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The Charleston daily news. (Charleston, S.C.) 1865-1873, January 04, 1872, Image 1

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VOLUME XI.-NUMBER 1883.
CHARLESTON, THURSDAY MORNING, JANUARY 18, 1872.
EIGHT DOLLARS A
THE ROGUES OF THE RING.
THE VULTURES THAT AXE PROTECT?
ED BT GRANT'S MARTIAL LAW.
Thc Colossal Robbers of Sooth Caroli?
na-A Legislature Packed with scoun?
drels, Black and White-Let the South
Carolina Legislature Adjourn to the
State Prison.
[Correspondence or the Nev? York: Sun.]
COLUMBIA, S. C., December 26.
For ODce the old adage bas proved untrue,
-and the history of events In the Legislature of
tbls State within the past fortnight bas de?
monstrated that lt ls not always true that
'.when rogues' fall out honest men get their
dues." for the rogues who were charged
with the administration of the State Govern?
ment bave bad a serious, falling but. While it
is true, however, that the honest men ot the
, State have not received their dues, this row
among the members of the Ring has brought
to light many damnable facts lhat have hither?
to lain comfortably hidden by the veil of ob?
scurity, and the well filled coffers of two de?
lectable carpet-bag princes have;been made
tc^pour out their treasures copiously into the
depleted pockets of their colored brethren,
who legislate for their constituency at the ex?
ceedingly cheap consideration of six dollars
.per diem.
THE CASUS BELLI.
It will be remembered thal ex-Congressman
C. C. Bowen, after his pardon by the Pres!
dent, turned his eyes toward the Gubernato?
rial chair of South Carolina. His first objeot
was to ruin Governor Scott's chance for a re
nomination. He took a seat in the Legisla?
ture. This was easily done. Being a sort of
prince among the unlettered colored inhabi?
tants of the sea Islands, Bowen had merely to
fe t one of the leg'slators to resign and signify
ls desire to bo elected. Upon presenting
himself for qualification in the House some of
the colored members entered a protest against
bis admis: lon, and the ex-Congressman, ris?
ing to explain, promised to expose the frauds
of the Ring and make the pilferers of the pub?
lic treasury disgorge. Having obtained bis
seat, one of the first acts of his new official
-career was to Introduce a resolution for the
appointment of a committee of five to investi
gate the alleged over-issue of bonds. The
committee having been appointed, with Mr.
Bowen at its head, submitted a report In
which they charged the Governor and treas
urer of the State with having fraudulently ls
sued over six millions of State bonds, and
recommended that the House "take imme?
diate steps to bring to justice those who had
defrauded the State and ruined her credit."
BOWEN'S FLAN K MOVEMENT ON SCOTT.
The recommendation contained In tbls re
port was adopted as the sense of the House
by an overwhelming majority, and Bowen
thereupon immediately introduced a r?solu
tion to Impeach Governor Scott and Treasurer
Parker of high crimes and misdemeanors in
office. Thia was the signal for the fray. His
Excellency at once perceived that bis time for
-acton had come, and as promptly began his
preparations for the fight. His funds were
properly arranged for distribution among his
mends In the Legislature, and a market forth?
with oper.ed for the purchase of votes. Dur?
ing -the consideration ol the resolutions
Bowen made a speech in which he openly ex
posed the frauds of the Statehouse Bing.
General Whipper, the black member from
* Beaufort, fought by his side, and the entire
battle was carried on by these two, assisted
-by a few straggling colored members and the
handful of white Democrats In the House.
, . SCOTT'S AMBUSCADE.
These two newly made Reformers prolong?
ed the battle until the 22d, on which day the
.General Assembly bad agreed to adjourn for
the Christmas holidays. Their object was to
stave off a vote un Ul the reassembling of the
Legislature, wben tbey hoped to be able to t
obtain a two-third vote to impeach the Gov- s
ernor and treasurer. But his Excellency was I
too sharp for them. He poured out his money I
-Tim Hurley swears he spent $100,000- |
bought votes right and left, and issued a pro?
clamation convening the Assembly in extra
session on the following day, and so forced a
?ote whereby the Impeachment resolutions 11
were defeated by a vote of 63 to 27. To those 11
unacquainted with the wire-workings of the
Legislature Of. South Carolina, this action
would appear somewhat strange on the part
of the House after lt had adopted Bowen's re
port, but the trouble ls Governor Scott bas
too much money, and having used it with an
unsparing band, can afford to snap his fingers
at bis opponents.
ROTTENNESS UNPARALLELED.
When the Impeachment resolutions came up
for consideration the question resolved itself
Into a mere matter bf how much each vote
was worth. Governor Scott, having made
enough money out of the State treasury to
pay the trifling consideration which the mom
Mrs of this Legislature demand for. their votes,
can afford to snap his fingers at Bowen, Hurley
and Whitemore, the three reformers, and
laugh their threats to scorn. The highest price,
I am informed, that was paid for a vote by the
Governor was $15,000, and that the recipient
was Dennis, the Statehouse furniture mao.
Jimmy, be lt remembered, was the chairman
ef tho committee from whose report I have
just cited, and as such signed the report de?
nouncing the frauds, and recommending that
Its perpetrators be brought to Justice. Two
days before the adjournment ol' the Legisla?
ture, Scott sent for Dennis to call at his office.
The conversation that followed ls reported]
nearly as follows :
A RICH CONVERSATION.
Governor Scott. Well, Dennis, what the
hell do you mean to do about this impeach?
ment business ?
Dennis (with a wink.) Well, I dont know,
Governor, but I guess the House means busi?
ness,.
Governor. Business, the devil ! Don't the
scoundrels know that I can send one-halt of |
them to the penitentiary ? Have they not
all received their share of the moneys from
me ? What 1B the matter with that d-d rascal
Harley ? Why ls he raising such a howl ?
Dennis. I don't know. But Hurley ls hand
In glove with Bowen, and means to show
Tight.
Governor. Did you delay that report so as
to prevent its reaching the House until after
the holidays ?
Dennis. That's all right, but the House
threatens the committee with expulsion un?
less a report 1B banded them in the morning.
Governor. Well, you will have to fix up a
report, and if you do the proper thing i'll give
you that check, and keep mum about your
o?er to sell out to me in New York last sum- 11
mor.
(It should be stated here that In pursuance
of tbls agreement Dennis did, on the follow?
ing day, submit an informal report from his
committee, which whitewashed the Governor,
and reported that there bad been no fraudulent
Issue of bonds.)
Dennis. I'll do It; but you must manage to
keep Bowen silent by sprlnglog some job on
him. It will take about $60,000 or $75,000
more to do the business.
Scott, m attend to that. Tou look out lor
the report.
The servant (entering.) Mr.-, of the
New York Sun, would like to see your Excel?
lency.
Scott. Tell bim I'm not in. Go, Dennis,
now, and look sharp after that report.
This terminated the Interview, and on the
following day Dennis did actually present the
whitewashed report, and voted against Im?
peachment.
TIM HURLEY ON THE WAR PATH.
Our old friend Tim Hurley, who was from
first to last arrayed on the side ot the Impeach?
ers, ls exceedingly wroth at the result. The
Governor offered to buy bim off, but either
failed to bid high enough, or else Timothy has
struck an honest groove, and refused to be
bribed. He swears that be will write to the
Sun and expose the entire affair. He has, how?
ever, entered into an agreement with those
members whom Scott bought. Scott is te be
subjected to tho bleeding process for the re?
mainder of the session. Hurley agrees to In?
troduce at stated times resolutions of Im?
peachment which tbe majority will agree to
entertain. Meantime, an agent of the organi?
zation will walt apon the Governor ana re?
ceive proposals. As soon as his Excellency
shells out, the resolutions will be voted down.
This programme is to be repeated at slated In?
tervals during the session. By this means
Hurley proposes to revenge himself on Scott,
and the impecunious members will be enabled,
to pocket some of the proceeds of the over?
issue ol bonds. This plan ls nicely concocted,
and all the details are arranged. Should ix be
carried out according to agreement, the Gov?
ernor will be In a bad way. The men whose
votes he bought are perfectly unscrupulous,
and will not hesitate to bleed him to the last
cent.
AK HONEST NEGRO.
Not all of the members, however, are of the
stripe of Dennis. Among the colored men
are to be found a few who are honest to the
backbone. One of these men came to your
correspondent the day the Legislature ad
{ourned, to borrow five dollars to pay his way
lome. Said he :
"I could have had my pay certificate cashed
and had a hundred dollars in my pocket to?
day, if I would have voted for dat damn rascal,
Scott. But, afore God, I radder my little
children starve than to take his dam
money ! "
I loaned him the money.
THE CITT DEBT.
The Law of Corporations- Whose Is t:he
Debt and Who mast Pay ttl-Can
Connell Try tl!? Cause ?
To the Members of the City Council:
GENTLEMEN-In a recent article we raised
the question whether you can assecs the city
debt, and therein presented reasons for be?
lieving that under the charter, you yourselves
would not have undertaken either to create
or to assess lt; and we now propose lo show
that, contracted by your predecessors, you ure
as much without the power to enforce lt by
taxation.
It is known to you that there are two kinds
of corporations, the public and private. The
public, as a town council for instance, ls the
agent of the State for local government.
It makes laws only, and, having no capital,
may be, and generally Is, vested with the
power to raise the fund lor Its expenses, by
taxation.
The'private, as the bank or trading compa?
ny, is the agent of the corporators for private
anterprlse. It makes contracts only, and hav?
ing capital, ls without the power of taxation,
ind not paying Its debts, like natural persons,
ls subject to the adjudication of the courts.
It Is known to you, also, that these corpora?
tions, usually distinct,are sometimes combined
in the same body; and the municipal corpora?
tion, the agent ol the State tor local govern?
ment, ls made the agent, also, ot the people
Tor their private enterprises; and so harbors,
parks, gas and water-works are constructed,
and lt may be known to you, or If not, the
Tact ls so, that these corporations, though com?
bined lu the same body, are yet distinct. So
far as it is the agent of the State In making
laws lt is a public corporation; so far as lt ls
the agent ol the people In making contracts lt
ls a private corporation, and Its acts In either
character are the same, precisely, as if still
apart, and in its public character it can no
more make contracts, than lu Its private it can
make law?, and Its expenses in making and
executing laws are as necessarily assessed,
and its contracts as necessarily adjudicated,
as If they were the laws of a public, or the con?
tracts ot a private body.
Now your Council, by the charter, Is simply
a public body. It has no capacity as a private
corporation. As we have shown, and as you
will Bee, looking Into the charter, lt was cre?
ated to the regulations necessary "to the pre?
servation, peace and .order of the town." To
that end, it has power to make "by-laws, rules
md regulations," only, respecting certain
3e?lgnated objects, and others added by
toiendment. There Is no indication of a pri?
ntie character-no Intimation that lt ls to ?ct
o ah y business enterprise-no capacity to do
io. lt has no capital, no means of raising
'unds but by assessment, and by assessment
iu. to the objects of ita powers, and any lm
alicatlon that it should make contracts ls
positively excluded by the provision that all
,'ts acts shall be sffbjectto the '-revision, alter
itlon and repeal ot the Legislature," which.
If contracts, they could not oe, for reason of
the prohibition In the Constitution of the
United States.
But lt has assumed that capacity. It has
undertaken to act as a private corporation
tor the paople in their business matters. It
has assumed a capital, issued certificates ol
stock, made investments In railroads, and
Laken upon Itself the functlonsjrf a monstrous,
ind most complicated moneyed corporation,
ind In that capacity it has contracted. Its
iertiflcates of stock are contracts, tts sub?
scriptions to railroads are contracts intended
to be obligatory upon the people in their
private fortunes, and thence ls the debt, the
propriety of whose assessment, we are now
considering. And so contracted, can you also,
undertake to coerce the payment ? You seem
to assumenhat the obligation ^results upon
rou to pay that debt, and to raise the fund
for payment by taxation, and we say lt does
not. We say, that so incurred, it imposes no
obligation on you whatever,* and If lt does, lt
gives you no power to execute that obligation
apon us.
Now to the proper understanding of the
point we make, lt ls necessary to state that
the question ls not whether you shall pay your
debt. If it be your debt, pay lt, of course;
and we would tiftfar from impertinent inter?
ference with your sense of your own pecuni?
ary or moral obligation. But lt ls not your
debt. It ls our debt. Your body has assum?
ed-gratuitously, we believe-to act as our
agent In contracting obligations for us, and
the question you consider ls whether we shall
pay lt; and, not only ls it not clear that you
propose any peculiar Individual sacrifices to
this preservation of pecuniary lal th. but some
of you may hold (he stock, and If the blush of
virtuous indignation shall mantle your cheeks
at what may seem to be our hesitation la the
matter, ls lt not possible that it may be In?
spired as much by the feeling that you will be
prevented from receiving aa from making pay?
ment ?
Nor ls lt the question whether you. will pay
Ute debt. If you hold*funds ol ours in your
hands it would, we think, be unbecoming and
Improper in you to apply them to this debt,
dow, with so many reasons to believe lt ques?
tionable, and when you know lt is ques?
tioned, and that proceedings are now pend?
ing in the courts to test its validity, and to re
?tralu you. Your body will have done enough
In this matter to perplex us. Without capacity
In the charter- without authority from'us
without notice of your instentlon, to have
Imposed upon us obligations to the extent of
millions to no earthly advantage, upon which
we have already paid more than $2,000,000 In?
terest; and which, when paid, if lt be paid,
must utterly exhaust our fortunes,-surely
were enough for you to do. And. when we
question obligations so Incurred, if you had
our funds In hand, you ought hot to antici?
pate our right to try that question by the
payment of the debt. But you have no randa
In hand. The question is not whether you
will pay thlB debt, but whether you will make
uspay it; and we surely may complain that rot
content with such gratuitous infliction, you
should persist in, as we think, the equally
gratuitous enforcement, of that wrong to its
final consummation.
But to that have you the power ? This, lt
an obligation at all, ls a legal obligation. This
debt, is a contract. The subscriptions to rail?
roads were contracts. Each Issue ol stock ls
a contract-a contract wlih the holder that
at certain rate of annual Interest he shall be
paid a certain amount of money. Il ls a con?
tract by you as a private, not a public, corpora?
tion; as the agent, not of the State, but ol us,
binding not the State, but us, it it bind at ell;
and that, like every other legal obligation, is
within the judicial power, ana to be enforced,
If enforced at all, only on the judgment of a
court. And are you a court ? Has the State
given you a commission to try causes ? or do
you take that power from the fact that you,
as agent, made the contract ? Is it the office
of agents to determine the validity of the ob?
ligations they undertake to impose, and to ex?
ecute them? Could the broken bank, for
whose debts the corporators by law In this
State are liable, render judgment and execu?
tion against them * And ls lt not, in fact, an
additional objection lo the exercise of this
power by a corporation, that it ls, itself, the
agent contracting the obligation it undertakes
to adjudicate. TAXPAYERS.
THE KU-KLOX TRIALS. .
TEN MORE PRISONERS PLEAD 6 XTILTY.
DKcharge of in Old O?an-The Answer
of Colonel mcmaster to Judge Bend.
[SPECIAL TELEGRAM TO TEE NEWS.]
COLUMBIA. S. G., January 3.
Ten more of the Spartanburg Ku-Klux pris?
oners pleaded guilty to-day, and told their
story to the court. One poor old man among
them was discharged on his own recogni?
zance.
Colonel McMaster submitted his answer to
the rule to show cause why he should not be
stricken from tae roll of attorneys for refus?
ing to answer Judge Bond's questions, as to
the whereabout of Dr. Avery. Mr. Ficklin
made an able argument In Colonel McMaster's
favor. The court reserved tbelr decision
until to-morrow. _ PICKET.
NOTES AND DETAILS BY MAIL.
The Avery Trial-Speeches by Messrs.
Mcmaster and Wilson fur the Defence
-Harangue of Mr. Corbin-A Verdict
of Guilty.
fFROSf OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.]
COLUMBIA, January 2.
In the United States Court tbls morning,
after some preliminary business, Mr. Cham?
berlain made an argument of nome length
as to the propriety of proceeding with the
trial ol Dr. Avery In the absence of the de?
fendant. He claimed that the trial should go
on, his principal point being that, while a
prisoner could not be deprived of his right to
be present at all stages of bis trial, still he
could not take ad/antage of his voluntary
wa: -or of that right by going away with the
obvious purpose of escaping the control and
jurisdiction of the court to deleat the ends of
justice. The only case he found to sustain
this view was a counterfeiting case in Ohio
reported In Bishop on Criminal Procedure,
Section 687. The counsel for defence re?
frained from argument upon the polar, and
Judge Bond announced the opinion of tbe
court. He said that the court bad to decldd
this question Immediately, while they would
prefer to have further time for consultation^
They thought lt safest to proceed to trial, be?
cause all questions then before the bar could
be argued when motion for Judgment came
to be made, If the verdict should be against
the prisoner.
Mr. McMaster then proceeded with his ar?
gument to the Jury, which was Interrupted
yesterday: He criticised very severely the
composition of the jury, explaining that lathe
first place the jurors were selected by the
three collectors of Internal revenue. Among
the voters of this State there were about two
whites to three colored men, but the jury Usia
showed no such proportion ol white men as
that. Another remarkable peculiarity was
shown. There were, In South Carolina, but
very few white Radical?, but strangely
enough almost every white man drawn -upon
these juries was a Radical. Eleven of the
jury whom he was addressing were violent
partisans. It was infinitely woree than the
notorious Episcopal Juries who tried O'Con?
nell, the Irish liberator, and the other Catho?
lics, during the troubles In Ireland. w?f the
present Jury, nine were'colored and three
were white. The outrages had been commit,
ted on colored ?nen, and naturally the colored
men upon the jury were inflamed against the
men who were brought to trial for those
outrages. The world had never seen a par?
allel to these cases. Macaulay bad said that
In the Irish cases Just referred to there was a
reasonable certainty of a verdict against the
prisoner; but here the chances were Increased
one hundred fold. But be declared If he were
a colored man he would pl orv lo aa oppoeta*.
nlty such as would be afforded by being on
that jury to show his race was flt for freedom
that a black Jury could rise above the pas?
sions and prejudices of tbelr race and do Jus?
tice according to the facts proven. He knew
that he would have to conquer a prejudice la
their minds because Dr. Avery had ran away ;
bathe begged them not to let that warp their
judgment of his case. The true way to Judge
ot bis action was to put themselves ia his
place, and th*>n say If they would not have
acted as be did. There had been an effort
made to connect hlu (the counsel) with com?
plicity ia the defendael's escape: but as ta that
he had nothing to say, for that was not the
time or place. Dr. Avery was gone, and
he boped he was by that time in a coun?
try which be thinks freer than- this. Dr.
Avery had come to that court positive of his
innocence. He bad not known a member of
the jury. He had been told that eleven of
them were partisans, but still he hoped for
Justice, but be was afterward astonished,
horrified at the practices resorted to to secure
conviction. The prosecution introduced Its
blackest testimony as to outrages in York
County, not pretending to connect those out?
rages with Dr. Avery, but Introduced solely
to paint in the blackest background to the
scene, and play upon the passions of the Jury.
Then he bad Introduced his witnesses. Some
of them were too scared to talK, and others
were kept away from the witness stand. . He
knew from his position In the community that
ihe prosecution were determined, by any
means, to attach to him the damning stigma
of all ihe outrages committed by the very
dregs and offscourlng ol" York County, the
devils of the coal Melds, and stamp
the gentlemen of that district with
the infamy of these acts. He knew
that three months would not roll by be?
fore those very devils who had committed
these merciless acts would still have honor
lett to aquit bim (Dr. Avery) of participation
in those orlmes. But wheo be saw ten years
In the penitentiary, In convlet's garb, and in a
convict's cell, because be was a gentleman,
could anybody blame him lor going, "where
the woodbine twlneih?" He bad seen an
aged gentleman sent to prison for Ave years
because forsooth, la the language of the court,
he bad not put forth his Influence and stopped
these outrages. The counsel asked, In the
nante of God, bow could be do lt? If the
moral force of this community bad been so
great as that, could the stealing, bribery and
rascality lo the government of this State have
gone oa until the debt had been piled up to
mountain height? Would not this venal
Legislature have been long ago expurged?
The court had told the prisoner re?
ferred to that be should have stop?
ped these outrages. No matter that
he was a quiet farmer, living at a dis?
tance from the outrages. He should forsooth
have gone to Yorkvllle, twenty miles from
home, and stopped these outrages. It was ab?
surd to Bay that the state of society In South
Carolina, Georgia and Florida can be judged
by such rules as In a social condition of pro?
found peace. Those States bad been harried,
outraged, ravaged by war, and bad not yet
been settled to their normal condition. - The
counsel then reviewed the evidence, tearing
to tatters the fltmsy testimony lor the prose?
cution, and proving that Dr. Avery had never
belonged to but one organization bearing any
resemblance to the Ku-Klux, and that was an
organization in 1868, purely for home protec?
tion, perfectly innocent and laudable In Its
purposes, and which bad been dissolved years
before the outrages in York County were com?
mitted.
Mr. Wilson followed on the same side, and
completed the reductlo ad absurdam of the
theory of the prosecution. He first remarked
that although the departure of his client had
added aa unexpected and heavy burden upon
him lt should not deter him, and he begged
that it should not prevent the Jury from doing
their whole duty. The flight was not necessa?
rily a proof of guilt. It might reasonably be
attributed to despair. He saw that he was
drifting to that roselBtrom from which no one
man had yet returned, and he took refuge In
flight, but tbelr duty was unchanged. The
counsel then read the enforcement act of 1870,
and showed the absurdity of charging that the
organization of 1868 was in defiance of that
law, and he pointed out dozens of the glaring
discrepancies and contradictions in the very
testimony of the prosectlon, and declared,
what has been perfectly patent to every
listener, that before- any Intelligent jury the
defendant would need no furlber vindication
of his innocence than the very testimony
against him.
Mr. Corbin then made bis argument for the
prosecution. He laid great stress upon the
flight of Dr. Avery, claiming that that was a
confession of guilt. He dilated upon the
irrelevant testimony of his old stand-bys, and
made a most inflammatory speech, based
upon the outrages of last spring. He evaded
most of tbe points made by the counsel for
the defence, but labored very hard to recon?
cile the apparent perjury In the testimony of
their unfortunate witness. Postle. He also
digressed to ex Dress an opinion of Rev. Mr.
Latham and Rev. Dr. Winkier, the conclusion
of his harangue being as follows :
uNow, gentlemen, we come to another In?
teresting matter in wblsh the ministers are
engaged. I wish I could find the ministers of
Yo" k County In better company. It ls only a
day or two since there was a long article In a
New Tors paper defending the Ku-Kluxlng in
York County, from Rev. Mr. Latham, of York
County. Only a day or two since we saw a
long letter in THE CHARLESTON NEWS from
a Rev. Mr. Wlnkler. He says: 'To anybody
who knows the facts about this Eu Klux busi?
ness, he would not be true te his Cod or his
country if he wished well to these prosecu?
tions.' What do you think of a minister of
this kind ? What have you to say for a man
I who preached Christ and Him crucified-had
a commission for that-but who says: I never
said a word against Ku-Kluzism. Whipping,
killing and murdering could be done ana I say
nothing about lt, because I don't preach poli?
tics. Is there any surprise that Ku-Klux could
exist In York County ?
"The question of whether Dr. Avery was In
this conspiracy ls to be determined by you, by
the testimony given you In thia case; and I
think, gentlemen, that I am not doing myself
Injustice or you wrong by saying that I think
you will agree with me that the testimony In
this case and the conduct of the defendant and
his counsel show you, equally, that he ls
guilty."
After an absence of about half an hour, the
Jury returned and rendered a verdict of guilty.
The following named prisoners appeared
and pleaded guilty under the Ku-Klux act:
First. Glbeon Cantrell, who said he lived in
Spartanburg County, was slxtv-slx years of
age, and bad belonged to Rprae Creek Klan,
but was never on any raid, and had joined for
protection. Jesse Tate, Cbrlstenbury Tate,
David Collins. Billy Scruggs, Judge Edwards,
King Edwards and Sherwood Blackwell were
members, and Alfred Harris was chief.
Next, Turner Phillips, Lewis Sally and W.
S. Blackwell. The last three stated that they
had been forced Into the klan against their
wishes.
Tbe court directed the marshal <o bring the
prisoners up to-morrow, to be sentenced! and
adjourned tl;l to-morrow, at eleven A. M.
_ PICKET.
ABOLISH THE FENCE LAW.
The In J mt Ice of the Pr?tent Fence Law
-Will not the Bottom Rall More
First ?
A correspondent cf the Columbia Union,
over the nom de plume of 'Tenant," writing
from Hopkins's Turnout, In Richland County,
says:
JSvery friend of agricultural progress will be
gratified to see that the subject of fences has
at last been mooted In the Legislature.
Improved stock, Improved implements and
improved culture may receive a full abare of
our attention, but with all this, we will ad?
vance but slowly as long as the "fence law,"
as lt now stands, remains a stumbling block In
our path.
The great revolution In our agricultural sys?
tem necessitates a change also lo this respect,
and it is demanded by toat great principle on
which all good laws are based-the greatest
good to the greatest number.
' Let us take for Instance a plantation of
eight hundred acres cleared land. The true
maxim of a "few acres well cultivated" re?
quires about half this tract to be abandoned.
The owner and tenants, or parties renting the
same, select the most fertile spots; but In or?
der to protect the crops the whole body must
be fenced or each tenant must enclose his
own field. Would il not be more rational to
enclose a pasture of thirty or forty acres for
fchftrtMoeAfciAjf: all Darl|e$ ftfl. the plantation ?
Indeed Itwould, but- here Ts" tue aiumutCf
there is no guarantee that the occupants of
the neighboring plantation will act BO wisely,
and the whole eight hundred acres must be
enclosed to guard against a few scrub cattle
which probably are not worth one-iourlh the
cost of the fences.
Again, how many plantations ia this State
are destitute of "rall timber." It 'ls a fact
familiar to axmen that every tree ls not suit?
able for rails. Many forests which still have
an abundance of timber have been worked
over and over again with the maul and
wed?.
A law requiring every man to enclose his
own stock will benefit the landowner because
lt will spare his limited supply of wood land.
It will benefit tbe tenant, because lt will re?
quire less labor to enclose bis few head of
stock than to keep a "lawful fence" around
his crop, and he will not, as ls now often the
case, be called from his plough to replace the
fence which some careless "possum hunter"
has burned. His stook being under his eye
always, will be safe, and receive a greater
share of attention. And lastly, lt will benefit
all parties. In the fa:t that lt will abolish the
most fruitful cause of quarrel and contention
that ever cursed an agricultural community.
"Every man shall live by the sweat ot his
brow, but his cattle shall live by the sweat ol
his neighbor's brow."
Thus virtually stands the law of South Caro?
lina. Shall we change lt? Shall we adopt
what other communities have proved to be a
wise, Just and good law? Or shall we continue
In force one which is every year becoming more
oppressive, more unjust, and rendering our
beautiful land more unsightly. We are told
that we cannot get rid of the fence because
the "bottom rail ls on tap," but that rall ought
to be the first one to move.
WASHINGTON NEWS AND GOSSIP.
WASHINGTON, January 3.
The ship Osprey, of Boston, ls traced by the
United States Treasury records to the coast of
Australia, Ihe claimant of the Tichborne
estates asserts he was saved by the O.'prey
Irom shipwreck off the coast of Brazil. The
records were searched at the instance ot the
English attorneys for the defendants.
It ls stated that the steamer Congress sails
with sealed orders, supposed to have refer?
ence to the Hornet.
THE WEATHER THIS DAT.
WASHINGTON, D. C., January 3.
Clear weather, with northwesterly winds, is
probable for Thursday from Florida to Ken?
tucky and westward. Cloudy and clearing
weather prevailing on the South Atlantic
coast. The barometer will continue to fall in
tbe Middle and Eastern States, with cloud
and fog. Westerly winds, with cloudy weath?
er, continues over the lakes. An area of low
barometer will develop In Nebraska and Min?
nesota. Warning signals are ordered. Dan?
gerous winds are not anticipated for to-night.
Yesterday's Weather Reports of the
Signal Service, V. S. A.-4.47 P. M.,
Local Time.
Place of
Observation.
AuguBca, Ga..
Baltimore.
Bustoa.
Charleston....
Chicago.
Cincinnati.
Galveston.
Key West, Fla
Knoxville, Tenn.
Memphis. Tenn..
Mt. Washington.
New Orleans...
New Tork.
Norrolk.
Philadelphia.
Portland, Me....
Savannah .
St. Louis.
Washington, DC.
Wilmington,N C.
H
30.20
30.10
30.38
30.16
30.07
30.04
30.2.'
30.14
30.04
30 23
30.05
30.14
30.26!
30.14
30.26
30.48
3t>.16
80.?0
30.18
30.15
NW
NB
NE
E
W
w
NW
N
SW
w
s
N
NB
NE
NE
N
55 SE
29 W
41 SE
55ISE
Gentle.
LI gat.
Gentle.
Light.
Fresh.
Gentle.
Fresh.
Gentle.
Fresh.
Brisk.
Fresh.
fresh.
Fresh.
Gentle.
fresh.
Light.
Fresh.
Llghr.
Light.
Non.-The weather resort dated 7.47 O'CIOCK,
this morning, will be posted in the rooms of the
L'a amber of commerce at 10 o'clock A. M., and,
together with the weather chart, may (by the
courtesy of the Chamber) be examined by ship,
masters at any time during the day.
THE ROCHESTER OUTRAGE.
.STATE TROOPS IK POSITION-MENA?
CES OF THE MOB.
Setting the Colon-A Woman in Peril
Plucking Honors from the Cannon's
Month-The Public Peace Mnst be Pre?
?erred.
KOCHESTEP.. January 3-Midnight.
The main portion of tbe crowd has dis?
persed. A public meeting 1B proposed for to?
morrow. The captains of the companies disa?
vow having ordered the firing whereby four
citizens were killed. The negroes have aban?
doned the streets. John Utter, who ls killed,
was a prominent German citizen. The mill
lar y claim that they were assailed with stones.
[SSCOND DISPATCH ]
ROCHESTER. January 3.
From three until eleven this morning the
city was comparatively quiet. Four companies
of the fifty-tour th regiment are guarding the
jail and Its approaches, and loaded' cannon
are placed to command the bridges.
At eleven o'clock the crowd assembled, and
there ls a ?rood deal of booting of tbe military,
but no overt act is committed. At half-past
eleven o'clock some one placed on the canal
boa', In the slip of Court street, a flag on
which were the words, "Avenge your
brothers." Brigadier-General Clark tore it
down, and Ihe crowd rushed upon bim, and
for a short time be wes lu peril, but he was
released and firearms were handed to him by
his friends.
Ihe sheriff has ordered out the remaining
six companies of the Fifty-fourth regiment,
and they are now assembling at the arsenal.
It is learned that there will be more trouble
this afternoon and evening, and the authorities
are determined to defend the Jail, but they
wish the negro Howard well out ol ll.
Further particulars of the shooting last eve?
ning show that the soldiers were pelted by
"the mob with brickbats and stones, and seve?
ral were Injured. An order to charge was
given, and some of the men fired Instead.
[THIRD DISPATCH.]
ROCHESTER, January 3.
There ls a considerable crowd about the Jail,
but the heavy rain checks tbe excitement,
and there has been no violence since noon.
Preparations are made to meet any emergency.
The negro Howard has been indicted.
[FOURTH DISPATCH.]
ROCHESTER, N. T., January 3.
The police charged the mob gathered around
the Jail, driving them through the streets in
every direction. There is a great crowd now
(four o'clock) in Buffalo street, at tbe inter?
section of State. Four veteran companies are
sworn In as special police. Several soldiers
who stepped put of the lines were knocked
down by the mob. Howard will not be brought
before the court until lt ls known whether his
victim will die.
(FIFTH DISPATCH.!
ROCHESTER, Januarys.
The Judges of the Oyer and Terminer Court
directs the sheriff not to take Howard from
Jail at present, and to proteot public property
and to preserve the public peace at all haz?
ards. The howitzers are removed to posi?
tions where they command Exchange street
and the approaches from the east side of the
river more effectually.
CRIMES AND CAS VAL TIES.
A Fire in Kentucky.
LOUISVALE, January 3.
A Are In Somerset, Pulaski County, burned
several buildings, Including the courthouse.
Loss $76,000.
Triple Murder in Connecticut.
HARTFORD, January 3.
A mau, his wife and another woman have
been murdered at Windsor Rock. No clue.
The Mormon Leader.
SALT LAKE, January 3.
Brigham Young ts refused ball. Young gave
the Federal Government ene of his houses for
a prison, wherein Young ls confined.
-nxmhlp-dvcrt YtlhBinr. _
NEW YORK, January*37~
Two ruffians seized a respectable married
woman on Eighth avenue and carried her to
a disreputable house. The woman fought,
and one of the twain split ber forehead with a
brass knuckle and fled. The other was ar?
rested and proved to be George Schuyler
Burns, who was convicted of a similar out?
rage a year ago.
HILLED IN COURT.
General R, Davis, of Mississippi, Shot
Dead.
An unpleasant state of fe/Ung has existed
between General Renben Davis and S. M.
Meek, both lawyers of Mississippi, for some
time back. In last July or August these gen?
tlemen appeared In Aberdeen, Mississippi, on
opposite sides of a killing case, which was in
course of examination before the circuit court
of that place. The person under trial was C.
Taylor Hill, who was charged with murder.
Davis was defending the prisoner, and Meek
was prosecuting. It is generally represented
that Davis bad what ls forcibly called "a vio?
lent way" about bim; whereas Meek was
upon ordinary occasions among the mild?
est of men, a modest, unobtrusive gentleman.
He was Insulted by Davis ar. that lime, and
felt much aggrieved. After that they never
spoke to each other. Cn Friday last they
again met on opposite sides of a case In the
courthouse of Columbus, Mississippi, when
Davis, as usual, indulged in violent and offen?
sive language, and so Irritated Meek that be
could bear lt no longer. He said : "Davis, I
can't stand your brow-beating any longer.
Defend yourself." Meek jerked out his pistol,
and Davis proceeded to draw his weapon, but
was too slow, and was shot before be bad his
weapon ready for use. This was In the court?
house. In the presence of the Judge and a full
court, Great excitement prevails throughout
the town consequent upon the shooting.
General Davis was a colonel of the Second
Mississippi Regiment during the Mexican war.
He was a general of the sixty-day Mississippi
militia ia the late war. He was before the
war a member of the United States Congress
from the Aberdeen District, Mississippi. He
served two years. After that, he returned
home and followed bis profession of criminal
lawyer, in which he achieved long ago a fine
reputation. Davis was about fifty-eight or
sixty years of age. S. M. Meek ls now perhaps
forty years old, and stands at the head of bis
profession.-Memphis Appeal.
THE GRANT RING IN NEW ORLEANS.
NEW ORLEANS, January 3.
Yesterday the Senate had no quorum, the
customhouse partisans absenting themselves.
The sargeant-at-arms sought them Ineffectu?
ally, in the House Carter (antl-Warmoth)
received a vote of thanks and an endorsement
of bis official acts by a handsome majority.
This ls regarded as a decided customhouse or
Grant Bing victory.
THE WINTER WEATHER.
.. SAK FRANCISCO. January 3.
The weather cleared on New Year's Day.
Twenty-five hundred tons of salt and the
works were washed away at Alemeda.
OMAHA, January 3.
Four eastern bound passenger trains, near
Shoeman, bare been two days trying to
shovel their way through.
BERGH AND THE BIRDS. '
NEW YORK, January 3.
The pigeon shooting match of the Long
Island Shooting Club was Interrupted yester?
day by Bergh. A member shot two birds,
however, to enable Bergh lo make a test case
in the courts. The society, on the other hand,
threaten to sue Bergh for trespassing on the
club ground.
THE OLD WORLD'S NEWS.
LONDON, December 3.
The Times, in discussing Catacazy's recall,
says that minister served bis government zeal?
ously but not Judiciously.
Slr Charles Dllkes's supporters are preparing
a grand demonstration In bis honor.
BERLIN, January 3.
Yon Boon has retired from the ministry of
GKZELET ONTHETRESIDEITCY.
The Fail Text ot his Famous Letter.
Mr. Greeley acknowledges the genuineness
of the following, which he call? Man old prt-l
vate letter:" ? \ .
STEW YORK TRIB?NE, I
a ? Sf October 18,1871. f
P. Donan, Esq., lexington, Mo.:
MT DEAR SIR-1 have yours of the 14th lost.
I have no doubt that the policv you sue
gest ls that which your party ought roadODt
They .should have taken up Salmon p Chase
in 1868. Then, as the result of that contest
the return of genuine peace and thrift would
have been promoted. That policy gave you
more last year in Missouri than could have
been achieved by a party triumph.
Yon only err as to the proper candidate,
am not the man you need. Your party ls
mostly free trade, and I am a ferocious pro?
tectionist. I have no doubt that I might be
nominated and elected byyonr help; out lt
would place us all In false positions. Il I,
who am adversely Interested, can see this, I
am sure your good sense will, on reflection,
realize lt. You must take some man like
Gratz Brown or Trumbull, or General Cox,
(late secretary of the Interior,) and thus help
to pacify and reunite our country anew.
Yours, HORACE GREELEY.
SHOOTING SCRAPES IN MARION.
[From the Marlon Star.]
-Mr. Resto Hinds was accidentally shot by
his brother on Christmas day. The wound ls
not considered dangerous.
-We are informed that a negro by the
name of Locklear shot another colored man lu
the knee, in the neighborhood of Mr. John
L. Smith's, last Friday.
-Mr. Len Posto a, a very old man, was shot j
In the back ot tbe head and dangerously
wounded on -the 21st ultimo, near W. M.
McNeil's store, in Marlon County, by a negro
named Stone, brother of Barn Stone, who was
convicted at the last term of court of commit?
ting an assault with Intent to kill on Stephen
Parker. On the day alluded to, Mr. Poston
was at McNeTs store, where he had received
some money In the presence of Stone. When
he had started home, a short distance lrom
the store, he passed Stone standing by a tree ,
with bis gun, which he fired when Mr. Pos-1
ton was about twenty paces from him, lodg
lng several buckshot in the back of his heat
The shot have been extracted, and the patient
ls doing well. The murderer ls still at large.
TILE TROUBLES OF. TWEED.
NEW YORK. January 3.
The counsel for the people propose to ex?
cept to young Tweed as surely for his father
on the ground that love and affection aa a
consideration are Insufficient to constitute a
good title. Tweed will not go to Albany j
until his ball bonds are arranged.
Special STatices.
^??TISST^NATTONAL BANK OP i
CH ARLES TOS-CHARLESTON, JANUARY 8,1872.
The annual election for DIRECTORS of this Bank
will be held at the Banking house on TUESDAY
next, the ninth (0th) Instant.
Polls open from 12 M. to half-past l o'clock P.
M. WM. C. BREESE,
Jani-thmtoS Cashier.
?BF* ACADEMY OF MUSIC DRAWING
Club Lists, on the following plana, are now open.J
for members to join:
1. Small and Large Clubs to divide equally.
2. Each member selects his own Tlc ket and de?
posita lt with the Treasurer of the Club. One
half of any Prize drawn by a Ticket to be given
to the member who chose it; the other hair to be
owned by Club.
3. Cubs appropriating three-fourths and nine
tenths on the same principle.
The best plan to secure something in the BUT?
LER, CHADWICK k GARY DRAWING, ls to put
hair the amount invested in single-tickets, and
'jutu III- ??rn t .iMM-t^Q_jn?rftJ<.-one_nrig?-j
In every sixty-two tickets.
Any smaller Clubs formel that wish to Increase
tbe sizs of Club, can do so oy applying to me,
who will add them to smaller clubs now formed.
Apply to EBEN COFFIN, Sub-Agent,
Office, E. M. Moreland, No. 29 Broad street.
decSO
/SF* FRESH VACCQO MATTER, JUST
taken from the Arm, kept constantly on hand at
BCRNHAM'S Drug Stole. . j an 3-6
/JF* PEOPLE'S NATIONAL BANK,
CHARLESTON, S. C., JANUARY 2, 1872.-Prepa?
ratory to the removal or the Safe?, Ac, from the
Old to the New Vault of this Bank, persons who
have Special Deposits on hand therein, (such as
Boxes and Packages,) are requested to have them I
removed by the 4th instant to some other place of |
safety for the time being. H. G. LOPER,
jans . Cashier.
jEaT* OFFICE OF THE CITY APPRAISE
ER, CITY HALL, CHARLESTON, S. 0., JANUARY
l, 1572.-NOTICE.-This office will be opened from
this date, and remain open until the 20th instant,
tor Issuing Licenses for the year 1872.
WM. H. EASTERBY,
Janl-18 city Appraiser.
jar THE CHARLESTON CHARITA?
BLE ASSOCIATION, FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE
FREE SCHOOL FUND.-OFFICAL RAFFLEB
NUMBERS.
CLASS NO. 278-MORNING.
56-74-77-30-42-13- 9-78-65-69-52-54
CLASS No. 279-EVENING.
47-24-16-46-23- 4-28-12-67- 3-11-34
AS witness our band at Charleston this 3d day
of January, 1872. FENN PECK,
JAMES GILLILAND,
oct3 Sworn commissioners.
pa* CITIZENS' SAVINGS BANK OF
SO?PH CAROLINA - CHARLESTON BRANCH,
No. 8 BROAD STREET.-All moneys deposited In
this Bank on or before the arm day of each calen?
dar month will bear interest (six' per cent.) for
that menth, as if deposited on the 1st.
D. RAVENEL, Jr.,
dec306_'_Assistant Cashier.
pa* UNION BANK OF SOUTH CARO?
LINA, CHARLESTON, 29th DECEMBER 187L
DIVIDEND.-A SEMI-ANNUAL DIVIDEND OF
FOUR PER CENT, free from tax, having been
declared by the Board of Directors, the same will
be paid to Stockholders on and after TUESDAY,
2d day of January next.
dec30-6 H. D. ALEXANDER, Cashier.
FIBST NATIONAL BANK OF
CHARLESTON, CHARLESTON, 28TH DECEMBER,
1871.-DIVIDEND N0T1CE.-A Seml-Annual Divi?
dend or SIX (6) PER CENT, or SIX DOLLARS PER ;
SHARE (tree of tax) having been declared by the j
Board or Directors, the same will be paid to stock?
holders on and after JANUARY 2D, 1872.
dec.9 WM. c. BREESE, Cashier.
~pf CITIZENS' SAVINGS BANK OF
SOUTH CAROLINA-CHARLESTON BRANCH,
No. 8 BROAD STREET.-On and after THURSDAY,
18th January, 1872, the regular semi-annual inter?
est will be paid to depositors.
All Interest not paid on the 3ist day of January
will be added to the principal of the depositor,
and will draw interest as tr deposited on tue 1st
January. Depositors are requested to bring in
their books, that the interest may be entered.
Interest ls c:mponnded quarterly, but payable as
heretofore in January and July.
D. RAVENEL. Jr.,
dec30-20 ' Assistant cashier.
ON MARRIA G E .
Happy relier for Yonne Men from the effects
of Errors and Abuses In early life. Manhood re?
stored. Nervous debility cared. Impedimenta
to Marriage removed. New method or treat?
ment. New and remarkable remedies. Booka
and Circulara aent free, In sealed envelopes. Ad?
dress HOWARD ASSOCIATION, Na 3 South
Ninth street, Philadelphia, Pa, ootia
Special ??oiites.
CONSIGNEES PER MERCHANTS'
LISE Schosner VRAIE, from New Yorkt will tena *
to Adger's North Wharf for goods before sunset.
No claims allowed after goods are removed.
Jan4-1 . WILLIAM ROACH A CO.
fi** CONSIGNEES PER STEAMSHIP
SEA G CLL, from Baltimore, are hereby notified
that she ls THIS DAT discharging cargo at
Pier No. lr Union, Wharves. AU gecds not taten
away at sunset will remain on the wharf at con
sign?es' risk. MORDECAI A 0?? "
J*n4-i ' .> Agents.
/ar* CON SIGNEE NOTICE -rTHE
schoonef J. H. STICKNEY, from Baltimore, ls dis
charging ter cargo at Kerr's wharf. Goods re?
maining on tho dock at sunset will be stored at '
risk and expense of owners. .
jans STREET JRQTHEBSJA CO., Agents;
pf* RAFFLE.-A BEAUTIFUL ' SET
Of TOY FURNITURE to be RAI ned at ; MCLEAN'S
Stores, Kos. 844 and 448 King a tree t. ' Everybody .
that sees lt wants lt, especially those who have a
ittle girl to give ltto. janl
_?s?-CITY HALL, .OFFICE CLERK OF
COUNCIL, CHARLESTON, fi. C., DECEMBER 29,
. 1871 .-Estimates will be received at this office until
the 6th- of January. 1873, at it M., for the b mid in g
of a PLANE ROAD on -King street, frcm Shep
herd street, to City Boundary. Same to be ' made
per running foot, according to the plans and
specifications in the City Engineer's office. -
Estimates to be directed to Committee on Con?
tracts. - : .W.'W. SIMONS, -: %r
deoaro' " ? -Clerk of Conuco.'
^r-NOTICEl-THREE WEEKS AFTER
date application win be made to the Planters' and
Mechanics' Bank, of South Carolina, for renewal
of Certificate No. 14,184, for Ten Shares, and'Oar*
tlflcatoNo.l?, 103, for Se ven Shares in the Capital
Stock of said Bank, standlog In the name of MES.
-ELIZABETH SMITH, the original having been
lost or destroyed., decal-ths
>Bt*SCREVEN HOUSE.-NOTICE TO
PARTIES INTERESTED.-Major JOHN W. CAM- 1
EROS has consented to*condoot, and' la daly ap?
pointed Manager of the 80 RE TES HOUSE.
decao-imo ... . R. BRADLEY. --
jirNATURES OWN BE2IEDY.-GER- -
TAIN CURE FOR HEADACHE, Dyspepsia, Dis
.asesor the Kidneys, Ac-SARATOGA PAVIL?
ION SPRING WATER. Try lt. For sale by all
Druggists. . - : . . decl8-3snh .
ST CLEAR AND HARMLESS AS WA?
TER-NATT ANS'S CRYSTAL DISCOVERY FOR -
THE HAIR.-A perfectly clear preparation in one ;
bottle, as easily applied as water, for restoring "to
gray hair its natnral color and youthful appear- .
ance, to eradicate and prevent dandruff,1 to. pro?
mote the growth ot the hair and stop itt falling j
oat. It ls entirely harmless, and perfectly free
from any pola on otu s ab J tan ce, and Will therefore
take the place .of all the dirty ind unpleasant
preparations now in use. Namer aus tea tiruonhVs
have been sent us from many of oar most promi?
nent citizens, some er which are subjoined. Ia
everything in which the articles now in use are
objectionable, CRYSTAL DISCOVERY IS' perfect.
It is warranted to contain neither Sogar of Lead?
Sulphur or Nitrate of Sliver, lt does not soil tte
clothes or scalp, is agreeably perfumed, and 1
makes one of the beat dressings lor the Hair tn
ase. It restores the color af the Hair "more per?
fect and uniformly than any other preparation,''
and always does so in from three to ten days,
virtually feeding the roots of the Hair, with all
the nourishing qualities necessary to-its growth
and Healthy condition; lt restores the decayed
andlndaces a new growth of the Hair more pod
lively than anything else. The application of
?vms wonicniumscuvery toto procaces a pieasainr
and coollngeffect on the scalp and gives the Hair
a pleasing and elegant appearance. <
We call especial attention to the fact that a
limited nu moer of trial bottles will be given way
gratuitously to those wishing to try it. Yod will
notice that m parse lng this course oar aim ls io
convince by the actual merits of the article.
ARTHUR NATT ANS,
Inventor and Proprietor,- Washington, D. c.
For sale by the Agent, - DB. e. BABB,
Ko. 131 Meeting street, Charleston, s. a
novia-stnthly_ .
SntiLytt*. '
-pAOLFIO GUANO-COMPANY'S
COMPOUND'
ACID PHOSPHATE OF LIME,/
FOR COMPOSTING WITH COTTON BEEJjfsf
PRICE-$25 CASH, WITH USUAL ADVANCE FOR
TIME.
This article ls prepared under the superintend?
ence of Dr. ST. JULIAN RAVENED, expressly for
Composting with Cotton Seed. .
It was introduced by this Company two years
ago, and its use has fully attested its value. 200
to 260 pounds of this article per acre, properly
composted with the same Weight of cotton seed,
famishes the planter with a Fertilizer or the high?
est excellence at the smallest cost. A Compost
prepared with tula article, as by printed direc?
tions furnished, contains all the elements of fer?
tility that can enter into a Plrst-Ciass Fertilizer,
while its economy must commend its liberal use
to planters. For supplies and printed directions,
for Composting, apply to J. N. ROBSON,
Agent Pacific Guano Company,
Nos. es East Bay and 1 and 2 Atlantic wharf,
Charleston, S. C.
JNO. S. REESE A CO., General Agents.
nov27-3mo8D*c
?1 0 L ? B L E
PACIFIC GUANO.
PRICE, $45 CASH, WITH USUAL ADVANCE
^ FOB TIME.
Experience m the use of this GUANO for the
pas. six yearsAn thia State, for Cotton and Com,
has so far established its character for excellence
as to render comment unnecessary.
In accordance with the established policy of the
Company to furnish the best Concentrated Ferti?
lizer at the lowest cost to consumers, this Guano
ls put into market this season at the above re?
t? aced price, which the Company ls enabled to do
by reason or its large faculties-an 1 the reduced
cost of manufacture.
The supplies put into market this season are, as
heretofore, prepared under the personal superin?
tendence of Dr. St. Julian Ravenel, Chemist of
the Company, at Charleston, S. C., hence planters
may rest assured that ita quality and composition
is precisely the same as that heretofore sold.
At the present low price, every acre planted
can be fertilized with 200 pounds Guano at a cost
not exceeding the present value of 80 pounds of
cotton, while experience has shown that under
favorable condition of season and cultivation, the
crop la inoreased by the application from two to
three-fold the natural capacity of the soil, hence
nnder no condlUon could its application fall to
compensate for the outlay.
Apply to J- N. ROBSON,
Agent Pacific Guano Company,
Nos. 08 East Bay and 1 and 2 Atlantic Wharf,
Charleston, S. a
JOHN 3. REESE A CO., General Agents.
nov27-3mosnAC ?
Senilis ?tlacrjinee.
TECES WEED
F. F. SEWING MACHINE
has not yet become such a drug la the market as
to require tobe hawked through the streets ot
left at the residences against the wishes of the oo
cnpints. But my sales have not diminished, nor
has the reputation of these Machines suffered bj
competition.
Call and see them and yon will be convinced a
their superiority.
D. B. HASELTON,
dec20>lmo N?. 307 KING STREET.

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