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The Columbia daily phoenix. (Columbia, S.C.) 1865-1865, June 06, 1865, Image 1

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$1 a Month, in Advance. ''Let our just Censure attend the tmo Even*."-Shaksprare. Single Copies Five Cents
By J. A. SELBY. . COLtJMBIA, S. C., FRIDAY MORNING, MAY 19, 1865. VOL. l.-NO. 43.
THE COLUMBIA PHOENIX,
PUUL1SHED DAILY, EXCEPT SUN PAY,
BY JULIAN A. SELBY.
TERMS-IN A D VANCE.
SUBSCRIPTION.
Six months, - - - $5
One month, - - - 1
ADVERTISING.
One square, (ten lines,) one time, 60 cts
Subsequent insertions. - 35 eta
Special notices ten cents per line.
The Callers.
Softly 'mid the world's confusion
Comes a knocking at the door
Of the heart. O, strange delusion,
That doth make H3 evermore
Bid it depart!
There sweet charity is standing
With her pleading, earnest eyes,
With her feet upon the landing;
Oft to enter in she tries,
But all in vain.
There meek prayer is ever waiting.
Seeing grief and pain go in;
Why should she be hesitating.
When such evil guests within
Have borne their woe?
FAith comes itng'ring round the portal.
Pointing through earth's misty veil;
. But we cling to what is mortal.
And reject her wondrous tale
Forevermore.
.Love divine necks oft to enter.
But a love has passed befon
Where our best affections centre.
And we turn forth from the door
Our holy guest!
.'Softly 'mid the world's confusion
Cornea a knocking at the door
Of the heart. O, strange delusion,
Thnt'dwth make us evermore,
Bid it depart! \
HOUSES OF THE ENGLISH IN INDIA. J
-A letter from Bombay has the fol
lowing concerning the houses of the
English there: We have no bells, no
door locks, no carpets, curtains, chim?
ney pieces, fire-places, no passages or
stairs, no house door, no servants' hall
--though about twenty servants-no
gas, no house maids, laundry-maids,
dairy-maid, etc., etc. I could give you
a still longer list of etceteras; but, lest
you should think your eurrespondent
has lapsed into savage life, I must pro?
ceed to explain how all these are
made up for.
Instead of hells, we u^e our own
g md voices; and there are so many
servants that one is sure to turn up as
wo call out Roy! a well known?sound
to Indian houses. Roy corresponds to
the French garcon, and is very pro?
bably answered by a boy of three
score and ten. Intead of door-locks,
there are bolts, and sometimes only
hooks and eyes. As the doors do not
abut very close with these, it- is
convenient for letting '-ut tho musk?
rats, as I found Inst night in my room.
Our feet are too hot already, without
carpets; mats do much better. Every?
thing hung on the walis is a refuge for
mosquitoes, so curtains aro .superfluous,
except, of course, mosquito curtains,
without which we should be eaten up
bodily. It would be dreadful to
think of a blazing hearth or a warm
fire-sido here; so grates, chimneys,
chimney- pieces, and fire screens are
unknown in Bombay.
Just look at the plan of the house,
and you eau see how we do without
a house-door, remembering that a
veranda runs before the house, and
there is always a man 6ttting in it
doing nothing, whose duty it is to
announce visitors. Instead of pass?
ages, the rooms all open into each
other and into the veranda. This,
like many other good house here, has
no second floor, so there are no stairs.
As for house-maids, and all sorts o?
maids, their work is done by various
sorts of men; it is very well done, teo,
and not like John, who succeeded so
ill in milking Tiny, in the old song.
A servant's hall for the servant's meals
there cannot be, where no two of the
servants will mess together; they are
of all casts, and live apart, some having
their wives on the premises.
Never show levity when people are
tagr?cd in worrhip.
What Gan be Done for the South.
All the powerful reasons for fighting
through the late expensive war to keep
the South in the Union, are equally
strong reasons for making the South
prosperous now that we have succeed?
ed. The grand reason of the West
for fighting was commonly condensed
into a single sentence, viz; that the
West would never relinquish its right
to the Mississippi. The Mississippi is
va'uahle only as affording a cheap and
commodious route to a market. What
market? Not mainly tho West Indies;
for the consumption of Western pro?
ducts is comparatively small io those
islands. Not Europe, most certainly;
for the route is too circuitous. The
best market the West ever had is the
South itself. The products of the West
are too heavy and bulky in proportion
to their value for distant exportation.
The natural circuit of American trade
is to convert the grain and pork of the
West into cotton, tobacco, and other
Southern staples, by feeding the popu?
lation which grows these staples, and
then exporting the fruits of Western
agriculture in this less bulky form,
which not only save* great expense of
freight, but insures the certainty of a
market. Whether grain will be in
demand ia Europe depends upon the
European harvests. But American
cotton will always be in demand; and
Western products are sure of a market
as long as they are u.-ed to feed colton
growers.
The mr?st important and urgent
interest of the West is that the South
shali be relieved o? its embarrassments
at tho earliest day possible. What the
We?t above all things needs is
a market. The market which, for
four years, it lost in th? South, has
been temporarily supplied by the war.
The West had fed our vast armies, and
the multitudes employed in the manu?
facture of anny supplies. But this
market is about to disappear. West?
ern agriculture will [sink into a low
and feeble condition unless it gets back
the Southern market; of which there
is no possibility except by the revival
ot" Southern industry.
Tlie great difficulty in the South^Js
the condition of utter impoverishrfwrit
into which that sect iou has been
brought by the war. The pecuniary
prostration of the South is so absolute
that its industry cannot be set agoing
without a great influx of capital from
the Northern States. All the money
of the wdiole section has been annihi?
lated. The property w hich has been
destroyed by the ravages of armies,
and come into dilapidation by iiie
absence and neglect of owners, cannot
be restored wiihont money to buv
materials and to pay wa^es. The
country has been diained of animals,
both horses and cattle, till not enough
are left to draw the plow. Nobody
will setid animals there to be sold un?
less 'money is supplied, from some
quarter, to purchase them. The North
has motley in abundance and can easily
supply this want, but in the present
condition of things the South can give
no security. There has ceased to be
in the South any basis for such
security except its real estate. Lend
raouey to a planter and there is nc
longer a lien upon'his slaves; they have
all become freemen. Money cannol
be borrowed u?>on Southern baDk
stock or railroad stock; bank and rail
roads are alike ruined. Northern
capitalists will not take the Southern
railroads, repleuish their rolling stock
and put them in running order, be
cause, for aught they know, whai
remain? of the property will be con
fiscated to the Government. All rea
estate in the South is in precisely th<
same predicament. Who will lene
money on a mortgage, when by ai
unreptaled law of Congress, whicl
awaits only execution, the property
mortgage does not belong to th?
reputed owner? And why should ?
fanner or planter, even if he could com
mand the means, replace his fence?
' buildings, implements, and animals
when it is certain that a single year's
crop would not refund the outlay, and
uncertain whether before that crop is
gathered, he may not be ousted from
possession.
While things continue in this state,
Southern industry eanuot revive. The
West lose3 ita best market; the East
loses a proGtable field for the invest?
ment of capital; the Government loses
the revenue which might be collected
from a prosperous community. When
tho South te impoverished and the
West unprosperous, how is employ?
ment to be found for the hundreds of
thousands of rae;i thrown loose by the
cessation of the war? Before we can
employ the surplus laborers we shall
pre?eutly have on our hands, we must
see a prospect of markets. No sound
business man wil manufacture for the
Southern market unt il he sees a chance
that the South will be able to pay for
goods; nor manufacture largely for the
West till he sees a possibility of the
West finding a market tor its pork and
grain. The chief thing to be done
now, at this present time, is for the
Government^to render it possible for
capital to flow into the Sonth to revive
its industry. That is to say, the pro?
perty that is left iu the South must be
put in such a condition, as regards
ownership, that it will be an available
security for the loan.
[Kew York World.
Praise your Wife.
Praise your wife, man-for pity's
sake give her a little encouragement;
it won't hurt her. She bas made your
home comfortable, your hearth bright
and shining, your food agreeable; for
pity's sake tell her you thank her, if
nothing more. She don't expect ii;
it will make her eyes open wider than
they have for these ten year?; but it
will do her good for ali that, and you,
too.
There are matty women to-day
thirsting for tho word of praise, the
language of encouragement. Through
summer's heat and winter's toil they
have drudged uncomplainingly, and so
accustomed have their fathers, brothers
and husbands become to their monoto?
nous labors, that they look for and
upon them as they do to the daily
rising of the sun and ifs daily going
down. Homely every day life may be
made beautiful by an appreciation ol
its very homeliness. You know that
if you can take from your drawer a
clean shirt whenever you want it,
somebody's fingers have ached io the
toil of making it so fresh and agree?
able, so smooth and lustrous. Every?
thing that pleases the eye and sense,
has been produced by constant work,
much thought, great caro, and untiring
efforts, bodily sad mentally.
It is not that mauy men do not ap?
preciate things and feel a glow ol
gratitude for the numberless attentions
bestowed upon them in sickness and
health, but they are so selfish in that
feeling. They don't come out with a
hearty, 'Why how plensaut you make
things look, wife!' or, 'I am obliged to
you fur taking so much pains.'
They thank the tailor for giving
them 'fits;' they thank the man iu the
full omnibus who gives them a seat;
they thank the lad}' who moves along
in thc concert room; they thank every?
body and everything out of doors,
because it is the custom; aud come
home, tip their chairs back aud their
heels up, pull out tho newspaper,
grumble if wife asks them to take the
baby, scold if the fire has got down;
or, if everything is just right, shut
their mouths with a smack ot satisfac?
tion, but never say to her, 'I thank
you.'
I tell you what, men,young and old,
if you did but show an ordinary ci?
vility toward these common articles ot
house-keepiDg, your wives; if you
gave the one hundred and ? sixtietl
part of the compliments you almost
choked them with before they were
married; if you wculd stop the badi
O.tge about wliciu you ave goiu? tc
have when number one is dead, (such
things wives may laugh at, bot they
sink deep sometimes;) if you would
cease to speak of their faults, however
banteringly, before others, fewer wo?
men would 6eek for other sources ?f
happiness than your cold so-so ish
affection. Praise your wife, then, for
all the good qualities she has, and you
may rest assured that her deficiencies
are fully counterbalanced by your own.
[Exchange.
Medical Card.
DR. A. N. TALLEY may be found, by
such as desire his professional aid, at
the residence of the Rev. N-. Tallev, corner
of Gervais and Pickens streets,
june 5 3*
Removal.
THE undersigned begs to inform his
friends and customers that he has RE?
MOVED his Boot and Shoe Making Estab
liahment to the house on the South side of |
Camden street, three doers from Assembly.
junes 3_GEO HG E SJV1LTH.
From Charleston.
DR P. MELVIN COHEN has returned
from the city with, a choice assort?
ment of DRUGS, MEDICINES, COMBS,
BRUSHES, ?c., <fec, and has made, ar?
rangements to receive regular weekly sup?
plies of imported goods. Office
PICKENS STREET.
June 5 2* Head of Ladv street.
TRO CE RI ES!! !
FROM
Oliarleston.
A CHOICE and W ELL SELECT
KSlED STOCK OF GOODS, which I
llj^arn prepared to offer AT RETAIL
for a SMALL ADVANCE, and can giv~ a
FAIR MARU IN to dealers in the city and
counUy. My stock consists in part of :
Boxes SMOKED HERRINGS.
?. COLGATE'S WASHING SOAP.
TOILET SOAP.
Bbls. BROWN SUGAR.
Chest YOUNG HYSON TEA.
" BLACK TEA.
Kite MACKEREL.
Cases PICKLES, quarts and pints.
Boxes CANDY, assorted.
Frails FRESH DATES.
Boxet TURKEY FIGS.
.? RAISINS.
" FRES h LEMONS,
" SOFT SHELL ALMONDS.
" BUTl'ER CRACKERS.
.? OYSTER
?' GINGER CAKES.
?. LEMON
.? DAIRY CHEESE.
" SARDINES.
.: CHOCOLATE.
" CONDENSED MILK.
Dozs. NORTHERN BROOMS.
Boxes Colgate's PEARL STARCH.
" BLACK INK, in stands.
? YEAST POWDERS-Durkee's.
? Brqwn's Es. JAMAICA GINGER
Cases SPARKLING SCOTCH ALE.
Boxes HAVANA S EG A RS.
" MASON'S BLACKING.
Dozs. SHOE BRUSHES.
Boxes FINE CHEWING TOBACCO.
? SMOKING TOBACCO.
" Fine Cut Chewing-TOBACCO.
SPERM CANDLES.
BACON, BUTTER, LARD.
FLOUR. MOLASSES.
CARBONATE SODA.
BLACK PEPPER.
COFFEE, RICE. SALT.
MANILLA ROPE, PINDEP.S.
COTTON CARDS, MATCHES.
GUM CAMPHOR. GUM OFIUM.
CHLOROFORM, CALOMEL.
POTASH and BLLE MASS.
ALSO,
A small stock of HARDWARE and
ST vTIONERY.
Give me a call, and jud?e for yourselves.
HARDY SOLOMON,
In basement ol' Mr. L. Levy'a house.
Comer of Assembly and Plain streets.
June & 6
MISS M. McELRONE respectfully in?
forms the ladies of Columbia that
she is prepared to execute all orders in the
MILLINERY line. Also, STRAW HATS
dyed, made and pressed to order. Resi?
dence corner of Lumber and Marion
streets. June 2 3*
PAPER' PAPER!
FOR 6ale, a small quantity of No. I
WRITING PAPER. Also, some ex?
cellent COPYING PAPER, Inquire at
it;.e otEce. may 80
Headers United States Forces,
CITY OF COLUMBIA, 3. C.,
MAY 27, 1865.
GENERAL ORDERS NO 4.
IN order to present any disturbance Which
may arise from the improper use of in?
toxicating liquors, it ia hereby ordered
that, for the present, no intoxicating li?
quors -will be sold or given a-way to any
citizen or soldier, unless permission is
granted from these headquarters. Any
one found guilty of disobeying this order,
will not only have his goods confiscated,
but will be subject to punishment by mili?
tary law. By command of
Lieut. Col. N. HAUGHTON,
ComrSanrling Post.
W. J. KYLE,lieut. 25th O. V. V. 1. aud
post Adjutaut. may 29
Headq'rs United States Forces,
CITY OF COLUMBIA, S. C.,
MAY 27, 1865.
GENERAL ORDERS NO. S.
4 LL citizens having in their possession
-i.V. any property that rightfully belongs
to the United States Government, accord?
ing to the terms of surrender of Gen. Jos.
E. Johnston, C. S. A.. to Gen. W. T. Sher?
man, U.S. A., will immediately report the
same to these headquarters.
Persons having mules, horses and wa?
gons, will, for the present, bo permitted to
retain the same for the purposrfi of carry?
ing on their work. Any person failing to e
comply with thia order within a reasona?
ble time, will not only be deprived of any
farther U6<2 of said property, but will also
subject themselves u> punishment by mili?
tary authoritv. By command of
N. HAUGHTON,
Lieut. Col. 25th O. Y. V.,
Com'dg City of Columbia. S C.
W. J. KYLE, Lieut. 25th O. V. V. I. and
Post Adjutaut. may 29
Headq'rs United States Forces,
CITY OF COLUMBIA, S. C.,
MAY 27. 1S65.
GENERAL ORDERS NO. 2.
INFORMATION having been received at
these- headquarters of tho cji?tence of
armed bands Sf marauders infesting the
j rountfy and co'mraitt.ing dept elanora on
j the properly of peaceful Citizens, it ia
hereby ordered that all persons, composing
such will be considered ar.d treated HA
outlaws, and if caught, will receive the
severest punishmeut ot military law.
Thc United States Government ie desir?
ous of protecting all peaceful and law
abiding c:tir;cr:c, o.r.d they will confer a
k favor on these headquarters, aDil do justice
to themselves, by giving any information
they nray have iii their possession respect?
ing the names and movements of such
bands, and, if possible, aiding iu their
capture.
The time has arrived when -it behooves
every citizen to do all in bia power to
assist the military forces of tile United
States to . restore peace and harmony
throughout tho land. By order of
Lieut. Col. N. HAUGHTON.
25th 0. V. V. I., Com'dg U. S. Torces,
City of Columbia.
W. J. KYLE, 2d Lieut 25th 0. V. V. I.
and Po.si Adjutant. nifty '?9
Headquarters, Northern District,
DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,
CHARLESTON, S. C., April 25, 18?6.
Circular ta Planters, ?tc.
NUMEROUS applications have been
made to mc for information aa to the
policy to be adopted on the subject of
labor.
All can understand the impc-TUnce of
making a crop the present season, and
foresee the misery and suffering consequent
upon its iailuie. A
In the present unsettled ste.te of the
country, and in the absence of any recog?
nized State authorities, I find it ny dutj*
to asiuime control of the plantations near
the military lines, and order as follows:
1st. The \ lanters, after taking the oath
of allegiance, will assemble the Freedmen
(lately their dave?; and inform them diat
they are free, und that henceforth they
must depend .?pun their o wu,, exertions for
their support
2d. Equitable contracts in writing will
be made by the owners of the lend with
the freedmen for the cultivation cf the
land during the present year.
Payment will be tna>.e ia kind, and the
allow ince of one half the crop i* recom?
mended as fair compensation for th.a labor,
the landlord furnishing submateuee unit
the crop is gathered!
These contra?is will submitted to the
nearest military or navel commander for
approval and endorsement.
When the above requirements ara com?
plied with, protection will be granted aa
far as military necessity will atlr-w; but
where no contract is made, the crop ruisad
will be cou6idered forfeited tor the ute of
the laborers. Should the owners refuse to
cultivate it, they will be considered a? en?
deavoring to embarrass the Government,
aud thc laud wiil be used ter eolcsiea of
the freedmen from the in erior.
JOHN P. H ATC fi,
June 1 Br;?. Gfc Comciaziisg.

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