OCR Interpretation


The Charleston daily news. (Charleston, S.C.) 1865-1873, April 13, 1867, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026994/1867-04-13/ed-2/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

VOLTIME IV.NO. 428. CHARLESTON, S. C., TUESDAY MORNING-, JANUARY 1, 1867. PRICE Tmm rnSfrTS " '
TELEGRAPHIC.
-. ?.
Our Cable Dlspatcncs.
WAR RUMORS rx EUROPE.
BERLIN. April ll. -BISMARK bas scut au ener?
getic note to Paris, demanding tho reason for arm?
ing. Ho says that Prussia holds Franco responsi?
ble for the consequence, and demands tho instant
cessation of warliko preparations.
RASTADT, April ll.--The Prussian garrison at
Rastadt has been rem forced by two regiments.
Rastadt is a strongly fortified Baden towu near
. tuc right bank ol tho Rhine, and 14 miles from
Karlsruhe.
STDTOARDT, April H.-Orders have been sent to
tho principal Wurtemberg and Baden Railway
Stations to send cars for cavalry horses.
SERIOUS ILLNESS OF THE PRINCESS OP WALES.
LONDON, April ll-Evening.-The Princess of
Wales is at tho point of death, a surgical operation
at tho lenee, bone being necessary to Bave her life,
and it is feared she cannot endure tho pain, as she
is too weak for chloroform. ?he news is carefully
kept from tho public. Tho Prince of Wales haunts
theatres as usual.
DUBLIN, April ll.-Patrick CONNELIN, alias
General MORREY, the late Fenian leader, escap?d
a:i indictment by turning Queen's evidence.
LIVERPOOL, April 12.- An iron-clad war steamer
departed. Her supposed destination ia Cadiz, to
enfoicc British views regarding^the seizure of thc
Tornado.
LONDON, April 12.-Tho Grand Jury have ignored
tho indictment agaiust Gov. EYRE for cruelty in
suppressing tho Jamaica rebollion.
Tho Canadian Railway Bill, by which England
guarantees certain railroad loans, was pissed.
LONDON, April 12.-The fleet which sailed for
Cadiz took out a peremptory demand for redress
in the Tornado and Victoria cases.
Spain has rei urned an evasive answer.
LIVERPOOL, April 12.-The steamships CUy of
Erie ano! the City of Limerick, have arrived cut.
BREST, April 12.-1116 Guiding Star touched.
LONDON, Aprii ll-Evening.-Consols 90?;
r Bonds 73i ; Bliuoh 764 ; Eries 36$.
LONDON, April 12-Noon.-Consols 904. Bonds
73|.
LONDON, April 12-Afternoon.-Consols advanced
j. American securities unchanged.
LONDON, April 12-Evening.-Consols 90?. U.
S. Bonds 74.
LONDON, April 12-Evening.-The Bullion in uno
Bank of Eugland ' is decreased 209,000 pounds.
LIVERPOOL, April ll-Evening.-Cotton contin?
ued dull and heavy to the close ; Middling Uplands
12al2?d; Orleans 12i ; sales 8000 bales. Corn
easier at 42s. 9d. Provisions generally unchanged.
Lard advanced ; American 4ts. Turpentine 37s.
Common Rosin 8s. 3d.;[Fine 17s.
LIVERPOOL, April 12-Noon.-The Brokers'Cir?
cular reports the total sales of the week 58,000
bales, including 16,000 for speculation and exports.
Prices declined fully jjd. during the'week. Quota?
tions this morning : Middling Uplands 12; Orleans
124. Stock estimai ed at 712,000 bales, including
383 American. Probable sales for the day 8000
bales.
. LIVERPOOL, April 12-Afternoon.-Wheat, ad?
vanced 2d. sine? noon. Cotton easier ; others un?
changed. .: ' -'. "
LIVERPOOL, April 12-Evening.-The cotton
market continued heavy and inactive, quotations
show no chango. Sales 8000 bales-Middling Up?
lands 12d; Orleane 124d.
Washington News.
WASHINGTON, April 12.-Thc postoihee building
has been lighted by gas generated on the premises,
and JAMES A. KENNEDY, Treasurer and Superin?
tendent, A. H. DOUBLEDAY and L. B. MOSES, clerks,
went to the basement to remedy some gas diffi?
culty. They carried a candle with them and a *c
rifle explosion occurred. MOSES will die, and ihe
others are seriously but not fatally hurt.
The Supreme Court has been densely crowded.
Two motions have precedence, and it is considered
doubtful whether tho complaints bo reached to?
day.
? Only an extra eiipense was incurred in making
the Russian Treaty. There was a dispatch of in?
quiry sent to Gen. HALLECK at San Francisco, and
he replied that from five to ten million dollars
would be a reasonable price.
The President's health has greatly unproved, f;
and he-has attended a Cabinet-meeting.
The Maryland returns give 7000 majority for
calling a Stete Convention.
In - the Senate; after a ven- -long debate, they
have adopted a resolution to adjourn on Tuesday.
The decision of the Supreme Court will be soon
rendered. ? ^ _ _ ?
Tbe Supreme Court.
WASHINGTON, April 12.-In the Supr?me Court, Ii.
on motion to file -tho Mississippi Bill, the Chief [
Justice said that a motion to file a BUI was usually
granted as a matter of course, but if, as was sug?
gested, tho Bill contains matter scandalous or un?
fit to come before the Court, tho Court examines
it, or r?fers it to a master. - lit; tins. case the At?
torney-General obj ects ito ihe 'BRI: as containing j
matter unfit to" bring - before th o Court. That is
the only point tlia icannow- bo -considered. "Upon
that point the Court wiU first hear the Attornoy
General.
Mr. O'CONNOR aanounced-bimseif and associates
in attendance, should it bo decided to argue both
Bills. The Attorney-General sad tho Georgia Bill
lacked the point bi which he proposed to' oppose
the filing 01 the Mississippi BUL Tho Mississippi
Bill was in a legal sense scandalous, as it proposed
to make the President a defendant before the
Court.
Mr. SHARKEY seid he had amended the Bill BO as
to proceed against tho President as a citizen of
Tennessee.
Attorney-General STANSBURY read portions of
the Bill, claiming that it was manifestly against
the President as President. He. alluded to a pro?
cess somewhat similar.used against Mr. JEFFER?
SON. In the BOD trial, Mr. JEFFERSON did not
obey, or even notice the process. As an officer, he
should advise tho President to disregard the sub?
poena, and traced the result should the Court re?
sist and the President remain firm. Thc Court, to
maintain its dignity, would have to imprison tho
President for contempt. Ho maintained that,
equally with the Kings of England, the President
was exempt from proceedings of this kind. He
could only be brought before the Bar of the Senate
af tor impeachment.
The Courts could punish him for acts committed
while President, but he was beyond their jurisdic?
tion while occupying that chair. He also main?
tained that tho action was Against the United
States Government as much so as if that Govern?
ment were named. He announced that he appear?
ed at the request of the President, who, when the
Bills were passed over his veto, there was but one
duty, in his estimation, resting upon lum-that
was, faithfully to carry out and execute those laws.
R. J. WALKER followed, and the Court took the
matter under advisement.
Marine Intelligence.
PHILADELPHIA, April 12.- -Arrived, tho Stars and
Stripes, from Havana.
The brig Milo, from New Orleans, has put in for
repairs.
. The .schooner Wm. A. Sargent, from Darien,
Georgia, was spoken at soa, and had been out of
food for four days. Sho was supplied.
NEW YORK, April 12.-Arrived, the Manhattan,
from Liverpool, and the Wilmington, from Gal?
veston.
Domestic Markets.
NOON DISPATCH.
NEW YORK, April 12.-Stocks steady; '62 coupons
109?al094; of 64,1074; of '65, 108; new issue, 107a
107]; 10-40's, 93; 7-30's, first series, 106; others 105?.
Virginia 6's of '62 at 65; Tennessee 6 s, old issue,
of'62, at 65. Money 7. Gold 86$.
Flour dull. When,, duh. Com lc. lower. Pork
quiet: Mess $22 95a23. lard dull, at 124al34 cents.
Whiskey dull. Barley dull. Peas dulL Cotton
quiet, at 27ja2Sc. for Middling Uplands. Freights
quiet.
EVENING DISPATCH.
Stock market ven- excited. Y>2 ?oupous 1094a
109J ; Tennessee 6's, new issue, 624a?J ; North
Carolina 6's, e x coupons, 49. Money 7. Gold 1363.
Cotton easier and lower ; sales 2400 bales at 27a
274 for Middling Uplands. Flour and Whoat quiet
anio1 unchanged. Com active ; Mixed Western
$1 29al 81 ; Southern White $1 26. Provisions
quiet. Mt BB Pork $23 05. Sugar firm and un?
changed. Rico quiet and unchanged. Coffee
heavy. Naval Stores firm and unchanged. Freights
dull.
BALTIMORE, April 12.-Flour firm and nominal.
Com-Mixed Went ru SI 19; Southern Yellow
?1 20al 22. Clover Seed $12 75al3. Provisions
and Whiskey unchanged.
NEW ORLEANS, April 12_Sales 750 bales Cot?
ton; market lower and unsettled; Low Middliugs
2(ia264, and nominal. Receipts of tho week, 8045,
against 9751. Exports, 2178. Stock, 107,232. Primo
Sugar 134. .fermenting Molasses 65. Flour firm,
aud in good demand; Super $13 5U. Corn in re?
quest at full prices, $1 30al 33. Oats 85a87A. Pork
dull at $234 nominal. Bacon very dull, and oiily a
retad business doing. Lard steady and firm.
Gold 37.|a37??. Sterling 1-17. New York sight *
premium.
MOBILE, April 12.-Sales 690 balea. Market quiet,
Middlings 2l4a? >:.. Receipts 388 bales ; sales
of the week 30s>'.>. Receipts of thc week 1925.
Exports of the "week 3558. Stock 43.071.
AUOUSTA. April 12.-Market inactive, prices easi?
er. Saies 100 l?ales Jliddlings at 25c.
SAVANNAH, April 12.-Market flat and a small
business done. Middlings 254a26c. Receipts 400
baler.
ST. LOUTS, April 12.-Flour unchanged. Wheat
di?L Com declined la2c. Provisions dull. Mess
Fork $22a25. Bacon unchanged. Lard 124al3e.
. CINCINNATI, April 12.-Hour firm and uncUanged.
Com-a better supplv offered; prices la2c. lower;
in sacks il. Mess Pork held at$22a22 75. Bacon
Shoulders 94c; Clear Sides 224c.
Our New York Letter.
[FROM OUR REGULAR CORRESPOKDWr.]
NEW YORK, April 10_lu my letter of the 3d
inst. I made an allusion to the unprecedented rise
in rents here, and the extreme difficulty in pro?
curing eligible unfurnished houses, except at the
most unreasonably exorbitant figures. It had
been confidently hoped and .expected that as the
month of April advanced, and the first of May
the great moving day -grew nearer and nearer at
hand, the landlords, fearful of having their houses
left untenanted, would yield gracefully, and lower
their high notions and high rents at tho same
time; but fifo is made up of disappointments and
miscalculations, and these are of them; for the
evil is unabated, and the house-rent panic (I mean
panic among the pay-rental class) grows with its
growth. In yesterday's Herald an advertisement
appeared of a desirable house to rent, in a good
location, Thirty-Sixth street, near Sixth avenue,
price only $1200; and applicants therefor were in?
vited to call at the residence of tho advertiser,
between the hours of 9 and ll in the morning.
I fear your readers may suspect me of exaggeration
when I assure them that this little notice created
more excitement among certain classes here than
would havo boen produced by the announcement
that the Supreme Court had given a decision
against tho constitutionality of the Reconstruction
Act. I can only say in reply that tho circum?
stance I am about to relate is founded strictly on
j fact, and will leavo the facts to speak for them?
selves. At tho appointed hour MOULTRIE Found
himself at the scene of action, having gono therei
not officially as your correspondent, but yet effici- j
ally in anothor capacity, viz : That of a house
seeker, acting in behalf of an about-to-be house?
less friend. If the man had advertised to give ont
gold in exchange for ex-Confederate currency, the
house could not have boon more crowded with
eager applicants ; the parlor was filled with ladies,
the passage-way was crowded-there was~a perfect
jam outside and around tho entrance, -ind, in fact,
it waa almost impossible to get inside thc honse.
MOULTRIE, however, wedged his way in-to see the
fun. At nine o'clock the gentleman made his ap?
pearance, like a Mayor at his court, and announced
that he would first give an . audience to the
lady, who he had been informed by his servant j
(who wore white gloves) had been waiting patiently
sinoe seven o'wock. Tho patient lady was received
Lu a "oom adjoining the crowded parlor, then an
n her lady, then another still, each one marching
ip in a post office style. The crowd, however, grew
impatient'and made a rush for the private room;
whereupon the gentleman came forward like a can?
didate for a public office and addressed them all
collectively. He began by stating that the honse
has no yard, whereupon about a dozen of the
ladies were seen to disappear suddenly. Next ho
stated that some ?f tho rooms were rather small,
then added in a kind of parenthetc style, that
there was a mistake in tho advertisement as to the
exact locality in which the house is situated, and
concluded his address by remarking that he re?
gretted to Btate that better-half being indisposed
he himself was indisposed to show the house to
each or any of the assembled multitude' till 6ome
time next week. To describe the scene that en?
sued at tho termination of this oration is almost
impossible. Noses wero turned so contemptuously
(some of,.thorn tantalizingly pretty noses) that
they seemed determined to remain up like the
renta.: A rush was made for the door, your cor?
respondent being the first one out, and the house
waa soon vacated by those who will have to VJ cate
their own houses before tho first of May, or stand
the raise in their rents and accept the situation
that they cannot better-except by taking a
house in an up-town situation, and moving up to
some point between 80th and 130th streets, tho
terminus of Third ? venue Railroad, and a ride of
one hour and twenty minutes from the City Hall
Park.
Some little exe i tentent has been cr it ed here by
the arrival of ?w Great Eastern ; not, howover.
from any desire to see the big -nip, io* the gene?
ral curiosity ba? been gratified on thut point on
two occasions .in 1860and 1662), bul because many
bad feared that bhe Nd ?one to bottom, as st* I
crossed tho ocean in quite a leisurely and^dig?i-J
fled style, taking fourteen diys from port to port>L
The Great Eastern may be-in fact-is-the largeet I
and handsomest ateomship.afloat, yet, should I over
have occasion to go across the water, uncoupled, j
with a desire to go under, I would prefer embark-ii,
Lng in a smaller craft.
I have hitherto purposely avoided any allusion to
the outrageous crusade against a class of people
whom, spite of religious (or rather irreligious) pre?
judice, we cannot but respect,by such of tholnsur
mcQ Compauios aa claim to have suffered by taking
what they are pleased to c-il? "Jew risks;" but as I
the excitement has been rosumed, and as there are
no less than sixty thousand israelites hero who
protest against tho base calumny, my duty as a
correspondent induces me at least to give the
facts as thoy are. A card has been publishod in
the Herald, which, it is supposed, emanates from !
ane of the Insurance Agenta, reiterating the ;
charges and attempting to substantiate th0
truth (?) thereof; wherefore, an indignation meet?
ing is to be held on Monday next, in which many :
of the wealthiest and most respectable Jewish
merchants and capitalists will take part. No less
than sixty of the largest and oldest Insurance
Companies in.the United States have made state?
ments giving the he unqualified and direct to these
ridiculous charges; but, nevertheless, the lie bas
taken root in all directions, proving that though
truth be mighty il will not always prevail, and that
the seeds of falsehood, planted in the soil of pre?
judice, and watered by the hand of ignorance, will
spring up with a groodly crop (or a badly crop) of
lies.
AUGUST BELMONT'S gallery of paintings-per?
haps the finest privato collection in this city-will
bo thrown open in a-few days for public inspec?
tion, the price of admittance being placed at ono
dollar, the proceeds to bo handed over to tho
Ladies' Southern Relief Fund.
A. T. STEWART'S dry goods establishment on
Broadway, at the corner of Tenth street, is to bc
enlarged to about six times its prcsont size. It
will extend through to Fourth avenue, and will
cover an area of an acre and a quarter of ground.
In ono of my letters published several months
ago, I gavo an account of a now invention, a mag?
netic fight, with such brilliancy as to admit of
one's reading ordinary print at a distance of a
quarter of a mile fir ->*the light, and I predicted
that it would soon .mc into general use herc.
My prediction will probably soon ?)a verified, as
the thing has been thoroughly tested and found to
bo all that is claimed for it. The Ugld is so in
teytse thal it mil fuse a piece of melatheld at a dis?
tance of ftfly yard? therefrom, and for photograph
purposes it is superior to the light of tho sun
itself.
Tho Charleston c?rrese ondont of thc Herald in
fonnr its readers that South Carolinians are not.
only repentant, but that if the Radical party
"would act generously, modify the iron-clad oath,-'
&c, that all who have been bad boys will not only
be good boya to Uncle Sam, but will throw their
Northern Democratic friends overboard, and that
" the Radical party will carry South Carolina
almost unanimously for their candidate for the
next Presidency." The correspondent does not
give this opinion as his own exactly, but tells us
that it is the opinion of "many." South Carolina
unanimous for a Radical candidate ! ! O t?mpora, O
nwres ! ! MOULTRIE.
TUF I IOHT IN TUE RICHMOND CUSTOM HOUSE.
The Herald's Richmond correspondent gives tho
following account of the rough and tumble between
the Hon. Mr. Sogar and the Collector of this port,
in the Custom House the other day :
The variations of the day's amusement com?
menced with an interesting checking match be?
tween tho Hon. Joseph Segar and Mr. James,
the Collector in Richmond, which was brought
about by a demand on tho part of the former
for certain over-assessed monies belonging to
citizens, which had been ordered to bo refunded
by the Secretary of tho Treasury. Mi. Segar,
representing tbeso parties, presented a power
o" attorney to Mr. James, consisting of claims
of sixty-six persons, amounting to some $4000
and demanded payment. Mr. James examined
the paper, made some objection, and not only re?
fused to pay, but by a flank movement subsequent?
ly obtained possession of the paper and secreted
ii upr.. his perron. Segar, seeing he could not get
tho money, demanded tho paper, but without suc?
cess, when lu seized James by the collar and
shook him violently. James still obstinately re?
fused to give up the paper, when Sogar, releasing
hold of his collar, seized him by tho throat, and
for a time there was a possibUity of the department
being minus a collector, when a third partv inter?
posed in tho person of a Mr. Smith, who separated
the belligerents andpledgod himself for tho return
of the document. Upon this assurance Mr. Segar
returned to his hotel, but up to thc present timo
the document has not been returned.
THE COLORED SCHOOLS OF CHARLES.
TOW.
The negro has been emancipated from slavery ;
been endowed with civil rights by Congress and
tho Legislature of the State ; and moro recently
still ho has had the greatest boon of a freeman
conferred upon him-a right to a voice in tue af?
fairs of the State and nation. In order to a proper
and salutary exercise of these newly acquired pri?
vileges, it is all important that his actions should
be directed by intelligence. Owing to circumstan?
ces over which he had no control, the negro to-day
is ignorant and uneducated. He sees the white
man around him occupy a social position superior
to his own. and he naturally ascribes it to the fact
of the greater advantages ol education he has en?
joyed. Accordingly-we find,-throughout'the South,
wherever the negroes have become thoroughly
alive to their newly acquired political importance,
a groat, almost universal desire for "education."
Of course, their ideas on the subject are vague, and
not unfrequently, exroneous. They expect impossi?
bilities. They have not yet learned that silk purses
cannot be made out of every kind of material. Tims
we not unfrequently see great, uncouth, unclean
girls, eighteen and twenty years old, as far as age
can be judged from looks,-the vory beau ideal of
an old-style plantation hand, sitting unhappily on
a hard bench in tho school room, thumbing, soil?
ing and dog-earing an unfortunate "WEBSTER'S
spelling book; learning nothing, and certainly not
enjoying their idleness; for being shut up for hours i
in a hot and crowded school room? and sitting on
a hard and narrow bench, is no fun, oven to a ne- ?
gro, who had been accustomed to regular work in :
tho open air. This class of students, as a general ;
thing, do not remain long at school; their mo- i
thers soon becoming weary of maintaining them
in idleness, while they themselves are engaged in j
hard work, and, unless the scholar shows a special ;
aptness for "book learning," and is likely to "take
an education," the attempt is soon abandoned. !
This, of course, has reference more especially to .
those born on the plantations, who have emigrated :
to the city within tho past two years. . j
There are two large schools here, devoted
to the furtherance of the cause of education
among the colored people of the city. One, the
SAXTON School, is in the Military Hall, in Went- j
worth street, the same which last year occupied tho ;
Normal Scho?l building in St. Philip street, in
charge of Rev. F. L. CABDOZO. The other, in
charge of Mr. ABTHUB SUMNER, is in the Morris
Street School building. The latter being the older .
of the two, we shall Bpeak of it first.
The Morris Street School, ?built by tho Board of
Commissioners of Free Schools of this city, a few
years before the war, was opened for the reception
of colored children in March, 18G5. Thero are
about 850 names on the rolls, average attendance i
being 607, or. 77 per centum. Tho Principal of this
School is aided in his labors by 16..assistants, 13 of
whom aro white and 3 "colored ; 5 ol' tho teachers ;
are from the North. /The number enrolled for I
March was' 788-455: girls and .as^boys. Thero
were in March 48 over 16 years' ot age. $73 50 was
received during tho .month from the pupils toward j
tho support of the SchooL Surprising is that
while wo find 154 in the Third*'Reader and 53 in
the Fourth National- Bea4e^? ghe number in !
Grammar is 0! Yet we find the School graded
into Intermediate and Grammar Classes.
"As a general thing," says Mr. SUMNER, in a rer ':
cent letter published in the Boston Jranscripl, \
"all that these children know of the aforesaid
parts of science has been acquired since the 14th 1
of March, 1865. Those who have attended con- !
stantly have had twonty months of schooling. \\
But they range aU thc way down to ono month. I ll
behove that most of the very best scholars could 1
read a little (some of them pretty well) when 'the ']
Union came in.' But very many who aro now in
the Third, and Borne who are in the 4th Reader,
did net know tueir letters afear ago. Of Arithmetic, ?
Writing and Geography,-they were, almost with?
out exception, totally ignorant."
We have recently visited this school, and can j,
testify to the proficiency of some of tho pupils in ?
reading, mental arithmetic, and even in writing. ; i
Grammar, it appears, is not studied, and j
Geography very little, because these studies are [3
hot considered necessary to the greater number of ; ?
tie ming i jdmen. We said some of the pupils jj
read*well; this we must qualify, however. They [j
have beeh^pretty well drillod in the rules ; onun- ; i
ciatr distinctly, and re:-d with some expression, or 1
what must be conside- ed its semblance ; for real' ? j
expression there'can bo-none,! wheh tho reader
does not understand the subject ho is reading '
about ; and this, with scarcely a single exception, .!
is the case with al) the best readers even we found j t
in our visits to both the colored schools. It may li
be we expect impossibilities, and look for '..
sprightliness and general intelligence, where, from ,
tho nature of the caso, they cannot, at least for ;
some years, be reasonably expected. . : !
Tho "Saxton,School," now at the Military Hall, I,
was established October 1, 1365, in the Normal h
School Building : Rev. F. L. CABDOZO. Principal,
assisted by a corps of twenty teachers,, ten of J
whom were colored natives-seven females and ,
three males-the other ten whito female teachers ;
from the North. During the term cf 1865-'66 ?
thero wero ono thousand scholars on the rolls. The
school was graded into three departments-oftor the
system prevailing in tho common schools through?
out the North-Primary, Intermediate and Giam
mar. There was a further division of the scholars .
into twonty classes-two in the Grammar Depart?
ment, six in the Intermediate, and twelve in the <
Primary. Tho present term commenced on tho
first of October, 18CC, and will close on tho UOth of [
June. The Principal is assisted this term by four?
teen teachers-eight of whom aro colored natives, :
six females and two males, and six white females
from tho North. There are eight hundred and
fifty pupils registered this term, divided into four- :
teen classes, two in the Grammar, six in the Inter?
mediate and six in tho Primary Department.
The books are purchased direct from the pub?
lishers, and tho scholars pay for them when they ;
arc able, and when too poor to pay, thoy receive ?
them gratis. Tho average attendance during the
first term was about 84 per cont.; and during the
present term, thus far, it has been about 75 per
cent. The proportion of freedmen to those who
wore free beforo tho war, among tho scholars of
this school, is about three to one. Tho number of
those of pure African deseen? and of mixed blood
is about equal. All the scholars, we aro informed
by the Principal, are making most creditable pro?
gress ; though wo must confess, in all candor, that
this is not very obvious. Still it may bo so, as Inc
Principal has better means for judging than an
occasional visitor can possibly havo. Three of thc
most advanced boys have been sent to Oberlin Col
lego, in Ohio, wo belie fo, to receive a collegiate
education, tho expense being defrayed by three
Northern gentlemen.
The school is supported by tho American Mis?
sionary Association of New York. Thc cost of
each scholar is about one dollar per month, of
which amount nearly one-eighth is contributed hy?
the scholars. Wc are requested to Btale that
visitors are welcomed to this school at all times;
and that there will be a public examination of the
school in the Methodist Episcopal Church, Went?
worth street, opposito the Military Hall, on Thurs?
day afternoon next, the 18th inst., commencing at
three o'clock.
The singing is very good in ail these schools;
sometimes perhaps a little too loud; but that is
easily coirected. Thero are two points, howover,
to which wo reluctantly call attention, in which it
seems to us these schools do not show lo tho same
advantage this year as they did twelve months
ago. The children as a rule are neither clean nor
tidy. True, in the condition of lite, to which most
of them bolong, it cannot be expected that they
should be finely dressed, wear their Sunday clothes
every day, or come with elaborate toilets; but it is
within the power ot every good teacher to have his
or her children come to school neat and clean. Wo
do not like to say what will be unpleasant either to
the teachers or to thc parents; but cleanliness is
tho first lesson in education, as there can bc no
self-respect without it; and, therefore, no healthy
ambition. Tho other fault wo rind, and it i^ akiu
to the first, is that the deportment of the children
in the class-room is not what we had expected.
There is more listlessness than wo saw on our
visits last year; it may he because the charm of
novelty has passed away; confinement becomes
irksome, and going to school begins to look too
much like work; or it may ho lhat the teachers,
weary of stemming thc current, have relaxed their
vigilance or abated their energy; and succumbed
to the irresistible for?a cf old negro habits. The
task of these teachers is a hard and thankless one;
and wo regret exceedingly to bc compelled by
truth to say one word that looks liko blame, or
that could tend to discourage them in their ardu?
ous work.
The Moms street School, we should have men?
tioned above, is supported hy the New England
Freedmen's Union Commission.. Mr. SUMNER, the
Principal, in his lotter to the Boston Transcript,
gives the i'ollowingTaccount of the progress of his
advanced scholars in the art of thinking, and of
giving expression to their ideaB ;
"In writing, about one-half (little ones and new
scholars) aro using slates; tho others are in copy^
books-from book No. 1 to No. 8. The more a?
vanced classes write letters and compositions.
Their letters, I am forced to confess, are chiefly
upon one theme-thc superior, nay, thc adorable
qualities of their instructors. One girl lately finish?
ed a letter to her teacher thus : 'Goodbye, my dear,
loving teacher, you'sweet Little sugar plum.' I
saw upon ?he blackboard a day or two ago : 'I love
my teacher because she is good, and she loves me
because I am good and always does right.'"
There are, besides these two largo public schools,
several small private colored schools tn this city,
which,_however,..we havo not \isiied....
Tile German Treaties.
HOW THE PBUSSIAN ARRANGEMENTS WITH THE
SOUTHERN STATES WERE BROUGHT ABOUT.
A Heidelberg correspondent furnishes the sub?
joined particulars relative to the treaties between
Prussia and the Southern States:
The constitution . of a Southern Confederation
was to bo prevented at any cost, as it would have
been an obstacle to the projects of Prussia. Ii
the Sudbuhd had seen tho light, its oonditions
of existence would have been regulated by
a Parliament which cwtainly would not. have
admitted the Prussian military system,'- but
would, on the contrary, have adopted a
flan similar to that of tho Swiss 'national militia,
nstead of an offensive and defensive alliance with
the house of Hohenzollern, it would have pro?
nounced for an armed neutrality.- But the most
important poiut for Count Bismarck was to have
at bis disposal, at any given moment, the military
resources of the German States on tho left bank bf
tho Main. He, therefoie, lost no time, but pro?
filed by the presence at Berlin of the foreign Min?
isters of tho Southern States to negotiate not only
terms of poacje, but also treaties ot alliance, offen?
sive and defensive. Baden had already been*won
over ; but, under pain of a check, there was a ne?
cessity for gaining Bavaria also, as her adhesion
would produce that of Wurtemburg and of tho
Grand Duchy of Hesse.
A.. ?hat moment there arose all of a sudden
those famous demands by France of territorial
compensation which have been repeatedly spoken
of iu the press, but never in the tribune of the
legislative body. According to the Berlin Review,
Napoleon UL set up no pretension to encroach on
the Prussian territory; he claims Rhenish Bavaria
and Rhenish Hesse. If these demands had not
obtained the result expected in Paris, they brought
an unhoped-for succor to Count Bismarck. "Be?
ing communicated," that publication states, "to
the Bavarian plenipotentiary, they led to an
immediato understanding. Nevertheless, Baron
von der Pfortden, who was not ina position to
make a display of an alliance between Bavaria
and Prussia, remained in office in order to con?
ceal by his presence the game from the distrustful
glance of Austria, and from the jealous eye of
Prance. When tho pear was ripe, that is to say,
when the resistanco of Wurtemburg and of the
Grand Duchy of Hesse was overcomp in their turn.
Baron von dor Pfortden was enabled to retire and
give up his poet to the Prince of Hohenlohe. Thia
latter person was charged to conduct the affair to
a successful conclusion. Ministerial conferences
took place at Stutgsrdt. The Ministers of Foreign
Affairs and of War for Bavaria, Wurtemberg, Baden
and -Hesse-Darmstadt, countersigned the act
of Count Bismarck.'.-'Nevertheless, if I am to be
heve the information I havo received, the treaties
just published do not contain the whole extent of
the stipulations. There is still a supplementary
article which it has been thought proper to keep
?secret, in order not to be obliged to submit the
treaties to the approbation >f the Chambers. The
clause in question relates to me organization of an
armed force. Count Bismarck does not want mere
soldiers; he wishes to have well drilled mon, and
he has therefore stipulated that the contingents of
the South should bo reorganized on the model of
the Prussian army. And LT any differences arose
at the conference's, they turned only on a single
point, namely, the sort of rifle that ought to be
adopted.
Demoralization ol' Hay ti.
[From, the New York Sun.]
The latest nows from Hay ti confirms the pre?
viously reported flight of Goftrord to Jamaica,
if ter having sent in his resignation of the Presi?
dency ol that stonily republic The election of
mother President was expected to take place im?
mediately arter ' the departure of "Goffrard.- The
bistory of Havti since tho negro population ob?
tained its freedom has been a series of sanguinary
revolutions and civil" wars, and : the country
is probably in a worse condition now than ever
before. The negro leaders have nevor shown
themselves capable of agreeing upon or es?
tablishing anything like a sound and sub?
stantial government.- Lifo and property have
always been exceedingly insecure and tho
constant danger of new revolutions has tended
to keep tho country in a deplorable condition.
H the African race had any capacity for self-gov?
ernment they have the best possible opportunities
i)f developing these talents in Hayti, where they
liavfl had things their-own way for moro than
tr ,y years past. The trouble appears to be tbat
their own way is a very disorderly and rebellious
mi e. They nave gone tack war da in .morals and
? du cition," and have attained proficiency in: none
of the arts of civilization except that of wai* and
political intrigue. Under their own management
their property and. credit havo alike deteriorated
in value, and the nation has made itself an object
of pity to those who expected better thiogs of the
race, and of ridicule to those who understood
them better and foresaw the result of the wild ex?
periment of negro self-government. The normal
condition of tho negro is such that.it is only by
constant association with superior races that any?
thing like civilization can be imparted to the race.
Even after such advantages there is an inevitable
tendency to relapsa into barbarity when the ele?
vating influence is withdrawn.
State Items.
PRAISEWORTHY. ACTION.- - AL a late hour jost be?
fore going to press, the following report has been
handed lyfljur tho Chairman, of the proceedings
had at a reBnt meeting of tho "colored citizens of
Sumter." TVO are sorry that we have not room in
this issue to give tho subject the attention and
consideration which it so eminently deserves. Wo
will take occasion in our next to make such re?
marks, in connection with tho same, as will at once
illustrate and verify the effect produced upon our
white citizens by this praiseworthy potion of the
freedmen. The report is as follows : '.<..
On tho evening of the 8th of April,.at a mass
meeting of the colored citizens of Sumter, Mr.
Abraham Rufliu was called to tho chan-, and Mr.
Samuel Leo was appointed Secretary.
Tho Chairman, m a few well-timed and appro?
priate remarks, oxplainod tothosowho were pres?
sent tho objeci of the Mooting-which was to take
into consideration the best and most efficient
means of bringing about more kind and friendly
feelings between tho two classes of people of our
town.
On motion of Mr. Samuel Lee a committee was
appointed, whoso duty it shall bo to di aw up a
platform in tho shape of a series of resolutions
tor consideration by a futuro meeting. Tho follow^
ing aro the names of those ;rho were appointed on*
tho said Committee; ,".,? * *.*
Ransom Jones, John Johnson London Sumter,
Darby Gale.iLott Dick, Henry Mack, IsttBwJohn
sou?atfi ftice, Joseph DcLorrne. |
.-. Zjt>. AJLRAHAM RUgFIN, Chairman.
S^yflpM?Ejic^Ktary. "^Sumter News.
DEATH OF"*AN ESTIMABLE LADY.-We are sure
that all classes of our citizens will join in the feel?
ing of sorrow with which wc announce tho death,
o:: the afternoon of Tuesday last, at four o'clock P.
M., of Mrs. Charlotte Bossard, ono of our oldest
and most esteemed residents. This sad intolh
?enco has reached us just before we go to pross.
bid.
COURT OF COMMON PLEAS.-Tho Spring Term
for 18fi7, of the Court of Common Pleas and Gon
cral Sessions for Sumter District convonod on
MOnday morning last. Tho Honorable Judge
Thomas N. DawkinB, of Union, presides. Our time
being fully engaged in attendance on the Court wc
have not had an opportunity to notice any Horns in
cennoction therewith that would likely prove of
public interest.
Judge Dawkins fulfils the duties of his high sta?
tion with dignity, grace, remarkable ability, and
stern impartiality.-ibid.
DEATH OF AN OLD COLORED RESIDENT_"Old
Garrick,'1 who, for many years, was to bo seen
about tho Commercial Bank, and who was always
regarded as an honest, straightforward servant,
departed this lifo, Wednesday afternoon, at his
residonce in this city.-Thanfr.
To TAKE THE STUMP.-The Columbia correspon?
dent of the Yorkvillo Enquirer says that th? party
who sustain Beverly Nash, among the colored rosi
dents of this city, is increasing, and that Beverly,
having been invited by his own people, in various
parts ot' the State, to address them on political
topics, is preparing to taku the ?tump.-Ibid.
ADJOURNMENT OF COURT.-Court adjourned on
Saturdav last after a laborious session. 'JLhe case
of tho State vs. Margaret S. Kirkland, Powell Kirk
ladd and McBas Kirkland, a mother and two sous,
for thc killing of James A. Kirkland, in June, 1865,
resulted in a verdict of guilty of murder. At tho
conclusion of the Court the Bar unanimously adopt?
ed a resolution highly complimentary tb Judge
Dawkins, which was presented in suitable terms
and responded tc by his Honor with words e lo?
quent with feeling.-Clint (ten Journal.
Tho Weldon Stato learns from au eye witness
that Woodson's liotei, in tho town of Halifax, was
entirelv destroyed by lire on Sunday night last. It
is thought that the tire was cummuncatod tc the
building by the explosion of a kerosene lamp. Thc
entire furniture of the house was destroyed. The
flames wero communicated to thc drag koro of J.
M. Grizzard & Co., but were finally extinguished
by thc gallant efforts of our colored friend, Wil?
liam Simmons, more favorably known as the gov?
ernor. Bill had his clothes burnt off while en?
deavoring to master the fire.
A general strike is threatened among tho loco?
motive engineers and firemen of Great Britain,
numbering about 20,000. j
ONE PRICE
OUR SPRING STOCK IS NOW
ready, and comprises a better assort?
ment of
CLOTHING
AND
J
Adapted to this market, than we
have ever offered. We have given
particular attention in getting up
this Stock to lightness of fabric,
strength of material and durability
of color. Much the larger portion:I
of our Stock is made in our own
workshop, and we warrant it in
every respect equal to custom work.
We haye Goods not of our own man?
ufacture, such as are usually sold
ready-made, the difference we shall
be glad to show our customers.
In fixing our prices, from which
we make no de viation, we have taken
into consideration the depressed
state of the market, and the univer?
sal desire to buy goods cheap.
We give below some of our lead.
ing prices:
CHECK CASSIMEBE SUITS.$8 00
ALL WOOL TWEED SUITS.'..ll 00
ALL WOOL TWEED SUITS.13 00
BLACK AND WHITE MTX CASSIMEBE
SUITS, our own moke.. .17
THRFJ/STYLES OF MIDDLESEX CASSI-, "
MERE BUTTS, DABS, MEDIUM, AND
LIGHT MIXTUBES........:....18 00
BLACK AND WHITE MIX CASSIMEBE
; surra.........22?
SILK MIX TBICOT, DIFFEBENT MIX
TUBES.-..2400
FINE BLACK GEBMAN TBICOT SUITS... .27.00
DABK BBOWN GI?AIN DE POUDEB
SUITS.. ; -. 29 Ol'
BLACK DRESS SUITS, ranging in price
from.$19 to 62 00
LINEN SUITS, from.$5 to 20 00
. . . . ? - /
In addition to the above, we have
many good Styles of LIGHT AND
DARK FANCY
CASSIMERES,
IN FULL SUITS
And in Pants and Vests.
ALSO,
ALPACA SACHS ?V\'
DRAP DEE?E.SUJ||I
MABSEILLES^tESTS, White and Fancy
BLUE^I^N^ELsfei?S, of very fine quality
^BEA^"WWTJB >PJrCK SJJTT8, &c, ?tc. ?
*****
FURNISHING GOODS.
....... '. '. i . j..
In addition to our usual assort?
ment of GENTLEMEN'S FURNISH?
ING GOODS, we wish to call parti?
cular attention to our
SHIRT DEPARTMENT
Wc have made arrangements to
have our SHIRTS made by our own
Pattern, and we think they will
compare favorably in style and flt
with any Shirt on the market.
THEY COMPRISE FOUR QUAL?
ITIES, $2 50, $3 00, $3 50, and
H OO.
We invite the attention of COUN?
TRY MERCHANTS and PLANT?
ERS TO OUR STOCK, which we
are selling In quantities at very low
prices.
' MACULLAR,. WILLIAMS di PARKER,
No. 270 KING STREET,
CORNER OF HASEL,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
April ll Imo
MARRIED.
On the 10th Instant, by the Bev. J. B. SEAIBOOK,
BOBEBT L. HOUSTON, to SABAH A, eldest daughter
of W. INGLIS, all of this city.
AST Thc B elativeg, Friends and Acquaint?
ances of Mr. and Mrs. Wu. J. Buns.' are respectful] / In?
vited to attend the Funeral Services of their youngest
Son, GI:OEGE HABEBNICHT, at their residence, No. 7
Chwch'Btreet,"TA? Jfomfnfc at 10 ?ftuSfc7 without fur?
ther invitation. * * , .Apifi.lS
SPECIAL NOTICES,
J8S-CITADEL SQUARE CHUBCH.-8EBYICES
To-Morrow Morning at half-past Ten' o'clock, and at
Night at quarter before Eight, by. the Pastor, Ber. : LU?
CIUS CUTHBEBT. 1 April ,13
?-TBINTTYM. E. CHURCH SOUTH, HABEL
STBEET.-Service in this Church To-Morrow, at lfl}? A.
M., and at Night at quarter to eight The discourse in the
evening will be addressed to Young Ladies. *
April 13 . 1 "
?S- ORPHAN HOUSE CHAPEL.-THE BEY.
:W. S. BOWMAN, of the Wentworth street Lutheran
Church,' will perform Divine' Service in this Chapel To
Morrow Afiernoon, 14th instant at 4 o'clock,
April 13 . .. ; ; 1 :.
?-STATE OP SOUTH CABOUNA, CHARLES?
TON DISTRICT.-DISTRICT COOM, April 7, 1857.-Or?
dered that Thu pay, tile 13th April, be appointed SEN?
TENCE DAY, that all persons who have been found guil?
ty at thia Term of the Court, and those for whom sealed
sentences have been left at the January Term, and those
under recognizance who have failed to appear, be brought
up this day. .
By order of Judge LOGAN. ....-:'
JACOB WTLLDLAN,
April 13 . Dep. Cleric
?-WE ARE AUTHORIZED TO ANNOUNCE
E. M. WHITING, Esq., as a candidate for Sheriff of
Charleston (Judicial) District ai the nert election.
September IC
?-MESSRS. EDITORS :-YOU WILL PLEASE
announce Gen. A M. MANIGAULT as a Candidate for
Sheriff at the ensuing election... r , A.01XIZEN.
Novembers . , ' sta
?- MESSRS. EDITORS:-PLEASEAN
NOUNCE JOHN T. MILLIGAN as a Candidate for Sheriff
of Charleston District, at the election' in July'next,
and ohlige.
. THE MECHANICS AND WORKINGMEN.
September 29 wW'; s
?-UNITED STATES INTERNAL REVENUE,
ASSISTANT ASSESSOB'S OFFICE, NO. 361 KTNG-ST.,
Return:? of ANNUAL TAXES for year 1866 will be receiv?
ed at tlds office for Divisions 3 and 7, comprising Wards
3, 6, c, 7, 8, and east part of *, between 12 and 3 P. M.,
until 15th ot April next, oxcept whwo parties receive no?
tice; in such cases returns must be rendered within ten
days from -lato thereof, according to law. -
A CARTER, Asst Assessor, Div. 3.
A. LINDSTROM, Aus. Assessor, Div. 7.
March 16 I stn8
?- THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA,
DARLINGTON DISTRICT.-TN FRUITY-B. W.; ED
WARDS, Administrator Tv E. HOWLS, vt. E. tu HOWLS,
JAMES P. WILSON AND. OTHERS.-BELL FOE IN?
JUNCTION, ACCOUNT AND BELIEF.-It ls ordered
that the CREDITORS of THOMAS S HOWLS, deceased,
be enjoined from proceeding to recover their claims at
law against the complainant and that they do prove and
establish their demands against the said HOWL? before
the Conunissoner of tins Court on or before the first day
of December next and in default .'thereof that they be
barred the benefit of any decree to bo pronounced
herein. . . :*
The above is a true copy from the original"rde? made
in the above stated case, 12th Feb roary, 1867.
A. F. EDWARDS, C. E. D. D'.
Commissioner's Office, Darlington C; H., Feb. 22, 1867.
February 23 .'.sal
?-THE STATE OP SOUTH CAROLINA
DARLINGTON DISTRICT-IN EQUITY-HANNAH J.
HABT, Administratrix, rs. ELLEN E. HART, JOHN
WITHERSPOON, et a!.-BILL FOB INJUNCTION,
ACCOUNT AND RELIEF.-It is ordered that the credit:
ors of JOHN L. HABT' be enjoined from proceeding to
recover their claims, at law against the - complainant, and
that they do prove and-astubUsh 'their demands against
the said John L. Hart, before the Commissioner of
this Court, on or before' the first day of November next
and in default thereof that they be ba?ed from tho ben?
efit of any decree to be made herein. 1 '."
It is also ordered that a copy of this order be published
at least once a week until (he first day of November next
in the Darlington Southerner and the Charleston Daily
News.
The above ls a true oopy from the original order made
in thc above case, 12th February, 1867.
?_A- F. EDWARDS, C. E. D. D.
COMMISSIONEB'S OFFICE, Darlington C. H, February
22,1867. *. s36fl ' ' February 23
?- THE STATE OP SOUTH CAROLINA,
DARLINGTON DISTRICT.-IN EQUITY.-P. B. BAGOT
AND T. L. EACOT, Administrators, PETER. S.
BAGOT, vs. THE HEIRS AND CREDITOR 3 OF PETER
S. 13 ACOT.-Upon hearing the pleadings ; In this case, it
is; oh motion of W. W. HABLLE?, Complainants' Solici?
tor, ordered that an and singular the creditors of the late
Peter .8. Bacot, Complainant's Intestate, be required
to filo and provo their respective demand!, and debts in
judgments and otherwise against the said Intestate, be?
fore the Commissioner of this Court, by or before the
first day of November next and in default thereof that
they be debarred from, the benefit of any decree to be
made therein, and that the Commlseloni?r of this Court
do advertise this order once a month in the Darlington
Southerner and the Charleston Daily 'News, until the
said first day of November next
The above ls a true copy from the original order made
In the above case, 13 th ot February, 1867.
A F. EDWARDS, C. E. D. D.
Commissioner's Office, Darlington C. H., February 22,
1867. 630 fl February23
?-CHIEF QUARTERMASTER'S OFFICE,
SECOND MILITARY DISTRICT, NO. ? AND SO. CA
CHABLESTON, ?0. OA., April 3d, 1867.-Sealed propos?
als will bo recel ved at this office until 1!) o'clock M.,. on
the 16lh inst, at which time they wUl; be opened, for
transporting within the City itmlte ALL THE STORES
for which the Quartermaster's Department may be re?
quired to furnish ! transportation. The contract to re?
main in force for six months ensuing May 1st 1867.
Bidders will state tho price per load for which they
wiR furnish transportation.' The average dally number
of loads hauled in the last month, has been one hundred.
Bids deemed unreasonable win be rejected. Proposals
must be addressed to tho undersigned, and. endorsed
"Proposals for furnishing Transportation.".
SO. TYLER,
Brevt Maj. Gen'L Deputy Q'r M'r Geni.
Chief Q'r M'r 2d Militasy Dist
April 3 12
SST A. YOUNG LADY RETURNING TO HER
country home, after a sojourn of a few months in the
city, was hardly recognized by her friends. In place of
a coarse, rustic, flushed face, she had a soft ruby com?
plexion of almost marble smoothness und instead of
tw: nty-three she really appeared but eighteen. Upon in?
quiry as to the cause of so great a change, she plainly
told them that she used the CERCAS ? IAN BALM, and
considered it an invaluable acquisition to any lady's toilet
By ita Mae any Lady or Gentlemen can improve their per?
sonal appearance an. hundred fold. It is simple in its
combination, as Nature herself is simple, yet unsurpass?
ed in its efficacy in drawing impurities from, also heal?
ing, cleansing and beautifying the skin and complexion.
By its direct action on the cuticle it draws from it ott its
impurities, kindly healing the same, and leaving tho sur?
face as Nature intended it should bo-clear, soft, smooth
and beautiful. Price $1, sent by Mail or Express, on re?
ceipt of an order, by
W. L. CLARK k CO., Chemists,
No. 3 West Fayette Street, Syracuse, N. Y.
The only American Agents for the sale of the same.
March 30 ly
SHIPPING
FOR LIVERPOOL.-THE FINE
t fast sailing coppered ship MABY OGDEN, W.
>E. Coldrev, master, ls now loading.' For
?fieight engagements apply to
W. B. SMITH k CO.,,
April 12 Napier's Bange.
NEW YORK AND BREMEN STEAMSHIP
COMPANY.
THE FIRST-CLASS ?. S. MAU, STEAMSHIP1
JB A L T I O ,
A G. JONES, Master,
Will leavo Pier No. 46, N. E., on Saturday, April 20, at
Noon;
FOB SOUTHAMPTON AND BREMEN,
taking passengers to Southampton, London, Havre and
Bremen, at the followiig rates, payable in gold or its
equivalent in currency: ""_ " ?,
First Cat in, ?HO; Second Cabin, $?65; Steerage, $M5.
From Bremen, southampton and Havre to Now YOIJI.
FirBt Cabm, $110; Second Cabin, S75; Steerage, $43.
EXCURSION TICKETS OUT AND HOME-Filfrl
Cabin, $210; Second Cabin, S130; Steerage, $70.
WESTERN METROPOLI-, Capt. War. WEIB.May 4
NEW STEAMER.May 18
For Freight or Passage apply to
ISAAC TAYLOR, President
February 27 ly No 40 Broadway, N. Y.
THE TRI-WEEKLY NEWS,
PUBLISHED TN WINNSBOBO' 8. C., AFFOBD8 A
profitable medium for the advertising public ol
Charleston.
We respectfully solicit their patronage for our mutual
benefit
GAILLARD, DESPOSTES k WILLIAMS.
November lo
sHiPPina,
FOR GEOEGETQjf?J^*
i TOUCHING AT SOUTH ISLAND,jjgjjjgfj^
LY MILLS, AND LANDINGS ON THE
WACCAMAW AND BLACK RIVBRS.
._ PS &2??[VZltQ'Z
-THE FINE 8TEA?EB '
CAPTAIN ISAAC DAVIS, -
ll/ILLLE?VE BOYCE'S WHABF AS ABOVE,
, VV Monday Huming, tho .15th inst? at 7 o'clock..
B turning, will leave Georgetown on ?Ted??<?ay aTonwv,
|! thenfflfiut;^ T betook;- *; - - ???r7m_
Freight received da i ly, and -Stored free of charge. -
For freight or passage apply to 'iii;
... . W. W. 8HACKELF0BD,
???-- 1,::' ^Nd.-lBoj*?'*Wharf
, N. B.-AI1 freight must be prepaid, and none recen eel:
j after sunset . . A V^V* ' : . Apzftll
; - FOR NEW YORE;- W?1
. . ... . ....j i ' , . '
FABE BFdSuCED-CAB?K PAflSAGBl^-V
. ... . o^iXAja. - ;; .J ?|? -
:. .' ... ' ai oJ?tl^;
. REGULAS UNITED STATES HAIL. LINK. Z?tit>
ONE OF THE FAVORITE AND ELE?
GANT STEAMSHIPS- . vi ?i f/
QUAKES CITY, I SARAGOSSA, '
. : ????CO OL^OSAMAPA?O J I
Will loave AdgeTs South Wharf every ?xfemiay. ..
-.. '. 1/ /rxoXHE STEAMSHIP ?5? 0?
:. .. .?MAil??p'S
' ? CAPTAIN IBA BUB8LEY; -a]::?y?**f:'
WILL LEAVE ADGEB'S WHARF ON SATURDAY,
,TT . April 13, at 2 o'clock P. M. . - r a.; >>-?^J'
Shippers aro requested to hand in Billi of Ladinif br
lao'cteckonthatday. - v'"T.WL
April 8 ? : BA YENED h CO. <i>
Cliarleston and Savairnah ??eam ,
Packet line. - j -
4 . "TIA. BEAUFORT AND HILTON HEAD* .
Steamer PILOT BOY;. ii ^Ci^^i^ds^m
Steamer ELIZA RfflfCOX....Captain J. K. BamiaBeoarl'
Steamer FANNIE.. . j,"..Capti?n D. B> Vrjarnt.:
x EAVE ACCOMMODATIONVHARF, CSABLESTON,"
JJ and Charleston Wharf, Savannah, Mondar, Wedn?a-'
day.Friday and Saturday mornings, at 7 o'clock. ??!T
Tho PILOT BOY leaves ^Charleston every Friday, and
Savannah ?very Saturday. ~>'j! ??.J/STO;.
The ELIZA- F A NOOK leaves QB^pptoa tjrttjjnjiprtM SJ .
day and Saturday, and Savannah every Monday and Fri?
day. \z.-.?. vs... ?:. ... -ii'- .*.*!?*-'#.?
The FANNIE leaves Ciharleston every Mciiday,,and,: .
8avaanah every Wednesday, touching ai Bbiflton going
and returning. : '?..?"- - ?-r-?P5S?
Freight recci ved daily and stored tait ottihKruXiZ'o ii HZ ...
. Freight to all points except Savannah mu?* 1% u rostid, i
No FteJgnt- recerved?afl?r sunaet '* ? ; - ^-m7^*TJ
For Freight or Pateare, oppry to * - : ?.'fc3.it o>,-it?i?C?Ot? .:.
. FEBGUSOlN.*?<?ai^A?Wtair r":i. ::
CLAGHOEN & CCNINGHAM, Age?tt?-'J
N; B.-The Steamew of this Line connect at (Charleston
with Northeastern and South Carolina Ba?hoads,- tad -?fr
Savannah with Central and Albany and Gutf Railroads an!
florida steamers; " , . ^acfaM
\ . :.. Sl'^IlS Sit- ' .?'/??;>:, ^:*>J? *aVdA CJIJ**
CHAKLESTON & fiEOHflEliBWS
TOUCHING AT SOUTH ISLAND, 'W?TM?tlj"t)
MILLS, AND LANDINGS ON - THE WAO
CAMAW AND BLACK KITERS, .....> .\>:L C-tli
r THE VEBY FAST STJSAMBB??j5 ?jj?ij:
WILL' "LEAVE ACCOMMODATION WHABTEYEBr.
ff. MONDAY M?BM?,at7ych)clt. r. : c
Beturning, will leave Georgetown every WEDNEHDiT'
i MORNING, st T.o'dpcfc.o.-a >?; 0T0.?? w a?iffl
Frchdit received daily, and stored free of charga. ;0
Foriieight or Passage, apply/to ?T iC ..
FEIUIUSON^HOLTCBSiE-;.:
Agenta, Charleston,. : ?
WALLACE'SPOBTBBT? I,
icc's ' ... ' - Agf^tw; QelsiiiiWBlJL
N. B. AU Frelata must.be prepaid, No Fredahiro. .
ceived after sunset" ' 7" " ." 7 ' 'Hsren22 . -
. -~;- * ; r<...'.i. i '.. i1., i - J j?j !VJJ- - ' -
jPOR FLORIDA, ^ i > i i
: VI A SAVANNAH,-" BRUN iwTCfnk?
' MARY'S, FERNANDE?iA, JACKSONVILLE, AND ?Lt'
j THE LANDLNG8 ON THE ffT. JOHN'S BIVER'AS'
j FAB AS PALATKA, ? .-'J -i-'.'.?-.?.'-.g ^ ;
. . THE'USE flTEAMEB ?l'&n.}
KATE,
' CAPTAIN T. J.' LOCKWOOD, "
WELL LEAVE NORTH ATLANTIC,. WHABF . ON ;
every Wednesday M om ing, at 8 o'clock precisely
^-Freiv7h 1 received dully and 8tor?<i free of charge. 13
For Freight or Paesagts apply on ;board,.oT at the , of
6ceof JOHN MAHONEY, JB.. ?8 Eut Bay, r .
November 38 *? ^P?W^BMSB^*Cbag"?;
FORCffiBRAW, :
AND ALL INTERHEDIATTE LANDINGS ON
. t?ii? '^? *. V?. ^ iV.i ?.-..^.
THE PEE DEE RIVER. ...
... ;? " ii. r-iisth'/tiS :i *. :??{>.;.
THE LIGHT-DBAUGHT STEAMER
-jil i?5tt?j ? at : ii
' * zzrz??i SO : ;i'i.-:^ A
F L A N T^B ? ,
CAPTAIN JOHN F ERG U SON,
IS NOW RECEIVING FREIGHT AT ACCOMMODA?
TION WHABF, and wfQ leave with dispatch.
All Freight must be prepaid. Ko Freight received a?>
ter sunset . ,.? J0
For Freight engagements, apply to '
FEBGUSON & HOLMES, Agents, .
April 8_Accqmmodsthm Wharf
THE STEAMER
"DIOTATOK,"
1000 TONS BURTHUN,
CAPTAIN L. M. 0 OXET TEE,
TTTTLL LEAVE MIDDLE ATLANT IC WHABF EVER lt
ff FRIDAY NIGHT, at 10 o'clock, for this port
For Freight or Passage, apply on board, or to office ol'
J. D. AIKEN A- CO., Agents,
January * 5 _S~-uth Atlantic Wnarf. ,\
FOR PALATKA, FLA.,
FERNANDINA, JACKSONVILLE, AND ALL THE
LANDINGS ON THE ST. JOHN'S RIVER.
Pli
SAVANNAH, GA.,
THE NEW AND SPLENDID STEAMSHIP
1000 TONS BURDEN,
CAPTAI? LOUTS M. COXETTEB,
ON AND AFTER THE 26TH OCTOBER, THIS FINK.
8HD? will sail from Middhi Atlantic Wharf- every
Friday Night, at 10 o'clock, for the above places.
All freiKht must be paid here by shippers.
Ganes of >egvoes wU be ti ken to the abo e point* ou
the St John's River at $6 each. Children uno er .torc
vearsofscefree. Horses and Mules at reduced rates, .
jsaK^untry papers advertising ?the DICTATOR" W?T
please discontinue their notices and send account to OM
A^r*Freight or Passage apply on board, cr to tbs
Agency, Scuth Atlantic Whart. Janoary 18

xml | txt