED GLASS DECANTERS, GOBLETS
CHAMPAGNE, TUMBLER, WINE AND CORDIAL
EVERY VARIETY OF HOUSE FURNISHING- ARTICLES. .
WATCHES AND JEWELRY REPAIRED.
AT "
NO. 256 KING-STREET,
CORNER OF BE AUE AIN, .
Novemberll _ snmw?mo CHARLESTON* SOUTH CAROLINA, '
SHIPPING.
sss
FOR NEW YORK.
THE STEAMSHIP
SABAGO SSA,
CAPTAIN CBOWELL,
TT7TLL LEAVE ADGEB'S WHARF ON SATURDAY,
VV January 12th, at - o'clock precisely. .
January 7
NEW YORK AND CHARLESTON
People's Steamship Company.
SAILING DAYS.WEDNESDAYS.
THE STEAMSHIP
EMILY B.SOUDEK
CAPTAIN B. W. LOCKWOOD,
TT7TLL LEAVE NORTH ATLANTIC WHARF ON
TT Wednesday, January 9, at - o'clock.
Une composed of Steamers "MONERA" and "EMLY.
B. SOUTER." WILLIS ? CHISOLM. Agents,
Jnnuarj' 7 mtuwth North Atlantic Wharf.
PASSAGE REDUCED!
CHEAP PASSAGE TC OR F ROU I
EURO PE,
BY RATT.TNO SHIPS. SAILING EVERY WEEK. ALSO I
by the
SPLENDID MAIL STEAMERS,
Sailing every WEDNESDAY and SATURDAY to and from
Now York.
Great Reduction in Fare to
CALIFORNIA AND AUSTRALIA.
DRAFTS FOB ANY AMOUNT on Great Britain ?nd
Ireland at the very lowest rates.
Passengers, on arrival in New York, will have their
baggage removed Free, and every care bestowed on them.
For Passage, Jrc, apply to M. M. QUINN,
Nc. 627 If ins street, charleston, b. ..
Februarv ?7 l*r
SALOONS.
BILLIARD SILOi,
WITH FIRST-CLASS
PHELAN TABLES.
THE FINEST LIQUORS, ALES AND SEGABS, AL?
WAYS ON HAND; NEW YORK AND MILL POND
OYSTERS.
H. H. BADENHOP & CO.,
No. 133 Meetioir-Street
November IO CHARLESTON. .& O
Tl SOUTHERN EXCHANGE !
THE FINEST OYSTERS
OP THE SEASON !
TUE BEST LIQUORS IN TOWN!
THE GREAT POPULAR RESORT.
THE PROPRIETOR OF THE SOUTHERN EX?
CHANGE, No. 125 MEETING-STREET, respectfully in?
forms the public that the
OLD POPULAR PLACE
Is still c?cn. The FINEST OYSTERS TO BE HAD he
offers by the barrel, bushel, gallon or quart; also, on the
half shell at tba counter, or stewed, roasted, fried, or in
any other way desired.
FRESH ALES,
FINE BRANDIES,
GOOD WHISKIES,
FIRST-RATE WINES,
No. 1 SEGARS.
THOMAS FLYNN, Proprietor. m
December 17
RAILROADS.
NORTHEASTERS RAILROAD.
SHORTEST, QUICKEST A KD ONLY DIRECT SOUTH
to ??: ? ....
NEW YORK .
PHILADELPHIA
BALTIMORE
WASHINGTON
BICHMOND
PETERSBURG
WELDON and ' ' '
WILMINGTON.
Time through by Express Train to New York 44 boors.'
Fare....fM 00. !
Tickets good by either of the three following Bootes :.
RICHMOND AND WASHINGTON
BAY LINE AND BALTIMORE V
... NORFOLK. AND DELAWARE.
Baggage checked through to any point
Tickets good until used.
8. 8. SOLOMONS,
December 29 Supt
T HOB
18 THE BEST FAMILY SEWING MACHINE
::Ht THE WORLD, t? OS
r; 13 THE EASIEST OPERATED ; THE LEAST COM?
PLICATED, and me leaat liable to getorit of order. :
It makes FOUR DIFFERENT STITCHES: Lock, Knot,
Double Lock and Double Knot; each stitch perfect and
alike on both uidea of the fabric
The work will feed either to the right or. left without
stopping tho maahine.
It will Braid, Tuck, Quflt, Cord, Hom, FeB, Bind.
Gather and Stitch on a Buffle at the sama time, and do au
Upd? of Stitching required by Families and. Mnimfah
turora
It runs easily, and la almost noiseless. ? ? > ?
It is the most rapid sewor hz the world, making fire
stitches to each revolution. - -
It uses the same size threads on both aides, of the
fabric.
It oils no dresses, sB its machinery being on top of tbs
table.
Its tension ls self-adjusting, and hence not habla to
break the thread.
THE
MACHINES may be seen in operation at HAYDEN'S
JEWELRY STORE, corner of King and Hasel streets,
where the truth of the above wfll be demonstrated to all
who may catt.
AGENTS WANTED
In every District in the State, to whom liberal induce?
ments w?l be offered.
For further Information, call on, or address
C. W. DENNIS k CO.,
General Agents for South Carolina.
Decembw 20 _?_ imo
WHITE & PAINE,
FACTORS,
SM? & Commission Merciants
NO 4 SOUTH A TI, ANTIC WHARF,
CMAHl.-?S l u>, ?, C,
J. J. WHITE..t.i?OifeL?3. ?\:S2
fiicv?moer
THE
SOUTHERN EIPEESS COMPANY,
Office No. 147 Meeting-street
OQIT3Sr??TIOiTS
WITH AIX
RAILROADS THB0?GH0?T.
SHE
UNITED STATES.
Every attention given to the
safe Transmission of Freight,
Money, and Valuables.
WILL GALL FOU AND DELIVER
FREIGHT TO ANT POINT IN
THE Oil? FREE QF
CHARGE.
II. B. PLAUT,
President Augusta, Bi
lira_
M. M. QUINN,
Wholesale & Retail Dealer*
IN
BOORS, PERIODICALS,
NEWSPAPERS, STATIONERY, ITO,
.> ?ST KII?.|VHIII,
(Oppoalte Amvttreet
JHARLEBTON, S. C.
The latest Issue* of the press alwavi on hand.
Subscript!.ina teoetved and Gooda daUmcdflf lon
fardad by Mall or Sm reas,
AO GASH ORDER?, wui o? promptly i*tan flatt o,
Pfffmiary jf u

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