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The Charleston daily news. (Charleston, S.C.) 1865-1873, January 02, 1872, Image 1

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VOLUME XI.-NUMBER 1883.
CHARLESTON, THURSDAY MORNING, JANUARY 18, 1872.
EIGHT DOLLARS A
ESCAPED FROM HIS BOND.
SUDDEy ECLIPSE OE A SON OF YORK.
The Defendant Avery Tarns ap Misk?
in g-AV ?int trill they do about it 1
The Court, If lt Knows Itself, means
Misch ter-An Order for the Forfeiture
of Ball-!? the Bondsman alio Visit?
ing his Family.
[SPECIAL TELEGRAM TO THE NEWS.]
COLUMBIA, January 1.
At the opening of the Ku-Klux Court, this
morning, the defendant, Dr. Avery, was not
present. The prosecution, however, proceed
?ed with their rebutting testimony, and then
.called the attention ot the court to
the fact that Avery was absent. Mr. Wil?
son, one of the counsel for the defence,
said that Dr. Avery had gone to
Yo ri ca Saturday night to visit Ms family, but
he had understood that he (Avery) was to re?
turn by the next train. Judge Bond demand
-ed to know of Colonel McMaster, of counsel
for Avery, where the defendant was. Col.
McMast er said he hoped the court would ex- j
ouse htm from answering that question. Judge j
Bond ordered Col. MoMaster to show cause
wlf? his name should not be stricken from the
roll of attorneys of that court. District At?
torney Corbin then prepared an order to for?
feit Avery's bail, and Issue a witt of soire /aci
a?, returnable on Wednesday next. This or?
der was signed by the court
Mr. Corbin now expressed a doubt whether
the trial should proceed in the absence of the
defendant, whether the case should go to the
jury or not, and asked time for consultation.
The court then adjourned to t?-morrow at
?eleven.
Dr. Amery's bondsman Is Mr. J. T. Lowry, of
York County, and the amount of the ball ls
three thousand dollars. The general Impres?
sion here is that Avery's departure was well
timed. He had proved his Innocence, but he
knew that his conviction was inevitable.
Emancipation Day is being uproariously ob?
served. The streets are crowded with negro
militiamen armed with muskets, and bearing
all the paraphernalia of war. There is a de?
lighted audience In the Statehouse yard,
where Chamberlain, Elliott and others are
dilating upon the blessings of freedom.
_ PICKET.
THINGS IN GREENVILLE.
GREENVILLE, S. C., December 23.
TO THE EDITOR OP THE NEWS.
Christmases passing away, and we have had
genuine Christmas weather. It has been very
?cold and very warm-very clear and then
oloudy-and now lt ls precious cold and clear.
We have had four snows this year already,
an$<asualIy.do not have that number In the en?
tire winter-February is the snow month here.
The misty Christmas and the snows tell well
on the wheat crop.
Ic has been rather a dull Christmas. The
Sunday schools, with one exception, had no
Christmas trees, and there was less festivity
and sociality than usual, and lt 1B very evident
that the martial law, the course ot the State
government on finance, its wretched Incom?
petency-and want of morals, the heavy taxes,
.ic, are acting like a nightmare on our peo?
ple. Alas ! wno shall deliver us ? Where is
the man, the party, the policy ? and lo ! no
man knowetb. The Air Line Railroad is
rapidly progressing. Hundreds oi hands are
grading on Doth sides of the city.
A new national bank, with a capital of sixty
thousand dollars, will be In operation here
next month, and lt ls generally supposed that
Hamlin Beat tis, Esq., of this place, will be
.president. This will be an excellent selec?
tion. He is well known in financial circles In
Charleston and elsewhere as a ?prudent and
discreet and skilful manager of tunda.
This place ls ready for rapid growth and
great prosperity, and nothing retards lt but
the bad government of the State. It has the
best of climated, the finest of water, the most
beautiful of scenery and most perfect health.
It ls emphatically the white man's country.
SOMERS.
SHOOTING AFFRAYS ZN ABBEVILLE.
?From the Colombia Union.;
By a passenger down from the village of
Abbeville, lt is stated that two shooting allrays,
causing considerable excitement, occurred in
village on'Fridav.
.he first, as stated, grew out of an attempt
Alfred Billson, colored, town marshal, to
rest John McCord lor shooting at certain
ptfties, and In the melee the pistol of the lat?
te? was accident ly discharged, the ball lodging
in his neck.
The second is stated as having occurred
near the depot, or. Griffins stables, Calhoun
Hambiln shooting a colorer!man named Bowie,
In three places. The men who did the shoot?
ing were lodged 1? Jail, amid considerable con?
fusion. .
^ A BLOODY DEED.
SAN FRANCISCO, January 1.
A man, his wife and two children have been
IDui dereel near Tuxson-lt is supposed by
outlaws driven from Sonora.
A DISASTROUS FIRE.
MONROE, LA.. January 1.
Sixty houses, including the wealthiest por?
tions ot ???? city, are burned. Among the
buildingtn||Btroved are the Union Church,
Marlon House and Central House. Loss over
haifa million._
THE WHARTON MC RD ER TRIAL.
ANNAPOLIS. January 1.
In his examination to-day, Genth said lt
was an Impossibility to get tartar emetic when
treating sulphide of antimony precipitate with
potash. It that was obtained lt would prove
that no tartar emetic was there. The evidence
was ^comprehensively technical, but positive
in Its contradictions ot the result obtilued by
Che prosecution.
THE MEXICAN REVOLUTION.
' SAN FBAXCISCO, January L
Mexican advices report that the government \
is merely holding the revolutionists of Nueva !
Leon in check. The whole available force ls
sent to crush Diaz. Diaz, after several en?
gagements, was compelled to retreat into
Oaxaca.- The troops sent by Diaz were driven
back at Oaxaca. The western coast, except
Oaxaca and the Port of Mazatlan. Is quiet,
and in possession of the Federal authorities.
WANTED--A SOUTHERN PACIFIC
RAILROAD.
OMAHA, January l.
The Pacific Railroad is still blocked. There
are eight feet of snow In cuts which have been
ehovefled twice.
NEVADA, January I.
The storm in California, Or3gon and Neva?
da ls unabated, and the malls, telegraphs and
all-travet .northward are Interrupted.
?PARKS FROM THE WIRES.
* .> ? _,
-An Indian'war In Arizona is ajprehetfde?.
-Seven days' Eastern mall arrived at San
Francisco yesterday. i
-Two respectable yonog. men have.dlsap-j
peared from Sacramento C/iy,-ana.aie suppos?
ed to have been murdered!
-The Louisiana Legislature assembled jes
terday in New Orleans and adjourned. The
Governor's message will be delivered to-day.
-There were no unusual Incidents attending
the New Year ceremonies in Washington, the
weather being unfavorable. :
-Judge Lake, ol 'Frisco, pleaded guilty of
assaulting Young, of the Chronicle, with a
pistol, and was fined three hundred dollars.
THE CI TT DEBT.
Shall a Tax be Levied for the Payment
or Past-due Debt and. Accruing In?
terest ?
To the Officers of the City Council of Charles
ton :
GENTLEMEN--As you are now about to make
assessments for the expenses of the city gor*
ernment, and may be disposed to ioelude in
them estimates for the interest and instal?
ments past due. of what is assumed to be, the
city debt, we, who question its validity and
taxable obligation, would ask you to consider
the propriety ot that action.
We teel assured you would not tax that
debt upon us if you did not conceive that
you hal the authority to do so. That would
be taking our money by force, knowing your
want of authority to take lr, and that were
robbery. There would be nothing conceivable
to distinguish lt from that grave offence.
You are officers with power, in certain cases,
to execute for taxes, but the sheriff himself
would commit robbery or murder ii he were
to take property or life without a warrant.
More than this, you have accepted the office
you hold, and have sworn to discharge its
duties, and you would scarcely conceive it
consistent with the obligations of that oath
to take $320,000 to the interest and $400,000 to
the past-due principal of a debt you do not
think ol/lgatory, or which you do not think
you have the power to enforce. We are en?
tirely assured your action in the matter will
depend upon your sense of your authority,
and that, without reference to the crimes it
would Involve, you would not gratuitously
inflict upon the' community the sufferings
such unauthorized burden must occasion.
Then, have you the authority ? If so, whence
comes lt ? From the charter, certainly, for In
that is all your power. You are but eighteen
respectable gentlemen, without, and utterly
incompetent to any act whatever affecting the
political futu-es of your fellow-citizens. Is
lt thence ? In what clause of lt ? Could you
take that charter, and under it make stock at
pleasure, not indicating the object of lt; issue
stock to the construction of railroads beyond
the city, and beyond the State-as yon know
thia has been made, and tax the Interest and
principal of that stock upon the citizens. The
object of the corporation, declared In the
charter Itself, ls to make the regulations ne- {
cessary to r he preservative peace and order
of the town. The powers thereto are to make
by-laws, rules and ordinances necessary, res?
pecting the "harbor, streets, lanes, public
buildings, engines? pumps, buckets, the poor
deserving people and negroes," and other
lesser matters, not more than sixteen In all.
Is this stock a regulation; or a by-law, rule
or ordinance ? or, if so, is lt a rule or regula?
tion respecting the harbor, streets, lanes,
or any other cf the subjects enume?
rated? The clause goes on to say: "And
In general, every other by-law or regu?
lation necessary to the security, welfare,
peace, order and good government of the
town." But this still gives but the further
power of regulation, not the power to regulate
any other subject. It does not say other sub?
jects, but merely every other by-law or regula
tim, and that lt does not Intend to Include any
other subject; Is evident In the fact that the
next Legislature, in 1785, by amendment,
gave to Council Jurisdiction of the "price and
assUe of breaa\" ot "lotteries" ot the fortifica?
tions., and of excavations along the custom
line. Why this, if, under the general clause,
the Jurisdiction had been extended to discre
tlonary objects ? and by act of 1617, the Juris
diction to open and widen streets was vested in
a committee, and that, too, when the jurisdic?
tion of streets was originally vested in the
Council. Clearly, the Council, by the general
clause, was not Intended to have jurisdiction,
even for the purpose of regulation, but over
the objects specifically enumerated. The terms
do not Impart lt. The subsequent amendments
exclude the Implication of lt, and lt is not to
have been intended, for, It not conn ned to the
objects enumerated, lt was without limit, and
courts, churches and domestic relations
had been within the power.
But admit the power of discretiona?
ry regulation, of what is this Btock,
obligatory upon the faith of the city,
payable in ten or twenty years at
six per cent.-the regulation ? Ol some, the
object is not indicated, and that if a regula
tlon of anything can be, of course, but a regu?
lation o? individual property in Charleston.
Of some the object ls the construction of rail
roads beyond the limits of the town, and that
may possibly be regarded as in regulation of
those roads; but whether the one or the other,
lc ls impossible the Legislature could have
Intended a power of regulation so extensive,
mentioning pumps, engines and buckets that
they might be within the power, lt is incon?
ceivable, lt could have intended, not withstand'
lng that the Council should regulate the whole
range ot private property, and railroads In
other States, besides. And Inconceivable, also,
if lt had intended putting private property at
the discretion of the Council to be the basis of
any Issue of stock to any object whatever, it
would have Indicated this purpose by a clause
which gave the power of regulation only, and
that, only, In reference to certain enumerated
objects,and these the most obviously subject to
che authority of a municipal government.
Clearly under that charter you could not
make this stock. But, If so, could you tax lt
on ns ? Your only power In this respect is to
make such assessments for the safety, conve?
nience, benefit and advantage of the city as
you shall deem expedient. Was this assess?
ment expedient ? Is lt expedient to the safety
of the citv ? Many believe ic will crush lt. Do
you thin' otherwise ? Is it expedient to the
convenience of the city ? In what possible
respect T-to the benefit and advantage of the
city? It were, ridiculous to suggest that the
exaction of this enormous sum of money from
this city In any state of ita fortunes, much less
from lt now, in its present condition, can be
of benefit or advantage. We dc, we Chink,
but justice to your Intelligence In assuming
that it these were original questions you could
neither find the power under this charter to
make this stock or to tax lt on the people. It
ls not a rule or regulation, and, therefore, you
could not make it. The payment ls not expe?
dient to the safety, convenience, benefit or
advantage of the city, und, therelore, you
could not tax lt-if the power to arness were
the power to tar, which ic is not, at least to
the extent of issuing executions to enforce
assessments, for execution requires a special
power.
But lt has been done; the obligation has
been incurred; and j ou are concluded, you
say, as to the expediency of this tax by the
action of your predecessors. Is this so ? Had
they authority to make this stock you have
not? Did they act under other charter or
power ? If you could not Incur the debt could
they ? If a wrong to make lt, is it less a wrong
to enforce lt made by others ? This we will
consider In another number. TAXPAYER.
THE WEATHER THIS DAT.
WASHINGTON, January 1.
The .barometer will probably continue rising
on Tuesday morning, "with partially cloudy
and clear weather in the Middle and Eastern
States, followed on Tuesday night by a falling
barometer and easterly winds. Easterly
winds with cloudy weather, will prevail In the
Southern and Gulf States. An area ol low
barometer will develop In the Missouri Val?
ley, and a rising temperature, with southeast- j
ly winds, veering south, will prevail from
Arkansas to Lake Superior. Dangerous winds
are not anticipated for the Atlantic to-night.
Yesterday's 'Weather Reporte of the
Signal Service, U. S. A.-4.47 P. Bl.,
Local Time.
Place or
Observation.
Augusta, Ga..'.. 30.31
Baltimore..".30.37
Boston.30.31
Charleston.30.22
Onlcago.30.48
Oucinoatt..30.50
Galveston.30.23
Key Weat, Pla.. 30.14
Knoxville, Tenn.*30.37
Memphis, Tenn.. 30 45
Mt. Washington. 30.0?
New Orleans.... 30.80
New York.30.33
Norfolk.30.23
Philadelphia.80.35
Portland, Me.....30.29
Savannah ...... so. 19
St Louis.30.38
washington,DO. 30.25
warning lou.N 0.130.19
sf
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~-' Pl
68 NW
45 NS
40 N '
70 SW
31 SE
44 Calm.
651N
7<J NW
48 NW
37 SE
12 W
88 N -j
43 M.
40 N
42 NE
37 N
81 NW
33 calm.
44N
83N
Cen tie.
Gentle.
Light.
Fresh.
Light.
Gentle.
Fresh.
Gentle.:
Storm. "
Geatle.
Gentle.
Fresh*
Gentle.
Light.
Light.
Fresh.
Light.
a et
?
Clear.
Cloudy.
Cloudy.
Cloudy.
Fair.
Fair.
Cloudy.
Fair.
Cloudy.
Cloudy..!
Pair." w
Cloudy.
Cloudy.
H.Rain.
Cl'ngup
Fair.
Fair.
Cloudy.
Cloudy.
Lt. Rain
GLIMPSES OF GOTHAM.
THE RADICAL DISINTEGRATION.
Senator Schnrz Assailed with Bill?
ingsgate-The President Thows Over
the German Voters-Greeley Pro?
nounces in Favor of a Democratic
Success-The Lt itBlom at the Ring
Tweed at Bay- \po?tacy of Rev. Slr.
Hepworth-Its Effect npon Unita?
rianism.
[FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.]
N sw YORE, December 30.
The President organ In this city has
opened Its guns on Senator Schurz. Nothing
could so clearly mark the wide divergence
of the Administration and the Reformed Re?
publicans than the acrimony which charac?
terized the TimeB' article. Ic showed that the
President has no loDger any expectation that
the breach In the Republican ranks can be
healed, and that he Is prepared henceforth to
treat Schurz and his companions in the Senate
as enemies. How tue senator can persist In
regarding himself as inside the party, wheo
he has been deliberately put out oy Its legiti?
mate authorities, remains to be seen. He
certainly has nothing now in common with
the Republican party of which Grant is the
chief, and very Attie In difference with the
Democratic party.
The Insults which the President's organ in
New York heap? upon the great leader ol the
Western Germans are In effect, that he ls a
mere adventurer, a person of neither capacity
nor honesty, a failure as a general In the war,
a fdllurd In -diplomacy and statesmanship, a
wordy, windy declalmer. and a "fraud" gene?
rally. He is accused of having been an uncon?
scionable seeker of government patronage, and
in enemy of civil service jelorm, until the
President removed his brotherin-law from the
collectors nip of Chicago. To all of this the
senator will doubtless reply in the Senate, as
>oon as the recess is over; and so the war will
so on.
A curious letter, written by Mr. Greeley,
relative to .the next Presidency, bas just
seen the light. The writer republishes ic in
tils own paper with the Intimation that it was
Intended to be private, but since* the recipient
las given it to the public, there is no reason
:o exclude it from the columns otthe Tribune.
The letter cannot fail to exasperate the ad
mlulstrationlsts still further with Mr. Greeley,
for he unequivocally expresses the opinion
:hat if the Democrats will nominate Gratz
Brown, Trumbull or ex-Secretary Cox for the
Presidency against Grant, they can elect
?ither, and that it would be better for the
country if they should succeed. He says that
ie believes the Democrats could have suc?
ceeded with Chief Justice Chase in 1868, and
:hat as the result, "genuine peace and thrllt
would have been promoted." This giving of
lid and comfort, in the shape of advice, to
Lhe opponents of the Republican party, car
?Inly looks like high treason, and logically
should subject the offender to expulsion.
Where will the Trloune stand after Grant is
nominated by the National Convention !
"Pity the sorrows ot a poor old man."
Tweed's condition ls indeed pitiable. His
Donds were made right again yesterday, and
ie crawled out of hts hiding place. He was
present at the sheriff's office In the morning,
but refused to go Into the room where Ter
mee Farley, the treacherous friend and re?
creant bondsman, was waking to get his re
ease from the security. After the business
lad been transacted, the fallen dictator walk
id with a friend through the Cliy Hall park,
ust to show the world that he was out. He
lad none of the old Jaunty air; the relentless
var of the State authorities, under the lead of
charles O'Conor, the loss ot position, power
ind wealth, the disgrace of arrest, and the ne
?essity of skulking from the officers of the
aw, and, worse than all, the treachery of old
rlends, and the Ingratitude of men whom he
las picked out ot the gutter to make rich,
iomblned Co break down his spirits and lower
ils mien. Ha was grave, though as rjuier and
>ollte as ever.
His fate seems to be assured. The State
senate will expel him. though he will doubt
ess attempt to save himself by sounding the
)urchasabte senators with money. AnyRe
mbllcau senator who wants to play the role
)t Wlnans In the last Assembly can get fifty
housand dollars for the service. Outside of
he Senate, Tweed will be repeatedly indicted
ind arrested, and, if he escapes conviction on
?ne trial, he must run the risk of lt on a new
sharge, and thus the persecution will be con
Inued until he will fairly crave to go to Sing
?lng to end the agony of suspense. All
?hances of escape from the country now ap?
pear to be futile, for. In addition to the re?
straint of his bonds, he ls watched by a hun
ired pairs of sharp eyes.
On all sides the props to the Ring are falling,
[weed has Just resigned bis position at the
lead of the department of public works, and
ils directorship in the Erle Railroad. A com?
mittee of members ot the Tammany Society
have requested him to retire from the office
jf grand sachem, and last night the Tammany
general committee passed resolutions repudi?
ating him. His late associates are Involved
n the general ruin. Connolly ls In Jail; Mayor
Hall ls to be Indicted and arrested as soon as
:he new attorney-general of the State assumes
end ce: Gould and Jim Fisk are la fresh
trouble, and warrants are out for their arrest.
The Legislature will destroy their connection
Erich the Erle Railroad, and bring them to
justice. Ingersoll, Garvey, and Sweeney's
irother, James, have fled from the country.
Tom Fields ls awaiting trial. Even the banks
ind savings institutions in which the Ring
members were directors have died from the
?light
In the religious world there ls a commotion
)vei the apostasy of Rev. George H. Hep
worth, from Unitarianism. Mr. Hepworth
KO? regarded as a shining light in a denomi
canon .which has always been able to boast of
many brilliant preachers. He was exceeding?
ly popular in Boston, and great was the
mourning In that town when he accepted a
call from the church of the Messiah in this city.
Se was quite the rage when he first came
1?re. People talked of going to hear Hep
ivorth with as much interest as they talk of
rolug to hear Beecher.
The society to which he was called to minis
;er is unfortunate. Its former pastor, Rev.
Dr. Osgood, abandoned Unitarianism and
.vent over to Episcopacy. Like Mr. Huntlng
:OD, who also became an Episcopalian, Dr.
Brownson, who went further stilt and became
i Roman Catholic, Mr. Hepworth seems to
lave arrived at the conclusion- that there ls
lot Christianity enough in . "the Broad
Church," as Dr. Bellows calls lt, to save its
idherenta from the fire. In his sermon to his
congregation on Christmas day. Mr. Hep
worth described the mental sufferings he had
indergone, and confessed that his mind had
reached a change. He professed his willing
less to sever his connection with them rather
dian give up his "belief in the divine cbarac
:er and mission of Christ." One of the Bee?
liar Journals commenting on Mr. Hep worth's
course, sees In it another proof of the disinte?
gration going on in the church founded with
iuch encouraging prospects by Dr. Channing
lalf a century ago. One-half of Its teachers
ire gravitating towards Catholicism, and the
c-ther half towards Parker ism or Rationalism.
NTM.
Hotel Arrivai-?-January 1.
.0 MILLS HOUSE.
J. S. Newberry, wife and daughter, New
Yprk; J. Koch, New York; J. Schult, New Or?
leans; R. G. Holmes, Beaufort; S. Manton,
Providence; G. Amsden, Providence; H. An?
drews and wife, New York; J. L. Thompson,
Brooklyn; Mrs. Seabrook and sen.
PAVILION HOTEL.
A. Halght and wife, A. B. Scott, W. Crosby,
J. M. TVilklne, K Dawson, Empire Circus Com?
pany; G. M. Palmer, Bonneau's; D. Barrow,
New York; J. F. Townsend, Edisto Island; H.
Van Voorhe8, New York-, R. Cooper, Cooper
River.
CHARLESTON HOTEL.
Rev. T. "Harley, St. John's, N, B.; J. Garhe
ga?,-Green Pond; G. Vanderwerken, wife and
child, Washington; Jno. W. Swann, New York;
Thomas0-Allen, Florida; J. W. Green, 0.13.
Skinner, M. G. Carraway, W. S. Boyland son,
Master McN. DuBose, Georgetown; H. Brown,
Barnwell; D. E. Morris, Georgia; W. J. Denel
son, St. Louis.
THE WORLD OF FASHION
The Latest Styles for January-Times
as They were and Are-\ew Fea?
tures of Social Life In the Metropolis
-Cloth Cloaks and Costumes-A Hap?
py New Year. ,
KEW YORE, December 30.
All the world, fashionable and otherwise
has been preparing for the first of January re?
ceptions, and for those lestlvltles which, from
remote periods, have ushered in the New
Year.
The lights have gone out from the Christ?
mas trees, but the Christmas greens still hold
their place and crown the honors which are
heaped upon the young head of the year to
come. What it Is to bring to us we know not;
but with ever fresh faith we garland our
future and hope the best untii;the worst ar?
rives.
It Is not in the nature of things to return to
the "good old days" of ^pinnlng-wheeU, and?
irons and sanded :Ioors;lnor does any intelli?
gent man or woman really wish that we
could; but every one le glad that a more
healthy tone prevails In the community over
the fierce passion for dress and display which
has been stimulated to the unhealthy height
it reached during the past few years. There
ls a lull this season, caused partly hy the want
(f Parisian excitement, partly by the Increas?
ing preponderance of the] German element In
our midst, and the Influence of their simple,
sober manners and customs, and completed
by our own commercial disasters, and the dis?
grace Into which mere money-spenders and I
money-getters have fallen.
A great display of gold and diamonds ls ra?
ted bad style and vulgar. Ladles belonging
to the very best cla3set> are even In some in?
stances making a show of simplicity, putting
all the cost inio the fineness and genuineness of
material-some into leweiry or the trimming
of their toilettes; others with less refinement
of intelligence, are using laces and stores of a
ifss cherished description, and employing
them partly in furbishing up old dresses, part?
ly In trimming new. . .
"I never knew," said" a wealthy lady, recent?
ly, "how much pleasure I missed in giving my
clothes away after a few times of wearing." I
Singularly, too, loreign travel ls doing much
to bring about more sensible Ideas in regard I
to drees and living than have heretolore pre
val;ed amongst us. Nothing does an American
woman so much good as going abroad and
finding out how people 'live whom she has
been accustomed to base all her ideas of style
upon. If families who go abroad to "educate"
their children, and what not, were willing to
live at horneas they do-when they are In
France or Germany, they .would not only re-1
lleve themselves of a vast burden, and set a I
?rood example to the entire community, but
impart to their children sound, honorable and
honest ideas, worth ull the the teaching of
schools.
CLOTH CLOAKS ANO COSTUMES.
Ail the later developments ot Interest in I
fashion have been in cloth cloaks and cos-1
turnes. The solid color, the solid fabrics, and
the ornamentation, which at a distance seems
to be interwoven with the material, give al
together an appearance of comfort, appro- I
priateness and adaptability which would con?
stitute beauty, even If tint and texture were
less choice and fine.
A complete costume of olive green, Yan-1
dyck brown, or sailor-blue cloth, braided with I
black and bordered with silk cord fringe, ls
the perfection of street costume, properly ac
companied by a velvet hat, black, or matching I
In color, and a set of seal skin, or sable furs.
Ot course a suit ol cloth, trimmed with fur, ls I
as desirable, and, perhaps, even more d?stin-1
?ue, but lt is not as popular, because the fur. I
esides being less durable, bas to be removed I
In so short a time to make way for more sea?
sonable trimmings. Tnose who cannot afford
broadcloth are fain to content themselves with I
English water-proof, which, when lt ls floe, I
genuin?, and all wool, i3 handsome enough
for some princesses, though there are repub-1
Hean dames who would turn up their noses at.
ir. Abroad the braided suits of best water
proof cloth are quite the success of the season,
and they are at least a blessed relief from the
eternal puffvand iussr sfcjrtr><?. which.are itlll 1
exhibiten in lighter fabrics.
It has been stated before that cloaks, as tn
dependent garments, have been worn this
winter for the first time In several years, and
though there has been no one style which
could be recommended as likely to obtain per?
manent suffrage lor others, still the popular
choice seems to have fallen upon the cloth
mantle, which consists of a sacque, with deep
cape, as the one best adapted to use and com-1
fort. At first these mantles, or double capes, j
as they were sometimes called, appeared only
In cashmere, braided and embroidered, and
were so restricted in style and cut as to pre?
sent a most ungraceful appearance. The pat?
tern has been improved upon, however, until
ic has become a very handsome and comfort?
able garment, deeper and more amply cut,
and allowing sufficient room for the extension
of the tournure beneath. The latest design ls
In dark bronze green cloth, with a Watteau
Slatt in the back, and a cape divided up the
ack, and trimmed upon each side to match
the border. This style constitutes a very
handsome finish to a suit, and ls, Indeed,
much better adapted for this purpose than
that of a separate cloak, to be worn with all
.sorts of dresses. As an independent garment,
we have nothing as jet to equal lt In grace
and beauty.
THE POLONAISE.
And, speaking of the polonaise, lt may be as
well to remark that lt will be certain to be
can led through the next season? Ladles in
more soirHiern climates anxious to prepare
spring and summer wardrobes lu advance ot
tue almanac, may confidently rest their faith
upon the polonaise as upon an anchor-sure,
and, for a time, steadfast.
The polonaise is as yet a novelty in Paris and
London. Ic is only Just beginning to take the
place of the overs K lr t and Jacket. It will be
"more of a rage In both cities during the coming
year than lt has been In the past. It ls grace?
ful and so convenient that it will obtain the
high vogue there that it has here. Vive la
Polonaise .' Choose your patterns and con?
struct vour costumes. They will be all right
In white pique, muslin, silk, challl, linen,
lawn or cambric.
A HAPPY NEW TEAR.
Shall I occupy space by writing of bonnet?,
about which there is nothing new to say, or
describing new combinations of old silks and
velvets, and laces which no one can pessibly
understand, and which everybody, therefore,
takes for very high fashion Indeed ? or shall I
cut my letter* short this month, and go and
build my own Christmas tree ?
Fashions are very fine, but just now they
sink into utter significance, besifles stockings
to be filled and Christmas greens to be hung,
for though this will not reach you tilt
after Christmas, lt is written before Christ?
mas, and there ls a hundred Invisible
voices whispering In my ear, and a hundred
Invisible hands tugging away at my heart?
strings and bidding me leave you, dear read?
er, and attend to them. So, with a thousand
good wishes, I bid you a happy New Year.
JENNIE JUNE.
THE METHODIST CONFERENCE.-The last ses?
sions of this body was held during the morn?
ing and afternoon of yesterday at the Went?
worth street Church, Bishop Simpson pre?
siding.
Rev. Trite Whittler and Henry Cardozo,
Esq., were elected trustees of the Claflln Uni?
versity at Orangeburg.
In connection with the report on the state
of the country, spirited addresses were de?
livered by Drs. Webster, Cumlngs, Fox ind
Professor Jackson.
Reports on the various church societies were
offered and adopted.
The statistics for the past year are as fol?
lows: Members and probationers 29,392;
baptisms $4603; value of church property
$109,745; amount raised for benevolent purpo?
ses $3028 83.
In the afternoon, an address was delivered
by Dr. Rust, after which the appointments
were read. Among them, we note the follow
in": Charleston, presiding elder, Rev. A.
Webster, D. D.; Centenary, Old Bethel and
Wesley, Rev. Henry J. Fox, D. D., and Rev.
Samuel Weston; Beaufort, J. G. Thompson;
Columbia, V. H. Buckley; Darlington, J. B.
Middleton; Summerville District,'J- A.Saspor
iaa: Klngstree, W. H-Scott; Greenville Dis?
trict; True Whittler: Greenville, B. J; Roberta:
Spartanborg, A. w. Cummings, D. D.: Spar?
enburg Circuit, W?F. Park?? JackeonvilieyC.
C. Manigault; Pernat^ni^W. J. Salmond;
Pilatka, Januaty Felder. . *J
The Conference adjourned at five* P.M. The
next session is to be held in Greenville. J
THE ADVISORY BOARD.
WHO CONTROL AND ARE RESPONSI?
BLE FOR THE LAND COMMISSION.
Have they Done their Dat y I-A Clear
Statement of their Powers and Privi?
leges.
The Radical Juiat committee having shown
up the glaring frauds of the land commission,
direct their attention to the advisory board, as
follows: * *
This Is a grand council of Ave, who direct
all things in connection with the land commis?
sion. Have they done their duty ? Can no
stones be cast at them ? Are they free from
suspicion or censure ? Let us see.
Who creates the land-coiamlssloner ? "The
advisory board."
How long does he hold bis office ? "At the
pleasure of the advisory board."
By whose advice and Instructions must be
be governed? "The advice and Instructions
of the advisory board."
Who determines th? price to be paid by the
land commission for lands ' "Jt shall be the
duty of the land comers ?loner to purchase, or
cause to be purchased, any lands in any por- j
Lion of the ti tate, at such price as the adviso?
ry board may determine."
Is there a limit to the amount of land to be
purchased in any flscai year ? "It shall, not
exceed, In the aggregate amount, In any one
fiscal year, the par value ot the public stock
of this State, created for this purpose." -
How far are the purchases of the land com?
missioner legal? "The land commissioner
shall be subject to a majority of the advisory
board, and any purchase or sale of property
made without their advice or consent shall
not be valid."
What rule 1B given for the purchase of land ?
"No purchase shall be made without the
certain knowledge of the commissioner that
he will be able to sell the same without de?
lay."
How are the bonds, authorized for land
commission purposes, to be issued ? By the
treasurer, in amounts specified in the acts
authorizing the same, "if, in the opinion of
the advisory board, so much be necessary."
What amount of bonds, for land commission
purposes, were authorized under the acts of I
March 29.1869, and March 1, 1870-? "Seven [
hundred thousand dollars."
How much has been expended for land
commission purposes ? According to the
books of the State treasurer and the financial
agent, "seven hundred and forty-six thousand
seven hundred "and twenty-three 7-100 dol?
lars."
Are the books of the land commission sub?
ject to Inspection ? "The books and records
ef the land commissioner sha'l, at all times, be
subject to the inspection of the advisory
board, or any member thereof."
lt appears, then, that there can be no land
commissioner who is not first decided "to be
suitable"-appointed-except by the advisory
board, nor can he purchase or sell land, fix
the price, or go beyond a specified limit in his
purchases, or dispose of a bond, or make his
transactions legal, or "discharge the duties of
his office" without "f7?e instructions, advice or \
control of the advisory board. His books and
records must be submitted to their Inspection,
and his every business operation should pass
under their scrutiny; and If he violates the
law or disregards its restrictions, the advisory
board, having approved "a written undertak?
ing, with good and sufficient security, exe?
cuted to the people of the State of South Caro?
lina, by the land commissioner, in the penal
Bum of twenty thousand dollars, for the faith?
ful discharge of the duties of bis office," and
died the same in the office of the secretary of
State, have at least something to fall back
upon to protect the State against hazard or
loss, and the courts are open to try and Judge
the offences committed by the commissioner,
according to the strict measures of justifie.
That great swindles have been perpetrated;
that corrupt means have been used and alli?
ances formed; that the money of the State and
the bonds issued have not been disposed of as
directed; thftt one of-tb? land Qom missioners
is not free from "speculation, either on ms
own account or as an agent for other persons
or corporations;*' that the excess of the public
stock of this State, created for land commis?
sion purposes over the par value of the same,
In the aggregate amount, has been expended;
that the whole spirit, letter and body of the
laws authorizing the appointment of land com?
missioner, the issue of bonds, the purchase of
land, the settlement of the same, the report of
the commissioner, everything Intended in the
act, "to create a land commissioner and define
his powers.and duties," have been disregarded
or wantonly perverted, cannot be gainsaid.
. That the advisory board are responsible for
all of this, the verdict ot-the "homeless and
landless," at least, will be recorded.
The land purchased, the Improved and un?
improved, eligible or unellelble, the 104,078
acres, land-bill, swamp and otherwise, which
have cost the State already over seven dollars
per acre, with or without titles, could not have
been purchased without the knowledge of the
advisory board, "their advice and consent." |
The advisory board should be requrled, then,
to explain their acts, their neglect of duty, and
unwarrantable violation of law.
THE OLD WORLD'S NEWS.
MADRID, January 1.
There ls again a ministerial crisis In conse?
quence of the appointment of Senor Ferres
Mora to succeed Senor Crespo as second in
command in Cuba, and of General Morales as
successor to the officer In the military direc?
tion of the eastern department of that Island.
ROME, January 2.
Victor Emanuel held a reoeptlon to-day in
the Quirinal. _ _
HACKETT, THE ACTOR.
Sir John Falstaff ls dead. The Jovial knight
lived a lonz life over again in the person of |
JamesaH. Hackett, who will be remembered
by thousands, when all other reminiscences of
his stage life will have passed away, asAeone
satisfactory Falstaff of our day. Mr.T?ackett
has of late years been a memory rather than an
actual presence on our stage. The generation
now rising bas caught occasional glimpses of
his genius when In the full maturity of
powers that never became over-ripe, but
that which ls passing away treasures the re?
membrance ot his talents amonz the brightest
of Its possessions. Mr. Hackett was one of
the few relics of the "palmy days" that have
remained to this time. His Falstaff ls worthy
of a place In history, so exquisitely did lt re?
produce the Ideal knight of the comedy. Une- j
tuous without the least touch of vulgarity, and
even classical in its overwhelming humor, lt j
remains as one of the brightest records in the
annals of the American stage.
All the New York papers have extended
obituaries of the veteran actor. Many Inter
ealing points in bis career, not generally
known, have been by this means made public.
His earlier dramatic efforts were so marred by
nervousness that his best friends counselled
him to leave the stage at once; but he perse?
vered and soon won a remarkable success.
He was especially admirable at that time in bis
imitations of other actors. His imitation of
Barnes had been so perfect that the idea struck
the manager that Hackett would make a
great hit as Dromlo, in "The Comedy of
Errors," Barnes playing the other Dromlo. It
was a happy thought. Hackett so perfectly
mimicked Barnes, both in voice, walk and
gesture, that the audience was completely
mystified. In regard to his celebrated imper?
sonation of FalBiaff, it 13 said that Hackett
made a special study of fat men, and give on
UM stage their waddling galt so perfectly that
few men could be brought to believe that he
owed his portly appearance to quilted gar?
ments and folds of padding. One of the great
surprises that awaited gentlemen who sought
an introduction to the great actor was to find
him so small a man. Hie conception of the char?
acter of Falstaff was original and subtle. He
comprehended that poor Jack had once been
a brave gentleman, who had fallen Into bad
courses. He made of him a man whom none
could approve, yet with whom none could for?
bear to sympathize. Mr. Hackett's personal
character was most attractive; his nature was
genial, and he was hlgWy esteemed wherev?
er known. Mr. Hackett married about three
vears ago a lady in Canada, by whom he bad
one son, now two years ot age. He left
another sen by his former wife; well known I
and honored to New York, the present city re?
corder, John K. Hackett,
FOE
BL?CK SILKS
GO TO
J. R. READ'S.
FOE
PLAIN COLOREO SILKS,
IN POULT DE SOIE AND JAPANESE,
J. R. READ'S. .
FOB
BLACK ALPACAS,
AND
BLACK CASHMERES.
J. R. READ'S.
*~" FOB
BLACK MOHAIR CORDS,
BLACK SATEENS AND-BLACK MERINOS.
_J. R. READ'S.
FOR
BLACK SILK VELVETS
. AND
BLACK AND COLORED VELVETEENS.
_J. R. READ'S.
FOR
RICH DRESS GOODS
AND
MEDIUM PRICED DRESS GOODS.
J. R. READ'S._
FOR
OLOVES,'
(HARRIS'S "SEAMLESS" KID GLOVES,)
ALSO, FRENCH KID GLOVES IN VARIETY,
One and two Battons, * i, 912s and $1 co.
_J. R. READ'S._
FOR
HOSIERY.
_J. R. READ'S.
FOR
RIBBONS, FANCY NECKTIES,
HANDKERCHIEFS, LACES AND EM?
BROIDERIES.
j. R-. READ'S.
FOR
GENTLEMEN'S SCARFS,
NECKTIES, LINEN SHIRT FRONTS, HAND?
KERCHIEFS AND GLOVES.
_J. R. READ'S.
FOR
LICE ll UH COLLARS,
SETS AND SLEEVES, INFANTS' CLOAKS
AND ROBES.
J. R. READ'S.
FOR
TABLE DAMASKS, NAPKINS,
TOWELS AND WHITE LINENS, LINEN
AND COTTON SHEETINGS.
J. R. READ'S.
FOR
\ LOXGCLOTH.
CORBETS AND UNDEBVESTS.
_J. R. READ'S._
FOR
CLOAKS AND SHAWLS,
LADIES' SUITS, CHILDRENS* CLOAKS,
LADIES'JACKETS, SACQUES, Ac.
J. R. READ'S,
oct2T-tataflflmoa_No. 863 KINO ST.
AliUiiitrfi, Omjaraakittg, ?tt.
jyj-BS. M. J. ZER?OW,
No. 304 KING STREET,
Would respectfully inform the ladles that she
wul
OPEN THIS DAY
A FULL ASSORTMENT OF MILLINERY
GOODS.
DRESSMAKING In all its branches attended to
as usual. Haring obtained the Agency of Md me.
DEMOREST'S CELEBRATED PAPER PATTERNS,
ls now prepared to famish a general
ASSORTMENT OF PATTERNS.
country orders will receive prompt attention.
noviS-tnUu.
jyj-RS. M. DUNLAP,
MILLINERY AND FANCY GOODS,
KO. 364 KING STREET,
?
ONE DOOR BELOW GBORGE ST BE ET.
SPEOIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO COUN?
TRY ORDERS. dec7-thstulmo
?Lonfeit tmenes.
?J?MAS GHEE Bl
"BUT ONCE A YEAR!"
THE RICHEST AND TBEJNICBST
MINCE PIES
HINGE PIES
MINCE PIES
In the City, always on hand or made to order at j
shore notice.
ALSO,
TURKEYS
GAME
PASTRY
ICED OAKES
JELLIES, tc, ftc,
AT
TULLY'S OLD STAND,
NO. 124 KING STREET,
decie Near Queen street.
Basinets Card*.
XJTTE LITE AND LEARN, DYE AND
YY FORGET ALL.
THE SOb THE RX DTE HOUSE,
NO. 359 SING STREET,
Dyes and cisans, by means of steam, Gentle?
men's, Ladies' and Children's Clothes. Fine
Laces and Lace Curtains cleaned and done
up with the Sort cr Manufacturera' Finish; Lace
ana crape Shawls and Kid Gloves Cleaned and
Dyed.
ja* Goods received and returned by Expresa.
Jnnaa-lTr L BILLER. Proprietor.
QTTO A MOSES, PH. D.
Geological Surveys and Maps promptly and
exactly executed. Phosphate and Mining Pro*
pertles reported upon, And Working Plana fur?
nished. Separating ?nd Metallurgical Proc?s-,
ses adapted to Ore Oapoalta. Special attention
to CHEMICAL ANALYSE5 0: FERTILIZERS,
.Drugs, Ores, Minerals, Ac. LABORATORY,
dec23?cutheaw No, 28 George street
Sirs (Sfoobs ards Wotio?&f
FraCH60TT9 BENEDICT & CO.,
No. Q44 King Street,?
.? . ' :ic.i
ARB CLEARING OUT THEIR
WINTER STOCK
REQ-ABDL?SS OP COgT
TO MAKE ROOM FOR
SP?ING IMPOETAHONS.
FURCHBOTT, BENEDICTA CO.
AT FUBCHGOTT, BENEDICT A GO.,
4-4 Black Alpaca 25o.
AT FUBCHGOTT, BENEDICT * CO,,
Colored Alpacas 26c.
AT FUUCHGOTT, BENEDICT A CO.,
Japanese Dress $3 50. -,
AT FUBCHGOTT, BENEDICT A CO.,
Black usHsemerets 86c.
AT FUBCHGOTT, BENED1CI A CO.,
Black Crape Cloth 50c.
AT FUBCHGOTT, BENEDICT * CO., " '
Black and White Shawls $2 25,
AT FUBCHGOTT, BENEDICT A GO., .
Saratoga Shawls Si.
AT F?BCHGOTT, BENEDICT A CO.,
Black Groa Grain SUk $1 W.
FUItCHGOTT, BENEDICT & CO.,
_. : No. : 244 KTgfoSTBEET.
AT FUEOHGOTT, BENEDICT ?t'd?Z^
Kentucky Jeana 12c.
AT FUBCHGOTT, BENEDICT A CO., .
Ali wool Jeans 26c
AT FUBCHGOTT, BENEDICT A CO.,
Flae Cassemeres $i. '
AT FUBCHGOTT; BENEDICT ? CO.,
Broad cioatn and Doeskin asper cent, reduction.
AT FUBCHGOTT, BENEDICT A CO., ,
I Fine Corsets Wc.
At FUBCHGOTT. BENEDICT A CO..
very Fine . . '
AT FUBCHGO?T, BENEDICT A CO.,:
Floe Cambrics-Sac
AU FUBCHGOTT, BENEDICT-A CO.; - - .
8-4 White and colored Tarletan? a 5a
AT FUBCHGOTT, BENEDICT A CO., %
Sash Ribbon red aced. -
AT FUBCHGOTT, BENEDICT A GO" .
-?_. Trimming Ribbon reduced. '
AT FUBCHGOTT, BENEDICT A CO. ,
x Bows reduced.. ? i. . ,
AT FUBCHGOTT,. BENEDICT A CO.,
CheUley's Kid Gloves $2.
AT FUBCHGOTT,'BENEDICT A CO.,
Holser/, g rea t red a ct lon.
AT FUBCHGOTT, BENEDICT A 00., . 0
_ Feathers and Plumes.
FTRt liGOTT, BENEDICT & CO.,
No. 244 KING STREET., ;
AT FUEOHGOTT. BENEDICT A 00. ;
8-4 Damask rsc. ^
AT FUBCHGOTr, BENEDICT A CO., .
6-4 Brown 850..
AT FUBCHGOTT, BENEDICT A CO.,
Scarlet Opera Flannel 86c.
AT FUBCHGOTT, BENEDICT A CO., . >vi
10-4 Sheeiing.soc
AT FUBCHGOTT, BENEDICT A CO.,
Large Towels, per dozen $140?
AT FUBCHGOTT, BENEDICT A CO.,
Dollies, per dozen 76c.
AT FUBCHGOTT, BENEDICT A CO;,
"Napkins, per dosen 1125. ..?
AT FUBCHGOTT, BENEDICT A CO.,
. . 5g??? 4-4 Bleached Shir ung i
F?0??,BE1D.V
No. 244 KING STEEET.
QBEAT CLOSING- OUT SALE . OF -
CARPETS.
GREAT REDUCTION .ON FORMER
PRICES.
REAL ENGLISH BRUSSELS $1 60.
All Wool Ingrain soc and
Rugs, Mats and Window Shades at equally low
price;.
FliRCUG???.B?!\W?&C9.,
_No. 244 KING STREET.
.fartcrj (?oo?fi, $?z.
.j^bnc^r^o^iOE i. N^TTCET " ^
In cons?quence of the Increased -demand for
TOTS, FANGT GOODS AND SHOWCASES, the
nn dei signed takes pleasure - In informing his na;
meron? rrlends and the public generally that ne
has opened a BRANCH OF HTS fi asl NESS et No*
844 KING STREET, where he will constantly keep
on hand a large and well selected stock of TOTS,
FANGT GOODS, Showcases, Glass Shades, Fin*
works, Musical Instruments, and every article
appertaining to the business. Dealers will lind lt
to their advantage to give him f.caii before pur*
chasing elsewhere. WK. MCLEAN,
Noa. 344 and 483 King street,
NOAH'S ASK of Charleston, s. 0.
decl4-thstu
HOatctjro, Jcmelrj!, SPt.
ENTIRELY NEW STOCK
OF
JEWELRY, SILVER,
AND
PLATEDWARE,
AT THE
NEW STORE,
Under the Masonic Arch,
No. ?89 King street.
AL30, "
FJLNCY GOODS,
AND
HOLIDAY PRESENTS
THOMAS & LANNEAU.
S. THOMAS, JB. WM. S. LANNEAU.
nov2_'
Jg ALL. BLACK A GO.
NOS. 695 a.. 897 BROADWAY, N. Tn
offer for the HOLIDAYS the moat complets and
best selected assortment of the following Goods
to be found in the etty:
DIAMOND AND GOLD JEWELRY"
Watches for Ladles an a Gentlemen
Sterling Silver Table Ware
Brontes, Antique and Modern
Marble and Bronze Clocks
Marble Statuary.
FANCY GOODS GENEBALL*
jclylS-lyr

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