OCR Interpretation


The daily phoenix. (Columbia, S.C.) 1865-1878, August 02, 1865, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84027008/1865-08-02/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

DIE PDAILY PE 10(E NJX
DAILY PAPER.$10 A YEAR. "LET OUR JUST CENSURE ATTEND THE TRUE EVENT." -TRI-WEEKLY $7 A! YEAR
BY 1. A. SELBY. COLUMBIA, S. C., WEDNESDAY MORNING' AUGUST 2, 1865. VOL. I.-NO. 10o7
THE PHONTX
IS PUBLISHED
D A IL Y AND TR I- WEEKL Y.
AND THE .
WEEKLY GLEANER
EVERY WEDNESDAY. ?
BY JULIAN A. SELBY.
T E R M S-IN A D VA N C E.
SUIlSCnUTION.
Daflv Paper, six months.S"> oft
Tri-Wcoklv, li 41 . 3 50
Weekly, ' '; l: . 2 00
Single copies of thc Daily and Tri-Weekly,
1U cents: ot' tho Weekly, 15 cuts.
.VSVERTX8E1IENTS
Inserted in wither thc 1 >aily orTri-Weeklv at
$1 per square for the tirsf insertion, and 75
cents for each subsequent insertion. In the
Weekly, SI a square.
?.?"Special notices IS cents a linc.
The Charleston ??on-espondem of
the New York J irr, dd, dating July
15th, give? us some few items which
wc have not found hi the Charleston
Courier. \Ye must remark in limine,
that while it is on record fox the future
historian, that thu white citizens dis?
guised themselves as soldiers, in order
"to butcher the negro troops, so it hus
been since discovered that thc .story
ou its very face an absurdity-was
totally unfounded, and that tho light?
ing was between the white aud black
'troops, in which the eiti/.oms had no
part, yet they were required to retire
to their houses und keep within doors
after H o'clock p. nr., und to deliver
up all their weapons. Thc correspon?
dent of the Herald says : i
As the whites with few exceptions
delivered up their arms on the occu
pution of the city;by the Union troops, ?
the order to them will be of little in- |
terest. Every house in tin: city at the
time, of the occupation by thc LTnion j
soldiers underwent a thorough search
ing operation by the troops of. the
Twenty-first United States colored
troops, for the purpose of announcing
freedom to the slaves, the seizure of j
lire-ai ms and the capture of abandoned
property, furniture, &c. The number
of lire-arms thus far brought in since
the publication of the order, ure live j
rilles and seven pistols, mostly belong- i
ing to blacks.
The Colored Orphan Asylum,'after
a number of changes by the release of
property to the owners? has at last !
been settled in Memminger's extensive |
mansion and grounds, at the corner of !
Smith and Wei ! wi >rih street*, lt now !
luis about ont hundred and .seventy
five members.
. The mortality list has eousiilcTiibly
diminished within tho 3inst two weeks. !
For tin? week from the 11th totlie 17th ;
dune, inclusive, thc deaths were eigh- ?
ty-eight blacks, twenty-live whites; i
from tin- ISth lo the 2-lth of June, in- ,
elusive, sixty-eight- blacks, twenty-one 1
whites; from 25th- of .lune to 1st of j
July, inclusive, sixty-six blacks, taren- ,
ty-two whites; from 2d to the 8th of ,
July, inclusive, sixty-six blacks, t wen
two whites, making a total in one '
month of four hundred and eighty-five.
blacks ami one hundred and thirty
four whites, a dreadful comparison
with former yours, when the whole
number of deaths in a month did not
average forty or fifty, white and black.
The highest number of deaths in the
yellow fever epidemic of 1861 was fifty
nine.
Here is another extract, the length
of which will not .impair its interest td
our readers. We do not care to re?
mark upon these passages, mit will
remind our readers that the unusual
greatness of the eorn crop is at the
expense of the cotton' crop. but. little
of the latter article having been plant?
ed. The wheat crop, by thu wity, wan
not a fair one.
To one who in the past has been
familiar with the zeal always displayed
by thc people of the South in the ad?
vocacy of their "peculiar institution,"
and who have witnessed the dogged
tenacity with which they have clung
to and fought for its perpetuation,
nothing can bo more astonishing than
the ;7ood praeo, and. T might- nlmost
say, pleasure, with which they have
beheld slavery-suddenly and ut ont;
fell blow-swept away forever from
their midst. I know not how to ac?
count for so singular a phenomenon ;
but in conversing^ recently with many
planters, who were but a few months
ago large sfcve-owners, I found the
same apparent indifference as tn the'
loss of their negroes exhibited by them
'all; and some of them went so far as
to say that even hud they the oppor?
tunity to repossess themselves of their
slaves they would refuse to avail them?
selves of it.
?But this feeling, it must be under?
stood, is not the. result of any chango
of sentiment on the part of the plant
ers as to the rights or true interests of
the negro. It arises, 1 think, simply
from the conviction which the events
! of the war have forced upon their
mind, that thc African slave is, genc
I nilly speaking, lazy, filthy, treacherous
and ungrateful; and that the results
I of free and compensated labor, though
! perhaps less profitable in appearance,
I will be far more satisfactory in thc i nd
I than those of the unpaid toil of slaves.
. They see that, with' free labor, it is
! within their power to choose" ?md re
. tain only the likeliest field hands and
; to rid themselves at once of th?' care
of all superfluous negroes, including
? the young children, those to? old to
work and the sick; while, on thc. other
hand, tin1 use of slave labor necessarily
saddles f?iom with the support of an
: anny of black dependents, utterly use
! less in any of the operations of plant
i ing. So that, after sill, the dreaded
I abolition has a blight side too for thc
planters, and they are beginning to
! recognize the fact.
There is a very general desire on the
part of many of the owners of large
plantations to secure white labor foi
their lands. This they propose to de
rftt by tlie ordinary process of hiring
the laborers, but by dividing out theil
large tracts into farms of suitable si/.e,
and by hatting these to industrious:
tenants at moderate rents, to be paid
in kind out of the crops raised. Tin
j lands nuder cultivation in this Statt
:u-e of all degrees of fertility, those in
j the upper or mountain region bein*,
comparatively sterile, while the beau
? tiful belt of islands which girdle om
i sea-coast present a soil so rich ami
fruitful that the plow is an implement
\ almost unknown to tin ?se who till it
the use of the hoe alone having en?
abled them, for generations past, tx
raise crops which were the admiratioi
and envy of their less fortunate mugil
bors in the interior. Should it hap
pen that the proprietors of these islam
lands decide to rent them in the man
uer I have described, a ran' chance wil
be afforded to adventurous agricultor
ists^ while, in any event, the hard;
immigrants who reach your Northen
cities, and who disdain not to can
their bread by the sw eat of their brows
may be sure to find on any of the Car
olina plantations abundant employ
ment jun very liberal terms bf ronni
neration.
lt is generally admitted among prac
ticsd men hoJte that in ten years fron
the present, time white labor will hav
gained a secure foothold among ns
wherever it can wifely be made avail
able. But there is one class of hun
from which there is.too good reason ti
fear that it must ever remain excluded
I allude to the ric?; plantations. . Pre
baldly few of your readers, who hsrv
not themselves beheld the wonder
and intricacies of the cultivation c
the rice plant, have any just idea <
the immense labor requisite for th
formation of a well ordered rice plan
tation. Miles on miles, dt powerfn
dykes, with multitudinous sluices sin
Hood-gates in every direction, teil
wondrous tale of diligence, skill an
untiring perseverance. Gazing' <>
such a plantation it is impoasiljle t.
refuse one's admiration to the tai
Which has directed the labor of me
so devoid of intelligence as the negr
slave to the achievement of results s
grand and imposing. Yet, under th
burning suns of summer and amid th
msdarial exhalations of the artill?is
rice scamps, it waa only'lij- black kibe
that these -wist lipids for the amphib
ous plant could have been reclaime
and constructed in the first instant'?
and it is only by black labor that the
cultivation can now be kept up. Nio
the rice planters all say, with one a<
cord, that not only must thay ha\
black labor to succeed, but compulsory
black labor, und not hing oise. For
the white nain to attempt to inhabit,
much less to work upon, ?i rice planta?
tion in tin' hot season1, is certain deal hi
This being tho case, and compulsory
labor la ing (as the negroes have learn?
ed to say) "played out." it is clear
that the rice planters are in a very bad
way. and that, unless something should i
? tura ii]> to prevent, the cultur? of rice I
i in South Carolina will, ere long, bc a j
j thing of the past, g
lint while there is literally no work j
I whatever being done on the rice lands, I
the othe-r crops thronghoiit the State j
I promise a fair yield. The haivesting j
! of the wheat is in>w nearly over, and, ?
i although iris?me localities it bas sus- I
taiue'd considerable injury from rust'
I and smut, hi general the ero;' is satis- ;
; factory. The cutir? corn crop was '
planted late; but thc season has been
propitious, and the coin now looks
very well. Nev? r before in this State
hr s so large an exit ut of country been
1 plant) ?1 with coin ?is tins year, except
"in the districts ravaged in the opera?
tions of the war. Thc planters also
' give favorable accounts of the minor
! crops-?alts, peas and potato nw. The
; fruit crop is by far the ni??st abundant
j and promising thai we have .had for
many years past. The yield <>f tigs,
pouches and aj.tples is particidarly
jhu-ge. _
Over the River.
This beautiful j.m. by au American
writer. Miss Prie; . ha- c<muna:idrd (lie
a? tm ir,: ! i)-ii nf LL1! readers during the many
f r<ninds it has made >>f thc newspaper an'd
i magazine pres? flic last t< n years. Tn
I those whu have lust intimate friends cud
; win) lias mifi some o? the allusions arc in
I expressibly a??e.et'mg. Manya moistened
nyc will follow the lilies:
Over the river they beckon t-> mc,
Dived onos who've pussod t<> tho other
side,
TV- <;!'-uH! ?rf thc::- snowy roh?? ?
!:::t their voi .? > uro tc ' m *.h. dasliing
ride.
i Tliere's min with ringlets nf : rimy gold?
i And ? ves thc reflection of Heaven's own
1.lill?
lie crossed in thc twilight irra* and cold,
' And the pale mist hid him from murtal
view. ?
We saw not thc angel who met him there,
I The gates <>f Tho City wc could not set:;
Over the river, over the river.
My"hr??thor .stands ready to welcome nie.
Over the river the Houtman pale.
Carried another -the household pet;
Her bright curls waved in thc'gentle gale
Darling Minnie. 1 si e her ye'.'.
She crossed i>n lu:r bosom lier dimpled
hands.
And "fc.arlesslv entered the phantom burk;
We watched it glide from thc silver sands.
And all our sunshine grew atrangcly dark.
Wc know she is sate on the other side..
Where all the ransomed and angels bc ;
Over tlc river, tito mystic river.
My childhood's idols are waiting for nie.
Por none return from those tpiict shores
Wim cross with thc Houtman cold and
blue: .
Wc hear thc dip of tho golden oars.
We catch a gleam of thc snowy sail.
.And lo! they have ?>asscd from our bi art
They cross dc stream and are gone for
aye!
We cannot sunder th?' veil apart,
'Hi::' hides from our vis thc gates ?if
day; - "'
Wc only know thai their harks no moro
Shall sail with ours on life's stormy sea.
Vet Somehow 1 llo|)C on the unseen shore.
They watch and beckon und wait for me;
And ['sit and think wi* ?i the sunset's gold
ls flushing rive.- ?uid hill and shore,
1 shall ..ne day stand 'ey thc water ?.*],],
And list to' ii:.' sound ol' the boatman's
. ?ar;
I shall watch for th gleam of the flapping
1 shall iie-u-tb.i h >at as it gains thc strand,
1 shall pass frein si\;ht willi* the boa timm
To the bettor si ion oi tho spirit laud!
I : hall lw-,ov> thc loved who have gone before,
And joyfully sw. i t ..ill thc mei tin;; he,
Wh-ti over thc river, th?' ?.eaeeful rivi r,
Tlie Angel ol' P<::?th sha,) carry me!
An official report of all the Ameri?
can gool received at the United States
mint and its branches, front our first
';'nld discoveries down to .Tune 80,
ISfit, shows a grund total of $007,
187,784, of which $57?<),718.873 came
from California; ?~'0.7s: 1,071 from Co?
lor?alo; 80.121,N!>7 from North Caroli?
na; 86,000,875 from Georgia; Sb, 142,
133 from preg?n; ?2,308,386 from
Idaho; ?fl..>">8,,s7-4 from Virginia; 81,
852,066 from Alabama; and tho bal?
ance from other 'States and Territo?
ries.
Miss. Neely, of Mocksville, X. C.,
shot a negro woman through the
heart on the 2d ult. : while the latter
was engaged in controversy with her
muster.
The army ?ent to Texas is not so
enormous as some of the .sensational
people have reported. A heavy column
of cavalry is on its march through the
State, and from 12,01)0 !o 15,000 in?
fantry ure making their appearraneo.
on the Kio Grande. It was necessary
to make a display of the '-military
power of the Republic on the plains
of Texas, and a small army of obser?
vation at the gate of Mexico will dono
harm.
Eighteen persons have died of in?
juries caused by the tornado at Firo
qiia, Wisconsin, June 28th, and many
others are still suffering. Fifty houses
were destroyed. The loss of property
tvas about $5300,000.
Edward J. Boyce, colored man. who,
twenty years ago was a barbe r in Terra
Haute, Ind., has been appointed chief
justice ?f Liberia, to lill the vacancy
occasioned by the death of Kev. j.
Boston Drayton.
Bennett has purchased the place
where Bamums' Museum stood.
Tilt; following gentlemen are respectfully
suggested ?is candidates for tho Convention
to br held ia September next:
?- WADE HAMPTON,
A. li. TAYLOR, *
. W. A. HARRIS,
,1.^;. GIBBES._ _ July 31 *
For ihv Convention.
The friends of tin- Union and of their
State, desiring to bring into her councils
practical knowledge, sound patriotism and
devotion to her best interests, respectfully
nominate tin- following gcntlorucn as dele?
gate* to tho State Convention from the
District of liiehkind:
JOHN CALDWELL,
WAUK HAMFTON,
A. R. TAYLOR,
W. A. HAKIMS.
August 1*
Sc '.loot for C?rlx.
rilHK Ml.-'-'!'.-' M YKi'iN ..rill ...pon >i School
L for (.rills on the FIRST MOND A J in Oe*
tuber, besides the usual English studies,
lessons uili bc given in Latin, French and
Music. A few boarders will bi- received
into ?he family. Apply at. their residcncAn
islanding street. August t 7
For S:tl<- ami in. Storr.
BAGGING. .
KOKE.
TWINE.
Dy A. L. SOLOMON,
AVigust 1 3 Commission RIercbiuit.
On Consignment.
"t ?\f\?\ LBS- BACON, SIDES.
').\ fVJyr 1,000 lbs. SMOKED BEEF.
For sab- by A. 1.. SOLOMON,
('omniissie]? Mer? bant.
Aug 1 S '2d door from Shiver House
To Rent.
, . -FOUF. BOOMS, with KITCHEN and ,
spHT LARGE GARDEN, in a pleasant .-itu- j
.??l'-Uwatioii, on Upper Boundary street, op
p?sito Mr. Smalleys: one room occupied by j
a widow lady auj, two small children. To j
any person with a small family it is :i hand- I
some and desirable place. Applv to . I
HlClll). O'NEAI.E. Executor, I
August 1 3* Near the place. I
-2-:-!
THADDEUS STUKET,
??SSI0X JIEBI'IIAXT. j
7i EAST BAY, VlIAliLESTON, S. C., j
"VTTILL give attention to the forwarding '
W of ( 'OT TON toN.-w York and Erirope,
and will receive and forward goods from
abroad consigned to parties in thc interior I
of this State. Advances made on produce I
consigned t<> Arthur Leary, Esq., Ni w York. I
A lull stock of GROCERIES always on'hand I
and tor sale at the lowest market rates. I
Fay Brothcrs'SUREKIOR FAMILY SOAP,
in quarter, ha;' and whole boxes, can bc
shipped in anv quantity at factory prices.
J ul j :ll 13* *
"LARGE AX? KKCKXT AURI.VALS
LADIES' WI) GEM'S SHOES,
.,?._ THE snbscriber offers to tin-public j
9flfla large and handsome assortment of i
1 S^LAD?ES' and GENTLEMEN'S SHOES, j
of the latest styi. s and qualities, at prices ?
ranging frAm one dollar and fifty cents per j
pair upwards. Ho is determined to dispose '
pf this stock to the satisfaction of all who '
may favor him with a call. Thc citizens of j
Columbia and surrounding country are re?
spectfully solicited to call and .examine
before pureba.-.mg elsewhere, Store in rear
of the large College Chapel. Columbia:
ll. VAN PELT,
.Tn Iv 31 1 _ Sutler 25th Ohio.
.1. X. ROBSON
HAS IlKSUMED THE
Commission Business
AT HIS OLD STAND,
? t?AST BAY, CI^VRLESTO.V, S. C.
t j- Particular attention given to the sale
tu Cotton, Flour. Cora, cte. j and, from las
long experience, he feels ZOT.?. of giving
geceraf 3aMsftTC*ioc; July 29 Sf
AV. B. .JOHNSTON, <
Magistrate,
Office on ricken* sired East end of lad;/.
XT7TLL attend* to all official business
W bronglit before him: viii also attend
to drying up Deeds, Conveyances, Mort?
gages. Contract!?, a nd other ordinary legal
instruments of writing. Fair copies of any
document executed with neatness pud de?
spatch. _ August 1
The Broad River
ZO ht GOMPaNY
HAVING secured two mic DRY BOATS,
and two crews of the moat experienced
Boatmen ou thc river, offers its services to
the public for transporting FREIGHT bo
twoeu Columbia and Alston. The following
rat?Ss ha ve been adopted:
Bacon, per IOU ihs.".S 75
Corn, per bushel... 88
Cotton, por bale. .. 3 00
Fodder. .. _ ..'.-. 2 50
Flo';:-, per barrvl . ..2 00
" bag.. . f.1 00
Other articles, per loo lbs.1 00
Passengers... . . 2 00
The Boat:i will leave Columbia at ti ?. m.,
every fltonday and Friday: and wilt leave
Alston at 6 a.m., every "Wednesday *and
Sunday. Apply to B. 'B. SIMONS."
Agent, Columpia.
- W. D. WALTER,
Agent. Newbei rv C. H.
J. w. CALL;
July ;;i .'{ Agent, in charge of Boats.
To I*rliit?'rx and PublisHcrs.
H. lil Pelouze St Co.,
LAW BUILDING, RICHMOND, VA.
MANUFACTURERS of and dealers in
every description of PRINTERS' MA?
TERIAL, ?'rom a N<^. 2 Card to an Eight Cy?
linder Steam Press: varieos colors Bronzes.
Inks. Varnishes. Oils. .Vc. A c., and in fact
everything pertaining to a rirst class Book,
Jolynn* Newspaper Office. Forfurt her par?
ticulars apply to
' HT"? X3L". Xjod-dToxa.,
Who eau be fonndai Mrs. LS. Ita wis'board?
ing house, corner Camden and Marion sta.
ftc is i'ds.? the authorized Agent to contract
for Advertisements and Subscriptions to tho
RICHMOND DAUA' TIMES, bovine U>.?
larqcxt. (jU.il>- circulation ot any newspaper
in thc South, now itcarb 10,000 copies. Mer
. ?... M?- and ??itiv: s .\?l consult l! civ ine rest
1". -IMII': ?in- a oa'L July iii Cl*
A G
\Y \YT SPPPMEU ?
STEWS FROM . 11 L \QTJA R TERS!
TOE FHm&X
PUBLISHED
At tim Capital of South Carolina,
COLUMBI ^Lm
isr.r?
THE SAILV PHOENIX,
ISST I'D ev. rv movnimr except Sun.hiv. is
filled with t'lie LATEST SEWS, (bv ?.ol"
graph, mails, etc..) EDiT?RJAL. CORRES
!'HS DENCE, M f SC F. I.LA NV, POETRY,
STORIES, etc. This is thc only daily paper
in the. State outside of tltfcHy.Vf <Jhar!?ston.
Tile Tri-Weekly Phoenix,
i *
For country circulation, is published every
Tuesday. Thursday and Saturday, and ha.?
all thc reading matter of interest ?joittauied
in this daily issues of thi'week.
WEEKLY GLEANER,'
A HOM!-: COMPANION.
,\s its name indicates, is intcndi d as a
FAMILY JOURNAL, and i- published every
Wednesday, it- will contain Fight Pages,
?d' Portv Columns. The cream of thc News.
Miscellany. Tales, etc., ni the "Daily and
Tri-wo klv will be found in its columns.
TERMS-INVARIABLY IN ADVANCE.
Dailv, ono year.$10 1)0
? . ihre.'- months. : : 00
Tri-Wceklv, one year ... 7 00
? ' three, months. 2 00
Weekly, one year. fe Ot)
. .. ' three months. 1 25
Advertisements inserted rn the Dally Vr
Tri-Weekly at ?1 a square for the lirst in?
sertion, and 7"> cents for each subsequent
insertion. Weekly advertisements il a
simare every insertion. ?
JOB WORK, .
Hitch a?s HAND-BILLS, CARDS, CIRCU?
LARS, ^KIN-PLASTERS, etc., ex?cuter?
promptly and ai reasonable rates.
JVZJZAX A. DSSBY,
Julv ?? ?-.;.'>hr-?o.- ?;? Prorrjetcr

xml | txt