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The Charleston daily news. (Charleston, S.C.) 1865-1873, March 24, 1871, Image 1

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VOLUME XI.-NUMBER 1578.
CHARLESTON, THURSDAY MORNING, JANUARY 12, 1871.
EIGHT DOLLARS A YEAR.
BISMARCK TO THE RESCUE!
THE G EH "iiA SS THREATEN TO TAME
THE REBELLIOUS BEDS.
A Scene In the Assembly at Versailles
.Mort Fighting and Marders tn Paris
The Needle Gun Required to Q,ut ll the
Revolution and Restore Order.
BERLIK. March 23.
It is reliably stated that the retnrn of French
prisoners has been stopped for the present.
VERSAILLES, March 22.
Order ls being gradually re-established in
Paris. Tbe significant demonstration made
by tbe disciplined citizens had a beneficial
effect. The Mobiles have offered to assist the
government against anarchy. A gcvvrnment,
circular closes by declaring that all good citi?
zens may feel reassured. Canrobert made
overtures to Thiers, which were well received.
PARIS, March 32-Night.
Quiet continues. The Nationals are en?
camped at the Place Vendome. ? The general
opinion is tbat the new government ls incapa?
ble of providing work lor the people. Military
and administrative (unction?, the people say,
oughlylo be entrusted to energetic Repub?
licans.
The majority ol the journals o? Paris con?
sider the elections ordered by the insurgent
committees as void.
The insurgent journals declare a willingness
to treat with the Versailles Government on
the following conditions: The election of a
communal council by the people ot Paris; the
reorganization of the National Guard to be
complied with; the power of Bell-electlon and
removal of officers, and the suppression of the
prefecture ol police of Paris. The army jour?
nals declare M. Thiers the author of the trou?
bles in Paris, and counsel the troops to self
government, firmness and tranquillity.
A meeting of the editors of the Paris press
was held to-day, at which a resolution was
adopted declaring the convocation of electors
for to-morrow should be regarded as null and
void; that public opinion is decidedly against
the committee which ordered lt; that it ls to
be hoped the committee ls not??mplicated in
the illegal and criminal acts of the insurgents,
and that now is the time for the National
Guard of Paris to come forward and put aa
end to the deplorable state of affairs.
The TiKtcitt.
VERSAILLES, March 23.
AU the principal Imperial officers have re?
turned to France from Imprisonment In Ger?
many, and are, without exception, retiring
Irom military service.
An adverse report was made In the Assembly
upon tbe bill for the election of the municipal?
ity Tn Paris.
Favre read a letter from Bismarck saying
that events In Paris did not indicate the exe- j
cutlon of the convention, entered Into with the
Germans, and intimating that unless the pro?
visions of the convention, were carried out he
would open fire upon the cl y.
This created great excitement ip the As?
sembly, and Favre Intimated that if Paris
holds out the government would co-operate
with the Germans.
PARIS, March 23.
Dispatches are very exciting, because the
National Guard fired into a crowd desiring to
pass into the district occupied by the insur?
gents. Fighting is apprehended to-night. It
Is reported that Bismarck has informed Thiers
that the Germans will occupy Paris on Sunday,
unless Thiers is then master of the situation.
Opening of the German Parliament
The Emperor'j Speech.
BERLIN, March 21.
The German Parliament was opened to-day
by Emperor William, who, In persou, deliver?
ed a speech irom the throne. The Emperor
said: "When I see the German Reichstag for
the first time after the glorious, but trying,
struggle which Germany has victoriously pros?
ecuted for her Independence, I am impelled
first to give thanks to God lor the historic
successes with which He has blessed the
faithful unity of the German allies, the hero?
ism and discipline of the armies, and tbe devo?
tion of the German people.
."We have what our forefathers struggled for
-unity of Germany and security of her fron?
tiers. Our conviction of future unity was
veiled, but tue ever-present enthusiasm of the
peddle rent the veil. When the Fatherland
was threatened, the nation unanimously rose
In her defence, and traced its firm will lu in?
delible characters on the battle-fields of
Franck, to be a united people. The spirit ani?
mating Germany pervades he? culture and
morals, and the constitution ol her armies
{uards against the abuse of acquired powers.
Dependent Germany respects the indepen?
dence of others. This fiery ordeal of war
through which we have passed ls a reliable
guarantee ot European peace. Powerful and
self-reliant, Germany bequeaths to you the
regulation of her own affairs as a satisfactory
heritage.
'.To the especial gratification of Germany the
conference at London, in a peaceful spirit, has
achieved.the work of conciliation. It is now
the task oi the Reichstag to heal the wounds,
and io confirm the thanks ot Fatherland to |1
those who have paid tor the victory with their
blood and lives. Let the Reichstag co-operate
wlih the government in the constitutional
mission of perfecting iaws for the : welfare of
the people. Constitutional arrangements con?
templated br the government involve the pro?
visions of the sep?rale treaties made in No?
vember with the Southern States, which will
receive in a new act, lo oe submitted to the
Reichstag, a better conformation and a more
harmonious rendering.
"The amount to be contributed by each State
toward the current expenses of the Empire de?
mand legal settlement, and sanction is to be
given to separate law3 for Bavaria which will I ]
be introduced.
"The war indemnity will be disposed of with
your approval, in conformity with the require?
ments ol. the Empire. The just claims ol the
Em pire'oa account of the expenses of the war ?,
will be laid before you as soon as possible,
Tht? position of the recovered territories ren?
ders necessary soecial legislation, which will I l
be speedily brought to your attention. Pen- j j
signs for the soldiers, and support for the
wfdows and orphans of the war are to be pro?
vided for, and measures to tbrse ends should I
be made to apply to the whole Empire, for all <
fought wit h ?quai devotion, and deserve equal .
honor and reward. May the re-establishment 1
of the German Empire be a promise of future
greatness; muy a war fought so gloriously be
followed by an equally glorious peace, and
may our people henceforth prove victorious
lu -the,- universal struggle tor the fruits ol'
peace.*', u /
.Marriage or, the Princess Louisc-i
Brilliant Affair. .
WINDSOR, March 21.
The weather is charming, and the marriage
of .the Princess Louise has been celebrated j
with brilliancy, AC ll this forenoon ministers,
embossadorc, nobility and clergy and the- 8
bridegroom's lamily were admitted to the I
royal chapel. At 12 o'clock the royal car?
riages, with all the members ol the Queen s *
famjl.v,;And other royal personages, left the
Qlieerfs gate, at Windsor Palace, and proceed- -I
ed to the south entrance of the chapel, where ?
they were received by the Lord Chamberlain >
andicont?uoted to places cn kant pas.
At 12.05 the bridegroom arrived, accompan?
ied by Earl Percy and Lord Gower, and they
were conducted to seats on leant i>as. At 12.15
the bride* accompanied by the Queen and suite
l^fiu?!pacages, arrived at the west entrance
ol the chapel, where they- were joined by the
bridesmaids,'and moved up the nave amid
muvle by the choir. The bride was supported
by tile Queen, Prince of Wales, and the Duke,
o: s'x'i? Coburg. The bridesmaids were Ladaes
Campbell, Cecil, Butler. Montague, Gordon,
Lennox, Seymour and Fitzgerald^
The beide was seated on the Mt of the aliar,
w?.?.ih?-Quet?n near at hand. The ceremony
vv?d performed by the Bishop of London la thy
Choral style, the Queen giving the bride away.
At the end of the last prayer a royal salute
was fired from the artillery in Windsor Park,
and the guests repaired to the Castle for lun?
cheon. The bride and bridegroom departed at
3 o'clock lor Claremont lor the honeymoon.
About a thousand guests witnessed the cere?
mony. The grounds of the Castle are filled
with immense crowds, and Windsor is en fete.
The Marquis of Lorne wore the uniform of the
Argyleshire Artillery, and not the Highland
costume. The Bishop of London was assisted
by the Bishops of Oxford,-Winchester and
Worcester. To-night there will be a grand ban?
quet, and the Castle will be illumiuated. The
lestlvilies will continue two days.
England and the Confederacy.
LONDON, March 21.
Earl Granville denied, in the House of Lords,
to-ni?ht, that there was anv truth whatever In
the statement ascribed to Baron Yon Gerolt,
that Russian influence alone prevented the
recognition of the Southern Confederacy
during the war in the United States. He de?
clared that, as a member of the Palmerston
and Russell Cabinet, he could say the proposi?
tion to recognize the South was never enter?
tained. The Duke of Somerset confirmed
Earl Granville's statement.
I.A WS OE THE STATE.
Acts and Joint Resolutions, Passed
by the General Assembly ot South
Carolina, Session of 1570-"71.
[OFFICIAL.]
AN ACT to amend an act entitled -'Act to de?
fine the criminal jurisdiction of trial jus?
tices," approved March 1, 1870.
SECTION 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and
House of Representatives of the State of South
Carolina, now met and sitting in General As?
sembly, and by the authority of the same:
Whenever a trial justice or justice of the
peace shall Issue a warrant for the arrest ol
any person charged with offence above the
grade o? a misdemeanor, such trial justice or
justice of the peace shall be authorized to se*
lect any citizen or citizens of the county to
execute the same, upon his endorsement upon
the said warrant that, in his judgment, the
selection of such person or persons will be
conducive to the certain and speedy execu?
tion of the said warrant; and the person or
persons so selected shall have all the powers
now, or hereafter, conferred by law upon any
constable within this State.
SEC. 2. Any person or persons selected In
the manner provided for in Section 1 of this
act shall be required forthwith to proceed to
execute the said warrant, and upon his wil?
fully, negligently or carelessly falling to make
the arrest, or permitting the party to escape
after arrest, he or they shall be punished, upon
conviction, on indictment, by floe and Im?
prisonment in the county jail, in the discretion
of the judge before whom the indictment may
be tried,-said imprisonment not to be less than
six months.
Approved the 9th day of March, A. D. 1871.
AN ACT to regulate the disposition of floes and
penalties imposed and collected in crim?
inal causes by the Circuit Court of General
S^sslo'ns and trial justices.
SECTION 1. Be it enacted by tho Senate aDd
House of Representatives of the STate of South
Carolina, now met and sitting In General As?
sembly, and by the authority of the same :
That all fines and penalties imposed and col?
lected by the Circuit Court of General Sessions
In criminal causes shall be forthwith turrred
over by the clerk ol said court to the county
treasurer of the county whereln..tbc same US
Imposed; and all fines and penalties Imposed
and collected by trial justices in criminal
causes Bhall be forthwith turned over by ihetn
to the county treasurer of their respective
counties for county purposes : Provided, That
where, by law, any person or persons enti?
tled, as Informer or informers, to any portion
of the fine or penalty imposed and collected,
the same shall be immediately paid over to him
or them.
BEC. 2. No account of the circuit solicitor,
the clerk of the Circuit Court of General Ses
Bion6, the county sheriff, or trial justices, for
lees In any criminal cause heard or prosecuted
In the Circuit Court, or belore a trial Justice,
shall be paid, unless they, severally, shall de?
clare, on oath, that the costs in the sa ld cause
dare not been pecovered ot the defendant, and
:hat he, the d?tendant, was unable to pay the
?ame; and, further, that all fines and penalties
lieretoiore collected by them have been lalth
fully and lully paid over to the county treasurer
ol the county.
SEC. 3. If any clerk of the Circuit Court of
General Sessions, county sheriffor trial justice,
shall neglect or refuse to immediately pay
jver, as required by the first section of this
ict, any and all Hoes and penalties collected by
.hem in any criminal cause or proceeding, he
mall, upon conviction thereoi, be subject to a
lne of not less than one hundred, nor more
han one thousand dollars, and imprisonment
aot less than three, nor more than six mouths,
md shall be dismissed from office, and dis?
qualified from holding any ornee of trust and
profit under the State of South Carolina.
Approved the 9th day of March, A. D. 1871.
JOLNT BESOLUTION directing that funds known
as Canby School Fund, remuining in hunds
ol' county treasurers, be appropriated to the
free school lund.
Be it resolved by the Senate and House ot
Representatives of the State of South Caroli
aa, now met and sitting In General Assembly,
inti by the authority ol' the same:
That such sums of the appropriation of $25,
)00 for the support of free BChools for the year
commencing October 31st, 1867, ?md ending
October 31st, 1SC8, and known as the Canby
'und, now remaluiog in the hands ol the s?v?
irai couuty treasurers, be, anil the same ls
lereby, appropriated for the payment of teach
jrs' claims in the several counties for the
isca!year commencing November 1st, i860;
ind any unexpended balance of tile same
?hall be applied to the free school fuud of said
?ountles.
Approved the 1st day of March, A. D. 1871.
THE STATE OiT ZA G WE-J. TJX ER.
WASHINGTON, March 23.
The storm centre of Wednesday evening in
lllnois was this morning on Lake Ontario,
mdls-tiow in the Valley of the SL Lawrence,
n Canada; brisk and fresh winds have circled
.round it in ita rapid progress to the northeast.
..?gilt rain and snow have been reported from
..ake Oatario to Lake Michigan. The arcas ol
if low pressure now exist In the Southern and
liddle States. Cloudy weather has prevailed
m the lakes and in the Eastern States, hazy
.nd partially clear weather in the Middle and
Southern States, cloudy and clearing up
weather on the'Gulf. The pressure ls station?
ary in the Rocky. Mountains, and following with
Ight rain and clouds on the Pac!Qc. Proba
illitles: Bi3lng barometer, clear or clearing
ip weather are probable tor Friday from the
?ulC to the upper lakes, briBk and high winds,
Dllowed by a dectfed fail in tho temp?rai ure,
hil clearing up weather will probably be ex
erleuced in thc Southern and Middle Slate.*. ?
BAYONETS FOR THE SOUTH.
GRANT CALLS UPON CONGRESS TO
SUPPRESS THE KU-KL TX.
Martial Law Proposed-1 he Suspension
of thc Habeas Corpas-The Hons? cf
Representatives Votes to Adjourn Un?
til December.
WASHINGTON, Mareil 23.
The President sent the following message to
Congress:
A condition of addles exists in some of the
States of the Union rendering life and proper?
ty insecure, and the carrying ot the mails and
the collection of the revenue dangerous. The
prool that such a condition of affairs exists in
some localities is now before the Senate. That
the power to correct these evils ls beyond the
control of the State authorities I do not doubt;
that the power ol the Executive ol the United
States, acting within the limits of existing
laws, is sufficient tor the present emergencies
ls not clear; therefore I urgently recommend
such legislation as, in the judgemnt ot Con?
gress, shall effectually secure life, liberty and
property, and the enforcement ofthelawin
all parts of the United States. It may be ex?
pedient to provide that such law as shall be
passed in pursuance of this recommendation
snail expire at the end of the next session o?
Congress. There Is no other subject on which
I would recommend legislation during the
present session.
(Signed) U. S. GRANT.
In the Senate, Sumner, in spite of the oppo?
sition, read until the expiration of the morn,
lng hour accounts from Dominica, showing
that the United States naval forces were ope*
ratlDg to prevent a free expression from the
people of Dominica.
Pomeroy Introduced n bill which, alter de?
scribing the condition of affairs alleged to ex?
ist in some portions ol' the South, concludes:
The President is hereby authorized, ll con?
vinced ol' the lacis herein set ion li, at his dis?
cretion to issue a proclamation declaring mar?
tial law to be In loree in such specific county
er district ot county; and lu addition to the
militia force provided lor In said act of 1795,
he is authorized to employ the army and navy
of the United States to suppress any resistance
to the laws of the United States, and to bring
to trial any person charged with crimes against
the United States or against any citizen there?
of, who. by the laws and constitution of the
United States, is entitled to the protection of
the laws. All such persons as are arrested to
be tried, and, if convicted, punished accord?
ing to the rules and articles of war. And the
President ls authorized to suspend the writ of
habeas corpus lu such districts for the time
being, reporting his action to Congress at the
next ensuing session.
lu the House, a resolution was introduced
that lue House adjourn to the first Monday in
December-passed, 112 to 90. The bill bridg?
ing the Arkansas River, at Little Rock, was
passed, and goes to the President.
A message from the President was read, fol?
lowed by a .sharp debate upon motion, which
was finally adopted, to refer lt to a committee
of nine. The committee are as foliows : Shel
labarger. Butler of Massachusetts, Ecofield,
Dawes, Blair ot Michigan, Thetas, Morgan,
Kerr, Whittemore. Adjourned till donday.
The President, Bouttvell and Robeson spent
the most of the day In the Capitol.
HOW TO THINK.
The first, and perhaps tbe greatest, aid
would bo, to determine the exact object for
thought aimed at. It would pernapa surprise
most of us if we were to observe with care how
rarely we state to ourselves, with any thing lias
accuracy, the precise object we wish to accom?
plish by thought. Often, after such observa?
tion, we would find that our object or thought
combined two or three contradictory elements.
It waB a very happy expression of Dickens,
"How not to do U;" and, it wo looked hon?
estly into tbe processos of our minds, wc
should often perceive that wo have begun by
Buch an insufficient or contradictory statement
(even to ourselves) of our endeavor, that we
have already insured tbe result of ''how not to
tbmk it." We constantly combino what ie
irrelevant, or even what IB absolutely inconsis
tenr, with tbe main purpose which wo have set
ourselves to (bink out. lia word, simplicity aa
records the objeot ot our thought is to ba aimed
at; and that we should bave thoroughly deter?
mined what is to bo tbe purpose ot our
thought.
Thou comes tho noxt pr.at endeavor to
which we should devote ourselves: it is, that
there should be simplicity ia tho processes of
our thinking. But a great deal moro than that
is required to insure the requisite simplicity in
the proches of thinking. Our own previous
thoughts are often most d imaging. Now here
comes in a subtlety which must be carefully
cousider :d. it is not only that our previous
thoughts lead tn astray, but they load m into
a direction wricu often can only land us in dis?
aster. For these previous thoughts, both of
our own and other people, have been chiefly
built upon precedent, the torce of which prece?
dent is entirely inapplicable to tbe new circum?
stances with vhicb we have lo deal.
As a general rule, prent thinkers have rarely
let us into the secret of how they have been
accustomed to think. But. when they have
been iuventors. we have sometimes bad an
inkling of their mo lo of procedure. They have
betrayed to us that it was what they call a
"sudden thoucht." Wo may be nearly sure
thal their object of thought stood veiy clearly
bet?re them tu their minds. Then came this
"suddeu" thought, as they call it. But I sus?
pect RB potency was not iu ita suddenness, but
in its being a disongaged thought- a thought
disentangled from the thoughts of other men,
or even from previous thoughts of their own.
I would ded ico from this, t bat. tho chief ar:
in severe thinking in tho art of forgetting, or
ot ignoring all that has been previously said,
done, or written by yourself and others in the
matter. I can conceive that there should be a
man who would be able tu combine and bring
to a focus all those ex'raneou8?4houghts, and
should ithuB bo able to attain to novelty of
thought, without the perplexity enaendered by
kuowiedte, or rather by half-knowledge, or by
the fancies of imagination, or by an ignoble
doting upon antiquity, or by a slavish subser?
viency to incomplete precedent. But-t hat mail
has rarely appeared nuon the earth. And ti o
main uso of ail that rrevious thought upen the
subject can teach you is that it may form a
means of criticisms, purifying, enlarging, con?
fining, or condemning vom DOW thought -By
the Author of "Friends in Council."
Hotel Arr i vu is-March ii.
PAVILION HOTEL.
J. P. Herrin. Wayuesvllle; E. Manes, New
York; W. S. Utsey, George's Station; J. Nettles
and lidy, South Cirollua; ?. W. Met?an, Billion's
Ferry; A. S. Cobb, Greenville.
HILLS noi sE.
N. Willet, R. Remme and lady, Mr. and Mrs.
Read, Miss Read, New York; E. Wagener, West?
minster; C. D. Mills, B. Tibbetts, Albany; J. F.
Hose li, wife and child. Mohawk.
CHARLESTON llOTEI..
T. W. Davis. Greenville; II. M. Gibson, Colum?
bia; F. J. Kimball, Philadelphia; W. B. McAter,
Baltimore; G. W. Davis, Wilmington, C. II. Chad
bouu aad wife, Minnesota; R. W. Chadboun and
wife, Wisconsin, T. Bralnor, Southern Express
Company; Wm. M. Fowler, New York; John
Mungilan), Baltimore; L. H. Holmes and wife.
Miss C. A. Holmes, J. F. Holmes, New Yolk; B. T.
Kelley, Maine; D. S. Haisell and wife, F. W. Leg?
gett, and wife. New York; S. G. Gleason and wife.
Elmira;8.T. Nasehan, Wilmington; A. M.La?
tham, St. Andrew's.
y R . LEVY,
TRIAL JUSTICE,
No. SC BROAD STREET,
Cilice recently occupied by s. L. Bcnuctt.
. ! ii ? *"? ?7; -, . rt.- -~ . ' 21 .
AW B;i<reis entrusted to mc will bc prompt*"
it tendea to. -. niaryi-atnu?
_Special ypticegj
^?r^UEmOAL NOTICE. -fiPA?fTENTS
suffering from Diseases pe; taming to tue QEN1TO
URINARY ORGANS, will receive tbe latest-sclen
tlflc treatment by placing themselves under tbe
care 01 Dr. T. REENSTJERNA. office No. 74 Basel
street, three doors from the Postofllce.
Bep20-tnthlyT
GETTING MARRIED.-ESSAYS
for Young Men on Social Evils, and the propriety
or impropriety of getting Married, with sanitary
help for those who reel unfitted for matrimonial
happiness. Sen: free, in sealed envelopes. Ad
dreBS Howard Association, Box P,gPhlladeIphla,
Pa. f. an25-3mo8
Jl&~ MOKE THAN ONE HUNDRED
thousand persons annually die in thia country
from Consumption, which ls but the child of Ca?
tarrh. $500 ls offered by the proprietor of DR.
SAGE'S CATARRH REMEDY for a case of Ca
tarrh he cannot cnre. Sold by Druggists, or send
Blxty cents to Dr. R. V. Pierce, Buffalo, N. Y., and
get lt by mall. A pamphlet free. 1
marie-thstu3D4C
BE GUIDED BY WHAT YOU
KNOW.-There is an old proverb which says,
"Experience ls the safest guide.? To this guide
the BICK, and ailing naturally turn when casting
nbout for the means or relier. They Inquire what
a medicine has done for others, before they adopt
it themselves. Of all the remedies and preven
tives in use, HOSTETTER'S STOMACH BITTERS
meets the test most triumphantly, and hence its
Immense popularity and vast sales. The sufferer
from indigestion ls sure to find some one among
his rriendB who has been cured or that ailment by
the famous vegetable Btomachlc. The victim or
rever and ague, liver complaint..constipation,
nervous prostration, or general debility, lias only
to make Inquiry in the neighborhood where he
resides in order to discover what this standard
restorative has effected In cases similar to*is
own. In the published testimony to Its merita he
will find a volume of proofs of ltsiBanltary prop?
erties, which it is impossible for his common
sense to resist. He tries it, and Ute effect lt pro?
duces on lils system adds another to the host of
witnesses in its favor. Thus, it? reputation
founded on facts, not assertions, continually
grows and spreads. Charlatans and imposters,
some of them mere local tricksters, and others
who take a somewhat wider range, attempt to
thrust into the hands and down the throats of
Invalids their haphazard concoctions, as substi?
tutes for the tonic which for so many years has
been a medical staple throughout the United
States, Spanish America, Canada and .the West
Indies, but only succeed to a very limited extent,
In this reasoning nge, the people, having ascer?
tained what ia really deserving of their conti
dence, decline "running after strange gods."
marl s-G Die 4,,
Ekg ?Doos, ?jp;
JpURCHGOTT, BENEDICT <fc CO.
RESPECTFULLY ANNOUNCE
TO THEIR FRIENDS AND THE PUBLIC
That, owing to the
SPECIAL FACILITIES AND QUALIFICATIONS
Of their Resident Partner In Sew York,
They are enabled to purchase tlielr supplies of
FINE AND STAPLE DRY*GOODS,
Both Foreign and Domestic, In all cases from
first hands,
ar!
AT THE LOWEST CASH PjjP^^a^
And thus to oiler
EXTRAORDINARY INDUCEMENTS TO C US
TOMERS,
Their prices will be found from
TWENTY TO FIFTY PER CENT. LOWER
Than those of any other Dry Goods House
in the South.
They invite an inspection of their Stork, which ls
made np of
NO AUCTION GOODS,
But which will be found to consist or an immense
variety of
THE CHOICEST AND LATEST NOVELTIES
IN THEIR LINE.
Comparison, as to quality, with the best goods
offered elsewhere,
IS CHALLENGED,
And competition as io price
IS DEFIED.
?
Every article sold by U9 ls warranted to be pre?
cisely as represented.
Our motto ls
..QUICK SALES AN*D SMALL PROFITS,"
And Customers wup wish to
SAVE MONEY IN BUYING
will do well to give us a call.
FURCHGOTT, BENEDICT & CO.
Dp-Town Store, I Down-Town store,
No. -WT King street. No. 244 King street.
Corner or Calhoun. | Near "The Bend.?
cct31
Nexrjspapers, iflcgajmes, #r.
^SK FOR THE MARCH NUMBER
OF TUE
RURAL CAROLINIAN,
and read the following articles : Does Farming
Pay in the soutn 1 D. Wyatt Aiken; Commercial
Manures with Experiments, Edward McIntosh;
Carulina Rice in Italy, F. Peyre Porcher; Esparto
Grass, Eugene W. Hllgard; The Fig, a Neglected
Resource, P. J. Berckruaus; Experiments with
Tomatoes, K. Chlsolm: Irish Potatoes ror Winter
Use. H. W. Kavenel; Is the South a Stock Coun?
try Y D. Wyan Alkea; Bee Hlve? and Beo Charm?
ing, P. J. Quattlenaum; History or Charleston
Phosphates, L. M. Hatch.
Also many other article?, varied correspond?
ence and much editorial matter in this the LEAD?
ING SOUTHERN AGRICULTURAL MAGAZINE.
Subscription, ?2 per annum.
Address
RURAL CAROLINIAN,
febl7 Charleston, S. C.
E
B. CARPENTER,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
No. "2 BROAD STREET,
Charleston, S. C.,
Will Practice in the State and Federal Courts.
feb2l
JOSEPH W. HARRISSONS,
ARTIST'S SUPPLY, PAINT AND OIL STORE,
No. c." QUEEN STREET, CHARLESTON, S. C.
Patent Tate' Detecting (alarm; MONEY DRAWER.
j'jn2-mwMni
s
ttqurooift.
?UTH cA?OLI^A~RAILROAL .
VICE-PRESIDENT'S OFFICE, ' \
CHARLESTON, 3. C., January 18, 1S71. . j
-On and after SUNDAY, January 22, the Passen?
ger Traine on ?.he south .> roana RaiJroad will
ruL as follows:
ros AUGUSTA.
Leave Charleston.rc. ? o p. M.
Arrive at Augusta.8.1? P. M.
FOE COLUMBIA.
Leave Cnarleaton..".. 8.20 A. M.
Arrive at Columbia.3.40 p. M.
FOR CHARLESTON.
Leave Angosta.?. 7.40 A.M.
Arrive at Charleston.3.20 P.M.
Leave Columbia...........12.16 P. M.
Arrrlve at Charleston. 7.50 P.M.
AUGUSTA K1GUT EXPRESS.
(Sundays excepted.)
Leave Charleston. 8.30 P.M.
Arrive at Augusta.7.05 A. M.
Leave Augusta. 5.60 P. M.
Arrive at Charleston. 5.40 A.M.
COLUMBIA NIGHT EXPRESS.
(Sundays excepted.)
Leave Charleston. 7.10 P.M.
Arrive at columbia.s.oo A. M.
Leave Columbia. 7.60 p. M.
Arrive at Charleston. 6.45 A. M.
SUMMERVILLE TRA1X.
Leave Charleston.4.30 P. M.
Arrive at Summerville.6.00 p. M.
Leave Summerville.*..7.00 A. M.
Arrive at Charleston..8.16 A. M.
CAMDEN BRANCH.
Leave Camden..-.9.50 A M.
Arrtye at King ville.... .....1.20P. M.
Leave Ringville.2.30 P. M.
Arrive at Camden.0.00 P. M.
Day and Night Trains make close connections
at Augusta with Georgia Railroad and Central
Railroad.
Night Train connects with Macon and Augusta
Railroad.
Columbia Night Train connects with Greenville
and Columbia Railroad.
Camden Train connects daily with Day Passen?
ger Trains.
jamo A. L. TYLER, vice-President.
VTORTHEASTERN RAILROAD COM
ll PANT.
CHARLESTON, S. C., February ll, 1871.
Trains leave Charleston Dally at 12 M. and 6:30 ?
P.M.
Arrive at Charleston 7:30 A. M. (Mondavs ex?
cepted) and 3:30 P. M.
Train does not leave Charleston 6:30 P. M., SUN
OATS.
Train leaving at 12 M. makes through connec?
tion to New York, via Richmond and Acqnla
Creen only, going through in 42 hours, WITHOUT
DETENTION ON SUNDAYS.
Passengers leaving by 6:30 P. M. Train have
choice of route, via Kichmond and Washington,
or via Portsmouth ana Ballimore. Those leaving
FRIDAY by this Train lay over on SUNDAY in Bal?
timore. Those leaving on s ATURDA Y remain SUN?
DAY In Wilmington, NI O.
This ls the cheapest, quickest and most pleasant
route to Cincinnati, Chicago and other points
West and Northwest, both Trains making close
connections at Washington with Western trains
of Baltimore and 0 hlo Railroad.
s. s. SOLOMONS, .;.
Engineer and Superintendent.
P. L. CLEAPOR, General Ticket Agent.
febli-i2mos, -
SAVANNAH AND CHARLESTON RAIL
ROAD.
PASSENGER TRAINS on this Road ron dally a*
fullows:
Leave Charleston....8.30 A. M.
. Arrive at Savannah:*;.3.00 P. M.
Leave Savannah.....11.15 A. M.
Arrive at Charleston.5.20 p. M..
Connects at Savannah with the Atlantic A Guli
Railroad for JaCkaonvUle, St. Augustine, anda!;
points In Florida. -
With Central (Railroad for Macon, Atlanta,.Mo
bile, New Orleans and the West.
Wurr Steamboats for points on the Savannah
River.
A) Charleston with the Northeastern and Sonta
Carolina Railroads, and Steamships ror all points
North and West.
Through Tickets over this line on sale at Dot?is
m Charleston; Screven House, Savannah; and all
principal Ticket omces North and South.
. Freights forwarded daily to and!from Savan
nah and ailTailaUbayand. ?,-r.i--ji"wiiii? ?.r" y
Through Ullis of Lading Issued to Jacksonville,
Polatka, Ac.
Tarin as low as by any other line.
C. S. GADSDEN,
oct? Engineer and Superintendent.
, Scxi?i^xs.
jg?RGER ?~~T3TJTZ "EXC?LS?OR
SUPERPHOSPHATE.
Ten tons of the above celebrated FERTILIZER
will be sold to close consignment. Extensively
used in Georgia with highly satisfactory results,
as letters in our possession will show.
Price $45 cash-$50 and seven per cent. Inter?
est payable 1st November.
For sale by REEDER ?-, DAVIS.
Adger's Wharf, Charleston, S. C.
marie-thstuO_
THE STON.O
PHOSPHATE COMPANY
OF THIS CITY,
ARE NOW MANUFACTURING THEIR
" SOLUBLE GUANO, "
Which will be furnished at $50 cash, or $5S on 1st
November next with City aceep- ance, and their
"DISSOLVED PHOSPHATE," for composting with
Cotton Seed, at $33 cash, or on 1st November
with 10 per cent additional.
"PURE GROUND PHOSPHATE" at $15 cash.
Contracts for the Fertilizers may be.made in ex?
change for Cotton.
ORDERS SENT WILL RECEIVE PROMPT AT?
TENTION.
J. D. AIKEN, AGENT.
marl
FERTILIZERS.
:uo tons No. 1 PERUVIAN (Chincha) GUANO,
warranted pure.
1500 bbls. Land Plaster, ground from the best
Nova scotia Rock, and warranted pure.
100 tons Pure Dissolved and Ground Bone.
iso tons Whlielock's Vegetator. The Vegetator
Has been successfully used, and bears a
very hieh reputation. It ls second to no
other Fertilizer, except Peruvian Guano,
offered in 1 his market.
100 tons -'Ralston's" Dissolved Bone and Ammo?
nia.
100 bbls. Eastern Island Fish Guano, at $36 per
ton of 2000 pounds.
For sale by T. J. KERR A CO.
feb8_
JpACIFIC GUANO COMPANY'S
(CAPITAL $1,000,000)
SOLUBLE PACIFIC GUANO.
Tills GUANO ls now so well known in all the
Southern States for ira remarkable eirectsasar
agency for Increasing the products of labor, aa
not to require especial commendation from us.
Its use for Uve years past has established tts
character for reliable excellence. Tbl large Oxen
capital Invested by the Company in this trade,
oilords the surest guarantee of the cont inucd ex?
cellence of its Guano. J. N. ROBSON,
Selling A;enr.. charleston, S. C.
JOHN S. REESE A CO., General Agents, Balti?
more. deC2'J-DAC
B
(Eas Mxtnxes.
ALL, BLACK & CO.,
Will Bell their Stock of
BRONZE AND IMITATION BRONZE
GAS FIXTURES
AT
MUCH LESS THAN THE ACTUAL COST
OF MANUFACTURE.
These goods are of the newest patterns, and In
finish superior to any iu the market. To those
furnishing houses. Wita is an opportunity to pro?
cure the BEST CHANDELIERS, BRACKETS. Ac,
at a less price than they would pay Tor lnrerlor
fixtures.
It ls our intention to give np entirely this branch
of our business, which causes so great a reduc?
tion In price.
BALL, BLACK & CO.,
Nos. 565 and 567 BROADWAY, N. Y.
junin-lyr
Km ?Jttbhmttons. a?,?
~-?--.-?-??4i<t?S>><
pOGARTJLE'S BOOK DEPOSIT^E"j*.
NEW CATALOGUE, No. 7.
JOHN ESTEN COOKE'S LIFE OF GENERAL
ROBERT ?. LEE, Illustrations, portraits and
maps, $5; Musings Over the "Christian Year"
and "Lyra Innocentlnm," by Charlotte Yonge, to?
gether with a few Gleanings of Recollections of
the Rev. John Keble, gathered by Bevera! friends,
t~ so; A Concordance to "Keble'a Christian Year,"
$2 50; Holiday's at St. Mary's, or TaleS'ih a Sis?
terhood, by s. D. BL; $1; The Jordan and its Valley
ana The Dead Sea, illustrated, 60 cents; The Lost
Blessing, by Anna Shipton, $1; Mornings with
Jesus, a series or flevotional readings for-tbe
closet and the family, by Rev. William Jay, $1 60;
Evenings with Jesus, by. Jay, $1 60; Professor
Darwin'a New Boote: The Descent of Man, and
Selection in relation to Sex, by Charles Darwin,
with illustrations, vol. 1, .$2; "Third Vol?me or
Max Muller's Cnlps, from a German workshop,
containing essays on literature, biography and
antiquities, $2 50; The History or Greece, by Pro?
fessor Dr. Erhest Cortina, transited by A. W.
Ward, M. A., vol. 1, $2 60; A Handbook or Legen
dary and Mythological Art, by clara Erskine Cle?
ment, with descriptive illustrations, $3 60; Life
and Nature under the Topics, Sketches of Travels
among the Andes and ui the Orinoco, Rio Negro,
and amazons, by H. M. and P. V. N. Myers, (2.
NEW 8?PPL1ES OF THE FOLLOWING VAL?A
. BLE AND POPULAR BOOKS :
YESTERDAY, TO-DAY AND FOREVER, by
Blckemith, $2; Changed Cross, $1 60; Shadow on
the Rock, $1 60; Stepping Heavenward, by Miss
Prentiss, $1 76; Broadna on the Preparation and
Delivery or Sermons. $2; Hanna's Life of Christ,
complete In 3 vols., $4 60: MacdniPs Memories of
Patmos, $2; The Victory or the Vanquished, by
the author or Schonberg-Cotta Family, $1 75; Sid
don's Bampton Lectures: The Divinity or our
Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, $2 50; Shiloh, or
Without and Within, $2; Bv the Sea, $1 76.
FAMILY AND PO?KET BIBLES.
We have recently made large additions to our
stock of Bibles. The prices are greatly reduced.
We are now offering an unusual large variety or
English and American Family Bibles, Pocket
Bibles and the Episcopal Prayer Book at extreme?
ly low prices. 'w
MST Persons residing in the country will please
bear in mind that by sending their orders to ns
for any books published in America, they will be
charged only the price of the book. We pay for
the postage or express.
Address
FOG ARTIE'S BOOK DEPOSITOBT,
No. 260 King street, (In the Bend,) Charleston, S. C,
marl-stmh
_ ?3iturs.
rjS E S T I M? 0"N I A L 8.
Read a few of the Testimonials tn regard to the
EFFICACY or that STERLING MEDICINE,
OLD CAROLINA BITTERS. '
A few Certificates from the many in our posses?
sion from persons who have tested the
OLD CAROLINA BITTERS:
FROM THE POSTMASTER AT TUMBLING
SHOALS, S. C.
ToilULINQ SHOALS, S. C., April 9, 1870.
Messrs. GOOPKICH, WIN KM AX A Co., ? Charleston,
S. C.:
Gentlemen-This is to Inform you that about a
year ago 1 was in delicate health, worn out with
old sge and hard work, weighing one hundred
and twenty-five pounds; upon request I com?
menced using the OLD CAROLINA BITTERS. Af?
ter using nine bottles, 1 felt as well and vigorous
as thirty years ago-went to work and made
money. I weighed, after using the above, one
hundred and seventy-two pounds. I have since
been strong and bale. Accept, gentlemen, my
than ka and snccess Bay I to the OLM CAROLINA
BITTERS.
(Signed) RANSOM PHILLIPS, P. M.,
-Tumbling Shoals, S. C.
PROM ANDREW CHAMBERS, IRWINTON, OA.
IRWINTON, GA., September 26, 1869.
Messrs. GOODRICH, WISEMAN A 00.:
: Gentlemen-When in your city, two weeks ago.
your Dr. Service gave rae a bottle of your cele?
brated CAROLINA BITTERS, which "I brought
home for my father, whose health was very feeble.
After using lt he was so wejl pleased with lu
effects, that he considers them almost indispensa?
ble. Please lind enclosed sixteen, ($18.) the price
or two cases; direct them W. J. Chambers A Son,
No. 16, C. R. R. Yours, very respectfully,
(Signed) ANPREW CHAMBERS.
? " ANOTHER VOICE FROM GEORGIA.
. - FORT VALLEY, GA,, September 16, 1869.
Messrs. GOODRICH, WISEMAN .V Co., Charleston:
Gen Hem en-I take great pleasure in informing
you that my wire has experienced great benefit
from the ose Of the OLD CAROLINA BITTERS,
lt ls certainly a good-medicine, and I wonldt.
pleased If you would send me another dozen im
LmetrtiI^t'^y..^?' "msp-cuiifulryr-fter.
(signed) JNO. A. HOUSER.
Sold i?y all Druggists in Charleston. The trade
supplied by
GOODRICH, WISEMAN A CO.,
Principal Depot, No. 35 Uayne street.
Sfhicbuin Scl'najjrjs.
READ
CAREFULLY.
Ague and Fever.
The only preventive known for Chilla and Fever
ls the use of Wolfe's Schiedam Schnapps.
Wolfe's Schiedam Schnapps
_ls good for Dyspepsia._
Wolfe's Schiedam Schnapps
Is a preventive ol Chills and Fever._
. Wolfe's Schiedam Schnapps
la good for all Kidney and Bladder Complaints.
Wolfe's Schiedam Schnapps
Is used all over the World by Physicians in their
_practice._
Wolfe's Schiedam Schnapps
ls good for Gout.
Wolfe's Schiedam Schnapps
Is good for all Urinary complaints.
Wolfe's Schiedam Schnapps
1B recommended by all the Medical Faculty.
Wolfe's Schiedam Schnapps. ?
Is good for Colic and palo In the stomach.
Wolfe's Schiedam Schnapps.
Is imitated and counterfeited, and purchasers will
have to use caution m purchasing._
I beg leave to call the attention or the reader tc
testimonials in tavor of thc Schnapps:
i reel bound to say that I regard your SCHNAPPS
as being in every respect, pre-eminently pure, and
deserving of medical patronage. At all events ll
ls thc purest possible urtic.e ol Uulljnd gin. here?
tofore unobtainable, and as such may be safely
prescribed by physicians.
DAVID L. MOTT. M. D., ?
Pharmaceutical Chemist, New York.
LOUISVILLE, Ky., September l.
I feel that we have now an artice or gin suit?
able for such cases as that remedy ls adapted to.
DR. J. W. BRIGHT.
.Schnapps" ls a remedy in chronic catarrhal
complaints, Ac.
I take great pleasure in bearing highly credit?
able testimony to its efficacy ns a remedial agent
In the diseases for which you recommend it.
Having a natural tendency to thc,mucous sur?
faces, with u slight degree of stimulation, I re?
gard lt as one of tue most important remedies In
chronic catarrhal affections, particularly those ol
the genlto-uriuary apparatus. With much re?
spect, your obedient servant.
CHAS. A, LIJAS, AI. D., New York.
No. 20 PISE STREET, N. T., NOV. 21. 1867.
UDOLPHO WOLFE, ESQ., Present: DEAR SIR-I
have maue a chemical- examination of a sample
or your "Schiedam Schnapps," with the intent of
dcterrn:nlQ? ir any foreign or InJunuOs substance
had beeu added to thc simple d ist Med spirits.
The examination has resulted in the conclusion
that the sample contained no p >isunous or harm
nil admixtures. I have been unable to discover
any trace or the deleterious subitunces whtch
are sometimes employed in the adulteration or
liquors. ? would not hesitate to use myself, nor
to recommend to others, fer medicinal puiposes,
the '-Schiedam Schnapps"as au excellent and
unobjectionable varley of gin. Very respectfully
yours, (Signed). CHAS. A. sh ELY, Chemist.
CHEMICAL ASP TECHNICAL LABORATORY, )
IS RXCUAXOB PLACE, N. Y., Nov. 25, 1867. J
L'uoLi'HO WOLFE, Esq. : DEAR Sin-The under?
signed have carefully and thoroughly analyzed a
sample ot your ..ArnniE.iIc Schiedam Schapps,"
selected by ourselves, and have found the same
free from all organic or inorganic substances,
more or less injurious to heall h. From the result
or our examination we consider the ari ide ono of
superior quality, healthful as a beverage, and
erieciual In lt-? medicinal qualities.
RespcctHilly yours,
(Signed) ALEX. TRIPPEL, Chemist.
FRANCIS E. ENG EL ?I.A RU, M. D.
For sale by all respect abie Grocers and Drug
UDOLPHO WOLFE'S EST.,
mar2'.-'3rnos No. U2 BEAVER STREET, N. Y.
-po
Shipping.
R NEW TOBI,
OLD LliriC N EW YORK AND CM A RL?
TON STEAMSHIPS.
ESTABLISHED 1B4*.
SPACIOUS AND ELK?ANT DECK. STATE-'ROO
The very rast and splendid side-Wheel Steam
ships of this Line - w ill eau from Adger's. South
CHAMPION, SATUBBAT..JfitiL at 6 P.iL
CHARLESTON, TUESDAY, 28th,at LIA M.. ' . ,
mw Thxongh Bills of Lading given on Cotton td
Liverpool, BoBton, Provtdeface and theN<3WEa#> '
\ land manufacturing towns at Lbs lowest market ?
rates; .... y .
For Freight or Passage engagements, Applr to- '
marl-lmo ._ JAME? ADOER Ss OO,
rjlHROUGH BOXS LADING TO AND'
FKOH il A LT ? 31 ORK, PHILADELPHIA,
BOSTON, BREMEN,
AND THE CITIES OP THE NORTHWEST.
The one steamship FALCON, Barnie,,
Commander, will sall tor Baltimore on 2^
TUESDAY, 28th March, at half-past io o''
A. M.
_ Philadelphia Frelghta forwarded to that
city by railroad from Baltimore without addi?
tional insurance, and Consignees are allowed am?
ple time to sample and soil their Goods from
the Railroad Derot in Philadelphia.
PAUL 0. TRENHOLM. Agent,
mar22-e No. 2 Union Wharves*
pAGIFIO MAIL STEAMSHIP OOMPPB
- THROUGH LIM3 TO
CALIFORNIA, CHINA AND JAPAN.
FARES GREATLY REDUCED.
Steamers of the above une leave Pier <r?rt?gm\. ; a
No. 42. North River, foot of. OanalS&HK '
street, New York, at 12 o'clock noon, or the 16th
and 33th of every month (except when these . |
dates fad on Snnday, then the Saturday preced?
ing. . ..
AU departures connect at Panama with steam--"
era for South Pacific and Central American ports. ,
Departure of -5th touches at Kingston, Jamaica. u
For Japan and China, steamers leave San Fran*,
cisco first of every month, except when lt falls on
Sunday; then on the day preceding.
No california steamers touch at Havana, bat
go direct from New York to AsplnwaU.
one hundred pounds baggage free to each adnlc a
Medicine and attendance free.
For Passage Tickets or other Information apply '
at the COMPANY'S ?I0KET OFFICE, on the '
wharf foot of Canal street, North River, flew -
York. F. R. BABY, Agent.
juiylfl-lyr
?y7"ESSELS WANTED.
For Coastwise as well as West india Jfcq
Charters. Apply to Sfitt
. J, A. ENSLOW A C07^
mar24-l Ship Brokers, No. 141 East Bay.
JVOR NEW ORLEANS.
TO SAIL IN A FEW DAYS.
The fine Brig MARY E. ROWLAND wants Jk*
a small portion of Cargo to complete, bndSHa?
will sall as above.
For balance of room, apply to
mar23 . STREET BROTHERS A CO.
Jp O R LIVERPOOL
The First ol ass British Bark FLORENCE
CHIPMAN.'Robt. Jones, Master, ls now<_
ready to receive cargo, and having portion of
same engaged, will have dispatch.
For Freight engagements, apply to
HENRY CARD, .
mar21 Accommodation Wharf.
JpOR NORTH EDISTO, BEAUFORT AND
PACIFIC LANDING.
The Steamer PILOT BOY, Captain
J. W. Sly, wUl leave Central Wharf. _
for the above points every MONDAY MOKNINO, at"
o'clock, and, returning, will leave Beaufort every
TUESDAY, at 8 o'clock A M., and Edlato at s P. M.
marti J. D. AIKEN, Agent.
F
OR F L OR ID A',
TWICE A WEEK.
FOR SAVANNAH, FERNANDINA JACKSON?
VILLE, PILATKA AND ALL POINTS ON
THE ST. JOHN'S RIVER.
The Steamer DICTATOR, Captain
h. M. COXETTBR, will sall from,_
Southern Wharf for above points every TUKSDA,Y
EvsNiNO.at 8.30 o'clock, arriving back at Charles- .'
ton every SUNDAY AFTBBNOOK, at.6 o'clock. V. s*7<*
The Steamer CITY POINT, captain D. B.vincent,..
wiU sail from Southern Wharf for shove points
every FRIDAY EVENING, at 8.30 o'clock, arriving
back at Charleston WxdNKSDAY AFTERNOON, at A
o'clock.
RAVENEL A CO., Agents,
octlO Southern wharf.
-pXCURSION TO THE PHOSPHATE
WORKS ON ASHLEY RIVER.
The Steamer PILOT BOY, Captain _ .?IT^a?.
J. W. Sly, will leave Central rVbarf^dSkMBC
as above, on SATURDAY MORNING, 26tn umlaut, at
10 o'clock. J. D. AIKEN, Agent.
mar j I
jp O R S A V A N N A H .
ELEGANT STATE ROOM ACCOMMODATIONS.
The Splendid Steamer CIT Y - .?nlT^a?,,
POINT, Captain D. B. Vincent, willj^gBSK,
leave Southern Wharf for the above piaceon rRI?
CAY EVENING, March 24,1871, at 8.30 o'clock.
The Splendid Steamer DICTATOR, Captain L.
M. - Coxen er, will leave Soul hern Wharf on TUES?
DAY EVENING, March 28, 1871, at 8.30 o'clock, for
the above place. RAVENEL SC CO.,.
mar22 Agents.
F
OR BEAUFORT AND PACIFIC
LANDING.
The steamer PILOT BOY. Captain.
J. W. Sly, will leave every THuas-j_
DAY MORNING, at 8 o'clock, as above. Keiurmng,
will leave Beaufort FRIDAY MORNING, at 8 o'clock.
m ar21 J. D. AIKEN, Agent.
Q.EORGETOWN STEAM PACKET.
CHANGE OF SCHEDULE.
Until further notice the steamer
EMILIE, Captain C. C. White, will
run as follows:
LEAVING CHARLESTON,
FRIDAY NICHT, March 17th, at 9 o'clock. "?
WEDNESDAY NIGHT, March 22d, at fl o'clcck.
SUNDAY NIGHT, March 26th, at 9 o'clock.
FRIDAY NIGHT, March 81st, at 9 o'clock.
LEAVING GEORGETOWN,
TUESDAY MORNING, March nth, at 8 o'clock. ' . . '
MONDAY MORNING, March 20th, at 8 o'clock.
FRIDAY MORNING, March 24tb, at 8 o'clock.
TUESDAY MORNING, March 28th, at 8 o'clock.
All freight must be prepaid.
For engagements apply cm board or to
SUACKELFORD A KELLY, Agents,
marla-wlm_ No. 1 Boyce's Wharf.
.yyEEKLY LINE TO SAVANNAH.
THROUGH BY DAYLIGHT.
FOR PACIFIC LAXDINO.'BEAUFORT, HILTON.
HEAD, SAVANNAH, DARIEN AND.
BRUNSWICK, GA.
The favorite Steamer
ELIZA HANCOX?
Captain L. w. BURNS,
will receive Freight at Accommoda- r . ^?r^??.
'.ion wharf for above pointa everyrfa?SBHC
TUESDAY, and leave on every WEDNESDAY-MOBM~
ING. at 7 o'clock, arriving at Savannah the sam?
evening, and leaving for Danen, Ac, th? follow-'
ing morning. Returning, will leave Savannah tor
Charleston every MONDAY MORNING, at 7 o'clock.
For Freight or passage, ai?ply to
RAVENEL. HOLMES St CO., .
soplo No. 177 East Bay?

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